Catalyst 6500 Release 12.2SX Software Configuration Guide
Port ACLs (PACLs) and VLAN ACLs (VACLs)
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Configuring Port ACLs and VLAN ACLs

Table Of Contents

Configuring Port ACLs and VLAN ACLs

Understanding ACLs

Understanding ACLs

Understanding VACLs

MAC Policy-Based Forwarding

Understanding Port ACLs

EtherChannel and PACL Interactions

Dynamic ACLs (Applies to Merge Mode Only)

Trunk Ports

Layer 2 to Layer 3 Port Conversion

Port-VLAN Association Changes

PACL and VACL Interactions

PACL Interaction with VACLs and Cisco IOS ACLs

Bridged Packets

Routed Packets

Multicast Packets

Configuring PACLs

PACL Configuration Guidelines

Configuring IP and MAC ACLs on a Layer 2 Interface

Configuring Access-group Mode on Layer 2 Interface

Applying ACLs to a Layer 2 Interface

Applying ACLs to a Port Channel

Displaying an ACL Configuration on a Layer 2 Interface

Configuring VACLs

VACL Configuration Guidelines

Defining a VLAN Access Map

Configuring a Match Clause in a VLAN Access Map Sequence

Configuring an Action Clause in a VLAN Access Map Sequence

Applying a VLAN Access Map

Verifying VLAN Access Map Configuration

VLAN Access Map Configuration and Verification Examples

Configuring a Capture Port

Configuring MAC PBF

Configuring VACL Logging


Configuring Port ACLs and VLAN ACLs


This chapter describes how to configure port ACLs (PACLs) and VLAN ACLs (VACLs) in Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX.


NoteFor complete syntax and usage information for the commands used in this chapter, see the Cisco IOS Master Command List, at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/mcl/allreleasemcl/all_book.html

Optimized ACL logging (OAL) and VACL capture are incompatible. Do not configure both features on the switch. With OAL configured (see the "Optimized ACL Logging" section), use SPAN to capture traffic.

Port ACLs do not support the access-list keywords log or reflexive. These keywords in the access list are ignored. OAL does not support PACLs.

PACLs are not supported on private VLANs.



Tip For additional information about Cisco Catalyst 6500 Series Switches (including configuration examples and troubleshooting information), see the documents listed on this page:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/switches/ps708/tsd_products_support_series_home.html

Participate in the Technical Documentation Ideas forum


This chapter consists of these sections:

Understanding ACLs

Configuring PACLs

Configuring VACLs

Configuring VACL Logging

Understanding ACLs

The following sections describe ACLs in Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX:

Understanding ACLs

Understanding VACLs

Understanding Port ACLs

PACL and VACL Interactions

Understanding ACLs

Access control lists (ACLs) provide the ability to filter ingress and egress traffic based on conditions specified in the ACL.

Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX supports the following types of ACLs:

Cisco IOS ACLs are applied to Layer 3 interfaces. They filter traffic routed between VLANs. For more information about Cisco IOS ACLs, see Chapter 49 "Understanding Cisco IOS ACL Support."

VACLs control access to the VLAN of all packets (bridged and routed). Packets can either enter the VLAN through a Layer 2 port or through a Layer 3 port after being routed. You can also use VACLs to filter traffic between devices in the same VLAN.

Port ACLs perform access control on all traffic entering the specified Layer 2 port.

PACLs and VACLs can provide access control based on the Layer 3 addresses (for IP protocols) or Layer 2 MAC addresses (for non-IP protocols).

You can apply only one IP access list and one MAC access list to a Layer 2 interface.

Understanding VACLs

VLAN ACLs (VACLs) can provide access control for all packets that are bridged within a VLAN or that are routed into or out of a VLAN or a WAN interface for VACL capture. Unlike Cisco IOS ACLs that are applied on routed packets only, VACLs apply to all packets and can be applied to any VLAN or WAN interface. VACLs are processed in the ACL TCAM hardware. VACLs ignore any Cisco IOS ACL fields that are not supported in hardware.

You can configure VACLs for IP and MAC-layer traffic. VACLs applied to WAN interfaces support only IP traffic for VACL capture.

If a VACL is configured for a packet type, and a packet of that type does not match the VACL, the default action is to deny the packet.


Note IGMP packets are not checked against VACLs.


MAC Policy-Based Forwarding

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXI and later releases support MAC Policy-Based Forwarding (PBF), a type of MAC-based VACL by which packets can be bridged between VLANs. MAC PBF forwards packets based solely on the source and destination MAC addresses, ignoring any information above Layer 2. Unlike other VACLs, which are processed in the ACL TCAM hardware, MAC PBF is performed in software, with optional rate limiters to control CPU usage. Also, PBF is applied only to incoming packets.


Note Layer 2 port ACLs (PACLs) take precedence over MAC PBF.


Understanding Port ACLs

The port ACL (PACL) feature provides the ability to perform access control on specific Layer 2 ports. A Layer 2 port is a physical LAN or trunk port that belongs to a VLAN. Port ACLs are applied only on the ingress traffic. The port ACL feature is supported only in hardware (port ACLs are not applied to any packets routed in software).

When you create a port ACL, an entry is created in the ACL TCAM. You can use the show tcam counts command to see how much TCAM space is available.

The PACL feature does not affect Layer 2 control packets received on the port.

You can use the access-group mode command to change the way that PACLs interact with other ACLs.

PACLs use the following modes:

Prefer port modeIf a PACL is configured on a Layer 2 interface, the PACL takes effect and overwrites the effect of other ACLs (Cisco IOS ACL and VACL). If no PACL feature is configured on the Layer 2 interface, other features applicable to the interface are merged and are applied on the interface.

Merge modeIn this mode, the PACL, VACL, and Cisco IOS ACLs are merged in the ingress direction following the logical serial model shown in Figure 51-2. This is the default access group mode.

You configure the access-group mode command on each interface. The default is merge mode.


Note A PACL can be configured on a trunk port only after prefer port mode has been selected. Trunk ports do not support merge mode.


To illustrate access group mode, assume a physical port belongs to VLAN100, and the following ACLs are configured:

Cisco IOS ACL R1 is applied on routed interface VLAN100.

VACL (VLAN filter) V1 is applied on VLAN100.

PACL P1 is applied on the physical port.

In this situation, the following ACL interactions occur:

In prefer port mode, Cisco IOS ACL R1 and VACL V1 are ignored.

In merge mode, Cisco IOS ACL R1, VACL V1 and PACL P1 are merged and applied on the port.


Note The CLI syntax for creating a PACL is identical to the syntax for creating a Cisco IOS ACL. An instance of an ACL that is mapped to a Layer 2 port is called a PACL. An instance of an ACL that is mapped to a Layer 3 interface is called a Cisco IOS ACL. The same ACL can be mapped to both a Layer 2 port and a Layer 3 interface.


The PACL feature supports MAC ACLs and IPv4 ACLs. The PACL feature does not support ACLs for IPV6, ARP, or Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) traffic.

PACLs are explained in more detail in the following sections:

EtherChannel and PACL Interactions

Dynamic ACLs (Applies to Merge Mode Only)

Trunk Ports

Layer 2 to Layer 3 Port Conversion

Port-VLAN Association Changes

EtherChannel and PACL Interactions

This section describes the guidelines for the EtherChannel and PACL interactions:

PACLs are supported on the main Layer 2 channel interface but not on the port members. A port that has a PACL configured on it may not be configured as an EtherChannel member port. The EtherChannel configuration commands are unavailable on ports that are configured with a PACL.

Changing the configuration on the logical port affects all the ports in the channel. When an ACL is mapped to the logical port belonging to a channel, it is mapped to all ports in the channel.

Dynamic ACLs (Applies to Merge Mode Only)

Dynamic ACLs are VLAN-based and are used by GWIP. The merge mode does not support the merging of the dynamic ACLs with the PACLs. In merge mode, the following configurations are not allowed:

Attempting to apply a PACL on a port where its corresponding VLAN has a dynamic ACL mapped. In this case, the PACL is not applied to traffic on the port.

Configuring a dynamic ACL on a VLAN where one of its constituent ports has a PACL installed. In this case, the dynamic ACL is not applied.

Trunk Ports

To configure a PACL on a trunk port, you must first configure port prefer mode. The configuration commands to apply a PACL on a trunk or dynamic port will not be available until you configure the port in port prefer mode by entering the access-group mode prefer port interface command. Trunk ports do not support merge mode.

Layer 2 to Layer 3 Port Conversion

If you reconfigure a port from Layer 2 to Layer 3, any PACL configured on the port becomes inactive but remains in the configuration. If you subsequently configure the port as Layer 2, any PACL configured on the port becomes active again.

Port-VLAN Association Changes

You can enter port configuration commands that alter the port-VLAN association, which triggers an ACL remerge.

Unmapping and then mapping a PACL, VACL, or Cisco IOS ACL automatically triggers a remerge.

In merge mode, online insertion or removal of a switching module also triggers a remerge, if ports on the module have PACLs configured.

PACL and VACL Interactions

The following sections describe interactions between the different types of ACL:

PACL Interaction with VACLs and Cisco IOS ACLs

Bridged Packets

Routed Packets

Multicast Packets

PACL Interaction with VACLs and Cisco IOS ACLs

This section describes the guidelines for the PACL interaction with the VACLs and Cisco IOS ACLs.

For an incoming packet on a physical port, the PACL is applied first. If the packet is permitted by the PACL, the VACL on the ingress VLAN is applied next. If the packet is Layer 3 forwarded and is permitted by the VACL, it is filtered by the Cisco IOS ACL on the same VLAN. The same process happens in reverse in the egress direction. However, there is currently no hardware support for output PACLs.

The PACLs override both the VACLs and Cisco IOS ACLs when the port is configured in prefer port mode. The one exception to this rule is when the packets are forwarded in the software by the route processor (RP). The RP applies the ingress Cisco IOS ACL regardless of the PACL mode. Two examples where the packets are forwarded in the software are as follows:

Packets that are egress bridged (due to logging or features such as NAT)

Packets with IP options

Bridged Packets

Figure 51-1 shows a PACL and a VACL applied to bridged packets. In merge mode, the ACLs are applied in the following order:

1. PACL for the ingress port

2. VACL for the ingress VLAN

3. VACL for the egress VLAN

Figure 51-1 Applying ACLs on Bridged Packets

In prefer port mode, only the PACL is applied to the ingress packets (the input VACL is not applied).

Routed Packets

Figure 51-2 shows how ACLs are applied on routed and Layer 3-switched packets. In merge mode, the ACLs are applied in the following order:

1. PACL for the ingress port

2. VACL for the ingress VLAN

3. Input Cisco IOS ACL

4. Output Cisco IOS ACL

5. VACL for the egress VLAN

In prefer port mode, only the PACL is applied to the ingress packets (the input VACL and Cisco IOS ACL are not applied).

Figure 51-2 Applying ACLs on Routed Packets

Multicast Packets

Figure 51-3 shows how ACLs are applied on packets that need multicast expansion. For packets that need multicast expansion, the ACLs are applied in the following order:

1. Packets that need multicast expansion:

a. PACL for the ingress port

b. VACL for the ingress VLAN

c. Input Cisco IOS ACL

2. Packets after multicast expansion:

a. Output Cisco IOS ACL

b. VACL for the egress VLAN

3. Packets originating from router:

a. Output Cisco IOS ACL

b. VACL for the egress VLAN

In prefer port mode, only the PACL is applied to the ingress packets (the input VACL and Cisco IOS ACL are not applied).

Figure 51-3 Applying ACLs on Multicast Packets

Configuring PACLs

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH and later releases support PACLs. This section describes how to configure PACLs. PACLs filter incoming traffic on Layer 2 interfaces, using Layer 3 information, Layer 4 header information, or non-IP Layer 2 information.

The PACL feature uses existing Cisco IOS access-list commands to create the standard or extended IP ACLs or named MAC-extended ACLs that you want to apply to the port.

Use the ip access-group or mac access-group interface command to apply an IP ACL or MAC ACL to one or more Layer 2 interfaces.


Note PACLs cannot filter Physical Link Protocols and Logical Link Protocols, such as CDP, VTP, DTP, PAgP, UDLD, and STP, because the protocols are redirected to the switch processor (SP) before the ACL takes effect.


This section contains the following topics:

PACL Configuration Guidelines

Configuring IP and MAC ACLs on a Layer 2 Interface

Configuring Access-group Mode on Layer 2 Interface

Applying ACLs to a Layer 2 Interface

Applying ACLs to a Port Channel

Displaying an ACL Configuration on a Layer 2 Interface

PACL Configuration Guidelines

Consider the following guidelines when configuring PACLs:

There can be at most one IP access list and one MAC access list applied to the same Layer 2 interface per direction.

PACLs are not applied to IPv6, MPLS, or ARP messages.

An IP access list filters only IPv4 packets, For IP access lists, you can define a standard, extended, or named access-list.

A MAC access list filters ingress packets that are of an unsupported type (not IP, IPv6, ARP, or MPLS packets) based on the fields of the Ethernet datagram. A MAC access list is not applied to IP, IPv6, MPLS, or ARP messages. You can define only named MAC access lists.

The number of ACLs and ACEs that can be configured as part of a PACL are bounded by the hardware resources on the switch. Those hardware resources are shared by various ACL features (such as VACLs) that are configured on the system. If there are insufficient hardware resources to program a PACL in hardware, the PACL is not applied.

PACL does not support the access-list log and reflect/evaluate keywords. These keywords are ignored if you add them to the access list for a PACL.

OAL does not support PACLs.

The access group mode can change the way PACLs interact with other ACLs. To maintain consistent behavior across Cisco platforms, use the default access group mode (merge mode).

Configuring IP and MAC ACLs on a Layer 2 Interface

IP and MAC ACLs can be applied to Layer 2 physical interfaces. Standard (numbered, named) and Extended (numbered, named) IP ACLs, and Extended Named MAC ACLs are supported.

To apply IP or MAC ACLs on a Layer 2 interface, perform this task:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Switch# configure terminal 

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

Switch(config)# interface interface 

Enters interface configuration mode for a Layer 2 port.

Step 3 

Switch(config-if)# {ip | mac} access-group 
{name | number | in | out}

Applies a numbered or named ACL to the Layer 2 interface.

Step 4 

Switch(config)# show running-config

Displays the access list configuration.

This example shows how to configure the Extended Named IP ACL simple-ip-acl to permit all TCP traffic and implicitly deny all other IP traffic:

Switch(config)# ip access-list extended simple-ip-acl 
Switch(config-ext-nacl)# permit tcp any any
Switch(config-ext-nacl)# end
 
   

This example shows how to configure the Extended Named MAC ACL simple-mac-acl to permit source host 000.000.011 to any destination host:

Switch(config)# mac access-list extended simple-mac-acl
Switch(config-ext-macl)# permit host 000.000.011 any
Switch(config-ext-macl)# end

Configuring Access-group Mode on Layer 2 Interface

To configure the access mode on a Layer 2 interface, perform this task:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Switch# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

Switch(config)# interface interface

Enters interface configuration mode for a Layer 2 port.

Step 3 

Switch(config-if)# [no] access-group mode 
{prefer port | merge}

Sets the mode for this Layer 2 interface. The no prefix sets the mode to the default value (which is merge).

Step 4 

Switch(config)# show running-config

Displays the access list configuration.

This example shows how to configure an interface to use prefer port mode:

Switch# configure terminal
Switch(config)# interface gigabitEthernet 6/1
Switch(config-if)# access-group mode prefer port
 
   

This example shows how to configure an interface to use merge mode:

Switch# configure terminal
Switch(config)# interface gigabitEthernet 6/1
Switch(config-if)# access-group mode merge

Applying ACLs to a Layer 2 Interface

To apply IP and MAC ACLs to a Layer 2 interface, perform one of these tasks:

Command
Purpose
Switch(config-if)# ip access-group ip-acl in 

Applies an IP ACL to the Layer 2 interface.

Switch(config-if)# mac access-group mac-acl in 

Applies a MAC ACL to the Layer 2 interface.

This example applies the extended named IP ACL simple-ip-acl to interface GigabitEthernet 6/1 ingress traffic:

Switch# configure t
Switch(config)# interface gigabitEthernet 6/1
Switch(config-if)# ip access-group simple-ip-acl in
 
   

This example applies the extended named MAC ACL simple-mac-acl to interface GigabitEthernet 6/1 ingress traffic:

Switch# configure t
Switch(config)# interface gigabitEthernet 6/1
Switch(config-if)# mac access-group simple-mac-acl in

Applying ACLs to a Port Channel

To apply IP and MAC ACLs to a port channel logical interface, perform this task:

Command
Purpose
Switch(config-if)# interface port-channel number

Enters configuration mode for the port channel.

Switch(config-if)# ip access-group ip-acl {in | out}

Applies an IP ACL to the port channel interface.

Switch(config-if)# mac access-group mac-acl {in | out}

Applies a MAC ACL to the port channel interface.

This example applies the extended named IP ACL simple-ip-acl to port channel 3 ingress traffic:

Switch# configure t
Switch(config)# interface port-channel 3
Switch(config-if)# ip access-group simple-ip-acl in

Displaying an ACL Configuration on a Layer 2 Interface

To display information about an ACL configuration on Layer 2 interfaces, perform one of these tasks:

Command
Purpose
Switch# show ip access-lists [interface interface-name]

Shows the IP access group configuration on the interface.

Switch# show mac access-group [interface interface-name]

Shows the MAC access group configuration on the interface.

Switch# show access-group mode [interface interface-name]

Shows the access group mode configuration on the interface.

This example shows that the IP access group simple-ip-acl is configured on the inbound direction of interface fa6/1:

Switch# show ip interface fast 6/1
FastEthernet6/1 is up, line protocol is up
  Inbound  access list is simple-ip-acl
  Outgoing access list is not set
 
   

This example shows that MAC access group simple-mac-acl is configured on the inbound direction of interface fa6/1:

Switch# show mac access-group interface fast 6/1
Interface FastEthernet6/1:
   Inbound access-list is simple-mac-acl   
   Outbound access-list is not set

This example shows that access group merge is configured on interface fa6/1:

Switch# show access-group mode interface fast 6/1
Interface FastEthernet6/1:
   Access group mode is: merge

Configuring VACLs

These sections describe how to configure VACLs:

VACL Configuration Guidelines

Defining a VLAN Access Map

Configuring a Match Clause in a VLAN Access Map Sequence

Configuring an Action Clause in a VLAN Access Map Sequence

Applying a VLAN Access Map

Verifying VLAN Access Map Configuration

VLAN Access Map Configuration and Verification Examples

Configuring a Capture Port

Configuring MAC PBF

VACL Configuration Guidelines

Consider the following guidelines when configuring VACLs:

VACLs use standard and extended Cisco IOS IP and MAC layer-named ACLs (see the "Configuring MAC ACLs" section) and VLAN access maps.

VLAN access maps can be applied to VLANs or to WAN interfaces for VACL capture. VACLs attached to WAN interfaces support only standard and extended Cisco IOS IP ACLs.

Each VLAN access map can consist of one or more map sequences; each sequence has a match clause and an action clause. The match clause specifies IP or MAC ACLs for traffic filtering and the action clause specifies the action to be taken when a match occurs. When a flow matches a permit ACL entry, the associated action is taken and the flow is not checked against the remaining sequences. When a flow matches a deny ACL entry, it will be checked against the next ACL in the same sequence or the next sequence. If a flow does not match any ACL entry and at least one ACL is configured for that packet type, the packet is denied.

To apply access control to both bridged and routed traffic, you can use VACLs alone or a combination of VACLs and ACLs. You can define ACLs on the VLAN interfaces to apply access control to both the ingress and egress routed traffic. You can define a VACL to apply access control to the bridged traffic.

The following caveats apply to ACLs when used with VACLs:

Packets that require logging on the outbound ACLs are not logged if they are denied by a VACL.

VACLs are applied on packets before NAT translation. If the translated flow is not subject to access control, the flow might be subject to access control after the translation because of the VACL configuration.

When VACL capture is configured with Policy Based Routing (PBR) on the same interface, do not select BDD as the ACL merge algorithm. We recommend using ODM, the default ACL merge algorithm for the Supervisor Engine 720.

When VACL capture is configured on an egress interface together with another egress feature that requires software processing of the traffic, packets of the overlapping traffic may be captured twice.

By default, software-switched WAN packets are not subjected to ACL lookup in the ACL TCAM and are therefore not affected by hardware-only features. As a result, VACL capture will fail for software-switched WAN packets. In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXI2 and later releases, you can allow ACLs to be applied to egress or ingress software-switched WAN packets by entering the platform cwan acl software-switched {egress | ingress} command in global configuration mode. To verify whether ACLs will be applied to software-switched WAN packets, enter the show platform acl software-switched command as shown in this example:

Router (config)# platform cwan acl software-switched ingress
Router (config)# exit
Router# show platform acl software-switched
 CWAN: ACL treatment for software switched in INGRESS is enabled 
 CWAN: ACL treatment for software switched in EGRESS is disabled 
 
   

The action clause in a VACL can be forward, drop, capture, or redirect. Traffic can also be logged. VACLs applied to WAN interfaces do not support the redirect or log actions.

VACLs cannot be applied to IGMP, MLD, or PIM traffic.

When the WAN logical interface (Multilink or Multilink Frame Relay) is removed, the corresponding VACL filter applied to the WAN logical interface is also removed and the error message VACL-4-VLANFILTER_CWAN_DELETE appears. The following example displays an illustration of this behavior:

Router (config)# do show vlan filter
VLAN Map capture_all:
        Configured on VLANs:  100
            Active on VLANs:  100
 
        Configured on Interfaces:  Multilink100 
            Active on Interfaces: 
 
Router (config)# no interface multilink 100
% Please 'shutdown' this interface before trying to delete it
Router (config)# interface multilink 100
Router (config-if)# show
Router (config-if)# exit
Router (config)# no interface multilink 100 
Router (config)#
%VACL-4-VLANFILTER_CWAN_DELETE: VLAN ACCESS-MAP capture_all applied on Multilink100 
will be removed.
Router (config)# do show vlan filter
VLAN Map capture_all:
        Configured on VLANs:  100
            Active on VLANs:  100
 
Router (config)#

NoteVACLs have an implicit deny at the end of the map; a packet is denied if it does not match any ACL entry, and at least one ACL is configured for the packet type.

If an empty or undefined ACL is specified in a VACL, any packets will match the ACL, and the associated action is taken.


Defining a VLAN Access Map

To define a VLAN access map, perform this task:

Command
Purpose

Router(config)# vlan access-map map_name [0-65535]

Defines the VLAN access map. Optionally, you can specify the VLAN access map sequence number.

Router(config)# no vlan access-map map_name 0-65535

Deletes a map sequence from the VLAN access map.

Router(config)# no vlan access-map map_name

Deletes the VLAN access map.


When defining a VLAN access map, note the following information:

To insert or modify an entry, specify the map sequence number.

If you do not specify the map sequence number, a number is automatically assigned.

You can specify only one match clause and one action clause per map sequence.

Use the no keyword with a sequence number to remove a map sequence.

Use the no keyword without a sequence number to remove the map.

See the "VLAN Access Map Configuration and Verification Examples" section.

Configuring a Match Clause in a VLAN Access Map Sequence

To configure a match clause in a VLAN access map sequence, perform this task:

Command
Purpose

Router(config-access-map)# match {ip address {1-199 | 1300-2699 | acl_name} | {mac address acl_name}}

Configures the match clause in a VLAN access map sequence.

Router(config-access-map)# no match {ip address {1-199 | 1300-2699 | acl_name} | {mac address acl_name}}

Deletes the match clause in a VLAN access map sequence.


When configuring a match clause in a VLAN access map sequence, note the following information:

You can select one or more ACLs.

VACLs attached to WAN interfaces support only standard and extended Cisco IOS IP ACLs.

Use the no keyword to remove a match clause or specified ACLs in the clause.

For information about named MAC-Layer ACLs, see the "Configuring MAC ACLs" section.

For information about Cisco IOS ACLs, see the "Traffic Filtering and Firewalls" section of the Cisco IOS Security Configuration Guide, Release 12.2, at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/12_2/security/configuration/guide/fsecur_c.html

See the "VLAN Access Map Configuration and Verification Examples" section.

Configuring an Action Clause in a VLAN Access Map Sequence

To configure an action clause in a VLAN access map sequence, perform this task:

Command
Purpose

Router(config-access-map)# action {drop [log]} | {forward [capture | vlan vlan_ID]} | {redirect {{ethernet | fastethernet | gigabitethernet | tengigabitethernet} slot/port} | {port-channel channel_id}}

Configures the action clause in a VLAN access map sequence.

Router(config-access-map)# no action {drop [log]} | {forward [capture | vlan vlan_ID]} | {redirect {{ethernet | fastethernet | gigabitethernet | tengigabitethernet} slot/port} | {port-channel channel_id}}

Deletes the action clause in from the VLAN access map sequence.


When configuring an action clause in a VLAN access map sequence, note the following information:

You can set the action to drop, forward, forward capture, or redirect packets.

VACLs applied to WAN interfaces support only the forward capture action. VACLs applied to WAN interfaces do not support the drop, forward, or redirect actions.

Forwarded packets are still subject to any configured Cisco IOS security ACLs.

The capture action sets the capture bit for the forwarded packets so that ports with the capture function enabled can receive the packets. Only forwarded packets can be captured. For more information about the capture action, see the "Configuring a Capture Port" section.

The forward vlan action implements Policy-Based Forwarding (PBF), bridging between VLANs.

VACLs applied to WAN interfaces do not support the log action.

When the log action is specified, dropped packets are logged in software. Only dropped IP packets can be logged.

The redirect action allows you to specify up to five interfaces, which can be physical interfaces or EtherChannels. You cannot specify packets to be redirected to an EtherChannel member or a VLAN interface.

The redirect interface must be in the VLAN for which the VACL access map is configured.

If a VACL is redirecting traffic to an egress SPAN source port, SPAN does not copy the VACL-redirected traffic.

SPAN and RSPAN destination ports transmit VACL-redirected traffic.

Use the no keyword to remove an action clause or specified redirect interfaces.

See the "VLAN Access Map Configuration and Verification Examples" section.

Applying a VLAN Access Map

To apply a VLAN access map, perform this task:

Command
Purpose

Router(config)# vlan filter map_name {vlan-list vlan_list | interface type1 number2 }

Applies the VLAN access map to the specified VLANs or WAN interfaces.

1 type = pos, atm, or serial

2 number = slot/port or slot/port_adapter/port; can include a subinterface or channel group descriptor


When applying a VLAN access map, note the following information:

You can apply the VLAN access map to one or more VLANs or WAN interfaces.

The vlan_list parameter can be a single VLAN ID or a comma-separated list of VLAN IDs or VLAN ID ranges (vlan_ID-vlan_ID).

If you delete a WAN interface that has a VACL applied, the VACL configuration on the interface is also removed.

You can apply only one VLAN access map to each VLAN or WAN interface.

VACLs applied to VLANs are active only for VLANs with a Layer 3 VLAN interface configured. Applying a VLAN access map to a VLAN without a Layer 3 VLAN interface creates an administratively down Layer 3 VLAN interface to support the VLAN access map.

VACLs applied to VLANs are inactive if the Layer 2 VLAN does not exist or is not operational.

You cannot apply a VACL to a secondary private VLAN. VACLs applied to primary private VLANs also apply to secondary private VLANs.

Use the no keyword to clear VLAN access maps from VLANs or WAN interfaces.

See the "VLAN Access Map Configuration and Verification Examples" section.

Verifying VLAN Access Map Configuration

To verify VLAN access map configuration, perform this task:

Command
Purpose

Router# show vlan access-map [map_name]

Verifies VLAN access map configuration by displaying the content of a VLAN access map.

Router# show vlan filter [access-map map_name | vlan vlan_id | interface type1  number2 ]

Verifies VLAN access map configuration by displaying the mappings between VACLs and VLANs.

1 type = pos, atm, or serial

2 number = slot/port or slot/port_adapter/port; can include a subinterface or channel group descriptor


VLAN Access Map Configuration and Verification Examples

Assume IP-named ACL net_10 and any_host are defined as follows:

Router# show ip access-lists net_10
Extended IP access list net_10
    permit ip 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any
 
   
Router# show ip access-lists any_host
Standard IP access list any_host
    permit any
 
   

This example shows how to define and apply a VLAN access map to forward IP packets. In this example, IP traffic matching net_10 is forwarded and all other IP packets are dropped due to the default drop action. The map is applied to VLAN 12 to 16.

Router(config)# vlan access-map thor 10
Router(config-access-map)# match ip address net_10
Router(config-access-map)# action forward 
Router(config-access-map)# exit 
Router(config)# vlan filter thor vlan-list 12-16 
 
   

This example shows how to define and apply a VLAN access map to drop and log IP packets. In this example, IP traffic matching net_10 is dropped and logged and all other IP packets are forwarded:

Router(config)# vlan access-map ganymede 10
Router(config-access-map)# match ip address net_10
Router(config-access-map)# action drop log
Router(config-access-map)# exit
Router(config)# vlan access-map ganymede 20
Router(config-access-map)# match ip address any_host
Router(config-access-map)# action forward
Router(config-access-map)# exit
Router(config)# vlan filter ganymede vlan-list 7-9 
 
   

This example shows how to define and apply a VLAN access map to forward and capture IP packets. In this example, IP traffic matching net_10 is forwarded and captured and all other IP packets are dropped:

Router(config)# vlan access-map mordred 10 
Router(config-access-map)# match ip address net_10
Router(config-access-map)# action forward capture
Router(config-access-map)# exit
Router(config)# vlan filter mordred vlan-list 2, 4-6 

Configuring a Capture Port

A port configured to capture VACL-filtered traffic is called a capture port.


Note To apply IEEE 802.1Q or ISL tags to the captured traffic, configure the capture port to trunk unconditionally (see the "Configuring the Layer 2 Switching Port as an ISL or 802.1Q Trunk" section and the "Configuring the Layer 2 Trunk Not to Use DTP" section).


To configure a capture port, perform this task:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# interface {{type1  slot/port}

Specifies the interface to configure.

Step 2 

Router(config-if)# switchport capture allowed vlan {add | all | except | remove} vlan_list

(Optional) Filters the captured traffic on a per-destination-VLAN basis. The default is all.

Step 3 

Router(config-if)# switchport capture

Configures the port to capture VACL-filtered traffic.

1 type = fastethernet, gigabitethernet, or tengigabitethernet

When configuring a capture port, note the following information:

You can configure any port as a capture port.

The vlan_list parameter can be a single VLAN ID or a comma-separated list of VLAN IDs or VLAN ID ranges (vlan_ID-vlan_ID).

To encapsulate captured traffic, configure the capture port with the switchport trunk encapsulation command (see the "Configuring a Layer 2 Switching Port as a Trunk" section) before you enter the switchport capture command.

For unencapsulated captured traffic, configure the capture port with the switchport mode access command (see the "Configuring a LAN Interface as a Layer 2 Access Port" section) before you enter the switchport capture command.

The capture port supports only egress traffic. No traffic can enter the switch through a capture port.

This example shows how to configure a Fast Ethernet interface 5/1 as a capture port:

Router(config)# interface gigabitEthernet 5/1 
Router(config-if)# switchport capture 
Router(config-if)# end
 
   

This example shows how to display VLAN access map information:

Router# show vlan access-map mymap 
Vlan access-map "mymap"  10
        match: ip address net_10
        action: forward capture
Router# 
 
   

This example shows how to display mappings between VACLs and VLANs. For each VACL map, there is information about the VLANs that the map is configured on and the VLANs that the map is active on. A VACL is not active if the VLAN does not have an interface.

Router# show vlan filter 
VLAN Map mordred:
        Configured on VLANs:  2,4-6
            Active on VLANs:  2,4-6
Router# 
 
   

Configuring MAC PBF

To configure MAC policy-based forwarding (PBF), perform this task on each source VLAN:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# mac host my_host mac_addr

(Optional) Assigns a name to the MAC address of the source host.

Step 2 

Router(config)# mac access-list extended macl_name

Configures a MAC ACL.

Step 3 

Router(config-ext-macl)# permit host my_host any

Configures an access control entry (ACE) to permit traffic from the named host to any other address. Hosts can be specified by a name or by a MAC address.

Router(config-ext-macl)# permit host my_host host other_host

Configures an ACE to permit traffic from the named host to one other host.

Step 4 

Router(config-ext-macl)# exit

Exits ACL configuration.

Step 5 

Router(config)# vlan access-map map_name

Defines a VLAN access map.

Step 6 

Router(config-access-map)# match mac address macl_name

Applies the MAC ACL to this VLAN access map.

Step 7 

Router(config-access-map)# action forward vlan other_vlan_ID [local]

Forwards matching traffic to the other VLAN.

Note By default, PBF-specified devices on the same VLAN cannot communicate with each other. To allow local communication by the host, use the local keyword.

Step 8 

Router(config-access-map)# exit

Exits access map configuration.

Step 9 

Router(config)# vlan filter map_name vlan-list my_vlan_ID

Applies the VLAN access map to the specified VLAN.

Step 10 

Router(config)# interface vlan my_vlan_ID

Enters interface configuration mode for the VLAN.

Step 11 

Router(config-if)# mac packet-classify

Classifies incoming or outgoing Layer 3 packets on this VLAN as Layer 2 packets.

Step 12 

Router(config-if)# exit

Exits interface configuration.

Step 13 

Router(config)# mls rate-limit unicast acl mac-pbf pps [burst_size]

(Optional) Sets a rate limit on PBF packets.

pps—Maximum number of packets per second. The range is 10 to 1000000 packets per second.

burst_size—Maximum number of packets in a burst. The range is 1 to 255 packets.

Step 14 

Router(config)# exit

Exits global configuration mode.

Step 15 

Router# show vlan mac-pbf config

Displays MAC PBF configuration and statistics.

Step 16 

Router# clear vlan mac-pbf counters

(Optional) Clears MAC PBF packet counters.

When configuring MAC PBF, note the following information:

To allow traffic in both directions between two VLANs, you must configure MAC PBF in both VLANs.

You can configure MAC PBF between hosts in different switches.

By default, MAC PBF hosts in the same VLAN cannot communicate with each other. To allow local communication, use the local keyword.

When configuring the vlan filter command, specify only one VLAN after the vlan-list keyword. If you specify more than one VLAN, MAC PBF will ignore all but the last VLAN in the list.

The output of the show vlan mac-pbf config command displays the following fields for configured PBF paths:

Rcv Vlan — The number of the VLAN to which packets are forwarded by PBF.

Snd Vlan — The number of the VLAN which will forward packets by PBF.

DMAC — The MAC address of the destination host on the receiving VLAN.

SMAC — The MAC address of the source host on the sending VLAN.

(Local) — Displays 1 if the local keyword is configured in the action forward vlan command on the sending VLAN; displays 0 if the local keyword is not configured.

(Packet counter) — The number of packets that have been forwarded from the sending VLAN to the receiving VLAN. To clear this counter, enter the clear vlan mac-pbf counters command.

Pkts dropped — The number of packets that have been dropped by the sending VLAN. To clear this counter, enter the clear vlan mac-pbf counters command.

If the sending VLAN is shut down, MAC PBF will still function. Shutting down a VLAN disables Layer 3 functionality, but MAC PBF is a Layer 2 function.

This example shows how to configure and display MAC PBF to allow two hosts in separate VLANs ("red" VLAN 100 and "blue" VLAN 200) on the same switch to exchange packets:

Router(config)# mac host host_red3 0001.0002.0003
Router(config)# mac access-list extended macl_red 
Router(config-ext-macl)# permit host host_red host host_blue
Router(config-ext-macl)# exit 
Router(config)# vlan access-map red_to_blue 
Router(config-access-map)# match mac address macl_red
Router(config-access-map)# action forward vlan 200 local
Router(config-access-map)# exit 
Router(config)# vlan filter red_to_blue vlan-list 100
Router(config)# interface vlan 100
Router(config-if)# mac packet-classify
Router(config-if)# exit 
Router(config)#
Router(config)# mac host host_blue5 0001.0002.0005
Router(config)# mac access-list extended macl_blue 
Router(config-ext-macl)# permit host host_blue host host_red
Router(config-ext-macl)# exit 
Router(config)# vlan access-map blue_to_red 
Router(config-access-map)# match mac address macl_blue
Router(config-access-map)# action forward vlan 100 
Router(config-access-map)# exit 
Router(config)# vlan filter blue_to_red vlan-list 200
Router(config)# interface vlan 200
Router(config-if)# mac packet-classify
Router(config-if)# exit 
Router# 
Router# show vlan mac-pbf config 
 Rcv Vlan 100, Snd Vlan 200, DMAC 0001.0002.0003, SMAC 0001.0002.0005 1 15 
 Rcv Vlan 200, Snd Vlan 100, DMAC 0001.0002.0005, SMAC 0001.0002.0003 0 23 
 Pkts Dropped 0
Router#
 
   

Configuring VACL Logging

When you configure VACL logging, IP packets that are denied generate log messages in these situations:

When the first matching packet is received

For any matching packets received during the last 5-minute interval

If the threshold is reached before the 5-minute interval

Log messages are generated on a per-flow basis. A flow is defined as packets with the same IP addresses and Layer 4 (UDP or TCP) port numbers. When a log message is generated, the timer and packet count is reset.

These restrictions apply to VACL logging:

Because of the rate-limiting function for redirected packets, VACL logging counters may not be accurate.

Only denied IP packets are logged.

To configure VACL logging, use the action drop log command action in VLAN access map submode (see the "Configuring PACLs" section for configuration information) and perform this task in global configuration mode to specify the global VACL logging parameters:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router(config)# vlan access-log maxflow max_number

Sets the log table size. The content of the log table can be deleted by setting the maxflow number to 0. The default is 500 with a valid range of 0 to 2048. When the log table is full, logged packets from new flows are dropped by the software.

Step 2 

Router(config)# vlan access-log ratelimit pps

Sets the maximum redirect VACL logging packet rate. The default packet rate is 2000 packets per second with a valid range of 0 to 5000. Packets exceeding the limit are dropped by the hardware.

Step 3 

Router(config)# vlan access-log threshold pkt_count

Sets the logging threshold. A logging message is generated if the threshold for a flow is reached before the 5-minute interval. By default, no threshold is set.

Step 4 

Router(config)# exit

Exits VLAN access map configuration mode.

Step 5 

Router# show vlan access-log config

(Optional) Displays the configured VACL logging properties.

Step 6 

Router# show vlan access-log flow protocol {{src_addr src_mask} | any | {host {hostname | host_ip}}} {{dst_addr dst_mask} | any | {host {hostname | host_ip}}}

[vlan vlan_id]

(Optional) Displays the content of the VACL log table.

Step 7 

Router# show vlan access-log statistics

(Optional) Displays packet and message counts and other statistics.

This example shows how to configure global VACL logging in hardware:

Router(config)# vlan access-log maxflow 800 
Router(config)# vlan access-log ratelimit 2200 
Router(config)# vlan access-log threshold 4000 

Tip For additional information about Cisco Catalyst 6500 Series Switches (including configuration examples and troubleshooting information), see the documents listed on this page:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/switches/ps708/tsd_products_support_series_home.html

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