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What is MPLS - Multiprotocol Label Switching

Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) enables Enterprises and Service Providers to build next-generation intelligent networks that deliver a wide variety of advanced, value-added services over a single infrastructure.

Cisco IOS Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) enables Enterprises and Service Providers to build next-generation intelligent networks that deliver a wide variety of advanced, value-added services over a single infrastructure. This economical solution can be integrated seamlessly over any existing infrastructure, such as IP, Frame Relay, ATM, or Ethernet. Subscribers with differing access links can be aggregated on an MPLS edge without changing their current environments, as MPLS is independent of access technologies.

Integration of MPLS application components, including Layer 3 VPNs, Layer 2 VPNs, Traffic Engineering, QoS, GMPLS, and IPV6 enable the development of highly efficient, scalable, and secure networks that guarantee Service Level Agreements.

Cisco IOS MPLS delivers highly scalable, differentiated, end-to-end IP services with simple configuration, management, and provisioning for providers and subscribers. A wide range of platforms support this solution, which is essential for both Service Provider and Enterprise networks.

MPLS versus SD-WAN

SD-WAN represents evolution of MPLS technology which has successfully powered private connectivity for more than two decades. In many ways, SD-WAN can be seen as a software abstraction of MPLS technology that is applicable to wider scenarios i.e. it brings secure, private connectivity agnostic to all kinds of links and providers and is cloud aware. Whereas MPLS handled failure scenarios with backup links, SD-WAN handles them with real-time traffic steering based on centralized policy. Also, given that SD-WAN unifies the entire WAN backbone, it delivers comprehensive analytics across the full enterprise back bone, globally. This wasn’t possible before due to disparate pieces of infrastructure and policy.