Cisco ONS 15454 SDH Installation and Operations Guide, Release 3.4
Chapter 8, Performance Monitoring

Table of Contents

SDH Performance Monitoring
8.1 Using the Performance Monitoring Window
8.2 Changing Thresholds
8.3 Enabling Intermediate Path Performance Monitoring
8.4 Enabling Pointer Justification Count Parameters
8.5 SDH Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards
8.6 SDH Performance Monitoring for Optical Cards

SDH Performance Monitoring


Performance monitoring (PM) parameters are used by service providers to gather, store, threshold, and report performance data for early detection of problems. PM terms are defined for both electrical cards and optical cards. For information about Ethernet PMs, see "Ethernet Operation." For information about card thresholds see the "Setting Network Element Defaults" section and "Card Provisioning."

For additional information regarding PM parameters, see ITU G.826, Telcordia GR-820-CORE, and Telcordia GR-253-CORE. Table 8-1 lists PM reference topics. Table 8-2 lists PM procedures.

8.1 Using the Performance Monitoring Window

The following sections describe how to use basic CTC window elements such as tabs, menus, and informational columns. Figure 8-1 shows the Performance tab of Cisco Transport Controller (CTC) card-level view.


Figure 8-1   Viewing performance monitoring information


8.1.1 Viewing PMs

Before you view PMs, be sure you have created the appropriate circuits and provisioned the card according to your specifications. For information about circuit creation and card provisioning, see "Circuits and Tunnels" and "Card Provisioning."

Procedure: View PMs

Purpose

View PM counts to detect performance problems early.

Prerequisite Procedures

Before you view PMs, be sure you have created the appropriate circuits and provisioned the card according to your specifications. For information about circuit creation and card provisioning, see "Circuits and Tunnels" and "Card Provisioning."

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Open the electrical or optical card of choice. Double-click the card's graphic in the main (node) view or right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once only highlights the card.)

Step 2   From the card view, click the Performance tab.

Step 3   View the PM parameter names that appear on the left portion of the window in the Param column. The parameter numbers appear on the right portion of the window in the Curr (current), and Prev (previous) columns.





8.1.2 Changing the Window Intervals

Changing the window view allows you to view PMs in 15-minute intervals or 24-hour periods. Figure 8-2 shows the time interval radio buttons on the Performance Monitoring window.


Figure 8-2   Time interval radio buttons on the card view Performance tab


Procedure: Select Fifteen-Minute PM Intervals on the Performance Monitoring Window

Purpose

Change the window view to display PMs in 15-minute intervals.

Prerequisite Procedures

Before you view PMs, be sure you have created the appropriate circuits and provisioned the card according to your specifications. For information about circuit creation and card provisioning, see "Circuits and Tunnels" and "Card Provisioning."

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Open the electrical or optical card of choice. Double-click the card's graphic in the main (node) view or right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once only highlights the card.)

Step 2   From the card view, click the Performance tab.

Click the 15 min radio button. Figure 8-2 shows the time interval buttons on the Performance Monitoring window.

Step 3   Click the Refresh button. Performance monitoring parameters display in 15-minute intervals synchronized with the time of day.

Step 4   View the Current column to find PM counts for the current 15-minute interval.

Each monitored performance parameter has corresponding threshold values for the current time period. If the value of the counter exceeds the threshold value for a particular 15-minute interval, a threshold crossing alert (TCA) will be raised. The value represents the counter for each specific performance monitoring parameter. For information about viewing TCAs, see "Viewing History" section.

Step 5   View the Prev-N columns to find PM counts for the preceding 15-minute intervals.


Note   If a complete 15-minute interval count is not possible, the value displays with a yellow background. An incomplete or incorrect count can be caused by monitoring for less than 15 minutes after the counter started, changing node timing settings, changing the time zone settings in CTC, replacing a card, resetting a card, or changing port states. When the problem is corrected, the subsequent 15-minute interval appears with a white background.





Procedure: Select 1 Day PM Intervals on the Performance Monitoring Window

Purpose

Change the window view to display PMs in 1 day intervals.

Prerequisite Procedures

Before you view PMs, be sure you have created the appropriate circuits and provisioned the card according to your specifications. For information about circuit creation and card provisioning, see "Circuits and Tunnels" and "Card Provisioning."

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Open the electrical or optical card of choice. Double-click the card's graphic in the main (node) view or right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once only highlights the card.)

Step 2   From the card view, click the Performance tab.

Click the 1 day radio button. Figure 8-2 shows the time interval buttons on the Performance Monitoring window.

Step 3   Click the Refresh button. Performance monitoring displays in 1 day periods synchronized with the time of day.

Step 4   View the Current column to find PM counts for the current 1 day period.

Each monitored performance parameter has corresponding threshold values for the current time period. If the value of the counter exceeds the threshold value for a particular 1 day period, a TCA will be raised. The value represents the counter for each specific performance monitoring parameter. For information on viewing TCAs, see "Viewing History" section.

Step 5   View the Prev columns to find PM counts for the preceding 1 day period.


Note   If a complete count over a 1 day period is not possible, the value displays with a yellow background. An incomplete or incorrect count can be caused by changing node timing settings, changing the time zone settings in CTC, replacing a card, resetting a card, or changing port states. When the problem is corrected, the subsequent 1 day period appears with a white background.





8.1.3 Viewing Near End and Far End PMs

Select the Near End or Far End radio button depending on the PMs you wish to view. Only cards that allow both near-end and far-end monitoring have these radio buttons as an option. Figure 8-3 shows the Near End and Far End radio buttons on the Performance Monitoring window.


Figure 8-3   Near End and Far End radio buttons on the card view Performance tab


Procedure: Select Near End PMs on the Performance Monitoring Window

Purpose

Select the Near End radio button to view PMs on the near end.

Prerequisite Procedures

Before you view PMs, be sure you have created the appropriate circuits and provisioned the card according to your specifications. For information about circuit creation and card provisioning, see "Circuits and Tunnels" and "Card Provisioning."

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Open the electrical or optical card of choice. Double-click the card's graphic in the main (node) view or right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once only highlights the card.)

Step 2   From the card view, click the Performance tab.

Step 3   Click the Near End radio button.

Step 4   Click the Refresh button. All PMs occurring for the selected card on the incoming signal are displayed.





Procedure: Select Far End PMs on the Performance Monitoring Window

Purpose

Select the Far End radio button to view PMs on the far end.

Prerequisite Procedures

Only cards that allow far-end monitoring have this radio button as an option.

Before you view PMs, be sure you have created the appropriate circuits and provisioned the card according to your specifications. For information about circuit creation and card provisioning, see "Circuits and Tunnels" and "Card Provisioning."

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Open the electrical or optical card of choice. To do so, double-click the card's graphic in the main (node) view or right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once only highlights the card.)

Step 2   From the card view, click the Performance tab.

Step 3   Click the Far End radio button.

Step 4   Click the Refresh button. All PMs recorded by the far-end node for the selected card on the outgoing signal are displayed.





8.1.4 Using the Port Selection Menu

Use the port selection menus to monitor PMs for near-end or far-end signals on a selected port. Different port selection menus appear depending on the card type and the circuit type. Figure 8-4 and Figure 8-5 show port selection menus on the Performance Monitoring window for a DS3i card and an STM-1 card.


Figure 8-4   Port selection menus for a DS3i card



Figure 8-5   Port selection menus for an STM4-4 card


Procedure: Select Card Ports on the Performance Monitoring Window

Purpose

Use the port selection menus to monitor PMs for near-end or far-end signals on a selected port.

Prerequisite Procedures

Different port selection menus appear depending on the card type and the circuit type. The appropriate types (E1, E3, DS3i, VC4, and line) appear based on the card. For example, the STM-64 card port selection menu lists line and VC4 types.

Before you view PMs, be sure you have created the appropriate circuits and provisioned the card according to your specifications. For information about circuit creation and card provisioning, see "Circuits and Tunnels" and "Card Provisioning."

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Open the electrical or optical card of choice. Double-click the card's graphic in the main (node) view or right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once only highlights the card.)

Step 2   From the card view, click the Performance tab.

Step 3   Click one of the port selection menus labeled in Figure 8-4 and Figure 8-5. Depending on the card, other options may be available (i.e., E1, E3, DS3i, VC4, and line).

Step 4   Click the Refresh button. For PM definitions, see the "SDH Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards" section, and the "SDH Performance Monitoring for Optical Cards" section.





8.1.5 Using the Baseline Button

In SDH Software R3.4 and earlier, the Baseline button located on the far right of the window clears the PM count displayed in the Current column, but does not clear the PM count on the card. When the current 15-minute or 24-hour time interval expires or the window view changes, the total number of PM counts on the card and on the window appear in the appropriate cell.

The baseline values are discarded if you select a new port, interval, near-end, far-end, VC4, or change the view to a different window and then return to the Performance Monitoring window. The Baseline button enables you to easily see how quickly PM counts are rising without having to perform calculations. Figure 8-6 shows the Baseline button on the Performance Monitoring window.


Figure 8-6   Baseline button for clearing displayed PM counts


Procedure: Use the Baseline Button on the Performance Monitoring Window

Purpose

The Baseline button clears the PM count displayed on the Current column, but does not clear the PM count on the card. When the current 15-minute or 24-hour time interval expires or the window view changes, the total number of PM counts on the card and on the window appear in the appropriate column. The baseline values are discarded if you change the view to a different window and then return to the Performance Monitoring window.

Prerequisite Procedures

Before you view PMs, be sure you have created the appropriate circuits and provisioned the card according to your specifications. For information about circuit creation and card provisioning, see "Circuits and Tunnels" and "Card Provisioning."

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Open the electrical or optical card of choice. Double-click the card's graphic in the main (node) view or right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once only highlights the card.)

Step 2   From the card view, click the Performance tab.

Step 3   Click the Baseline button.





8.1.6 Using the Clear Button

The Clear button located on the far right of the Performance Monitoring window clears certain PM counts depending on the option selected. Figure 8-7 shows the Clear button on the Performance Monitoring window.


Caution   Clicking the Clear button can potentially mask problems if used incorrectly. This button is commonly used for testing purposes such as clearing a count that results in the unavailable seconds (UAS) count incrementing.


Figure 8-7   Clear button for clearing PM counts


Procedure: Clearing PM Counts on the Performance Monitoring Window

Purpose

Use the Clear button to clear certain PM counts depending on the option selected.

Prerequisite Procedures

Before you view PMs, be sure you have created the appropriate circuits and provisioned the card according to your specifications. For information about circuit creation and card provisioning, see "Circuits and Tunnels" and "Card Provisioning."

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Open the electrical or optical card of choice. Double-click the card's graphic in the main (node) view or right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once only highlights the card.)

Step 2   From the card view, click the Performance tab.

Step 3   Click the Clear button.

Step 4   From the Clear Statistics dialog box, choose one of three options:

  • Selected Interfaces: Clearing selected interfaces erases all PM counts associated with the selected radio buttons. For example, if the 15 min and the Near End radio buttons are selected and you click the Clear button, all near-end PM counts in the current 15-minute interval are erased from the card and the window display.
  • All interfaces on port x: Clearing all interfaces on port x erases from the card and the window display all PM counts associated with all combinations of the radio buttons on the selected port. This means the 15-minute near-end and far-end counts, as well as the 24-hour near-end and far-end counts are cleared from both the card and the window display.
  • All interfaces on card: Clearing all interfaces on the card erases from the card and the window display all PM counts for data and ports on all interfaces.

Step 5   From the Zero Data dialog box, click Yes to clear the selected statistics.


Note   The Ethernet cards are the only cards without the Clear button option.





8.2 Changing Thresholds

Thresholds are used to set error levels for PMs. During the accumulation cycle, if the current value of a performance monitoring parameter reaches or exceeds its corresponding threshold value, a TCA is generated by the node and sent to CTC. TCAs provide early detection of performance degradation. When a threshold is crossed, the node continues to count the errors during a given accumulation period.

Card thresholds can be set up before cards are installed. For more information, see the "Setting Network Element Defaults" section. You can program PM threshold ranges on cards individually from the Provisioning > Threshold tabs on the card view. For procedures on provisioning card thresholds, such as line and path, see "Card Provisioning." Figure 8-8 shows the Provisioning > Threshold tabs for an STM-64 card. Figure 8-9 shows the Provisioning > Threshold tabs for a DS3i card.


Figure 8-8   Threshold tab for setting threshold values (Example of an STM64 card)



Figure 8-9   Threshold tab for setting threshold values (Example of a DS3i card)


Change the threshold if the default value does not satisfy your error monitoring needs. For example, customers with a critical DS3i installed for emergency phone calls must guarantee the best quality of service on the line; therefore, they lower all thresholds so that the slightest error raises a TCA.


Note   A TCA is not reported if 0 or a number exceeding the threshold range is entered as the threshold value.


Note   Under the Provisioning > Threshold tab, the E1 card has user-defined thresholds for the E1 receive (Rx) path PMs. In the Threshold tab they are displayed as EB, BBE, ES, SES, and UAS without the Rx prefix. No threshold settings are associated with the E1 transmit (Tx) path PMs. Displayed in the Performance tab are the PM counts received for the E1 Rx path PMs. The displayed E1 Tx path PM values are based on calculations performed by the card and therefore have no TCAs that require provisioning.

8.3 Enabling Intermediate Path Performance Monitoring

Intermediate path performance monitoring (IPPM) allows transparent monitoring of a constituent channel of an incoming transmission signal by a node that does not terminate that channel. Many large ONS 15454 SDH networks only use line-terminating equipment (LTE), not path-terminating equipment (PTE). After enabling IPPM provisioning on the line card, service providers can monitor high-order paths that are configured in pass-through mode on an ONS 15454 SDH operating in SDH AU4 mode, thus making troubleshooting and maintenance activities more efficient.

SDH Software R3.4 allows LTE cards to monitor near-end PM data on individual high-order paths by enabling IPPM. IPPM occurs only on high-order paths which have IPPM enabled, and TCAs are raised only for PM parameters on the selected IPPM paths.


Note   The E1 and STM-1 cards can monitor far-end IPPM.

The ONS 15454 SDH performs IPPM by examining the overhead in the monitored path and by reading all of the near-end path PMs in the incoming direction of transmission. The IPPM process allows the path signal to pass bidirectionally through the node completely unaltered.

For detailed information about specific PMs, locate the card name in the following sections and review the appropriate definition.

Procedure: Enable Intermediate Path Performance Monitoring

Purpose

Enable IPPM to monitor high-order paths that are configured in pass-through mode on an ONS 15454 SDH operating in SDH AU4 mode.

Prerequisite Procedures

If no VC4 circuit exists, perform VC4 Circuit Creation. For information about circuit creation, see "Circuits and Tunnels."

The circuit must pass through an STM-N card before you can enable IPPM on the circuit.

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Open the LTE card of choice. Double-click the card's graphic in the main (node) view or right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once only highlights the card.) See the list of Cisco ONS 15454 SDH LTE cards below.

Line-Terminating Equipment

OC3 IR 4/STM1 SH 1310

OC12 IR/STM4 SH 1310

OC12 LR/STM4 LH 1310

OC12 LR/STM4 LH 1550

OC12-4 IR/STM4-4

OC48 IR/STM16 SH AS 1310

OC48 LR/STM16 LH AS 1550

OC48 ELR/STM16 EH 100 GHz

OC192 LR/STM64 LH 1550

E1

Step 2   Select the Provisioning > VC4 tabs (Figure 8-10).


Figure 8-10   VC4 tab for enabling IPPM


Step 3   Click Enable IPPM for the VC4 you want to monitor.

Step 4   Click Apply.





8.4 Enabling Pointer Justification Count Parameters

Pointers provide a way to align the phase variations in VC4 payloads. Pointer justification counts indicate frequency adjustments on SDH networks. The VC4 payload pointer is located in the H1 and H2 bytes of the AU pointers section and is a count of the number of bytes the VC4 POH J1 byte is away from the H3 byte, not including the section overhead bytes.

When a network is out of synch, jitter and wander occur on the transported signal. Excessive wander can cause terminating equipment to slip. It also causes slips at the SDH and plesiochronous digital hierarchy (PDH) boundaries. Slips cause different effects in service: voice service has intermittent audible clicks; compressed voice technology has short transmission errors or dropped calls; fax machines lose scanned lines or experience dropped calls; digital video transmission has distorted pictures or frozen frames; encryption service loses the encryption key causing data to be transmitted again.

Figure 8-11 shows pointer justification count parameters on the Performance Monitoring window. You can enable positive pointer justification count (PPJC) and negative pointer justification count (NPJC) performance monitoring parameters for LTE cards. See the "Enable Intermediate Path Performance Monitoring" procedure for a list of Cisco ONS 15454 SDH LTE cards.


Figure 8-11   Viewing pointer justification count parameters


To avoid problems with data when timing differences exist, dummy bytes can be inserted into the VC4. There are negative (NPJC) and positive (PPJC) pointer justification count parameters. NPJC is a count of path-detected (NPJC-Pdet) or path-generated (NPJC-Pgen) negative pointer justifications. H3 bytes are called negative justification bytes and carry extra payload data for one frame during a pointer decrease.

PPJC is a count of path-detected (PPJC-Pdet) or path-generated (PPJC-Pgen) positive pointer justifications. The three bytes following the last H3 byte in the VC4 are called positive justification bytes and carry three dummy bytes of information for one frame during a pointer increment.

A consistently large pointer justification count indicates clock synchronization problems between nodes. A difference between the counts means the node transmitting the original pointer justification has timing variations with the node detecting and transmitting this count.

For pointer justification count definitions, depending on the cards in use, see the "E1 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters" section, the "STM-1 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters" section, the "STM-4 and STM4-4 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters" section, or the "STM-16 and STM-64 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters" section.

In CTC, the count fields for PPJC and NPJC PMs appear white and blank unless they are enabled on the Provisioning > Line tabs. Figure 8-12 shows the PJVC4Mon# menu on the Provisioning window.


Figure 8-12   Line tab for enabling pointer justification count parameters


Procedure: Enable Pointer Justification Count Performance Monitoring

Purpose

Enable pointer justification counts to monitor the clock synchronization between nodes.

Prerequisite Procedures

Before you view pointer justification PMs, be sure you have created the appropriate circuits and provisioned the card according to your specifications. For information about circuit creation and card provisioning, see "Circuits and Tunnels" and "Card Provisioning."

Onsite/Remote

Onsite or remote


Step 1   Open the LTE card of choice. Double-click the card's graphic in the main (node) view or right-click the card and select Open Card. (Clicking a card once only highlights the card.) See the list of Cisco ONS 15454 SDH LTE cards below.

Line-Terminating Equipment

OC3 IR 4/STM1 SH 1310

OC12 IR/STM4 SH 1310

OC12 LR/STM4 LH 1310

OC12 LR/STM4 LH 1550

OC12-4 IR/STM4-4

OC48 IR/STM16 SH AS 1310

OC48 LR/STM16 LH AS 1550

OC48 ELR/STM16 EH 100 GHz

OC192 LR/STM64 LH 1550

 

Step 2   From the card view, click the Provisioning > Line tabs.

Step 3   Click the PJVC4Mon# menu and select a number.

  • Select off to disable pointer justification monitoring.
  • The values 1 to N are the VC4 numbers on one port. One VC4 per port can be enabled from the PJVC4Mon# card menu, as follows:
    • STM-1 PJVC4Mon# card menu: off or 1 can be selected on a total of 4 ports.
    • STM-4 PJVC4Mon# card menu: off, 1, or any number through 4 can be selected on 1 port.
    • STM4-4 PJVC4Mon# card menu: off, or 1 through 4 can be selected on a total of 4 ports.
    • STM-16 PJVC4Mon# card menu: off, 1, or any number through 16 can be selected on 1 port.
    • STM-64 PJVC4Mon# card menu: off, 1, or any number through 64 can be selected on 1 port.

Step 4   Click Apply and return to the Performance tab to view PM parameters.





8.5 SDH Performance Monitoring for Electrical Cards

The following sections define performance monitoring parameters for the E1, E3, and DS3i electrical cards.

8.5.1 E1 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters

Figure 8-13 shows the signal types that support near-end and far-end PMs for the E1 card. Figure 8-14 shows where overhead bytes detected on the ASICs produce performance monitoring parameters for the E1 card.


Figure 8-13   Monitored signal types for the E1 card



Figure 8-14   PM read points on the E1 card


The PM parameters for the E1 card are described in Table 8-3, Table 8-4, and Table 8-5.

Table 8-3   Line PMs for the E1 Card, Near-end

Parameter  Definition 
E1 CV-L

Code Violation Line (CV-L) indicates the number of coding violations occurring on the line. This parameter is a count of bipolar violations (BPVs) and excessive zeros (EXZs) occurring over the accumulation period.

E1 ES-L

Errored Seconds Line (ES-L) is a count of the seconds containing one or more anomalies (BPV + EXZ) and/or defects (loss of signal) on the line.

E1 SES-L

Severely Errored Seconds Line (SES-L) is a count of the seconds containing more than a particular quantity of anomalies (BPV + EXZ > 2048) and/or defects on the line.


Note   Under the Provisioning>Threshold tab, the E1 card has user-defined thresholds for the E1 Rx path PMs. In the Threshold tab, they are displayed as EB, BBE, ES, SES, and UAS without the Rx prefix.

Table 8-4   CEPT and CRC4 Framing Path PMs, both Tx and Rx for the E1 Card, Near-end
and Far-End

Parameter  Definition 
E1 (Tx or Rx) P-EB

Path Errored Block (P-EB) indicates that one or more bits are in error within a block.

E1 (Tx or Rx) P-BBE

Path Background Block Error (P-BBE) is an errored block not occurring as part of an SES.

E1 (Tx or Rx) P-ES

Path Errored Second (P-ES) is a one-second period with one or more errored blocks or at least one defect.

E1 (Tx or Rx) P-SES

Path Severely Errored Seconds (P-SES) is a one-second period containing > 30% errored blocks or at least one defect. SES is a subset of ES.

E1 (Tx or Rx) P-UAS

Receive Path Unavailable Seconds (E1 Rx P-UAS) is a count of one-second intervals when the E1 path is unavailable on the receive end of the signal. The E1 path is unavailable when ten consecutive SESs occur. The ten SESs are included in unavailable time. Once unavailable, the E1 path becomes available when ten consecutive seconds occur with no SESs. The ten seconds with no SESs are excluded from unavailable time.

Transmit Path Unavailable Seconds (E1 Tx P-UAS) is a count of one-second intervals when the E1 path is unavailable on the transmit end of the signal. The E1 path is unavailable when ten consecutive SESs occur. The ten SESs are included in unavailable time. Once unavailable, the E1 path becomes available when ten consecutive seconds occur with no SESs. The ten seconds with no SESs are excluded from unavailable time.

E1 (Tx or Rx) P-ESR

Path Errored Second Ratio (P-ESR) is the ratio of errored seconds to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

E1 (Tx or Rx) P-SESR

Path Severely Errored Second Ratio (P-SESR) is the ratio of SES to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

E1 (Tx or Rx) P-BBER

Path Background Block Error Ratio (P-BBER) is the ratio of BBE to total blocks in available time during a fixed measurement interval. The count of total blocks excludes all blocks during SESs.

Table 8-5   VC-12 Low-Order Path PMs for the E1 Card, Near-end and Far-end

Parameter  Definition 
LP-EB

Low-Order Path Errored Block (LP-EB) indicates that one or more bits are in error within a block.

LP-BBE

Low-Order Path Background Block Error (LP-BBE) is an errored block not occurring as part of an SES.

LP-ES

Low-Order Path Errored Second (LP-ES) is a one-second period with one or more errored blocks or at least one defect.

LP-SES

Low-Order Path Severely Errored Seconds (LP-SES) is a one-second period containing > 30% errored blocks or at least one defect. SES is a subset of ES.

LP-UAS

Low-Order Path Unavailable Seconds (LP-UAS) is a count of the seconds when the VC path was unavailable. A low-order path becomes unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as LP-SESs, and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as LP-SESs.

LP-ESR

Low-Order Path Errored Second Ratio (LP-ESR) is the ratio of errored seconds to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

LP-SESR

Low-Order Path Severely Errored Second Ratio (LP-SESR) is the ratio of SES to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

LP-BBER

Low-Order Path Background Block Error Ratio (LP-BBER) is the ratio of BBE to total blocks in available time during a fixed measurement interval. The count of total blocks excludes all blocks during SESs.

8.5.2 E3 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters

Figure 8-15 shows the signal types that support near-end and far-end PMs for the E3 card. Figure 8-16 shows where overhead bytes detected on the ASICs produce performance monitoring parameters for the E3 card.


Figure 8-15   Monitored signal types for the E3 card



Figure 8-16   PM read points on the E3 card


The PM parameters for the E3 card are described in Table 8-6, Table 8-7, Table 8-8, and Table 8-9.

Table 8-6   E3 Line PMs for the E3 Card, Near-End

Parameter  Definition 
E3 CV-L

Code Violation Line (CV-L) indicates that the number of coding violations occurring on the line. This parameter is a count of BPVs and EXZs occurring over the accumulation period.

E3 ES-L

Errored Seconds Line (ES-L) is a count of the seconds containing one or more anomalies (BPV + EXZ) and/or defects (loss of signal) on the line.

E3 SES-L

Severely Errored Seconds Line (SES-L) is a count of the seconds containing more than a particular quantity of anomalies (BPV + EXZ > 44) and/or defects on the line.

E3 LOSS-L

Line Loss of Signal (LOSS-L) is a count of one-second intervals containing one or more LOS defects.

Table 8-7   E3 Path PMs for the E3 Card, Near-End

Parameter  Definition 
E3 P-ES

Path Errored Second (P-ES) is a one-second period with at least one defect.

E3 P-SES

Path Severely Errored Seconds (P-SES) is a one-second period containing at least one defect. SES is a subset of ES.

E3 P-UAS

Path Unavailable Seconds (P-UAS) is a count of the seconds when the path was unavailable. A path becomes unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as P-SESs, and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as P-SESs.

E3 P-ESR

Path Errored Second Ratio (P-ESR) is the ratio of errored seconds to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

E3 P-SESR

Path Severely Errored Second Ratio (P-SESR) is the ratio of SES to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

Table 8-8   VC3 Low-Order Path PMs for the E3 Card, Near-End and Far-End

Parameter  Definition 
LP-EB

Low-Order Path Errored Block (LP-EB) indicates that one or more bits are in error within a block.

LP-BBE

Low-Order Path Background Block Error (LP-BBE) is an errored block not occurring as part of an SES.

LP-ES

Low-Order Path Errored Second (LP-ES) is a one-second period with one or more errored blocks or at least one defect.

LP-SES

Low-Order Path Severely Errored Seconds (LP-SES) is a one-second period containing > 30% errored blocks or at least one defect. SES is a subset of ES.

LP-UAS

Low-Order Path Unavailable Seconds (LP-UAS) is a count of the seconds when the VC path was unavailable. A low-order path becomes unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as LP-SESs, and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as LP-SESs.

LP-ESR

Low-Order Path Errored Second Ratio (LP-ESR) is the ratio of errored seconds to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

LP-SESR

Low-Order Path Severely Errored Second Ratio (LP-SESR) is the ratio of SES to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

LP-BBER

Low-Order Path Background Block Error Ratio (LP-BBER) is the ratio of BBE to total blocks in available time during a fixed measurement interval. The count of total blocks excludes all blocks during SESs.

Table 8-9   VC4 High-Order Path PMs for the E3 Card, Near-End and Far-End

Parameter  Definition 
HP-EB

High-Order Path Errored Block (HP-EB) indicates that one or more bits are in error within a block.

HP-BBE

High-Order Path Background Block Error (HP-BBE) is an errored block not occurring as part of an SES.

HP-ES

High-Order Path Errored Second (HP-ES) is a one-second period with one or more errored blocks or at least one defect.

HP-SES

High-Order Path Severely Errored Seconds (HP-SES) is a one-second period containing > 30% errored blocks or at least one defect. SES is a subset of ES.

HP-UAS

High-Order Path Unavailable Seconds (HP-UAS) is a count of the seconds when the VC path was unavailable. A low-order path becomes unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as HP-SESs, and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as HP-SESs.

HP-ESR

High-Order Path Errored Second Ratio (HP-ESR) is the ratio of errored seconds to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

HP-SESR

High-Order Path Severely Errored Second Ratio (HP-SESR) is the ratio of SES to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

HP-BBER

High-Order Path Background Block Error Ratio (HP-BBER) is the ratio of BBE to total blocks in available time during a fixed measurement interval. The count of total blocks excludes all blocks during SESs.

8.5.3 DS3i Card Performance Monitoring Parameters

Figure 8-17 shows the signal types that support near-end and far-end PMs for the DS3i card. Figure 8-18 shows where overhead bytes detected on the ASICs produce performance monitoring parameters for the DS3i card.


Figure 8-17   Monitored signal types for the DS3i card



Figure 8-18   PM read points on the DS3i card


The PM parameters for the DS3i card are described in Table 8-10, Table 8-11, Table 8-12, Table 8-13, Table 8-14, and Table 8-15.

Table 8-10   DS3 Line PMs for the DS3i Card, Near-End

Parameter  Definition 
DS3 CV-L

Code Violation Line (CV-L) indicates that the number of coding violations occurring on the line. This parameter is a count of BPVs and EXZs occurring over the accumulation period.

DS3 ES-L

Errored Seconds Line (ES-L) is a count of the seconds containing one or more anomalies (BPV + EXZ) and/or defects (i.e., loss of signal) on the line.

DS3 SES-L

Severely Errored Seconds Line (SES-L) is a count of the seconds containing more than a particular quantity of anomalies (BPV + EXZ > 44) and/or defects on the line.

DS3 LOSS-L

Line Loss of Signal (LOSS-L) is a count of one-second intervals containing one or more LOS defects.

Table 8-11   C-Bit and M23 Framing DS3 Path PMs for the DS3i Card, Near-End

Parameter  Definition 
DS3 AISS-P

AIS Seconds Path (AISS-P) is a count of one-second intervals containing one or more AIS defects.

DS3 CVP-P

Code Violation Path (CVP-P) is a code violation parameter for M23 applications. CVP-P is a count of P-bit parity errors occurring in the accumulation period.

DS3 ESP-P

Errored Second Path (ESP-P) is a count of seconds containing one or more P-bit parity errors, one or more SEF defects, or one or more AIS defects.

DS3 SASP-P

SEF/AIS Seconds Path (SASP-P) is a count of one-second intervals containing one or more SEFs or one or more AIS defects on the path.

DS3 SESP-P

Severely Errored Seconds Path (SESP-P) is a count of seconds containing more than 44 P-bit parity violations, one or more SEF defects, or one or more AIS defects.

DS3 UASP-P

Unavailable Second Path (UASP-P) is a count of one-second intervals when the DS3 path is unavailable. A DS3 path becomes unavailable when ten consecutive SESP-Ps occur. The ten SESP-Ps are included in unavailable time. Once unavailable, the DS3 path becomes available when ten consecutive seconds with no SESP-Ps occur. The ten seconds with no SESP-Ps are excluded from unavailable time.

Table 8-12   CP-Bit Framing DS3 Path PMs for the DS3i Card, Near-End

Parameter  Definition 
DS3 CVCP-P

Code Violation Path (CVCP-P) is a count of CP-bit parity errors occurring in the accumulation period.

DS3 ESCP-P

Errored Second Path (ESCP-P) is a count of seconds containing one or more CP-bit parity errors, one or more SEF defects, or one or more AIS defects. ESCP-P is defined for the C-bit parity application.

DS3 SESCP-P

Severely Errored Seconds Path (SESCP-P) is a count of seconds containing more than 44 CP-bit parity errors, one or more SEF defects, or one or more AIS defects.

DS3 UASCP-P

Unavailable Second Path (UASCP-P) is a count of one-second intervals when the DS3 path is unavailable. A DS3 path becomes unavailable when ten consecutive SESCP-Ps occur. The ten SESCP-Ps are included in unavailable time. Once unavailable, the DS3 path becomes available when ten consecutive seconds with no SESCP-Ps occur. The ten seconds with no SESCP-Ps are excluded from unavailable time.

Table 8-13   CP-Bit Path PMs for the DS3i Cards, Far-End

Parameter  Definition 
DS3 CVCP-P

Code Violation (CVCP-PFE) is a parameter that is counted when the three far-end block error (FEBE) bits in a M-frame are not all collectively set to 1.

DS3 ESCP-P

Errored Second (ESCP-PFE) is a count of one-second intervals containing one or more M-frames with the three FEBE bits not all collectively set to 1 or one or more far-end SEF/AIS defects.

DS3 SASCP-P

SEF/AIS Second (SASCP-PFE) is a count of one-second intervals containing one or more far-end SEF/AIS defects.

DS3 SESCP-P

Severely Errored Second (SESCP-PFE) is a count of one-second intervals containing one or more 44 M-frames with the three FEBE bits not all collectively set to 1 or one or more far-end SEF/AIS defects.

DS3 UASCP-P

Unavailable Second (UASCP-PFE) is a count of one-second intervals when the DS3 path becomes unavailable. A DS3 path becomes unavailable when ten consecutive far-end CP-bit SESs occur. The ten CP-bit SESs are included in unavailable time. Once unavailable, the DS3 path becomes available when ten consecutive seconds occur with no CP-bit SESs. The ten seconds with no CP-bit SESs are excluded from unavailable time.

Table 8-14   VC3 Low-Order Path PMs for the DS3i Card, Near-End and Far-End

Parameter  Definition 
LP-EB

Low-Order Path Errored Block (LP-EB) indicates that one or more bits are in error within a block.

LP-BBE

Low-Order Path Background Block Error (LP-BBE) is an errored block not occurring as part of an SES.

LP-ES

Low-Order Path Errored Second (LP-ES) is a one-second period with one or more errored blocks or at least one defect.

LP-SES

Low-Order Path Severely Errored Seconds (LP-SES) is a one-second period containing > 30% errored blocks or at least one defect. SES is a subset of ES.

LP-UAS

Low-Order Path Unavailable Seconds (LP-UAS) is a count of the seconds when the VC path was unavailable. A low-order path becomes unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as LP-SESs, and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as LP-SESs.

LP-ESR

Low-Order Path Errored Second Ratio (LP-ESR) is the ratio of errored seconds to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

LP-SESR

Low-Order Path Severely Errored Second Ratio (LP-SESR) is the ratio of SES to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

LP-BBER

Low-Order Path Background Block Error Ratio (LP-BBER) is the ratio of BBE to total blocks in available time during a fixed measurement interval. The count of total blocks excludes all blocks during SESs.

Table 8-15   VC4 High-Order Path PMs for the DS3i Card, Near-End and Far-End

Parameter  Definition 
HP-EB

High-Order Path Errored Block (HP-EB) indicates that one or more bits are in error within a block.

HP-BBE

High-Order Path Background Block Error (HP-BBE) is an errored block not occurring as part of an SES.

HP-ES

High-Order Path Errored Second (HP-ES) is a one-second period with one or more errored blocks or at least one defect.

HP-SES

High-Order Path Severely Errored Seconds (HP-SES) is a one-second period containing > 30% errored blocks or at least one defect. SES is a subset of ES.

HP-UAS

High-Order Path Unavailable Seconds (HP-UAS) is a count of the seconds when the VC path was unavailable. A low-order path becomes unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as HP-SESs, and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as HP-SESs.

HP-ESR

High-Order Path Errored Second Ratio (HP-ESR) is the ratio of errored seconds to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

HP-SESR

High-Order Path Severely Errored Second Ratio (HP-SESR) is the ratio of SES to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

HP-BBER

High-Order Path Background Block Error Ratio (HP-BBER) is the ratio of BBE to total blocks in available time during a fixed measurement interval. The count of total blocks excludes all blocks during SESs.

8.6 SDH Performance Monitoring for Optical Cards

The following sections define performance monitoring parameters and definitions for the STM-1, STM-4, STM-16, and STM-64 cards.

8.6.1 STM-1 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters

Figure 8-19 shows where overhead bytes detected on the ASICs produce performance monitoring parameters for the STM-1 card.


Figure 8-19   PM read points on the STM-1 card



Note   For PM locations relating to protection switch counts, see the Telcordia GR-253-CORE document.

The PM parameters for the STM-1 card are described in Table 8-16, Table 8-17, Table 8-18, Table 8-19, and Table 8-20.

Table 8-16   Regenerator Section PMs for the STM-1 Card, Near-End

Parameter  Definition 
RS-EB

Regenerator Section Errored Block (RS-EB) indicates that one or more bits are in error within a block.

RS-BBE

Regenerator Section Background Block Error (RS-BBE) is an errored block not occurring as part of an SES.

RS-ES

Regenerator Section Errored Second (RS-ES) is a one-second period with one or more errored blocks or at least one defect.

RS-SES

Regenerator Section Severely Errored Second (RS-SES) is a one-second period which contains >30% errored blocks or at least one defect. SES is a subset of ES.

Table 8-17   Multiplex Section PMs for the STM-1 Card, Near-End and Far-End

Parameter  Definition 
MS-EB

Multiplex Section Errored Block (MS-EB) indicates that one or more bits are in error within a block.

MS-BBE

Multiplex Section Background Block Error (MS-BBE) is an errored block not occurring as part of an SES.

MS-ES

Multiplex Section Errored Second (MS-ES) is a one-second period with one or more errored blocks or at least one defect.

MS-SES

Multiplex Section Severely Errored Second (MS-SES) is a one-second period which contains >X% errored blocks or at least one defect. SES is a subset of ES. For more information, see ITU-T G.829 Section 5.1.3.

MS-UAS

Multiplex Section Unavailable Seconds (MS-UAS) is a count of the seconds when the section was unavailable. A section becomes unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as MS-SESs, and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as MS-SESs. When the condition is entered, MS-SESs decrement and then count toward MS-UAS.


Note   For information about Troubleshooting SNCP switch counts, see the alarm troubleshooting information in the Cisco ONS 15454 SDH Troubleshooting and Reference Guide. For information about creating circuits that perform a switch, see "Circuits and Tunnels."

Table 8-18   1+1 LMSP Protection Switch Count PMs for the STM-1 Cards, Near-End

Parameter  Definition 
MS-PSC (1+1 protection)

In a 1+1 protection scheme for a working card, Multiplex Section Protection Switching Count (MS-PSC) is a count of the number of times service switches from a working card to a protection card plus the number of times service switches back to the working card.

For a protection card, MS-PSC is a count of the number of times service switches to a working card from a protection card plus the number of times service switches back to the protection card. The MS-PSC PM is only applicable if revertive line-level protection switching is used.

Note MS-SPRing is not supported on the STM-1 card; therefore, the MS-PSD-W, MS-PSD-S, and MS-PSD-R PMs do not increment.

MS-PSD

Multiplex Section Protection Switching Duration (MS-PSD) applies to the length of time, in seconds, that service is carried on another line. For a working line, MS-PSD is a count of the number of seconds that service was carried on the protection line.

For the protection line, MS-PSD is a count of the seconds that the line was used to carry service. The MS-PSD PM is only applicable if revertive line-level protection switching is used.

Note MS-SPRing is not supported on the STM-1 card; therefore, the MS-PSD-W, MS-PSD-S, and MS-PSD-R PMs do not increment.


Note   In CTC, the count fields for MS-PPJC and MS-NPJC PMs appear white and blank unless they are enabled on the Provisioning > Line tabs. See the "Enable Pointer Justification Count Performance Monitoring" procedure.

Table 8-19   Pointer Justification Count PMs for the STM-1 Card, Near-End

Parameter  Definition 
MS-PPJC-Pdet

Multiplex Section, Positive Pointer Justification Count, Path Detected (MS-PPJC-Pdet) is a count of the positive pointer justifications detected on a particular path on an incoming SDH signal.

MS-NPJC-Pdet

Multiplex Section, Negative Pointer Justification Count, Path Detected (MS-NPJC-Pdet) is a count of the negative pointer justifications detected on a particular path on an incoming SDH signal.

MS-PPJC-Pgen

Multiplex Section, Positive Pointer Justification Count, Path Generated (MS-PPJC-Pgen) is a count of the positive pointer justifications generated for a particular path.

MS-NPJC-Pgen

Multiplex Section, Negative Pointer Justification Count, Path Generated (MS-NPJC-Pgen) is a count of the negative pointer justifications generated for a particular path.


Note   SDH path PMs will not count unless IPPM is enabled. For additional information, see the "Enabling Intermediate Path Performance Monitoring" section.

Table 8-20   High-Order VC4 and VC4-Xc Path PMs for the STM-1 Card, Near-End and Far-End

Parameter  Definition 
HP-EB

High-Order Path Errored Block (HP-EB) indicates that one or more bits are in error within a block.

HP-BBE

High-Order Path Background Block Error (HP-BBE) is an errored block not occurring as part of an SES.

HP-ES

High-Order Path Errored Second (HP-ES) is a one-second period with one or more errored blocks or at least one defect.

HP-SES

High-Order Path Severely Errored Seconds (HP-SES) is a one-second period containing > 30% errored blocks or at least one defect. SES is a subset of ES.

HP-UAS

High-Order Path Unavailable Seconds (HP-UAS) is a count of the seconds when the VC path was unavailable. A low-order path becomes unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as HP-SESs, and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as HP-SESs.

HP-ESR

High-Order Path Errored Second Ratio (HP-ESR) is the ratio of errored seconds to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

HP-SESR

High-Order Path Severely Errored Second Ratio (HP-SESR) is the ratio of SES to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

HP-BBER

High-Order Path Background Block Error Ratio (HP-BBER) is the ratio of BBE to total blocks in available time during a fixed measurement interval. The count of total blocks excludes all blocks during SESs.

8.6.2 STM-4 and STM4-4 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters

Figure 8-20 shows the signal types that support near-end and far-end PMs for the STM-4 and STM4-4 cards. Figure 8-21 shows where overhead bytes detected on the ASICs produce performance monitoring parameters for the STM-4 and STM4-4 cards.


Figure 8-20   Monitored signal types for the STM-4 and STM4-4 cards



Note   PMs on the protect VC4 are not supported for MS-SPRing.


Figure 8-21   PM read points on the STM-4 and STM4-4 cards



Note   For PM locations relating to protection switch counts, see the Telcordia GR-1230-CORE document.

The PM parameters for the STM-4 and STM4-4 cards are described in Table 8-21, Table 8-22, Table 8-23, Table 8-24, and Table 8-25.

Table 8-21   Regenerator Section PMs for the STM-4 and STM4-4 Cards, Near-End and Far-End

Parameter  Definition 
RS-EB

Regenerator Section Errored Block (RS-EB) indicates that one or more bits are in error within a block.

RS-BBE

Regenerator Section Background Block Error (RS-BBE) is an errored block not occurring as part of an SES.

RS-ES

Regenerator Section Errored Second (RS-ES) is a one-second period with one or more errored blocks or at least one defect.

RS-SES

Regenerator Section Severely Errored Second (RS-SES) is a one-second period which contains >30% errored blocks or at least one defect. SES is a subset of ES.

Table 8-22   Multiplex Section PMs for the STM-4 and STM4-4 Cards, Near-End and Far-End

Parameter  Definition 
MS-EB

Multiplex Section Errored Block (MS-EB) indicates that one or more bits are in error within a block.

MS-BBE

Multiplex Section Background Block Error (MS-BBE) is an errored block not occurring as part of an SES.

MS-ES

Multiplex Section Errored Second (MS-ES) is a one-second period with one or more errored blocks or at least one defect.

MS-SES

Multiplex Section Severely Errored Second (MS-SES) is a one-second period which contains >X% errored blocks or at least one defect. SES is a subset of ES. For more information, see ITU-T G.829 Section 5.1.3.

MS-UAS

Multiplex Section Unavailable Seconds (MS-UAS) is a count of the seconds when the section was unavailable. A section becomes unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as MS-SESs, and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as MS-SESs. When the condition is entered, MS-SESs decrement and then count toward MS-UAS.

Table 8-23   Pointer Justification Count PMs for the STM-4 and STM4-4 Cards, Near-End

Parameter  Definition 

Note In CTC, the count fields for MS-PPJC and MS-NPJC PMs appear white and blank unless they are enabled on the Provisioning > Line tabs. For procedures, see the "Enable Pointer Justification Count Performance Monitoring" procedure.

MS-PPJC-Pdet

Multiplex Section Positive Pointer Justification Count, Path Detected (MS-PPJC-Pdet) is a count of the positive pointer justifications detected on a particular path on an incoming SDH signal.

MS-NPJC-Pdet

Multiplex Section Negative Pointer Justification Count, Path Detected (MS-NPJC-Pdet) is a count of the negative pointer justifications detected on a particular path on an incoming SDH signal.

MS-PPJC-Pgen

Multiplex Section Positive Pointer Justification Count, Path Generated (MS-PPJC-Pgen) is a count of the positive pointer justifications generated for a particular path.

MS-NPJC-Pgen

Multiplex Section Negative Pointer Justification Count, Path Generated (MS-NPJC-Pgen) is a count of the negative pointer justifications generated for a particular path.

Table 8-24   Protection Switch Count PMs for the STM-4 and STM4-4 Cards, Near-End

Parameter  Definition 

Note For information about Troubleshooting SNCP switch counts, see the alarm troubleshooting information in the Cisco ONS 15454 SDH Troubleshooting and Reference Guide. For information about creating circuits that perform a switch, see "Circuits and Tunnels."

MS-PSC (MS-SPRing)

For a protect line in a 2-fiber ring, Multiplex Section Protection Switching Count (MS-PSC) refers to the number of times a protection switch has occurred either to a particular span's line protection or away from a particular span's line protection. Therefore, if a protection switch occurs on a 2-fiber MS-SPRing, the MS-PSC of the protection span to which the traffic is switched will increment, and when the switched traffic returns to its original working span from the protect span, the MS-PSC of the protect span will increment again.

Note 4-fiber MS-SPRing is not supported on the STM-4 and STM4-4 cards; therefore, the MS-PSC-S, and MS-PSC-R PMs do not increment.

MS-PSC (1+1 protection)

In a 1+1 protection scheme for a working card, Multiplex Section Protection Switching Count (MS-PSC) is a count of the number of times service switches from a working card to a protection card plus the number of times service switches back to the working card.

For a protection card, MS-PSC is a count of the number of times service switches to a working card from a protection card plus the number of times service switches back to the protection card. The MS-PSC PM is only applicable if revertive line-level protection switching is used.

MS-PSD

For an active protection line in a 2-fiber MS-SPRing, Multiplex Section Protection Switching Duration (MS-PSD) is a count of the number of seconds that the protect line is carrying working traffic following the failure of the working line. MS-PSD increments on the active protect line and MS-PSD-W increments on the failed working line.

Note 4-fiber MS-SPRing is not supported on the STM-4 and STM4-4 cards; therefore, the MS-PSD-S, and MS-PSD-R PMs do not increment.

MS-PSC-W

For a working line in a 2-fiber MS-SPRing, Multiplex Section Protection Switching Count-Working (MS-PSC-W) is a count of the number of times traffic switches away from the working capacity in the failed line and back to the working capacity after the failure is cleared. PSC-W increments on the failed working line and PSC increments on the active protect line.

MS-PSD-W

For a working line in a 2-fiber MS-SPRing, Multiplex Section Protection Switching Duration-Working (MS-PSD-W) is a count of the number of seconds that service was carried on the protection line. MS-PSD-W increments on the failed working line and PSD increments on the active protect line.

Table 8-25   High-Order VC4 and VC4-Xc Path PMs for the STM-4 and STM4-4 Cards, Near-End

Parameter  Definition 

Note SDH path PMs will not count unless IPPM is enabled. For additional information, see the "Enabling Intermediate Path Performance Monitoring" section. The far-end IPPM feature is not supported on the STM-4 and STM4-4 cards. However, SDH path PMs can be monitored by logging into the far-end node directly.

HP-EB

High-Order Path Errored Block (HP-EB) indicates that one or more bits are in error within a block.

HP-BBE

High-Order Path Background Block Error (HP-BBE) is an errored block not occurring as part of an SES.

HP-ES

High-Order Path Errored Second (HP-ES) is a one-second period with one or more errored blocks or at least one defect.

HP-SES

High-Order Path Severely Errored Seconds (HP-SES) is a one-second period containing > 30% errored blocks or at least one defect. SES is a subset of ES.

HP-UAS

High-Order Path Unavailable Seconds (HP-UAS) is a count of the seconds when the VC path was unavailable. A low-order path becomes unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as HP-SESs, and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as HP-SESs.

HP-ESR

High-Order Path Errored Second Ratio (HP-ESR) is the ratio of errored seconds to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

HP-SESR

High-Order Path Severely Errored Second Ratio (HP-SESR) is the ratio of SES to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

HP-BBER

High-Order Path Background Block Error Ratio (HP-BBER) is the ratio of BBE to total blocks in available time during a fixed measurement interval. The count of total blocks excludes all blocks during SESs.

8.6.3 STM-16 and STM-64 Card Performance Monitoring Parameters

Figure 8-22 shows the signal types that support near-end and far-end PMs for the STM-16 and STM-64 cards. Figure 8-23 shows where overhead bytes detected on the ASICs produce performance monitoring parameters for the STM-16 and STM-64 cards.


Figure 8-22   Monitored signal types for the STM-16 and STM-64 cards



Note   PMs on the protect VC4 are not supported for MS-SPRing.


Figure 8-23   PM read points on the STM-16 and STM-64 cards



Note   For PM locations relating to protection switch counts, see the Telcordia GR-1230-CORE document.

The PM parameters for the STM-16 and STM-64 cards are described in Table 8-26, Table 8-27, Table 8-28, Table 8-29, and Table 8-30.

Table 8-26   Regenerator Section PMs for the STM-16 and STM-64 Cards, Near-End and Far-End

Parameter  Definition 
RS-EB

Regenerator Section Errored Block (RS-EB) indicates that one or more bits are in error within a block.

RS-BBE

Regenerator Section Background Block Error (RS-BBE) is an errored block not occurring as part of an SES.

RS-ES

Regenerator Section Errored Second (RS-ES) is a one-second period with one or more errored blocks or at least one defect.

RS-SES

Regenerator Section Severely Errored Second (RS-SES) is a one-second period which contains >30% errored blocks or at least one defect. SES is a subset of ES.

Table 8-27   Multiplex Section PMs for the STM-16 and STM-64 Cards, Near-End and Far-End

Parameter  Definition 
MS-EB

Multiplex Section Errored Block (MS-EB) indicates that one or more bits are in error within a block.

MS-BBE

Multiplex Section Background Block Error (MS-BBE) is an errored block not occurring as part of an SES.

MS-ES

Multiplex Section Errored Second (MS-ES) is a one-second period with one or more errored blocks or at least one defect.

MS-SES

Multiplex Section Severely Errored Second (MS-SES) is a one-second period which contains >X% errored blocks or at least one defect. SES is a subset of ES. For more information, see ITU-T G.829 Section 5.1.3.

MS-UAS

Multiplex Section Unavailable Seconds (MS-UAS) is a count of the seconds when the section was unavailable. A section becomes unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as MS-SESs, and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as MS-SESs. When the condition is entered, MS-SESs decrement and then count toward MS-UAS.

Table 8-28   Pointer Justification Count PMs for the STM-16 and STM-64 Cards, Near-End

Parameter  Definition 

Note In CTC, the count fields for MS-PPJC and MS-NPJC PMs appear white and blank unless they are enabled on the Provisioning > Line tabs. For procedures, see the "Enable Pointer Justification Count Performance Monitoring" procedure.

MS-PPJC-Pdet

Multiplex Section Positive Pointer Justification Count, Path Detected (MS-PPJC-Pdet) is a count of the positive pointer justifications detected on a particular path on an incoming SDH signal.

MS-NPJC-Pdet

Multiplex Section Negative Pointer Justification Count, Path Detected (MS-NPJC-Pdet) is a count of the negative pointer justifications detected on a particular path on an incoming SDH signal.

MS-PPJC-Pgen

Multiplex Section Positive Pointer Justification Count, Path Generated (MS-PPJC-Pgen) is a count of the positive pointer justifications generated for a particular path.

MS-NPJC-Pgen

Multiplex Section Negative Pointer Justification Count, Path Generated (MS-NPJC-Pgen) is a count of the negative pointer justifications generated for a particular path.

Table 8-29   Protection Switch Count PMs for the STM-16 and STM-64 Cards, Near-End

Parameter  Definition 

Note For information about Troubleshooting SNCP switch counts, see the alarm troubleshooting information in the Cisco ONS 15454 SDH Troubleshooting and Reference Guide. For information about creating circuits that perform a switch, see "Circuits and Tunnels."

MS-PSC (MS-SPRing)

For a protect line in a 2-fiber ring, Multiplex Section Protection Switching Count (MS-PSC) refers to the number of times a protection switch has occurred either to a particular span's line protection or away from a particular span's line protection. Therefore, if a protection switch occurs on a 2-fiber MS-SPRing, the MS-PSC of the protection span to which the traffic is switched will increment, and when the switched traffic returns to its original working span from the protect span, the MS-PSC of the protect span will increment again.

MS-PSC (1+1 protection)

In a 1+1 protection scheme for a working card, Multiplex Section Protection Switching Count (MS-PSC) is a count of the number of times service switches from a working card to a protection card plus the number of times service switches back to the working card.

For a protection card, MS-PSC is a count of the number of times service switches to a working card from a protection card plus the number of times service switches back to the protection card. The MS-PSC PM is only applicable if revertive line-level protection switching is used.

MS-PSD

For an active protection line in a 2-fiber MS-SPRing, Multiplex Section Protection Switching Duration (MS-PSD) is a count of the number of seconds that the protect line is carrying working traffic following the failure of the working line. MS-PSD increments on the active protect line and MS-PSD-W increments on the failed working line.

MS-PSC-W

For a working line in a 2-fiber MS-SPRing, Multiplex Section Protection Switching Count-Working (MS-PSC-W) is a count of the number of times traffic switches away from the working capacity in the failed line and back to the working capacity after the failure is cleared. MS-PSC-W increments on the failed working line and MS-PSC increments on the active protect line.

For a working line in a 4-fiber MS-SPRing, MS-PSC-W is a count of the number of times service switches from a working line to a protection line plus the number of times it switches back to the working line. MS-PSC-W increments on the failed line and MS-PSC-R or MS-PSC-S increments on the active protect line.

MS-PSD-W

For a working line in a 2-fiber MS-SPRing, Multiplex Section Protection Switching Duration-Working (MS-PSD-W) is a count of the number of seconds that service was carried on the protection line. MS-PSD-W increments on the failed working line and MS-PSD increments on the active protect line.

MS-PSC-S

In a 4-fiber MS-SPRing, Multiplex Section Protection Switching Count-Span (MS-PSC-S) is a count of the number of times service switches from a working line to a protection line plus the number of times it switches back to the working line. A count is only incremented if span switching is used.

MS-PSD-S

In a 4-fiber MS-SPRing, Multiplex Section Protection Switching Duration-Span (MS-PSD-S) is a count of the seconds that the protection line was used to carry service. A count is only incremented if span switching is used.

MS-PSC-R

In a 4-fiber MS-SPRing, Multiplex Section Protection Switching Count-Ring (MS-PSC-R) is a count of the number of times service switches from a working line to a protection line plus the number of times it switches back to a working line. A count is only incremented if ring switching is used.

MS-PSD-R

In a 4-fiber MS-SPRing, Multiplex Section Protection Switching Duration-Ring (MS-PSD-R) is a count of the seconds that the protection line was used to carry service. A count is only incremented if ring switching is used.

Table 8-30   High-Order VC4 and VC4-Xc Path PMs for the STM-16 and STM-64 Cards

Parameter  Definition 

Note SDH path PMs will not count unless IPPM is enabled. For additional information, see the "Enabling Intermediate Path Performance Monitoring" section. The far-end IPPM feature is not supported on the STM-16 and STM-64 cards. However, SDH path PMs can be monitored by logging into the far-end node directly.

HP-EB

High-Order Path Errored Block (HP-EB) indicates that one or more bits are in error within a block.

HP-BBE

High-Order Path Background Block Error (HP-BBE) is an errored block not occurring as part of an SES.

HP-ES

High-Order Path Errored Second (HP-ES) is a one-second period with one or more errored blocks or at least one defect.

HP-SES

High-Order Path Severely Errored Seconds (HP-SES) is a one-second period containing > 30% errored blocks or at least one defect. SES is a subset of ES.

HP-UAS

High-Order Path Unavailable Seconds (HP-UAS) is a count of the seconds when the VC path was unavailable. A low-order path becomes unavailable when ten consecutive seconds occur that qualify as HP-SESs, and it continues to be unavailable until ten consecutive seconds occur that do not qualify as HP-SESs.

HP-ESR

High-Order Path Errored Second Ratio (HP-ESR) is the ratio of errored seconds to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

HP-SESR

High-Order Path Severely Errored Second Ratio (HP-SESR) is the ratio of SES to total seconds in available time during a fixed measurement interval.

HP-BBER

High-Order Path Background Block Error Ratio (HP-BBER) is the ratio of BBE to total blocks in available time during a fixed measurement interval. The count of total blocks excludes all blocks during SESs.