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Cisco Router Web SetUp Tool

Cisco Router Web Setup 3.3 Troubleshooting Guide

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Table of Contents

Cisco Router Web Setup 3.3 Troubleshooting Guide
System Requirements
Starting CRWS
Troubleshooting
Loading the CRWS Files on the Router
Adjusting the PC to Communicate with the Router
Limitations and Restrictions
Related Documents
Obtaining Documentation
Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco Router Web Setup 3.3 Troubleshooting Guide


The Cisco Router Web Setup (CRWS) utility can be used to configure your router. The following devices are supported:

  • Cisco 806 router
  • Cisco 82x routers
  • Cisco 83x routers
  • Cisco SOHO 7x routers
  • Cisco SOHO 9x routers

CRWS is loaded in Flash memory or webflash memory, depending on the version of the IOS the router is running. It can also be uploaded to your router to add or update the utility.

This document describes CRWS version 3.3, how to update the files by using the CLI, and how to launch the application if it fails to launch automatically. It includes the following sections:

CRWS is also available at Cisco.com. See the "Obtaining Technical Assistance" section in this document for more information.

System Requirements

CRWS runs on a PC that is using the Microsoft Windows 98, Windows 98SE, Windows Me, Windows 2000, Windows XP, or Windows NT 4.0 operating system. The following are the system requirements for all operating systems:

  • Netscape 4.5 or better (Netscape 6.x is not supported)
  • Internet Explorer 5.0 or better
  • Java enabled on the web browser
  • Pentium III or higher processor, or its equivalent
  • 64 MB of RAM
  • 800 by 600 screen resolution with 256 or more colors

Starting CRWS

CRWS is the recommended means for configuring your router. A command-line interface (CLI) is also available for configuring the routers. The CLI is used for custom configurations that are not available through the use of CRWS. Refer to the IOS documentation for detailed instructions.


Note   To communicate with CRWS, the PC must be on the same subnetwork as the router and must be configured for dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP). For example, if the router subnet mask is 255.255.255.0 (the default), the PC subnet mask must also be 255.255.255.0. See the "Adjusting the PC to Communicate with the Router" section for additional information.

Follow these steps to configure the router:


Step 1   Connect the yellow Ethernet cable from the PC Ethernet port to the router Ethernet port.


Note    If you are restarting CRWS, you must begin with the Web browser shut down. Make sure all browser windows are closed.

Step 2   Power on the router.

Step 3   Open a browser window.

Step 4   Enter the URL 10.10.10.1, or if the router IP address has been changed, the new IP address of the router.

Step 5   Follow the instructions that appear in the window.





The CRWS utility leads you through the process of configuring your router. The help system describes the individual windows and should answer all your questions once you launch the utility. If you have trouble launching the utility, see the "Troubleshooting" section in this document for information that will help you resolve any problems.

Troubleshooting

This section provides suggestions for resolving common problems. If CRWS is not launched or the windows are not displayed, check the following:

  • If you are using the Microsoft Internet Explorer web browser, verify that the Work Offline option under the File menu is not selected.
  • Make sure the cable connections are complete. See the Cisco 800 Series Router Hardware Installation Guide or the Cisco 800 Series Router Quick Start Guide for instructions.
  • Make sure that the CRWS files are in memory. See the "Verify That the CRWS Files Are in Flash or Webflash" section.
  • Make sure the router Ethernet port IP address is correct. See the "Verify the IP Address of the Router Ethernet Port" section.

Displaying the Command Line Interface

The command line interface (CLI) is helpful for troubleshooting the router.

To display the CLI, follow these steps:


Step 1   Connect a console cable from your terminal to the router, and verify that both devices are powered on. Refer to the Cisco 800 Series Router Hardware Installation Guide or the Cisco 800 Series Router Quick Start Guide for instructions.

Step 2   Start a configuration session. Open a configuration window by using a terminal emulation software, such as HyperTerminal, and logging in to the router. The terminal port settings are as follows:

  • 9600 bits per second
  • 8 data bits, no parity
  • 1 stop bit
  • Flow control is none

A prompt appears. For example, Router>. Note that Router is the name of the router and that it can be changed. Your router might have a different name if it was previously configured. The "greater than" sign (>) indicates that you have entered exec mode. In this mode, some show commands are available. For example, the show interface command displays the IP address of an interface.





To go to privileged mode, enter the enable command. If an enable password is not set, the router changes to privileged mode without asking for a password. If this is the first time the router is being configured, the router prompts you for the enable password. Enter the enable password, if a password is set. The prompt changes to Router#. The pound sign (#) indicates that you are in privileged mode.

To go to global configuration mode, enter the configure terminal command. The prompt changes to Router(config)#. In this mode, you can change the router configuration. However, unless you are familiar with the IOS and have experience using the CLI, this method of router configuration is not recommended.

Verify That the CRWS Files Are in Flash or Webflash

If one or more CRWS files are missing from Flash memory, problems can result. The application might not display correctly or the application might not launch. You must have the correct IOS and the correct CRWS files in Flash memory. Although the filenames and number of files vary, depending on the router model, release, and features, the following files might be loaded on the router:

  • loading.gif
  • home.html
  • GUI.html
  • CRWS_1.jar
  • CRWS_2.jar
  • vpnlogin.html
  • CRWS_VPNLogin.jar
  • ConfigExp.cfg
  • IPCPSubnet.cfg (DSL routers)
  • CRWSbHlp.html

To verify the files, enter the show flash: command to display the files in Flash memory. (Or, enter the show webflash: command to display the files in webflash memory.) For example:

Router>show flash:

System flash directory:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   3558832  c820-y6-mz.121-3.XG2
  2   580      ConfigExp.cfg
  3   222749   CRWS_1.jar
  4   84363    CRWS_2.jar
  5   14892    GUI.html
  6   1411     Home.html
  7   8082     loading.gif
[3890720 bytes used, 4497888 available, 8388608 total]
8192K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)

Compare the files required to run CRWS on your router to the files located in Flash memory. If the files are not present, they must be copied into Flash memory or webflash memory. To add or replace the files, follow the procedure in the "Copy the CRWS Files to Memory" section.

Verify the IP Address of the Router Ethernet Port

To verify the IP address, enter the show interface e0 command on the command line. For example:

Router>show interface e0
Ethernet0 is up, line protocol is down 
  Hardware is PQUICC Ethernet, address is 0003.6bdc.0435 (bia 0003.6bdc.0435)
  Internet address is 10.10.10.1/24
....

If the IP address is not correct, change it by using the procedure in the "Set the Router Ethernet IP Address" section.

Verify the Ethernet Connection

The Ethernet connection from the PC to the router can be tested by using the Command window, or it can be tested from the router to the PC by using the Terminal window.

Testing the Ethernet Connection to the Router

Test the connection from the PC Ethernet port to the router by using the ping command as follows:


Step 1   Select Run from the Windows Start menu.

Step 2   Enter command in the Open field. A Command window displays.

Step 3   Enter ping 10.10.10.1 at the command prompt. For example:

C:\>ping 10.10.10.1
Pinging 10.10.10.1 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 10.10.10.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=255
Reply from 10.10.10.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=255
Reply from 10.10.10.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=255
Reply from 10.10.10.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=255

Ping statistics for 10.10.10.1:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
    Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum =  0ms, Average =  0ms

If you cannot ping the router, it is likely that there is a problem with the Ethernet cable or that the router port is not configured correctly. Verify that the Ethernet ports are connected correctly. To check the router IP address, follow the procedure in the "Verify the IP Address of the Router Ethernet Port" section.





Testing the Ethernet Connection to the PC

Test the connection from the router Ethernet port to the PC by using the ping command as follows:


Step 1   Display the CLI. See the "Displaying the Command Line Interface" section for instructions.

Step 2   Enter the ping command on the CLI to test the connection from the router Ethernet port to the PC. For example:

Router#ping 10.10.10.2

Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 10.10.10.1, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5)

Although you are using the terminal (or a HyperTerminal window on a PC) to view the CLI, it is simply a device for transmitting router commands and receiving the results. In the previous example, 10.10.10.2 is an IP address assigned to the PC by a DHCP server. (The DHCP option is sometimes shown as, "automatically obtain an IP address.")





If you successfully pinged the router by using the Command window but you could not ping the PC by using the CLI, it is likely that the PC is not set for communications with CRWS. To check the PC IP address, follow the procedure provided with your Windows operating system. To check the router IP address, follow the instructions in the "Verify the IP Address of the Router Ethernet Port" section.

Loading the CRWS Files on the Router

CRWS is already loaded on most routers, and it is available on Cisco.com. If an old version of the utility is loaded on your router, launch CRWS and use the Upgrade feature to update the files.

If your version of the utility does not have an upgrade feature, or the utility is not loaded on your router, follow the instructions in this section.

The following are the basic steps for loading the CRWS files:

Set the Router Ethernet IP Address

Setting the router Ethernet IP address establishes communications through the router Ethernet port. If the router is preconfigured, it is likely that the router Ethernet port has been set up, and CRWS will make the rest of the adjustments to the configuration. If you cannot launch CRWS, it might be the router Ethernet port IP address is missing or incorrect, or the port might be shut down.

To configure the router Ethernet port, follow these steps:


Step 1   Open a configuration window by using a terminal emulation software, such as HyperTerminal. A prompt displays, for example; Router>. Note that Router is the name of the router and that it can be changed. Your router might have a different name. The "greater than" sign (>) indicates that you have entered exec mode.

Step 2   Enter the enable command to change to privileged mode. The router prompts you for the enable password. If this is the first time the router is being configured, an enable password might not be set. The router changes to privileged mode without asking for a password, and you can skip to Step 4.

Step 3   If an enable (secret) password is set, enter the enable password. The prompt changes to Router# to indicate that you are in privileged mode.

Step 4   Enter the configure terminal command to enter global configuration mode. The prompt changes to Router(config)#.

Step 5   Enter the interface ethernet0 command to configure the Ethernet interface:

Router(config)# interface ethernet0

The prompt changes to Router(config-if)#.

Step 6   Enter the IP address by using the command ip address 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0.

Step 7   Enter the no shutdown command to bring up the port.

Router(config-if)#no shutdown


Note    The port is administratively shut down by default. If the port is already up, this command does not change the status of the port.

Step 8   Enter the end command to terminate the configuration session and return to privileged mode.

Router(config-if)#end
Router#

Step 9   Enter the ping command to make sure that the connection to the router is up. The ping command is described in the "Verify the Ethernet Connection" section.





Start a TFTP Server

A TFTP server allows you to copy files from your PC to the router over the Ethernet connection, by using the CLI. Start the TFTP server by following these steps:


Step 1   Download and install the free TFTP server software from CCO. If TFTP software is already installed on your PC, you do not need to perform this step.

Step 2   Copy the CRWS files to the root directory of the TFTP server.

Step 3   Start the TFTP server.





Copy the CRWS Files to Memory

If the CRWS utility is loaded on your router, and you want to update your version of the software, use the Refresh feature in your current version of CRWS.

If the CRWS utility is not loaded on your router, follow the instructions in this section.


Note   This procedure assumes that the router is cabled (including the console cable), and powered on, and that you can ping the Ethernet port. Refer to the Cisco 800 Series Router Hardware Installation Guide or the Cisco 800 Series Router Quick Start Guide for instructions.


Step 1   Download the latest version of CRWS from CCO to your local hard disk, and uncompress the file.

Step 2   Uncompress the ZIP file. The files that are extracted onto your hard disk are:

  • loading.gif
  • home.html
  • GUI.html
  • CRWS_1.jar
  • CRWS_2.jar
  • vpnlogin.html
  • CRWS_VPNLogin.jar
  • IPCPSubnet.cfg
  • index806.txt
  • index.txt
  • ConfigExp_806.cfg
  • ConfigExp.cfg
  • CRWSbHlp.html

Step 3   Delete the ZIP file.

Step 4   If you have a Cisco 806 router, Cisco 831 router, Cisco SOHO 71 router or a Cisco SOHO 91 router, delete the following files and continue with Step 5. Otherwise, skip to Step 6.

  • IPCPSubnet.cfg
  • index806.txt
  • ConfigExp.cfg

Step 5   Rename ConfigExp_806.cfg to ConfigExp.cfg and skip to Step 7.

Step 6   If you have a Cisco 826 router, Cisco 827 router, Cisco 828 router, Cisco SOHO 76 router, Cisco SOHO 77 router, or Cisco SOHO 78 router, delete the following files and continue with Step 7.

  • index806.txt
  • index.txt,
  • ConfigExp_806.cfg

Step 7   Start a TFTP server. Instructions for starting a TFTP server is provided in the "Start a TFTP Server" section.

Step 8   Copy the CRWS files to the root directory of the TFTP server.

Step 9   Open a configuration window by using a terminal emulation software, such as HyperTerminal. A prompt displays; for example, Router>. Note that Router is the name of the router and that it can be changed. Your router might have a different name. The "greater-than" sign (>) indicates that you have entered exec mode.

Step 10   Enter the enable command to change to privileged mode.

Router> enable

The router might prompt you for the enable password. If an enable password is set, your are prompted for the password. If this is the first time the router is being configured or if an enable password has not been set, the router changes to privileged mode without asking for a password, and you can skip
to Step 12.

Step 11   If a password is set, enter the enable password. The prompt changes to Router# to indicate that you are in privileged mode.

Step 12   Enter the configure terminal command.

Router# configure terminal

The prompt changes to Router(config)# to indicate that you are in global configuration mode.

Step 13   Enter the IP address. Instructions for entering a router Ethernet IP address are provided in the "Set the Router Ethernet IP Address" section.

Step 14   Copy the files to memory. If you are copying the files to webflash memory, enter the copy tftp: webflash: command. (Note, the colon is a required part of the command.) If you are copying the files to Flash memory, enter the copy tftp: flash: command. The router prompts you for the TFTP server IP address.

Step 15   Enter the IP address of the PC. Typically, the IP address is 10.10.10.2; for example:

Address or name of remote host? 10.10.10.2

The router prompts you for the source filename.

Step 16   Enter the source filename to be copied. For example, home.html:

Source filename []? home.html

The router prompts you for the destination filename.

Step 17   Press Enter, without entering a filename to accept the source filename, home.html, as the destination file name. If a home.html file already exists in memory, you are asked if the file can be overwritten. Enter YES.

The router prompts you to erase Flash memory.

Erase flash: Before copying?[confirm]


Caution   The IOS image is stored in Flash memory. If you are copying a file to Flash memory and enter YES, all the files in Flash memory, including the IOS image, are deleted and cannot be recovered. Note that erasing webflash memory does not erase the IOS image stored in Flash memory.

Step 18   tRespond to the prompt as follows:

  • Enter NO if you are copying the file to Flash memory.
  • If you are copying the first (home.html) file to webflash memory, press Enter. Otherwise enter NO.
  • If you are copying a subsequent file to webflash memory, enter NO.

The router displays exclamation points (!) to indicate that the file is being transferred from the PC to the router. When this process is complete, the router prompt appears.

Step 19   Repeat Step 16 through Step 18 to copy all the CRWS files to memory.

Step 20   Copy the ConfigExp.cfg file to the router startup-config file and reload (restart) the router. For instructions on copying the ConfigExp.cfg to the startup-config file, see the "Copy the CRWS Configuration to the Router" section.


Caution   When you are prompted to save the running configuration to startup configuration, enter NO.





After the ConfigExp.cfg file is copied, launch CRWS from a browser window by following the procedure in the "Starting CRWS" section.

Copy the CRWS Configuration to the Router

A configuration that supports CRWS, ConfigExp.cfg, is provided with the utility. This configuration file must match the running-config file.

If CRWS is already loaded on the router, the router has probably been preconfigured to use the utility. You can skip this section.

If CRWS is loaded on the router, but the router has not been preconfigured to use the utility, the CRWS configuration can be copied from Flash memory or webflash memory to the router configuration. A router Ethernet port connection is not required to perform this procedure.

If CRWS is not loaded on the router, the CRWS configuration can be copied from the PC to the router configuration. See the "Copy the CRWS Files to Memory" section.

To copy the CRWS configuration from Flash memory or webflash memory to the router startup configuration, follow these steps:


Step 1   Open a configuration window by using a terminal emulation software, such as HyperTerminal. A prompt displays; for example, Router>. The name of the router can be changed. Your router might have a different name. The greater-than sign (>) indicates that you have entered exec mode.

Step 2   Enter the enable command to change to privileged mode.

Router> enable

The router might prompt you for the enable password. If an enable password is set, your are prompted for the password. If this is the first time the router is being configured or if an enable password has not been set, the router changes to privileged mode, and you can skip to Step 4.

Step 3   If a password is set, enter the enable password. The prompt changes to Router#. This prompt indicates that you are in privileged mode.

Step 4   Copy the CRWS configuration to the router startup configuration. If your router supports webflash memory, enter the copy webflash:ConfigExp.cfg startup-config command. If your router does not support webflash memory, enter the copy ConfigExp.cfg startup-config command. The configuration is saved to NVRAM.

Step 5   Enter the reload command to reboot the router. You are prompted to save the running configuration to the startup configuration, as follows:

System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]:

Step 6   Enter NO. You are prompted to proceed with the reload.

Proceed with reload? [confirm]

Step 7   Press Enter. The router restarts. You can communicate with the router through the Ethernet port.





Adjusting the PC to Communicate with the Router

This section provides instructions for configuring a PC to communicate with the router through an Ethernet LAN for the purpose of running CRWS. To establish communications with the router, the PC must be set as a DHCP client and must lease an IP address from the router before invoking the utility. In most cases, you do not need to change any settings to communicate with the router.

We recommend that you try communicating with the router by bringing up your browser (Internet Explorer or Netscape) and entering the URL http://10.10.10.1 . If this does not work and the router configuration is correct, follow the instructions in one of the following sections, appropriate for your operating system:

Adjust Your Windows XP Settings

If you did not install TCP /IP when you installed Windows XP, you must add the protocol and configure your PC for TCP/IP automatic addressing. Typically, TCP/IP is installed by default in Windows XP systems.

In case TCP/IP is not installed by default, do the following:


Step 1   Select Start > Help to launch Windows XP Online Help.

Step 2   Enter Installing TCP/IP in the keyword entry field of the search tab and press Enter or click List Topics button.

Step 3   Select Installing TCP/IP from the listed topics, and press Enter or click Display button.

Step 4   Follow the instructions in the help window to install TCP/IP.





To configure TCP/IP settings in your PC, do the following:


Step 1   Select Start > Help to launch Windows XP Online Help.

Step 2   Enter Configuring TCP/IP in the search box and press Enter or click List Topics button.

Step 3   Select Configuring TCP/IP settings from the listed topics, and press Enter or click Display button.

Step 4   Follow the instructions in the help window to configure TCP/IP.





Adjust Your Windows 2000 Settings

If you did not install TCP /IP when you installed Windows 2000, you must add the protocol and configure your PC for TCP/IP automatic addressing. Typically, TCP/IP is installed by default in Windows 2000 systems.

In case TCP/IP is not installed by default, do the following:


Step 1   Select Start > Help to launch Windows 2000 Online Help.

Step 2   Enter Installing TCP/IP in the keyword entry field of the search tab and press Enter or click List Topics button.

Step 3   Select Installing TCP/IP from the listed topics, and press Enter or click Display button.

Step 4   Follow the instructions in the help window to install TCP/IP.





To configure TCP/IP settings in your PC, do the following:


Step 1   Select Start > Help to launch Windows 2000 Online Help.

Step 2   Enter Configuring TCP/IP in the search box and press Enter or click List Topics button.

Step 3   Select Configuring TCP/IP settings from the listed topics, and press Enter or click Display button.

Step 4   Follow the instructions in the help window to configure TCP/IP.





Adjusting Your Windows NT Settings

If you did not install TCP /IP when you installed Windows NT, you must add the protocol and change the settings on your PC so that the protocol will work with your new router.

Follow these steps to load the TCP/IP protocol:


Step 1   Open the Control Panel.


Step 2   Double-click the Network icon. The Network window appears.


Step 3   Click the Protocol tab in the Network window.


Step 4   If TCP/IP is listed under Network Protocols, go to Step 5. If TCP/IP is not shown, install TCP/IP as follows:

a. Click Add.

b. Double-click Protocol in the Select Network Component Type window. The Select Network Protocol window appears.

c. Choose Microsoft for the manufacturer.

d. Choose TCP/IP for the network protocol.

e. Click OK. The Network window appears.

Step 5   Change the TCP/IP settings to use DHCP as follows:

a. Double-click the first TCP/IP cable icon. The TCP/IP Properties window appears.


b. In the IP Address tab, make sure the Obtain an IP address from a DHCP server option is selected and that the IP Address and Subnet Mask fields are grayed out.

Step 6   Add the DNS server given to you by your ISP or network administrator:

a. Click the DNS tab.


b. Enter your host name in the Host field.

c. Enter your domain name in the Domain field.

d. Click Add under the DNS Server Search Order window if the DNS server IP address is provided by your service provider. Otherwise, skip to Step f.

e. Enter the IP address of the DNS server in the DNS Server Search Order field.

f. Remove any DNS server IP address that is not provided by your service provider. If your service provider did not provide any IP addresses, all IP addresses should be removed. The DNS IP addresses will be automatically leased from the router.

Step 7   Click OK to accept the changes and exit this window.

Step 8   Click OK to exit the Network window. The Control Panel appears.

Step 9   If it is necessary to reboot the system to make your changes effective, a dialog box prompts you to reboot the PC. Click Yes to reboot the PC. Click No to continue without rebooting; the settings are changed the next time the PC is rebooted.





Adjust Your Windows 98 Settings

If you did not install TCP/IP when you installed Windows 98, you must add the protocol and change the settings on your PC so that the protocol will work with your new router.

Follow these steps to load the TCP/IP protocol:


Step 1   Open the Control Panel.


Step 2   Double-click the Network icon. The Network window appears.


Step 3   If TCP/IP is listed, continue to the next step. If TCP/IP is not listed, install TCP/IP as follows:

a. Click Add.

b. Double-click Protocol in the Select Network Component Type window. The Select Network Protocol window appears.

c. Choose Microsoft for the manufacturer.

d. Choose TCP/IP for the network protocol.

e. Click OK. The Network window appears.

Step 4   Change the TCP/IP settings to use DHCP as follows:

a. Double-click the first TCP/IP cable icon. The TCP/IP Properties window appears.

b. Make sure that the IP Address tab has Obtain an IP address automatically is selected and that the IP Address and Subnet Mask fields are grayed out.


Step 5   Add the DNS server given to you by your ISP or network administrator:

a. Click the DNS Configuration tab.

b. Click Enable DNS.

c. Enter your host name in the Host field.

d. Enter your domain name in the Domain field.

e. Enter the IP address of the DNS server in the DNS Server Search Order field.

f. Click Add. The IP address shows in the window below the field.


Step 6   If your network administrator has instructed you to use DHCP to obtain a WINS address, complete this step. Otherwise, go to Step 7.

a. Click the WINS Configuration tab.

b. Select Use DHCP for WINS Resolution.


Step 7   Click OK to accept the changes and exit this window.

Step 8   Click OK to exit the Network window. The Control Panel appears.

Step 9   If it is necessary to reboot the system to make your changes effective, a dialog box prompts you to reboot the PC. Click Yes to reboot the PC. Click No to continue without rebooting; the settings are changed the next time the PC is rebooted.





Limitations and Restrictions

This section provides the latest information about the limitations and restrictions of the Cisco Router Web Setup.

  • Netscape 6.x is not supported in this release of CRWS.
  • Java and JavaScript should be enabled before starting CRWS. If CRWS does not start, enable Java and JavaScript, close the browser window, and clear the browser cache. Then restart CRWS.
  • If reload is chosen, and the PC does not connect to the router, change the IP address of the PC to be in the same subnet as the router Ethernet IP address. Then restart CRWS.
  • If all the vty lines on the router are occupied, CRWS will not work. One of the vty lines must be cleared.
  • If CRWS is not closed by using Close link, the user name and password configured by CRWS may not be removed from the system memory. Use Close link in the CRWS window to close.
  • When CRWS is closed, verify that the main browser window in which the user typed in the IP address is also closed before starting CRWS again. It might be necessary to right-click the icon in the toolbar to close the window.
  • CRWS is contained in two jar files. If either of the jar files is corrupted or not downloaded, CRWS might not work properly. Close the browser and restart CRWS.
  • CRWS sets the vty line for login local. If another login type (other than login local) is configured on the router, when CRWS is invoked it configures the vty line for login local for the duration of the session and reverts to the old login type when the CRWS session is terminated. To login to the router during the CRWS session, fill in the CRWS Router Password window or configure the username and password by using the CLI.
  • If a login type other than login local is configured on the vty line on the router before invoking CRWS, and you have completed the fields in the CRWS Router Password window, when the CRWS session is closed, CRWS reverts back the original login type on the vty line. You cannot use the CRWS Router Password information to Telnet into the router. To Telnet into the router, you must use the login information that was in place before you invoked CRWS.
  • CRWS may not work properly if non-standard plugins (plugins not provided by IE and Netscape, e.g., JavaHotSpot Client VM, etc.) are installed. In such a situation, disable the plugins through controlpanel and invoke CRWS again.
  • CRWS may not work properly in the PC with Microsoft Windows XP if the virtual machine is not provided by Microsoft. The Microsoft virtual machine can be installed through Microsoft Windows Service Pack 1.

Related Documents

The following documents provide information about installing and configuring the Cisco 800 series routers and the Cisco SOHO 77, and SOHO 78 series routers:

  • Cisco 82x Router Hardware Installation Guides—Gives procedures for installing the Cisco 826, Cisco 827, Cisco 828, SOHO 77, and SOHO 78 series routers.
  • Cisco 806 and SOHO 71 Router Hardware Installation Guide—Gives procedures for installing the Cisco 806 and SOHO 71 routers.
  • Cisco 831 Router and SOHO 91 Router Hardware Installation Guides—Gives procedures for installing the Cisco 831 and SOHO 91 series routers.
  • Release Notes for Cisco 800 Series Routers—Provides the latest information on the application software.
  • Cisco 800 Series Router Quick Start Guide—Provides instructions for the basic router connections.
  • Cisco IOS configuration guides and command references—Describe IOS software commands and configurations for your router.

Obtaining Documentation

The following sections provide sources for obtaining documentation from Cisco Systems.

World Wide Web

You can access the most current Cisco documentation on the World Wide Web at the following sites:

Documentation CD-ROM

Cisco documentation and additional literature are available in a CD-ROM package, which ships with your product. The Documentation CD-ROM is updated monthly and may be more current than printed documentation. The CD-ROM package is available as a single unit or as an annual subscription.

Ordering Documentation

Cisco documentation is available in the following ways:

  • Registered Cisco Direct Customers can order Cisco Product documentation from the Networking Products MarketPlace:

http://www.cisco.com/public/ordsum.html

  • Registered Cisco.com users can order the Documentation CD-ROM through the online Subscription Store:

http://www.cisco.com/go/subscription

  • Nonregistered Cisco.com users can order documentation through a local account representative by calling Cisco corporate headquarters (California, USA) at 408 526-7208 or, in North America, by calling 800 553-NETS(6387).

Documentation Feedback

If you are reading Cisco product documentation on the World Wide Web, you can submit technical comments electronically. Click Feedback in the toolbar and select Documentation. After you complete the form, click Submit to send it to Cisco.

You can e-mail your comments to bug-doc@cisco.com.

To submit your comments by mail, for your convenience many documents contain a response card behind the front cover. Otherwise, you can mail your comments to the following address:

Cisco Systems, Inc.
Document Resource Connection
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, CA 95134-9883
We appreciate your comments.

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco provides Cisco.com as a starting point for all technical assistance. Customers and partners can obtain documentation, troubleshooting tips, and sample configurations from online tools. For Cisco.com registered users, additional troubleshooting tools are available from the TAC website.

Cisco.com

Cisco.com is the foundation of a suite of interactive, networked services that provides immediate, open access to Cisco information and resources at anytime, from anywhere in the world. This highly integrated Internet application is a powerful, easy-to-use tool for doing business with Cisco.

Cisco.com provides a broad range of features and services to help customers and partners streamline business processes and improve productivity. Through Cisco.com, you can find information about Cisco and our networking solutions, services, and programs. In addition, you can resolve technical issues with online technical support, download and test software packages, and order Cisco learning materials and merchandise. Valuable online skill assessment, training, and certification programs are also available.

Customers and partners can self-register on Cisco.com to obtain additional personalized information and services. Registered users can order products, check on the status of an order, access technical support, and view benefits specific to their relationships with Cisco.

To access Cisco.com, go to the following website:

http://www.cisco.com

Technical Assistance Center

The Cisco TAC website is available to all customers who need technical assistance with a Cisco product or technology that is under warranty or covered by a maintenance contract.

Contacting TAC by Using the Cisco TAC Website

If you have a priority level 3 (P3) or priority level 4 (P4) problem, contact TAC by going to the TAC website:

http://www.cisco.com/tac

P3 and P4 level problems are defined as follows:

  • P3—Your network performance is degraded. Network functionality is noticeably impaired, but most business operations continue.
  • P4—You need information or assistance on Cisco product capabilities, product installation, or basic product configuration.

In each of the above cases, use the Cisco TAC website to quickly find answers to your questions.

To register for Cisco.com, go to the following website:

http://www.cisco.com/register/

If you cannot resolve your technical issue by using the TAC online resources, Cisco.com registered users can open a case online by using the TAC Case Open tool at the following website:

http://www.cisco.com/tac/caseopen

You can also e-mail your comments to cs-crws@cisco.com.

Contacting TAC by Telephone

If you have a priority level 1(P1) or priority level 2 (P2) problem, contact TAC by telephone and immediately open a case. To obtain a directory of toll-free numbers for your country, go to the following website:

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/687/Directory/DirTAC.shtml

P1 and P2 level problems are defined as follows:

  • P1—Your production network is down, causing a critical impact to business operations if service is not restored quickly. No workaround is available.
  • P2—Your production network is severely degraded, affecting significant aspects of your business operations. No workaround is available.