IP Routing: LISP Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS XE Release 3S
Configuring LISP (Locator ID Separation Protocol)
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Configuring LISP (Locator ID Separation Protocol)

Contents

Configuring LISP (Locator ID Separation Protocol)

This guide describes how to configure basic Locator ID Separation Protocol (LISP) functionality on all LISP-related devices, including the egress tunnel router (ETR), ingress tunnel router (ITR), proxy ETR (PETR), proxy ITR (PITR), map resolver (MR), map server (MS), and LISP-ALT device.

LISP is a network architecture and protocol that implements the use of two namespaces instead of a single IP address. These namespaces, known as endpoint identifiers (EIDs), are assigned to end-hosts and routing locators (RLOCs), which are assigned to devices (primarily routers) that make up the global routing system. Splitting EID and RLOC functions delivers improvements in routing system scalability, multi-homing efficiency, and ingress traffic engineering.

How to Configure LISP

Configure a Dual-Homed LISP Site with Two IPv4 RLOCs and an IPv4 EID

Perform this task to configure a dual-homed LISP site with two IPv4 RLOCs and an IPv4 EID. In this task, a LISP site uses a single edge router configured as both an ITR and an ETR (known as an xTR) with two connections to upstream providers. Both of the RLOCs and the EID prefix are IPv4. The LISP site registers to two map resolver/map server (MR/MS) devices in the network core. The topology used in this LISP configuration is shown in the figure below.

Figure 1. Dual-Homed LISP Site with Two IPv4 RLOCs and an IPv4 EID

The components illustrated in the topology shown in the figure are described below:

  • LISP site:
    • The CPE functions as a LISP ITR and ETR (xTR).
    • The LISP xTR is authoritative for the IPv4 EID prefix of 172.16.1.0/24.
    • The LISP xTR has two RLOC connections to the core. The RLOC connection to SP1 is 10.1.1.2/30; the RLOC connection to SP2 is 10.2.1.2/30.
    • For this simple dual-homed configuration, the LISP site policy specifies equal load sharing between service provider (SP) links for ingress traffic engineering.
  • Mapping system:
    • Two map resolver/map server (MR/MS) systems are assumed to be available for the LISP xTR to configure. The MR/MSs have IPv4 RLOCs 10.10.10.10 and 10.10.30.10.
    • Mapping Services are assumed to be provided as part of this LISP solution via a private mapping system or as a public LISP mapping system. From the perspective of the configuration of this LISP site xTR, there is no difference.

      Note


      Map server and map resolver configurations are not shown here. See the "Configure a Private LISP Mapping System Using a Standalone Map Resolver/Map Server" section for information about map server and map resolver configuration.


This task shows how to enable and configure LISP ITR and ETR (xTR) functionality when using a LISP map server and map resolver for mapping services.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    configure terminal

    2.    router lisp

    3.    Do one of the following:

    • database-mapping EID-prefix/prefix-length locator priority priority weight weight
    • database-mapping EID-prefix/prefix-length ipv4-interface locator priority priority weight weight

    4.    Repeat one of the choices in Step 3 to configure a second RLOC.

    5.    ipv4 itr

    6.    ipv4 etr

    7.    ipv4 itr map-resolver map-resolver-address

    8.    ipv4 etr map-server map-server-address key key-type authentication-key

    9.    exit

    10.    ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop

    11.    exit


DETAILED STEPS
     Command or ActionPurpose
    Step 1 configure terminal


    Example:
    Router# configure terminal
     

    Enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 2 router lisp


    Example:
    Router(config)# router lisp
     

    Enters LISP configuration mode (Cisco IOS XE software only).

     
    Step 3 Do one of the following:
    • database-mapping EID-prefix/prefix-length locator priority priority weight weight
    • database-mapping EID-prefix/prefix-length ipv4-interface locator priority priority weight weight


    Example:
    Router(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50


    Example:
    Router(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 ipv4-interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0 priority 1 weight 50
     

    Configures an EID-to-RLOC mapping relationship and its associated traffic policy for this LISP site.

    • In this step example, a single EID prefix, 172.16.1.0/24, is being associated with the single IPv4 RLOC 10.1.1.2 but the weight argument of 50 signifies that a second database-mapping command is to be configured in the next step.
    • In the second example, the configuration shows the use of the dynamic interface form of the database-mapping command. This form is useful when the RLOC address is obtained dynamically, such as via DHCP.
     
    Step 4Repeat one of the choices in Step 3 to configure a second RLOC.  

     
    Step 5 ipv4 itr


    Example:
    Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr
     

    Enables LISP ITR functionality for the IPv4 address family.

     
    Step 6 ipv4 etr


    Example:
    Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr
     

    Enables LISP ETR functionality for the IPv4 address family.

     
    Step 7 ipv4 itr map-resolver map-resolver-address


    Example:
    Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
     

    Configures the locator address of the LISP map resolver to which this router will send Map-Request messages for IPv4 EID-to-RLOC mapping resolutions.

    • The locator address of the map resolver may be an IPv4 or IPv6 address. In this example, because each xTR has only IPv4 RLOC connectivity, the map resolver is reachable via its IPv4 locator address. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)
    Note   

    Up to two map resolvers may be configured if multiple map resolvers are available. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

     
    Step 8 ipv4 etr map-server map-server-address key key-type authentication-key


    Example:
    Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-key
     

    Configures the locator address of the LISP map server and the authentication key that this router, acting as an IPv4 LISP ETR, will use to register with the LISP mapping system.

    • The map server must be configured with EID prefixes matching those configured on this ETR and with an identical authentication key.
    Note   

    The locator address of the map server may be an IPv4 or IPv6 address. In this example, because each xTR has only IPv4 RLOC connectivity, the map server is reachable via its IPv4 locator address. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

    Note   

    Up to two map servers may be configured if multiple map servers are available. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

     
    Step 9 exit


    Example:
    Router(config-router-lisp)# exit
     

    Exits LISP configuration mode and returns to global configuration mode.

     
    Step 10 ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop


    Example:
    Router(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.1.1.1
     

    Configures a default route to the upstream next hop for all IPv4 destinations.

    • All IPv4 EID-sourced packets destined to both LISP and non-LISP sites are forwarded in one of two ways:
      • LISP-encapsulated to a LISP site when traffic is LISP-to-LISP
      • natively forwarded when traffic is LISP-to-non-LISP.
    • Packets are deemed to be a candidate for LISP encapsulation when they are sourced from a LISP EID and the destination matches one of the following entries:
      • a current map-cache entry
      • a default route with a legitimate next-hop
      • no route at all
    In this configuration example, because the xTR has IPv4 RLOC connectivity, a default route to the upstream SP is used for all IPv4 packets to support LISP processing.
     
    Step 11 exit


    Example:
    Router(config)# exit
     

    Exits global configuration mode.

     

    Example:

    Figure 2. Dual-Homed LISP Site with Two IPv4 RLOCs and an IPv4 EID

    This example shows the complete configuration for the LISP topology illustrated in the figure above and in this task.

    hostname xTR
    !
    no ip domain lookup
    ip cef
    !
    interface Loopback0
     ip address 172.17.1.1 255.255.255.255
    !
    interface LISP0
    !
    interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0
     description Link to SP1 (RLOC)
     ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.252
    !
    interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1
     description Link to SP2 (RLOC)
     ip address 10.2.1.2 255.255.255.252
    !
    interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0
     description Link to Site (EID)
     ip address 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.0
    !
    router lisp
     database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
     database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
     ipv4 itr
     ipv4 etr
     ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
     ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
     ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-key
     ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key 0 some-key
     exit
    !
    ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.1.1.1
    ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.2.1.1
    

    Configure a Multihomed LISP Site with Two xTRs and Two IPv4 RLOCs and an IPv4 EID

    Perform this task to configure a multihomed LISP site with two xTRs, two IPv4 RLOCs, and an IPv4 EID. In this task, a LISP site uses two edge routers. Each edge router is configured as an xTR (each performs as both an ITR and an ETR) and each also includes a single IPv4 connection to an upstream provider. (Two different providers are used in this example but the same upstream provider could be used for both connections.) Both of the RLOCs and the EID prefix are IPv4. The LISP site registers to two map resolver/map server (MR/MS) devices in the network core. The topology used in this typical multihomed LISP configuration is shown in the figure below.

    Figure 3. Typical Multihomed LISP Site with Two xTRs and Two IPv4 RLOCs and an IPv4 EID

    The components illustrated in the topology shown in the figure are described below:

    • LISP site:
      • Two CPE routers make up the LISP site: xTR-1 and xTR-2.
      • Both CPE routers function as LISP xTRs (that is, an ITR and an ETR).
      • The LISP site is authoritative for the IPv4 EID prefix of 172.16.1.0/24.
      • Each LISP xTR has a single IPv4 RLOC connection to the core: the RLOC connection for xTR-1 to SP1 is 10.1.1.2/30; the RLOC connection for xTR-2 to SP2 is 10.2.1.2/30.
      • For this multihomed case, the LISP site policy specifies equal load-sharing between service provider (SP) links for ingress traffic engineering.
    • Mapping system:
      • Two map resolver/map server (MR/MS) systems are assumed to be available for the LISP xTR to configure. The MR/MSs have IPv4 RLOCs 10.10.10.10 and 10.10.30.10.
      • Mapping services are assumed to be provided as part of this LISP solution via a private mapping system or as a public LISP mapping system. From the perspective of the configuration of these LISP site xTRs, there is no difference.

        Note


        Map server and map resolver configurations are not shown here. See the "Configure a Private LISP Mapping System Using a Standalone Map Resolver/Map Server" section for information about map server and map resolver configuration.


    Perform the steps in this task (once through for each xTR in the LISP site) to enable and configure LISP ITR and ETR (xTR) functionality when using a LISP map server and map resolver for mapping services. The example configurations at the end of this task show the full configuration for configuring two xTRs (xTR1 and xTR2).

    SUMMARY STEPS

      1.    configure terminal

      2.    router lisp

      3.    database-mapping EID-prefix/prefix-length locator priority priority weight weight

      4.    Repeat Step 3 to configure a second RLOC for the same xTR.

      5.    ipv4 itr

      6.    ipv4 etr

      7.    ipv4 itr map-resolver map-resolver-address

      8.    Repeat Step 7 to configure a second locator address for the map resolver.

      9.    ipv4 etr map-server map-server-address key key-type authentication-key

      10.    Repeat Step 9 to configure a second locator address for the map server.

      11.    exit

      12.    ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop

      13.    exit


    DETAILED STEPS
       Command or ActionPurpose
      Step 1 configure terminal


      Example:
      Router# configure terminal
       

      Enters global configuration mode.

       
      Step 2 router lisp


      Example:
      Router(config)# router lisp
       

      Enters LISP configuration mode (Cisco IOS XE software only).

       
      Step 3 database-mapping EID-prefix/prefix-length locator priority priority weight weight


      Example:
      Router(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
       

      Configures an EID-to-RLOC mapping relationship and its associated traffic policy for this LISP site.

      • In this step example, a single EID prefix, 172.16.1.0/24, is being associated with a LISP site that contains two separate xTRs. Each xTR has a single IPv4 RLOC connection to the core. In this example, xTR-1 has an IPv4 RLOC connection to SP1 at 10.1.1.2 but the weight argument of 50 signifies that a second database-mapping command is to be configured in the next step.
      Note   

      Two database-mapping commands are required on each xTR to indicate to the mapping system that this LISP site is reachable via these two IPv4 RLOCs. In this example, one RLOC is local (connected) to one xTR and the other is local (connected) to the other xTR.

       
      Step 4 Repeat Step 3 to configure a second RLOC for the same xTR.

      Example:
      Router(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
       

      Configures an EID-to-RLOC mapping relationship and its associated traffic policy for an xTR on this LISP site.

      • In this step example, the second RLOC connection for xTR-1 has an IPv4 RLOC connection to SP2 (10.2.1.2).
      Note   

      When a LISP site contains multiple xTRs, all xTRs must be configured with identical database-mapping commands to provide the mapping system with consistent information about EID-to-RLOC mappings.

       
      Step 5 ipv4 itr


      Example:
      Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr
       

      Enables LISP ITR functionality for the IPv4 address family.

       
      Step 6 ipv4 etr


      Example:
      Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr
       

      Enables LISP ETR functionality for the IPv4 address family.

       
      Step 7 ipv4 itr map-resolver map-resolver-address


      Example:
      Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
       

      Configures a locator address for the LISP map resolver to which this router will send Map-Request messages for IPv4 EID-to-RLOC mapping resolutions.

      • The locator address of the map resolver may be an IPv4 or IPv6 address. In this example, because each xTR has only IPv4 RLOC connectivity, the map resolver is reachable via its IPv4 locator address. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)
      Note   

      Up to two map resolvers may be configured if multiple map resolvers are available. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

       
      Step 8 Repeat Step 7 to configure a second locator address for the map resolver.

      Example:
      Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
       

      Configures a second locator address for the LISP map resolver to which this router will send Map-Request messages for IPv4 EID-to-RLOC mapping resolutions.

       
      Step 9 ipv4 etr map-server map-server-address key key-type authentication-key


      Example:
      Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-key
       

      Configures a locator address for the LISP map server and an authentication key that this router, acting as an IPv4 LISP ETR, will use to register with the LISP mapping system.

      • In this example, each xTR must register to both map servers.
      • The map server must be configured with EID prefixes matching those configured on this ETR and with an identical authentication key.
      Note   

      The locator address of the map server may be an IPv4 or IPv6 address. In this example, because each xTR has only IPv4 RLOC connectivity, the map server is reachable via its IPv4 locator address. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

      Note   

      Up to two map servers may be configured if multiple map servers are available. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

       
      Step 10 Repeat Step 9 to configure a second locator address for the map server.

      Example:
      Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key 0 some-key
       

      Configures a second locator address for the LISP map server and the authentication key that this router will use to register with the LISP mapping system.

       
      Step 11 exit


      Example:
      Router(config-router-lisp)# exit
       

      Exits LISP configuration mode and returns to global configuration mode.

       
      Step 12 ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop


      Example:
      Router(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.1.1.1
       

      Configures a default route to the upstream next hop for all IPv4 destinations.

      • All IPv4 EID-sourced packets destined to both LISP and non-LISP sites are forwarded in one of two ways:
        • LISP-encapsulated to a LISP site when traffic is LISP-to-LISP
        • natively forwarded when traffic is LISP-to-non-LISP
      • Packets are deemed to be a candidate for LISP encapsulation when they are sourced from a LISP EID and the destination matches one of the following entries:
        • a current map-cache entry
        • a default route with a legitimate next-hop
        • no route at all
      In this configuration example, because the xTR has IPv4 RLOC connectivity, a default route to the upstream SP is used for all IPv4 packets to support LISP processing.
       
      Step 13 exit


      Example:
      Router(config)# exit
       

      Exits global configuration mode.

       

      Example:

      Figure 4. Typical Multihomed LISP Site with Two xTRs and Two IPv4 RLOCs and an IPv4 EID

      The examples below show the complete configuration for the LISP topology illustrated in the figure above and in this task:

      Example configuration for xTR-1:

      !
      hostname xTR-1
      !
      no ip domain lookup
      ip cef
      !
      interface Loopback0
       ip address 172.17.1.1 255.255.255.255
      !
      interface LISP0
      !
      interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0
       description Link to SP1 (RLOC)
       ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.252
      !
      interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0
       description Link to Site (EID)
       ip address 172.16.1.2 255.255.255.0
      !
      router lisp
       database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
       database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
       ipv4 itr
       ipv4 etr
       ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
       ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
       ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-key
       ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key 0 some-key
       exit
      !
      ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.1.1.1
      

      Example configuration for xTR-2:

      !
      hostname xTR-2
      !
      no ip domain lookup
      ip cef
      !
      interface Loopback0
       ip address 172.17.1.2 255.255.255.255
      !
      interface LISP0
      !
      interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0
       description Link to SP2 (RLOC)
       ip address 10.2.1.2 255.255.255.252
      !
      interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0
       description Link to Site (EID)
       ip address 172.16.1.3 255.255.255.0
      !
      router lisp
       database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
       database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
       ipv4 itr
       ipv4 etr
       ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
       ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
       ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-key
       ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key 0 some-key
       exit
      !
      ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.2.1.1

      Configure a Multihomed LISP Site with Two xTRs and Two IPv4 RLOCs and Both an IPv4 and an IPv6 EID

      Perform this task to configure a multihomed LISP site with two xTRs, two IPv4 RLOCs, and both an IPv4 and an IPv6 EID. In this task, a LISP site uses two edge routers. Each edge router is configured as an xTR (each performs as both an ITR and an ETR) and each also includes a single IPv4 connection to an upstream provider. (Two different providers are used in this example but the same upstream provider could be used for both connections.) Both of the RLOCs and one of the EIDs are IPv4. However, in this example, the LISP site includes an IPv6 EID, as well.

      This LISP site requires the use of Proxy Ingress/Egress Tunnel Router (PxTR) LISP infrastructure for access to non-LISP IPv6 addresses. That is, the LISP site uses only its IPv4 RLOCs to reach IPv6 LISP and non-LISP addresses. Additionally, this LISP site registers to two map resolver/map server (MR/MS) devices in the network core. The topology used in this multihomed LISP configuration is shown in the figure below.

      Figure 5. Multihomed LISP Site with Two xTRs, Two IPv4 RLOCs, and Both an IPv4 and an IPv6 EID

      The components illustrated in the topology shown in the figure are described below:

      • LISP site:
        • Two CPE routers make up the LISP site: xTR-1 and xTR-2.
        • Both CPE routers function as LISP xTRs (that is, an ITR and an ETR).
        • The LISP site is authoritative for both the IPv4 EID prefix of 172.16.1.0/24 and the IPv6 EID prefix 2001:db8:a::/48.
        • Each LISP xTR has a single RLOC connection to the core: the RLOC connection for xTR-1 to SP1 is 10.1.1.2/30; the RLOC connection for xTR-2 to SP2 is 10.2.1.2/30.
        • For this multihomed case, the LISP site policy specifies equal load-sharing between service provider (SP) links for ingress traffic engineering.
      • Mapping system:
        • Two map resolver/map server (MR/MS) systems are assumed to be available for the LISP xTR to configure. The MR/MSs have IPv4 RLOCs 10.10.10.10 and 10.10.30.10.
        • Mapping services are assumed to be provided as part of this LISP solution via a private mapping system or as a public LISP mapping system. From the perspective of the configuration of these LISP site xTRs, there is no difference.

          Note


          Map server and map resolver configurations are not shown here. See the "Configure a Private LISP Mapping System Using a Standalone Map Resolver/Map Server" section for information about map server and map resolver configuration.


        • PxTR services are also assumed to be provided as part of this LISP solution via a private or public mapping system. From the perspective of the configuration of these LISP site xTRs, there is no difference.
        • The PxTRs have IPv4 RLOCs of 10.10.10.11 and 10.10.30.11 and will be used (as PETRs) for LISP IPv6 EIDs to reach non-LISP IPv6 sites. Return traffic is attracted by the PITR function (with the assumption that the PITR advertises coarse aggregates for IPv6 LISP EIDs into the IPv6 core.)

      Perform the steps in this task (once through for each xTR in the LISP site) to enable and configure LISP ITR and ETR (xTR) functionality when using a LISP map server and map resolver for mapping services. The example configurations at the end of this task show the full configuration for two xTRs (xTR1 and xTR2).

      SUMMARY STEPS

        1.    configure terminal

        2.    router lisp

        3.    database-mapping EID-prefix/prefix-length locator priority priority weight weight

        4.    Repeat Step 3 to configure a second RLOC (10.2.1.2) for the same xTR and IPv4 EID prefix.

        5.    Repeat Step 3 and Step 4 to configure the same RLOC connections, again, for the same xTR but, when repeating these two steps, associate the IPv6 EID prefix, 2001:db8:a::/48, instead of the IPv4 EID prefix.

        6.    ipv4 itr

        7.    ipv4 etr

        8.    ipv4 itr map-resolver map-resolver-address

        9.    Repeat Step 8 to configure a second locator address of the map resolver.

        10.    ipv4 etr map-server map-server-address key key-type authentication-key

        11.    Repeat Step 10 to configure a second locator address for the map server.

        12.    ipv6 itr

        13.    ipv6 etr

        14.    ipv6 itr map-resolver map-resolver-address

        15.    Repeat Step 14 to configure a second locator address for the map resolver.

        16.    ipv6 etr map-server map-server-address key key-type authentication-key

        17.    Repeat Step 16 to configure a second locator address for the map server.

        18.    ipv6 use-petr petr-address

        19.    Repeat Step 18 to configure a second locator address for the PETR.

        20.    exit

        21.    ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop

        22.    exit


      DETAILED STEPS
         Command or ActionPurpose
        Step 1 configure terminal


        Example:
        Router# configure terminal
         

        Enters global configuration mode.

         
        Step 2 router lisp


        Example:
        Router(config)# router lisp
         

        Enters LISP configuration mode (Cisco IOS XE software only).

         
        Step 3 database-mapping EID-prefix/prefix-length locator priority priority weight weight


        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
         

        Configures an EID-to-RLOC mapping relationship and its associated traffic policy for this LISP site.

        • In steps 3, 4, and 5 of this example, an IPv4 EID prefix, 172.16.1.0/24, and an IPv6 prefix, 2001:db8:a::/48, are being associated with a LISP site that contains two separate xTRs that each have a single IPv4 RLOC connection to the core. In this first step example, xTR-1 is configured with an IPv4 RLOC connection to SP1 at 10.1.1.2 but the weight argument of 50 signifies that a second database-mapping command is to be configured in the next step.
        Note   

        Four database-mapping commands are required for each xTR to indicate to the mapping system that both the associated IPv4 and IPv6 EID prefixes are reachable at this LISP site via these two IPv4 RLOCs. In this example, one RLOC is local (connected) to one xTR and the other is local (connected) to the other xTR.

         
        Step 4 Repeat Step 3 to configure a second RLOC (10.2.1.2) for the same xTR and IPv4 EID prefix.

        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
         

        Configures an EID-to-RLOC mapping relationship and its associated traffic policy for an xTR on this LISP site.

        • In this step example, the second RLOC connection for xTR-1 has an IPv4 RLOC connection to SP2 (10.2.1.2).
        Note   

        When a LISP site contains multiple xTRs, all xTRs must be configured with identical database-mapping commands to provide the mapping system with consistent information about EID-to-RLOC mappings.

         
        Step 5 Repeat Step 3 and Step 4 to configure the same RLOC connections, again, for the same xTR but, when repeating these two steps, associate the IPv6 EID prefix, 2001:db8:a::/48, instead of the IPv4 EID prefix.  

         
        Step 6 ipv4 itr


        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr
         

        Enables LISP ITR functionality for the IPv4 address family.

         
        Step 7 ipv4 etr


        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr
         

        Enables LISP ETR functionality for the IPv4 address family.

         
        Step 8 ipv4 itr map-resolver map-resolver-address


        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
         

        Configures a locator address for the LISP map resolver to which this router will send Map-Request messages for IPv4 EID-to-RLOC mapping resolutions.

        • The locator address of the map resolver may be an IPv4 or IPv6 address. In this example, because each xTR has only IPv4 RLOC connectivity, the map resolver is reachable via its IPv4 locator address. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)
        Note   

        Up to two map resolvers may be configured if multiple map resolvers are available. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

         
        Step 9 Repeat Step 8 to configure a second locator address of the map resolver.

        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
         

        Configures a second locator address for the LISP map resolver to which this router will send Map-Request messages for IPv4 EID-to-RLOC mapping resolutions.

         
        Step 10 ipv4 etr map-server map-server-address key key-type authentication-key


        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-key
         

        Configures a locator address for the LISP map server and an authentication key that this router, acting as an IPv4 LISP ETR, will use to register with the LISP mapping system.

        • In this example, each xTR must register to both map servers.
        • The map server must be configured with EID prefixes matching those configured on this ETR and with an identical authentication key.
        Note   

        The locator address of the map server may be an IPv4 or IPv6 address. In this example, because each xTR has only IPv4 RLOC connectivity, the map server is reachable via its IPv4 locator address. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

        Note   

        Up to two map servers may be configured if multiple map servers are available. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

         
        Step 11 Repeat Step 10 to configure a second locator address for the map server.

        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key 0 some-key
         

        Configures a second locator address for the LISP map server and the authentication key that this router will use to register with the LISP mapping system.

         
        Step 12 ipv6 itr


        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 itr
         

        Enables LISP ITR functionality for the IPv6 address family.

         
        Step 13 ipv6 etr


        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 etr
         

        Enables LISP ETR functionality for the IPv6 address family.

         
        Step 14 ipv6 itr map-resolver map-resolver-address


        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
         

        Configures a locator address for the LISP map resolver to which this router will send Map-Request messages for IPv6 EID-to-RLOC mapping resolutions.

        • The locator address of the map resolver may be an IPv4 or IPv6 address. In this example, because each xTR has only IPv4 RLOC connectivity, the map resolver is reachable via its IPv4 locator address. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)
        Note   

        Up to two map resolvers may be configured if multiple map resolvers are available. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

         
        Step 15 Repeat Step 14 to configure a second locator address for the map resolver.

        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
         

        Configures a second locator address for the LISP map resolver to which this router will send Map-Request messages for IPv4 EID-to-RLOC mapping resolutions.

         
        Step 16 ipv6 etr map-server map-server-address key key-type authentication-key


        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-key
         

        Configures a locator address for the LISP map server and an authentication key that this router, acting as an IPv6 LISP ETR, will use to register to the LISP mapping system.

        • In this example, each xTR must register to both map servers.
        • The map server must be configured with EID prefixes matching those configured on this ETR and with an identical authentication key.
        Note   

        The locator address of the map server may be an IPv4 or IPv6 address. In this example, because each xTR has only IPv4 RLOC connectivity, the map server is reachable via its IPv4 locator address. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

        Note   

        Up to two map servers may be configured if multiple map servers are available. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

         
        Step 17 Repeat Step 16 to configure a second locator address for the map server.

        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 itr map-server 10.10.30.10 key 0 some-key
         

        Configures a second locator address for the LISP map server and an authentication key that this router, acting as an IPv6 LISP ETR, will use to register with the LISP mapping system.

         
        Step 18 ipv6 use-petr petr-address


        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 use-petr 10.10.10.11
         

        Configures a locator address for the Proxy Egress Tunnel Router (PETR) to which each xTR will forward LISP-encapsulated IPv6 EIDs (using the xTR's IPv4 RLOC) to reach non-LISP IPv6 addresses.

        Note   

        The PETR is assumed to be dual-stacked and capable of natively reaching the non-LISP IPv6 address. In addition, the PITR is assumed to be dual-stacked and to be advertising coarse aggregates for IPv6 LISP EIDs into the IPv6 core to handle return traffic (non-LISP IPv6 to LISP IPv6 over an IPv4 infrastructure).

        Note   

        The locator address of the PETR may be an IPv4 or IPv6 address. In this example, because each xTR has only IPv4 RLOC connectivity, the PETR is reachable via its IPv4 locator address. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

        Note   

        Up to eight PETRs may be configured if multiple PETRs are available. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

         
        Step 19 Repeat Step 18 to configure a second locator address for the PETR.

        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 use-petr 10.10.30.11
         

        Configures a second locator address for the PETR to which each xTR will forward LISP-encapsulated IPv6 EIDs (using the xTR's IPv4 RLOC) to reach non-LISP IPv6 addresses.

         
        Step 20 exit


        Example:
        Router(config-router-lisp)# exit
         

        Exits LISP configuration mode and returns to global configuration mode.

         
        Step 21 ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop


        Example:
        Router(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.1.1.1
         

        Configures a default route to the upstream next hop for all IPv4 destinations.

        • All IPv4 EID-sourced packets destined to both LISP and non-LISP sites are forwarded in one of two ways:
          • LISP-encapsulated to a LISP site when traffic is LISP-to-LISP
          • natively forwarded when traffic is LISP-to-non-LISP
        • Packets are deemed to be a candidate for LISP encapsulation when they are sourced from a LISP EID and the destination matches one of the following entries:
          • a current map-cache entry
          • a default route with a legitimate next-hop
          • no route at all
        In this configuration example, because the xTR has IPv4 RLOC connectivity, a default route to the upstream SP is used for all IPv4 packets to support LISP processing.
         
        Step 22 exit


        Example:
        Router(config)# exit
         

        Exits global configuration mode.

         

        Example:

        Figure 6. Multihomed LISP Site with Two xTRs, Two IPv4 RLOCs, and Both an IPv4 and an IPv6 EID

        The examples below show the complete configuration for the LISP topology illustrated in the figure above and in this task:

        Example configuration for xTR-1:

        !
        hostname xTR-1
        !
        no ip domain lookup
        ip cef
        ipv6 unicast-routing
        ipv6 cef
        !
        interface Loopback0
         ip address 172.17.1.1 255.255.255.255
        !
        interface LISP0
        !
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0
         description Link to SP1 (RLOC)
         ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.252
        !
        interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0
         description Link to Site (EID)
         ip address 172.16.1.2 255.255.255.0
         ipv6 address 2001:db8:a:1::2/64
        !
        router lisp
         database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
         database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
         database-mapping 2001:db8:a::/48 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50 
         database-mapping 2001:db8:a::/48 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50 
         ipv4 itr
         ipv4 etr
         ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
         ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
         ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-key
         ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key 0 some-key
         ipv6 itr
         ipv6 etr
         ipv6 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
         ipv6 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
         ipv6 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-key
         ipv6 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key 0 some-key
         ipv6 use-petr 10.10.10.11
         ipv6 use-petr 10.10.30.11
         exit
        !
        ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.1.1.1
        !
        ipv6 route ::/0 
        
        

        Example configuration for xTR-2:

        !
        no ip domain lookup
        ip cef
        ipv6 unicast-routing
        ipv6 cef
        !
        interface Loopback0
         ip address 172.17.1.2 255.255.255.255
        !
        interface LISP0
        !
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0
         description Link to SP2 (RLOC)
         ip address 10.2.1.2 255.255.255.252
        !
        interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0
         description Link to Site (EID)
         ip address 172.16.1.3 255.255.255.0
         ipv6 address 2001:db8:a:1::3/64
        !
        router lisp
         database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
         database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
         database-mapping 2001:db8:a::/48 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50 
         database-mapping 2001:db8:a::/48 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50 
         ipv4 itr
         ipv4 etr
         ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
         ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
         ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-xtr-key
         ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key 0 some-xtr-key
         ipv6 itr
         ipv6 etr
         ipv6 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
         ipv6 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
         ipv6 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-xtr-key
         ipv6 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key 0 some-xtr-key
         ipv6 use-petr 10.10.10.11
         ipv6 use-petr 10.10.30.11
         exit
        !
        ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.2.1.1
        !
        ipv6 route ::/0  
        

        Configure a Multihomed LISP Site with Two xTRs that Each have Both an IPv4 and an IPv6 RLOC and Both an IPv4 and an IPv6 EID

        Perform this task to configure a multihomed LISP site with two xTRs, each with both an IPv4 and an IPv6 RLOC and both with an IPv4 and an IPv6 EID. In this task, a LISP site uses two edge routers. Each edge router is configured as an xTR (each performs as both an ITR and an ETR) and each also includes a single, dual stack (IPv4 and IPv6) connection to an upstream provider. (Two different providers are used in this example but the same upstream provider could be used for both connections.) Each xTR has an IPv4 RLOC and an IPv6 RLOC and both IPv4 and IPv6 EID prefixes are being used within the LISP site. However, because the site has both IPv4 and IPv6 RLOCs, it does not require a Proxy Ingress/Egress Tunnel Router (PxTR) LISP infrastructure for access to non-LISP IPv6 addresses. (The PxTR infrastructure can still be configured as a resiliency mechanism if desired.)

        The LISP site registers to two map resolver/map server (MR/MS) devices in the network core using both IPv4 and IPv6 locators. The topology used in this multihomed LISP configuration is shown in the figure below.

        Figure 7. Multihomed LISP Site with Two xTRs, Each with an IPv4 and an IPv6 RLOC and each with an IPv4 and an IPv6 EID

        The components illustrated in the topology shown in the figure are described below:

        • LISP site:
          • Two CPE routers make up the LISP site: xTR-1 and xTR-2.
          • Both CPE routers function as LISP xTRs (that is, an ITR and an ETR).
          • The LISP site is authoritative for both the IPv4 EID prefix of 172.16.1.0/24 and the IPv6 EID prefix 2001:db8:a::/48.
          • Each LISP xTR has a single IPv4 RLOC connection and a single IPv6 RLOC connection to the core: the RLOC connections for xTR-1 to SP1 include an IPv4 RLOC, 10.1.1.2/30, and an IPv6 RLOC, 2001:db8:e000:1::2/64. The xTR-2 connections to SP2 include IPv4 RLOC 10.2.1.2/30 and IPv6 RLOC 2001:db8:f000:1::2/64.
          • For this multihomed case, the LISP site policy specifies equal load-sharing between service provider (SP) links for ingress traffic engineering.
        • Mapping system:
          • Two map resolver/map server systems are assumed to be available for the LISP xTR to configure. The MR/MSs have IPv4 RLOCs 10.10.10.10 and 10.10.30.10 and IPv6 RLOCs 2001:db8:e000:2::1 and 2001:db8:f000:2::1.
          • Mapping services are assumed to be provided as part of this LISP solution via a private mapping system or as a public LISP mapping system. From the perspective of the configuration of these LISP site xTRs, there is no difference.

            Note


            Map resolver and map server configurations are not shown here. See the "Configure a Private LISP Mapping System Using a Standalone Map Resolver/Map Server" section for information about map resolver and map server configuration.


          • PxTR services are not required in this example since both xTRs have dual-stack connectivity to the core.

        Perform the steps in this task (once through for each xTR in the LISP site) to enable and configure LISP ITR and ETR (xTR) functionality when using a LISP map resolver and map server for mapping services. The example configurations at the end of this task show the full configuration for two xTRs (xTR1 and xTR2).

        SUMMARY STEPS

          1.    configure terminal

          2.    router lisp

          3.    database-mapping EID-prefix/prefix-length locator priority priority weight weight

          4.    Repeat Step 3 to configure a second IPv4 RLOC for the same xTR and IPv4 EID prefix.

          5.    Repeat Step 3 and Step 4 to configure the same RLOC connections, again, for the same xTR but, when repeating these two steps, associate the IPv6 EID prefix, 2001:db8:a::/48, instead of the IPv4 EID prefix.

          6.    Repeat Step 3, Step 4, and Step 5 to configure the second set of IPv4 and IPv6 RLOC connections on the same xTR for both the IPv4 and IPv6 EID prefixes.

          7.    ipv4 itr

          8.    ipv4 etr

          9.    ipv4 itr map-resolver map-resolver-address

          10.    Repeat Step 9 to configure a second locator address of the LISP map resolver.

          11.    Repeat Step 9 and Step 10 to configure the IPv6 locator addresses of the LISP two map resolvers.

          12.    ipv4 etr map-server map-server-address key key-type authentication-key

          13.    Repeat Step 12 to configure a second locator address of the map server.

          14.    Repeat Step 12 and Step 13 to configure the IPv6 locator addresses of the two map servers.

          15.    ipv6 itr

          16.    ipv6 etr

          17.    ipv6 itr map-resolver map-resolver-address

          18.    Repeat Step 17 to configure a second IPv6 locator address of the LISP map resolver.

          19.    Repeat Step 17 and Step18 to configure the IPv6 (instead of IPv4) locator addresses for the two map resolvers to which this router will send Map-Request messages for IPv6 EID-to-RLOC mapping resolutions.

          20.    ipv6 etr map-server map-server-address key key-type authentication-key

          21.    Repeat Step 20 to configure a second locator address of the LISP map server.

          22.    Repeat Steps 20 and 21 to configure the IPv6 locator addresses of the two map servers for which this router, acting as an IPv6 LISP ETR, will use to register to the LISP mapping system.

          23.    exit

          24.    ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop

          25.    exit


        DETAILED STEPS
           Command or ActionPurpose
          Step 1 configure terminal


          Example:
          Router# configure terminal
           

          Enters global configuration mode.

           
          Step 2 router lisp


          Example:
          Router(config)# router lisp
           

          Enters LISP configuration mode (Cisco IOS XE software only).

           
          Step 3 database-mapping EID-prefix/prefix-length locator priority priority weight weight


          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
           

          Configures an EID-to-RLOC mapping relationship and its associated traffic policy for this LISP site.

          • In this example, a single IPv4 EID prefix, 172.16.1.0/24, and a single IPv6 prefix, 2001:db8:a::/48, are being associated with a LISP site that contains two separate xTRs that each have a single IPv4 RLOC connection and a single IPv6 connection to the core. In this first database-mapping step example, xTR-1 is configured with an IPv4 RLOC connection to SP1 (10.1.1.2) and an IPv6 RLOC connection to SP1 (2001:db8:e000:1::2/64.) while xTR-2 has an IPv4 RLOC connection of10.2.1.2 to SP2 and an IPv6 RLOC connection of 2001:db8:f000:1::2/64 to SP2. The weight argument of 50 signifies that a second database-mapping command is to be configured in the next step.
          Note   

          Eight database-mapping commands are required for each xTR to indicate to the mapping system that both the IPv4 and IPv6 EID prefixes are reachable at this LISP site via both the two IPv4 RLOCs and the two IPv6 RLOCs. In this example, one IPv4 RLOC and one IPv6 RLOC are local (connected) to one xTR and the others are local (connected) to the other xTR.

           
          Step 4 Repeat Step 3 to configure a second IPv4 RLOC for the same xTR and IPv4 EID prefix.

          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
           

          Configures an EID-to-RLOC mapping relationship and its associated traffic policy for an xTR on this LISP site.

          • In this step example, the second RLOC connection for xTR-1 has an IPv4 RLOC connection to SP2 (10.2.1.2).
          Note   

          When a LISP site contains multiple xTRs, all xTRs must be configured with identical database-mapping commands to provide the mapping system with consistent information about EID-to-RLOC mappings.

           
          Step 5 Repeat Step 3 and Step 4 to configure the same RLOC connections, again, for the same xTR but, when repeating these two steps, associate the IPv6 EID prefix, 2001:db8:a::/48, instead of the IPv4 EID prefix.

          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 2001:db8:a::/48 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50


          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# database-mapping 2001:db8:a::/48 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
           

           
          Step 6 Repeat Step 3, Step 4, and Step 5 to configure the second set of IPv4 and IPv6 RLOC connections on the same xTR for both the IPv4 and IPv6 EID prefixes.  

           
          Step 7 ipv4 itr


          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr
           

          Enables LISP ITR functionality for the IPv4 address family.

           
          Step 8 ipv4 etr


          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr
           

          Enables LISP ETR functionality for the IPv4 address family.

           
          Step 9 ipv4 itr map-resolver map-resolver-address


          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
           

          Configures a locator address for the LISP map resolver to which this router will send Map-Request messages for IPv4 EID-to-RLOC mapping resolutions.

          • The locator address of the map resolver may be an IPv4 or IPv6 address. In this example, because each xTR has both IPv4 and IPv6 RLOC connectivity, the map resolver is reachable via both IPv4 and IPv6 locator addresses. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)
          Note   

          Up to two map resolvers may be configured if multiple map resolvers are available. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

           
          Step 10 Repeat Step 9 to configure a second locator address of the LISP map resolver.

          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
           

          Configures a second locator address for the LISP map resolver to which this router will send Map-Request messages for IPv4 EID-to-RLOC mapping resolutions.

           
          Step 11 Repeat Step 9 and Step 10 to configure the IPv6 locator addresses of the LISP two map resolvers.  

           
          Step 12 ipv4 etr map-server map-server-address key key-type authentication-key


          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-key
           

          Configures a locator address for the LISP map server and an authentication key that this router, acting as an IPv4 LISP ETR, will use to register with the LISP mapping system.

          • In this example, a second xTR can be registered to the same two map servers using the same authentication key.
          • The map server must be configured with EID prefixes matching those configured on this ETR and with an identical authentication key.
          Note   

          The locator address of the map server may be an IPv4 or IPv6 address. In this example, because each xTR has both IPv4 and IPv6 RLOC connectivity, the map server is reachable via both IPv4 and IPv6 locator addresses. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

          Note   

          Up to two map servers may be configured if multiple map servers are available. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

           
          Step 13 Repeat Step 12 to configure a second locator address of the map server.

          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key 0 some-key
           

          Configures a second IPv4 locator address of the LISP map server and the authentication key that this router, acting as an IPv4 LISP ETR, will use to register with the LISP mapping system.

           
          Step 14 Repeat Step 12 and Step 13 to configure the IPv6 locator addresses of the two map servers.

          Example:
          ipv4 etr map-server 2001:db8:e000:2::1 key 0 some-xtr-key


          Example:
          ipv4 etr map-server 2001:db8:f000:2::1 key 0 some-xtr-key
           

           
          Step 15 ipv6 itr


          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 itr
           

          Enables LISP ITR functionality for the IPv6 address family.

           
          Step 16 ipv6 etr


          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 etr
           

          Enables LISP ETR functionality for the IPv6 address family.

           
          Step 17 ipv6 itr map-resolver map-resolver-address


          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
           

          Configures a locator address for the LISP map resolver to which this router will send Map-Request messages for IPv6 EID-to-RLOC mapping resolutions.

          • The locator address of the map resolver may be an IPv4 or IPv6 address. In this example, because each xTR has both IPv4 and IPv6 RLOC connectivity, the map resolver is reachable via both IPv4 and IPv6 locator addresses. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)
          Note   

          Up to two map resolvers may be configured if multiple map resolvers are available. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

           
          Step 18 Repeat Step 17 to configure a second IPv6 locator address of the LISP map resolver.

          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
           

          Configures a second locator address of the map resolver to which this router will send Map-Request messages for IPv6 EID-to-RLOC mapping resolutions.

           
          Step 19 Repeat Step 17 and Step18 to configure the IPv6 (instead of IPv4) locator addresses for the two map resolvers to which this router will send Map-Request messages for IPv6 EID-to-RLOC mapping resolutions.

          Example:
          ipv6 itr map-resolver 2001:db8:e000:2::1


          Example:
          ipv6 itr map-resolver 2001:db8:f000:2::1
           

           
          Step 20 ipv6 etr map-server map-server-address key key-type authentication-key


          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-key
           

          Configures a locator address for the LISP map server and an authentication key that this router, acting as an IPv6 LISP ETR, will use to register to the LISP mapping system.

          • In this example, a second xTR can be registered to the same two map servers using the same authentication key.
          • The map server must be configured with EID prefixes matching those configured on this ETR and with an identical authentication key.
          Note   

          The locator address of the map server may be an IPv4 or IPv6 address. In this example, because each xTR has both IPv4 and IPv6 RLOC connectivity, the map server is reachable via both IPv4 and IPv6 locator addresses. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

          Note   

          Up to two map servers may be configured if multiple map servers are available. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

           
          Step 21 Repeat Step 20 to configure a second locator address of the LISP map server.

          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key 0 some-key
           

          Configures a second locator address for the LISP map server and an authentication key that this router, acting as an IPv6 LISP ETR, will use to register with the LISP mapping system.

           
          Step 22 Repeat Steps 20 and 21 to configure the IPv6 locator addresses of the two map servers for which this router, acting as an IPv6 LISP ETR, will use to register to the LISP mapping system.

          Example:
          ipv6 etr map-server 2001:db8:e000:2::1 key 0 some-xtr-key


          Example:
          ipv6 etr map-server 2001:db8:f000:2::1 key 0 some-xtr-key
           

           
          Step 23 exit


          Example:
          Router(config-router-lisp)# exit
           

          Exits LISP configuration mode and returns to global configuration mode.

           
          Step 24 ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop


          Example:
          Router(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.1.1.1
           

          Configures a default route to the upstream next hop for all IPv4 destinations.

          • All IPv4 EID-sourced packets destined to both LISP and non-LISP sites are forwarded in one of two ways:
            • LISP-encapsulated to a LISP site when traffic is LISP-to-LISP
            • natively forwarded when traffic is LISP-to-non-LISP
          • Packets are deemed to be a candidate for LISP encapsulation when they are sourced from a LISP EID and the destination matches one of the following entries:
            • a current map-cache entry
            • a default route with a legitimate next-hop
            • no route at all
          In this configuration example, because the xTR has IPv4 RLOC connectivity, a default route to the upstream SP is used for all IPv4 packets to support LISP processing.
           
          Step 25 exit


          Example:
          Router(config)# exit
           

          Exits global configuration mode.

           

          Example:

          Figure 8. Multihomed LISP Site with Two xTRs, Each with an IPv4 and an IPv6 RLOC and each with an IPv4 and an IPv6 EID

          The examples below show the complete configuration for the LISP topology illustrated in the figure above and in this task:

          Example configuration for xTR-1:

          !
          hostname xTR-1
          !
          no ip domain lookup
          ip cef
          ipv6 unicast-routing
          ipv6 cef
          !
          interface Loopback0
           ip address 172.17.1.1 255.255.255.255
          !
          interface LISP0
          !
          interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0
           description Link to SP1 (RLOC)
           ip address 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.252
           ipv6 address 2001:db8:e000:1::2/64
          !
          interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0
           description Link to Site (EID)
           ip address 172.16.1.2 255.255.255.0
           ipv6 address 2001:db8:a:1::2/64
          !
          router lisp
           database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
           database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
           database-mapping 2001:db8:a::/48 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50 
           database-mapping 2001:db8:a::/48 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50 
           database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 2001:db8:e000:1::2 priority 1 weight 50
           database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 2001:db8:f000:1::2 priority 1 weight 50
           database-mapping 2001:db8:a::/48 2001:db8:e000:1::2 priority 1 weight 50 
           database-mapping 2001:db8:a::/48 2001:db8:f000:1::2 priority 1 weight 50 
           ipv4 itr
           ipv4 etr
           ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
           ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
           ipv4 itr map-resolver 2001:db8:e000:2::1
           ipv4 itr map-resolver 2001:db8:f000:2::1
           ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-xtr-key
           ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key 0 some-xtr-key
           ipv4 etr map-server 2001:db8:e000:2::1 key 0 some-xtr-key
           ipv4 etr map-server 2001:db8:f000:2::1 key 0 some-xtr-key
           ipv6 itr
           ipv6 etr
           ipv6 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
           ipv6 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
           ipv6 itr map-resolver 2001:db8:e000:2::1
           ipv6 itr map-resolver 2001:db8:f000:2::1
           ipv6 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-xtr-key
           ipv6 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key 0 some-xtr-key
           ipv6 etr map-server 2001:db8:e000:2::1 key 0 some-xtr-key
           ipv6 etr map-server 2001:db8:f000:2::1 key 0 some-xtr-key
           exit
          !
          ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.1.1.1
          !
          ipv6 route ::/0 2001:db8:e000:1::1 
          !
          

          Example configuration for xTR-2:

          !
          hostname xTR-2
          !
          no ip domain lookup
          ip cef
          ipv6 unicast-routing
          ipv6 cef
          !
          interface Loopback0
           ip address 172.17.1.2 255.255.255.255
          !
          interface LISP0
          !
          interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0
           description Link to SP2 (RLOC)
           ip address 10.2.1.2 255.255.255.252
           ipv6 address 2001:db8:f000:1::2/64
          !
          interface GigabitEthernet1/0/0
           description Link to Site (EID)
           ip address 172.16.1.3 255.255.255.0
           ipv6 address 2001:db8:a:1::3/64
          !
          router lisp
           database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
           database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
           database-mapping 2001:db8:a::/48 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50 
           database-mapping 2001:db8:a::/48 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50 
           database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 2001:db8:e000:1::2 priority 1 weight 50
           database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 2001:db8:f000:1::2 priority 1 weight 50
           database-mapping 2001:db8:a::/48 2001:db8:e000:1::2 priority 1 weight 50 
           database-mapping 2001:db8:a::/48 2001:db8:f000:1::2 priority 1 weight 50 
           ipv4 itr
           ipv4 etr
           ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
           ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
           ipv4 itr map-resolver 2001:db8:e000:2::1
           ipv4 itr map-resolver 2001:db8:f000:2::1
           ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-xtr-key
           ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key 0 some-xtr-key
           ipv4 etr map-server 2001:db8:e000:2::1 key 0 some-xtr-key
           ipv4 etr map-server 2001:db8:f000:2::1 key 0 some-xtr-key
           ipv6 itr
           ipv6 etr
           ipv6 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
           ipv6 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
           ipv6 itr map-resolver 2001:db8:e000:2::1
           ipv6 itr map-resolver 2001:db8:f000:2::1
           ipv6 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key 0 some-xtr-key
           ipv6 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key 0 some-xtr-key
           ipv6 etr map-server 2001:db8:e000:2::1 key 0 some-xtr-key
           ipv6 etr map-server 2001:db8:f000:2::1 key 0 some-xtr-key
           exit
          !
          ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.2.1.1
          !
          ipv6 route ::/0 2001:db8:f000:1::1
          ! 
          

          Configure a Private LISP Mapping System Using a Standalone Map Resolver/Map Server

          Perform this task to configure and enable standalone LISP map resolver/map server (MR/MS) functionality for both IPv4 and IPv6 address families. In this task, a Cisco device is configured as a standalone MR/MS for a private LISP mapping system. Because the MR/MS is configured as a standalone device, it has no need for LISP alternative logical topology (ALT) connectivity. All relevant LISP sites must be configured to register with this map server so that this map server has full knowledge of all registered EID prefixes within the (assumed) private LISP system. However, because this device is functioning as a map resolver/map server, the data structure associated with an ALT virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) table must still be configured to hold LISP EIDs for registered sites.

          The map resolver/map server is configured with both IPv4 and IPv6 RLOC addresses. The topology used in this most basic LISP MR/MS configuration is shown in the figure below.

          Figure 9. Standalone LISP Map Resolver/Map Server with both IPv4 and IPv6 RLOCs

          The components illustrated in the topology shown in the figure are described below, although the map resolver is configured separately:

          Mapping System
          • The LISP device is configured to function as a standalone map resolver/map server (MR/MS).
          • The xTRs in the LISP site are assumed to be registered to this map server. That is, the xTR registers the IPv4 EID prefix of 172.16.1.0/24 and, when IPv6 EIDs are used, the xTR also registers the IPv6 EID of prefix 2001:db8:a::/48.
          • The MR/MS has an IPv4 locator of 10.10.10.10/24 and an IPv6 locator of 2001:db8:e000:2::1/64.
          SUMMARY STEPS

            1.    configure terminal

            2.    vrf definition vrf-name

            3.    address-family ipv4 [unicast]

            4.    exit-address-family

            5.    address-family ipv6

            6.    exit-address-family

            7.    exit

            8.    router lisp

            9.    ipv4 alt-vrf vrf-name

            10.    ipv4 map-server

            11.    ipv4 map-resolver

            12.    ipv6 alt-vrf vrf-name

            13.    ipv6 map-server

            14.    ipv6 map-resolver

            15.    site site-name

            16.    eid-prefix EID-prefix

            17.    authentication-key [key-type] authentication-key

            18.    exit

            19.    Repeat Steps 15 through 18 to configure additional LISP sites.

            20.    exit

            21.    ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop

            22.    ipv6 route ipv6-prefix next-hop

            23.    exit


          DETAILED STEPS
             Command or ActionPurpose
            Step 1 configure terminal


            Example:
            Router# configure terminal
             

            Enters global configuration mode.

             
            Step 2 vrf definition vrf-name


            Example:
            Router(config)# vrf definition lisp
             

            Creates a virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) table and enters VRF configuration mode.

            • Use the vrf-name argument to specify a name to be assigned to the VRF table. In this example, a VRF table named lisp is created to hold EID prefixes.
             
            Step 3 address-family ipv4 [unicast]


            Example:
            Router(config-vrf)# address-family ipv4
             

            Enters VRF IPv4 address family configuration mode to specify an IPv4 address family for a VRF table.

            • In this example, the VRF table named lisp handles IPv4 EID prefixes.
             
            Step 4 exit-address-family


            Example:
            Router(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family
             

            Exits VRF IPv4 address family configuration mode and returns to VRF configuration mode.

             
            Step 5 address-family ipv6


            Example:
            Router(config-vrf)# address-family ipv6
             

            Enters VRF IPv6 address family configuration mode to specify an IPv6 address family for a VRF table.

            • In this example, the VRF table named lisp handles IPv6 EID prefixes.
             
            Step 6 exit-address-family


            Example:
            Router(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family
             

            Exits VRF IPv6 address family configuration mode and returns to VRF configuration mode.

             
            Step 7 exit


            Example:
            Router(config-vrf)# exit
             

            Exits VRF configuration mode and enters global configuration mode.

             
            Step 8 router lisp


            Example:
            Router(config)# router lisp
             

            Enters LISP configuration mode (Cisco IOS XE software only).

             
            Step 9 ipv4 alt-vrf vrf-name


            Example:
            Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 alt-vrf lisp
             

            Associates a VRF table with the LISP ALT for IPv4 EIDs.

            • In this example, the VRF table named lisp (created in Step 2) is associated with the LISP ALT.
             
            Step 10 ipv4 map-server


            Example:
            Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 map-server
             

            Enables LISP map server functionality for EIDs in the IPv4 address family.

             
            Step 11 ipv4 map-resolver


            Example:
            Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 map-resolver
             

            Enables LISP map resolver functionality for EIDs in the IPv4 address family.

             
            Step 12 ipv6 alt-vrf vrf-name


            Example:
            Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 alt-vrf lisp
             

            Associates a VRF table with the LISP ALT for IPv6 EIDs.

            • In this example, the VRF table named lisp (created in Step 2) is associated with the LISP ALT.
             
            Step 13 ipv6 map-server


            Example:
            Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 map-server
             

            Enables LISP map server functionality for EIDs in the IPv6 address family.

             
            Step 14 ipv6 map-resolver


            Example:
            Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 map-resolver
             

            Enables LISP map resolver functionality for EIDs in the IPv6 address family.

             
            Step 15 site site-name


            Example:
            Router(config-router-lisp)# site Site-1
             

            Specifies a LISP site named Site-1 and enters LISP site configuration mode.

            Note   

            A LISP site name is locally significant to the map server on which it is configured. It has no relevance anywhere else. This name is used solely as an administrative means of associating one or more EID prefixes with an authentication key and other site-related mechanisms.

             
            Step 16 eid-prefix EID-prefix


            Example:
            Router(config-router-lisp-site)# eid-prefix 172.16.1.0/24
             

            Configures an IPv4 or IPv6 EID prefix associated with this LISP site.

            • Repeat this step as necessary to configure additional EID prefixes under this LISP sites.
            • In this step example, only an IPv4 EID prefix is configured but to complete the configuration, an IPv6 EID prefix must also be configured.
            Note   

            The LISP ETR must be configured with matching EID prefixes and an identical authentication key.

            Note   

            Additional eid-prefix command configuration options are available. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

             
            Step 17 authentication-key [key-type] authentication-key


            Example:
            Router(config-router-lisp-site)# authentication-key 0 some-key
             

            Configures the authentication key associated with this site.

            Note   

            The LISP ETR must be configured with matching EID prefixes and an identical authentication key.

            Note   

            The authentication-key can be configured with Type 6 encryption. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

             
            Step 18 exit


            Example:
            Router(config-router-lisp-site)# exit
             

            Exits LISP site configuration mode and returns to LISP configuration mode.

             
            Step 19Repeat Steps 15 through 18 to configure additional LISP sites.  

             
            Step 20 exit


            Example:
            Router(config-router-lisp)# exit
             

            Exits LISP configuration mode and returns to global configuration mode.

             
            Step 21 ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop


            Example:
            Router(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.1.1.1
             

            Configures an IPv4 static route.

            • In this example, a default route to the upstream next hop for all IPv4 destinations is created.
             
            Step 22 ipv6 route ipv6-prefix next-hop


            Example:
            Router(config)# ipv6 route ::/0 2001:db8:e000:1::1
             

            Configures an IPv6 static route.

            • In this example, a default route to the upstream next hop for all IPv6 destinations is created.
             
            Step 23 exit


            Example:
            Router(config)# exit
             

            Exits global configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

             

            Example:

            Figure 10. Standalone LISP Map Resolver/Map Server with both IPv4 and IPv6 RLOCs

            The example below shows the complete configuration for the LISP topology illustrated in the figure above and in this task. However, this example is for a full configuration of a standalone LISP MR/MS and includes some basic IPv4 and IPv6 configuration not covered in this task:

            !
            hostname MR-MS
            !
            vrf definition lisp
            !
             address-family ipv4
             exit-address-family
             !
             address-family ipv6
             exit-address-family
            !
            no ip domain lookup
            ip cef
            ipv6 unicast-routing
            ipv6 cef
            !
            interface Loopback0
             ip address 172.17.2.1 255.255.255.255
            !
            interface LISP0
            !
            interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0
             description Link to SP1 (RLOC)
             ip address 10.10.10.10 255.255.255.0
             ipv6 address 2001:db8:e000:2::1/64
            !
            router lisp
             site Site-1
              authentication-key some-key
              eid-prefix 172.16.1.0/24
              eid-prefix 2001:db8:a::/48
              exit
             !
             site Site-2
              authentication-key another-key
              eid-prefix 172.16.2.0/24
              eid-prefix 2001:db8:b::/48
              exit
             !
            !---more LISP site configs---
             !
             ipv4 map-server
             ipv4 map-resolver
             ipv4 alt-vrf lisp
             ipv6 map-server
             ipv6 map-resolver
             ipv6 alt-vrf lisp
             exit
            !
            ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.10.1
            !
            ipv6 route ::/0 2001:db8:e000:2::fof
            

            Configure a Public Mapping System Using Separate ALT-Connected Map Resolver and Map Server Devices

            The following tasks show how to configure a map resolver (MR) and a map server (MS) on separate devices, each using LISP alternative logical topology (ALT) connectivity. The MR and MS share their EID prefix information via the LISP ALT connectivity, which is typical of a public LISP deployment model where higher performance and scalability (for tasks such as the handling of Map-Request messages) is required. The LISP ALT is implemented as an overlay virtualized network using GRE tunnels and BGP, which allows for separation of EID prefixes from the underlying core network.

            Configuring an ALT-Connected LISP Map Resolver

            Before You Begin

            Perform this task to configure LISP alternative logical topology (ALT) map resolver functionality for both IPv4 and IPv6 address family mapping services.


            Note


            You must also configure an ALT-connected LISP map server (see the Configuring an ALT-Connected LISP Map Server task).


            In the figure below, the map resolver (MR) and map server (MS) are configured on separate devices and share their EID prefix information via connectivity.

            Figure 11. ALT-Connected LISP Map Resolver and Map Server, each having both an IPv4 and an IPv6 RLOC

            The map resolver illustrated in the topology shown in the figure is described below; the map server and LISP ALT are configured in separate tasks:

            Mapping System
            • Two LISP devices are configured, one as an MS and the other as an MR.
            • The MS has an IPv4 locator of 10.10.10.13/24 and an IPv6 locator of 2001:db8:e000:2::3/64.
            • The MR has an IPv4 locator of 10.10.10.10/24 and an IPv6 locator of 2001:db8:e000:2::1/64.
            • Assume that the xTRs in the LISP site register to this map server. That is, the xTR registers the IPv4 EID-prefix of 172.16.1.0/24 and, when IPv6 EIDs are used, the xTR registers the IPv6 EID-prefix of 2001:db8:a::/48.

              Note


              The configuration of the xTR must be changed to use the MS RLOC for its map server configuration and the MR RLOC for its map resolver configuration. For example:
              • ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
              • ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.10.13 key 0 some-key

            Other Infrastructure

            • The MR has IPv4 and IPv6 tunnel endpoints in the VRF table (named lisp) of 192.168.1.1/30 and 2001:db8:ffff::1/64, respectively, and the MS has IPv4 and IPv6 tunnel endpoints of 192.168.1.2/30 and 2001:db8:ffff::2/64, respectively, in the same VRF table. This tunnel is used for the ALT.
            SUMMARY STEPS

              1.    configure terminal

              2.    vrf definition vrf-name

              3.    rd route-distinguisher

              4.    address-family ipv4 [unicast]

              5.    exit-address-family

              6.    address-family ipv6

              7.    exit-address-family

              8.    exit

              9.    interface type number

              10.    vrf forwarding vrf-name

              11.    ip address ip-address mask

              12.    ipv6 address ipv6-address/mask

              13.    tunnel source interface-type interface-number

              14.    tunnel destination ipv4-address

              15.    exit

              16.    router lisp

              17.    ipv4 map-resolver

              18.    ipv4 alt-vrf vrf-name

              19.    ipv6 map-resolver

              20.    ipv6 alt-vrf vrf-name

              21.    exit

              22.    router bgp autonomous-system-number

              23.    address-family ipv4 [unicast | multicast | vrf vrf-name]

              24.    neighbor ip-address remote-as autonomous-system-number

              25.    neighbor ip-address activate

              26.    exit

              27.    address-family ipv6 vrf vrf-name

              28.    neighbor ip-address remote-as autonomous-system-number

              29.    neighbor ip-address activate

              30.    exit

              31.    exit

              32.    ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop

              33.    ipv6 route ipv6-prefix next-hop

              34.    exit


            DETAILED STEPS
               Command or ActionPurpose
              Step 1 configure terminal


              Example:
              Router# configure terminal
               

              Enters global configuration mode.

               
              Step 2 vrf definition vrf-name


              Example:
              Router(config)# vrf definition lisp
               

              Creates a virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) table and enters VRF configuration mode.

              • Use the vrf-name argument to specify a name to be assigned to the VRF. In this example, a VRF named lisp is created to hold EID prefixes.
               
              Step 3 rd route-distinguisher


              Example:
              Router(config-vrf)# rd 1:1
               

              Creates routing and forwarding tables for a VRF.

               
              Step 4 address-family ipv4 [unicast]


              Example:
              Router(config-vrf)# address-family ipv4
               

              Enters VRF IPv4 address family configuration mode to specify an IPv4 address family for a VRF table.

              • In this example, the VRF table named lisp handles IPv4 EID prefixes.
               
              Step 5 exit-address-family


              Example:
              Router(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family
               

              Exits VRF IPv4 address family configuration mode and returns to VRF configuration mode.

               
              Step 6 address-family ipv6


              Example:
              Router(config-vrf)# address-family ipv6
               

              Enters VRF IPv6 address family configuration mode to specify an IPv6 address family for a VRF table.

              • In this example, the VRF table named lisp handles IPv6 EID prefixes.
               
              Step 7 exit-address-family


              Example:
              Router(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family
               

              Exits VRF IPv6 address family configuration mode and returns to VRF configuration mode.

               
              Step 8 exit


              Example:
              Router(config-vrf)# exit
               

              Exits VRF configuration mode and enters global configuration mode.

               
              Step 9 interface type number


              Example:
              Router(config)# interface tunnel 192
               

              Specifies the interface type of tunnel and the interface number and enters interface configuration mode.

               
              Step 10 vrf forwarding vrf-name


              Example:
              Router(config-if)# vrf forwarding lisp
               

              Associates a VRF instance configured in Step 2 with the tunnel interface configured in Step 9.

              • When the interface is bound to a VRF, previously configured IP addresses are removed, and the interface is disabled.
               
              Step 11 ip address ip-address mask


              Example:
              Router(config-if)# ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.252
               

              Configures an IPv4 address for the tunnel interface.

               
              Step 12 ipv6 address ipv6-address/mask


              Example:
              Router(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:db8:ffff::1/64
               

              Configures an IPv6 address for the tunnel interface.

               
              Step 13 tunnel source interface-type interface-number


              Example:
              Router(config-if)# tunnel source GigabitEthernet 0/0/0
               

              Configures the tunnel source.

               
              Step 14 tunnel destination ipv4-address


              Example:
              Router(config-if)# tunnel destination 10.10.10.13
               

              Configures the tunnel destination IPv4 address for the tunnel interface.

               
              Step 15 exit


              Example:
              Router(config-if)# exit
               

              Exits interface configuration mode and enters global configuration mode.

               
              Step 16 router lisp


              Example:
              Router(config)# router lisp
               

              Enters LISP configuration mode (Cisco IOS XE software only).

               
              Step 17 ipv4 map-resolver


              Example:
              Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 map-resolver
               

              Enables LISP map resolver functionality for EIDs in the IPv4 address family.

               
              Step 18 ipv4 alt-vrf vrf-name


              Example:
              Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 alt-vrf lisp
               

              Associates a VRF table with the LISP ALT for IPv4 EIDs.

              • In this example, the VRF table named lisp (created in Step 2) is associated with the LISP ALT.
               
              Step 19 ipv6 map-resolver


              Example:
              Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 map-resolver
               

              Enables LISP map resolver functionality for EIDs in the IPv6 address family.

               
              Step 20 ipv6 alt-vrf vrf-name


              Example:
              Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 alt-vrf lisp
               

              Associates a VRF table with the LISP ALT for IPv6 EIDs.

              • In this example, the VRF table named lisp (created in Step 2) is associated with the LISP ALT.
               
              Step 21 exit


              Example:
              Router(config-router-lisp)# exit
               

              Exits LISP configuration mode and returns to global configuration mode.

               
              Step 22 router bgp autonomous-system-number


              Example:
              Router(config)# router bgp 65010
               

              Enters router configuration mode for the specified routing process.

               
              Step 23 address-family ipv4 [unicast | multicast | vrf vrf-name]


              Example:
              Router(config-router)# address-family ipv4 vrf lisp
               
              Specifies the IPv4 address family and enters IPv4 address family configuration mode.
              • The vrf keyword and vrf-name argument specify the name of the VRF instance to associate with subsequent commands.
              • In this example, the VRF table named lisp (created in Step 2) is associated with the BGP IPv4 VRF that carries EID-prefixes in the LISP ALT.
               
              Step 24 neighbor ip-address remote-as autonomous-system-number


              Example:
              Router(config-router-af)# neighbor 192.168.1.2 remote-as 65011
               

              Adds the IP address of the neighbor in the specified autonomous system to the IPv4 multiprotocol BGP neighbor table of the local router.

               
              Step 25 neighbor ip-address activate


              Example:
              Router(config-router-af)# neighbor 192.168.1.2 activate
               

              Enables the neighbor to exchange prefixes for the IPv4 unicast address family.

               
              Step 26 exit


              Example:
              Router(config-router-af)# exit
               

              Exits IPv4 address family configuration mode and returns to router configuration mode.

               
              Step 27 address-family ipv6 vrf vrf-name


              Example:
              Router(config-router)# address-family ipv6 vrf lisp
               
              Specifies the IPv6 address family and enters IPv6 address family configuration mode.
              • The vrf keyword and vrf-name argument specify the name of the VRF instance to associate with subsequent commands.
              • In this example, the VRF table named lisp (created in Step 2) is associated with the BGP IPv6 VRF that carries EID-prefixes in the LISP ALT.
               
              Step 28 neighbor ip-address remote-as autonomous-system-number


              Example:
              Router(config-router-af)# neighbor 2001:db8:ffff::2 remote-as 65011
               

              Adds the IPv6 address of the neighbor in the specified autonomous system to the IPv6 multiprotocol BGP neighbor table of the local router.

               
              Step 29 neighbor ip-address activate


              Example:
              Router(config-router-af)# neighbor 2001:db8:ffff::2 activate
               

              Enables the neighbor to exchange prefixes for the IPv6 unicast address family.

               
              Step 30 exit


              Example:
              Router(config-router-af)# exit
               

              Exits address family configuration mode and returns to router configuration mode.

               
              Step 31 exit


              Example:
              Router(config-router)# exit
               

              Exits router configuration mode and returns to global configuration mode.

               
              Step 32 ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop


              Example:
              Router(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.10.1
               

              Configures an IPv4 static route.

              • In this example, a default route to the upstream next hop for all IPv4 destinations is created.
               
              Step 33 ipv6 route ipv6-prefix next-hop


              Example:
              Router(config)# ipv6 route ::/0 2001:db8:e000:2::f0f
               

              Configures an IPv6 static route.

              • In this example, a default route to the upstream next hop for all IPv6 destinations is created.
               
              Step 34 exit


              Example:
              Router(config)# exit
               

              Exits global configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

               
              Examples
              Figure 12. ALT-Connected LISP Map Resolver and Map Server, each having both an IPv4 and an IPv6 RLOC

              The example below shows the full configuration for a LISP map resolver including some basic IP and IPv6 configuration not included in the task table for this task:

              !
              vrf definition lisp
               rd 1:1
               !
               address-family ipv4
               exit-address-family
               !
               address-family ipv6
               exit-address-family
              !
              no ip domain lookup
              ip cef
              ipv6 unicast-routing
              ipv6 cef
              !
              interface Loopback0
               no ip address
              !
              interface Tunnel192
               vrf forwarding lisp
               ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.252
               ipv6 address 2001:db8:ffff::1/64
               tunnel source GigabitEthernet 0/0/0
               tunnel destination 10.10.10.13
              !
              interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/0
               description Link to SP1 (RLOC)
               ip address 10.10.10.10 255.255.255.0
               ipv6 address 2001:db8:e000:2::1/64
              !
              router lisp
               ipv4 map-resolver
               ipv4 alt-vrf lisp
               ipv6 map-resolver
               ipv6 alt-vrf lisp
               exit
              !
              router bgp 65010
               bgp asnotation dot
               bgp log-neighbor-changes
               !
               address-family ipv4 vrf lisp
                neighbor 192.168.1.2 remote-as 65011
                neighbor 192.168.1.2 activate
               exit-address-family
               !
               address-family ipv6 vrf lisp
                neighbor 2001:db8:ffff::2 remote-as 65011
                neighbor 2001:db8:ffff::2 activate
               exit-address-family
              !
              ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.10.1
              !
              ipv6 route ::/0 2001:db8:e000:2::f0f
              !
              

              Configuring an ALT-Connected LISP Map Server

              Perform this task to configure LISP alternative logical topology (ALT) map server functionality for both IPv4 and IPv6 address family mapping services.


              Note


              You must also configure an ALT-connected LISP map resolver (see the Configuring an ALT-Connected LISP Map Resolver task).


              In the figure below, the map resolver (MR) and map server (MS) are configured on separate devices and share their EID prefix information via connectivity.

              Figure 13. ALT-Connected LISP Map Resolver and Map Server, each having both an IPv4 and an IPv6 RLOC

              The map server illustrated in the topology shown in the figure is described below; the map resolver and LISP ALT are configured in separate tasks:

              Mapping System
              • Two LISP devices are configured, one as an MS and the other as an MR.
              • The MS has an IPv4 locator of 10.10.10.13/24 and an IPv6 locator of 2001:db8:e000:2::3/64.
              • The MR has an IPv4 locator of 10.10.10.10/24 and an IPv6 locator of 2001:db8:e000:2::1/64.
              • Assume that the xTRs in the LISP site register to this map server. That is, the xTR registers the IPv4 EID-prefix of 172.16.1.0/24 and, when IPv6 EIDs are used, the xTR registers the IPv6 EID-prefix of 2001:db8:a::/48.

                Note


                The configuration of the xTR must be changed to use the MS RLOC for its map server configuration and the MR RLOC for its map resolver configuration. For example:
                • ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
                • ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.10.13 key 0 some-key

              Other Infrastructure

              • The MR has IPv4 and IPv6 tunnel endpoints in the VRF table (named lisp) of 192.168.1.1/30 and 2001:db8:ffff::1/64, respectively, and the MS has IPv4 and IPv6 tunnel endpoints of 192.168.1.2/30 and 2001:db8:ffff::2/64, respectively, in the same VRF table. This tunnel is used for the ALT.
              SUMMARY STEPS

                1.    configure terminal

                2.    vrf definition vrf-name

                3.    rd route-distinguisher

                4.    address-family ipv4 [unicast]

                5.    exit-address-family

                6.    address-family ipv6

                7.    exit-address-family

                8.    exit

                9.    interface type number

                10.    vrf forwarding vrf-name

                11.    ip address ip-address mask

                12.    ipv6 address ipv6-address/mask

                13.    tunnel source interface-type interface-number

                14.    tunnel destination ipv4-address

                15.    exit

                16.    router lisp

                17.    ipv4 map-server

                18.    ipv4 alt-vrf vrf-name

                19.    ipv6 map-server

                20.    ipv6 alt-vrf vrf-name

                21.    site site-name

                22.    eid-prefix EID-prefix

                23.    authentication-key key-type authentication-key

                24.    exit

                25.    Repeat Steps 21 through 24 to configure additional LISP sites.

                26.    exit

                27.    router bgp autonomous-system-number

                28.    address-family ipv4 [unicast | multicast | vrf vrf-name]

                29.    redistribute lisp

                30.    neighbor ip-address remote-as autonomous-system-number

                31.    neighbor ip-address activate

                32.    exit

                33.    address-family ipv6 vrf vrf-name

                34.    redistribute lisp

                35.    neighbor ip-address remote-as autonomous-system-number

                36.    neighbor ip-address activate

                37.    exit

                38.    exit

                39.    ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop

                40.    ipv6 route ipv6-prefix next-hop

                41.    exit


              DETAILED STEPS
                 Command or ActionPurpose
                Step 1 configure terminal


                Example:
                Router# configure terminal
                 

                Enters global configuration mode.

                 
                Step 2 vrf definition vrf-name


                Example:
                Router(config)# vrf definition lisp
                 

                Creates a virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) table and enters VRF configuration mode.

                • Use the vrf-name argument to specify a name to be assigned to the VRF. In this example, a VRF named lisp is created to hold EID prefixes.
                 
                Step 3 rd route-distinguisher


                Example:
                Router(config-vrf)# rd 1:1
                 

                Creates routing and forwarding tables for a VRF.

                 
                Step 4 address-family ipv4 [unicast]


                Example:
                Router(config-vrf)# address-family ipv4
                 

                Enters VRF IPv4 address family configuration mode to specify an IPv4 address family for a VRF table.

                • In this example, the VRF table named lisp handles IPv4 EID prefixes.
                 
                Step 5 exit-address-family


                Example:
                Router(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family
                 

                Exits VRF IPv4 address family configuration mode and returns to VRF configuration mode.

                 
                Step 6 address-family ipv6


                Example:
                Router(config-vrf)# address-family ipv6
                 

                Enters VRF IPv6 address family configuration mode to specify an IPv6 address family for a VRF table.

                • In this example, the VRF table named lisp handles IPv6 EID prefixes.
                 
                Step 7 exit-address-family


                Example:
                Router(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family
                 

                Exits VRF IPv6 address family configuration mode and returns to VRF configuration mode.

                 
                Step 8 exit


                Example:
                Router(config-vrf)# exit
                 

                Exits VRF configuration mode and enters global configuration mode.

                 
                Step 9 interface type number


                Example:
                Router(config)# interface tunnel 191
                 

                Specifies the interface type of tunnel and the interface number and enters interface configuration mode.

                 
                Step 10 vrf forwarding vrf-name


                Example:
                Router(config-if)# vrf forwarding lisp
                 

                Associates a VRF instance configured in Step 2 with the tunnel interface configured in Step 9.

                • When the interface is bound to a VRF, previously configured IP addresses are removed, and the interface is disabled.
                 
                Step 11 ip address ip-address mask


                Example:
                Router(config-if)# ip address 192.168.1.6 255.255.255.252
                 

                Configures an IPv4 address for the tunnel interface.

                 
                Step 12 ipv6 address ipv6-address/mask


                Example:
                Router(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ffff::6/64
                 

                Configures an IPv6 address for the tunnel interface.

                 
                Step 13 tunnel source interface-type interface-number


                Example:
                Router(config-if)# tunnel source GigabitEthernet 0/0/0
                 

                Configures the tunnel source.

                 
                Step 14 tunnel destination ipv4-address


                Example:
                Router(config-if)# tunnel destination 10.10.10.13
                 

                Configures the tunnel destination IPv4 address for the tunnel interface.

                 
                Step 15 exit


                Example:
                Router(config-if)# exit
                 

                Exits interface configuration mode and enters global configuration mode.

                 
                Step 16 router lisp


                Example:
                Router(config)# router lisp
                 

                Enters LISP configuration mode (Cisco IOS XE software only).

                 
                Step 17 ipv4 map-server


                Example:
                Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 map-server
                 

                Enables LISP map server functionality for EIDs in the IPv4 address family.

                 
                Step 18 ipv4 alt-vrf vrf-name


                Example:
                Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 alt-vrf lisp
                 

                Associates a VRF table with the LISP ALT for IPv4 EIDs.

                • In this example, the VRF table named lisp (created in Step 2) is associated with the LISP ALT.
                 
                Step 19 ipv6 map-server


                Example:
                Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 map-server
                 

                Enables LISP map server functionality for EIDs in the IPv6 address family.

                 
                Step 20 ipv6 alt-vrf vrf-name


                Example:
                Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 alt-vrf lisp
                 

                Associates a VRF table with the LISP ALT for IPv6 EIDs.

                • In this example, the VRF table named lisp (created in Step 2) is associated with the LISP ALT.
                 
                Step 21 site site-name


                Example:
                Router(config-router-lisp)# site Site-1
                 

                Specifies a LISP site and enters LISP site configuration mode.

                Note   

                A LISP site name is locally significant to the map server on which it is configured. It has no relevance anywhere else. This name is used solely as an administrative means of associating one or more EID prefixes with an authentication key and other site-related mechanisms.

                 
                Step 22 eid-prefix EID-prefix


                Example:
                Router(config-router-lisp-site)# eid-prefix 172.16.1.0/24
                 

                Configures an IPv4 or IPv6 EID prefix associated with this LISP site.

                • Repeat this step as necessary to configure additional EID prefixes under this LISP sites.
                • In this step example, only an IPv4 EID prefix is configured but to complete the configuration, an IPv6 EID prefix must also be configured.
                Note   

                The LISP ETR must be configured with matching EID prefixes and an identical authentication key.

                Note   

                Additional eid-prefix command configuration options are available. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

                 
                Step 23 authentication-key key-type authentication-key


                Example:
                Router(config-router-lisp-site)# authentication-key 0 some-key
                 

                Configures the authentication key associated with this site.

                Note   

                The LISP ETR must be configured with matching EID prefixes and an identical authentication key.

                Note   

                The authentication-key can be configured with Type 6 encryption. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

                 
                Step 24 exit


                Example:
                Router(config-router-lisp-site)# exit
                 

                Exits LISP site configuration mode and returns to LISP configuration mode.

                 
                Step 25Repeat Steps 21 through 24 to configure additional LISP sites.  

                 
                Step 26 exit


                Example:
                Router(config-router-lisp)# exit
                 

                Exits LISP configuration mode and returns to global configuration mode.

                 
                Step 27 router bgp autonomous-system-number


                Example:
                Router(config)# router bgp 65011
                 

                Enters router configuration mode for the specified routing process.

                 
                Step 28 address-family ipv4 [unicast | multicast | vrf vrf-name]


                Example:
                Router(config-router)# address-family ipv4 vrf lisp
                 
                Specifies the IPv4 address family and enters IPv4 address family configuration mode.
                • The vrf keyword and vrf-name argument specify the name of the VRF instance to associate with subsequent commands.
                • In this example, the VRF table named lisp (created in Step 2) is associated with the BGP IPv4 VRF that carries EID prefixes in the LISP ALT.
                 
                Step 29 redistribute lisp


                Example:
                Router(config-router-af)# redistribute lisp
                 

                Redistributes EID prefixes known to LISP into BGP.

                 
                Step 30 neighbor ip-address remote-as autonomous-system-number


                Example:
                Router(config-router-af)# neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 65010
                 

                Adds the IP address of the neighbor in the specified autonomous system to the IPv4 multiprotocol BGP neighbor table of the local router.

                 
                Step 31 neighbor ip-address activate


                Example:
                Router(config-router-af)# neighbor 192.168.1.1 activate
                 

                Enables the neighbor to exchange prefixes for the IPv4 unicast address family.

                 
                Step 32 exit


                Example:
                Router(config-router-af)# exit
                 

                Exits address family configuration mode and returns to router configuration mode.

                 
                Step 33 address-family ipv6 vrf vrf-name


                Example:
                Router(config-router)# address-family ipv6 vrf lisp
                 
                Specifies the IPv6 address family and enters IPv6 address family configuration mode.
                • The vrf keyword and vrf-name argument specify the name of the VRF instance to associate with subsequent commands.
                • In this example, the VRF table named lisp (created in Step 2) is associated with the BGP IPv6 VRF that carries EID prefixes in the LISP ALT.
                 
                Step 34 redistribute lisp


                Example:
                Router(config-router-af)# redistribute lisp
                 

                Redistributes EID prefixes known to LISP into BGP.

                 
                Step 35 neighbor ip-address remote-as autonomous-system-number


                Example:
                Router(config-router-af)# neighbor 2001:db8:ffff::1 remote-as 65010
                 

                Adds the IPv6 address of the neighbor in the specified autonomous system to the IPv6 multiprotocol BGP neighbor table of the local router.

                 
                Step 36 neighbor ip-address activate


                Example:
                Router(config-router-af)# neighbor 2001:db8:ffff::1 activate
                 

                Enables the neighbor to exchange prefixes for the IPv6 unicast address family.

                 
                Step 37 exit


                Example:
                Router(config-router-af)# exit
                 

                Exits address family configuration mode and returns to router configuration mode.

                 
                Step 38 exit


                Example:
                Router(config-router)# exit
                 

                Exits router configuration mode and returns to global configuration mode.

                 
                Step 39 ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop


                Example:
                Router(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.10.1
                 

                Configures an IPv4 static route.

                • In this example, a default route to the upstream next hop for all IPv4 destinations is created.
                 
                Step 40 ipv6 route ipv6-prefix next-hop


                Example:
                Router(config)# ipv6 route ::/0 2001:db8:e000:2::f0f
                 

                Configures an IPv6 static route.

                • In this example, a default route to the upstream next hop for all IPv6 destinations is created.
                 
                Step 41 exit


                Example:
                Router(config)# exit
                 

                Exits global configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

                 
                Example:
                Figure 14. ALT-Connected LISP Map Resolver and Map Server, each having both an IPv4 and an IPv6 RLOC

                The example below shows the full configuration for a LISP map server including some basic IP and IPv6 configuration not included in the task table for this task:

                !
                hostname MS
                !
                vrf definition lisp
                 rd 1:1
                 !
                 address-family ipv4
                 exit-address-family
                 !
                 address-family ipv6
                 exit-address-family
                !
                no ip domain lookup
                ip cef
                ipv6 unicast-routing
                ipv6 cef
                !
                interface Loopback0
                 no ip address
                !
                interface Tunnel192
                 vrf forwarding lisp
                 ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.252
                 ipv6 address 2001:db8:ffff::2/64
                 tunnel source GigabitEthernet 0/0/0
                 tunnel destination 10.10.10.10
                !
                interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/0
                 description Link to SP1 (RLOC)
                 ip address 10.10.10.13 255.255.255.0
                 ipv6 address 2001:db8:e000:2::3/64
                !
                router lisp
                 site Site-1
                  authentication-key 0 some-xtr-key
                  eid-prefix 172.16.1.0/24
                  eid-prefix 2001:db8:a::/48
                  exit
                 !
                 site Site-2
                  authentication-key 0 another-xtr-key
                  eid-prefix 172.16.2.0/24
                  eid-prefix 2001:db8:b::/48
                  exit
                 !
                 !---configure more LISP sites as required---
                 !
                 ipv4 map-server
                 ipv4 alt-vrf lisp
                 ipv6 map-server
                 ipv6 alt-vrf lisp
                 exit
                !
                router bgp 65011
                 bgp asnotation dot
                 bgp log-neighbor-changes
                 !
                 address-family ipv4 vrf lisp
                  redistribute lisp
                  neighbor 192.168.1.1 remote-as 65010
                  neighbor 192.168.1.1 activate
                 exit-address-family
                 !
                 address-family ipv6 vrf lisp
                  redistribute lisp
                  neighbor 2001:db8:ffff::1 remote-as 65010
                  neighbor 2001:db8:ffff::1 activate
                 exit-address-family
                !
                ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.10.1
                !
                ipv6 route ::/0 2001:db8:e000:2::f0f
                

                Configure a PETR and a PITR

                The following tasks show how to design and deploy a Proxy Egress Tunnel Router (PETR) and a Proxy Ingress Tunnel Router (PITR). The example scenario shows deployment of a PETR and PITR as separate devices but it is also possible to deploy a single device that acts simultaneously as a PETR and a PITR, which is called a PxTR.

                Deploying a Proxy Egress Tunnel Router with both an IPv4 and an IPv6 RLOC

                Perform this task to deploy a Proxy Egress Tunnel Router (PETR) for both IPv4 and IPv6 address families. You can also perform this task to configure PETR functionality on a single device that acts simultaneously as a PETR and as a Proxy Ingress Tunnel Router (PITR), referred to as a PxTR.

                A PETR simply takes in LISP encapsulated packets and decapsulates them and forwards them. For example, a PETR can be used to provide IPv6 LISP EIDs access to non-LISP EIDs when the LISP site only has IPv4 RLOC connectivity. A PETR, therefore, is used for LISP-to-non-LISP access in situations where cross-address family connectivity is an issue. (A PETR can still be used for matching EID and RLOC address families if desired.) Note that a PITR is required to provide return-traffic flow. A PETR is simple to deploy because it need only provide dual-stack connectivity to the core.

                The topology used in this PETR example is shown in the figure. The PETR and PITR in this example are deployed as separate devices and each have both an IPv4 and an IPv6 locator.

                Figure 15. Proxy Egress Tunnel Router with both an IPv4 and an IPv6 RLOC

                The components illustrated in the topology shown in the figure are described below:

                PETR
                • When deployed as a standalone LISP device, the PETR has dual-stack connectivity to the core network.
                • The PETR IPv4 locator is 10.10.10.14/24 and the IPv6 locator is 2001:db8:e000:2::4/64.
                SUMMARY STEPS

                  1.    enable

                  2.    configure terminal

                  3.    router lisp

                  4.    ipv4 proxy-etr

                  5.    ipv6 proxy-etr

                  6.    exit

                  7.    ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop

                  8.    ipv6 route ipv6-prefix next-hop

                  9.    exit


                DETAILED STEPS
                   Command or ActionPurpose
                  Step 1 enable


                  Example:
                  Router> enable
                   

                  Enables privileged EXEC mode.

                  • Enter your password if prompted.
                   
                  Step 2 configure terminal


                  Example:
                  Router# configure terminal
                   

                  Enters global configuration mode.

                   
                  Step 3 router lisp


                  Example:
                  Router(config)# router lisp
                   

                  Enters LISP configuration mode (Cisco IOS XE software only).

                   
                  Step 4 ipv4 proxy-etr


                  Example:
                  Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 proxy-etr
                   

                  Enables PETR functionality for IPv4 EIDs.

                   
                  Step 5 ipv6 proxy-etr


                  Example:
                  Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 proxy-etr
                   

                  Enables PETR functionality for IPv6 EIDs.

                   
                  Step 6 exit


                  Example:
                  Router(config-router-lisp)# exit
                   

                  Exits LISP configuration mode and enters global configuration mode.

                   
                  Step 7 ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop


                  Example:
                  Router(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.10.1
                   

                  Configures an IPv4 static route.

                  • In this example, a default route to the upstream next hop for all IPv4 destinations is created.
                   
                  Step 8 ipv6 route ipv6-prefix next-hop


                  Example:
                  Router(config)# ipv6 route ::/0 2001:db8:e000:2::f0f
                   

                  Configures an IPv6 static route.

                  • In this example, a default route to the upstream next hop for all IPv6 destinations is created.
                   
                  Step 9 exit


                  Example:
                  Router(config)# exit
                   

                  Exits global configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

                   
                  Example:
                  Figure 16. Proxy Egress Tunnel Router with both an IPv4 and an IPv6 RLOC

                  The example below shows the full configuration for a PETR including some basic IP and IPv6 configuration not included in the task table for this task:

                  !
                  hostname PETR
                  !
                  no ip domain lookup
                  ip cef
                  ipv6 unicast-routing
                  ipv6 cef
                  !
                  interface Loopback0
                   no ip address
                  !
                  interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/0
                   description Link to Core (RLOC)
                   ip address 10.10.10.14 255.255.255.0
                   ipv6 address 2001:db8:e000:2::4/64
                  !
                  router lisp
                   ipv4 proxy-etr
                   ipv6 proxy-etr
                   exit
                  !
                  ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.10.1
                  !
                  ipv6 route ::/0 2001:db8:e000:2::f0f

                  Deploying a Proxy Ingress Tunnel Router with both an IPv4 and an IPv6 RLOC

                  Perform this task to deploy a Proxy Ingress Tunnel Router (PITR) for both IPv4 and IPv6 address families. You can also perform this task to configure PITR functionality on a single device that acts simultaneously as a PITR and as a Proxy Egress Tunnel Router (PETR), referred to as a PxTR.

                  A PITR attracts non-LISP packets by advertising a coarse-aggregate prefix for LISP EIDs into the core (such as the Internet or a Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) core) and then performs LISP encapsulation services (like an ITR) to provide access to LISP EIDs. Thus, a PITR provides non-LISP-to-LISP interworking. A PITR is also used to provide address family “hop-over�? for non-LISP-to-LISP traffic. For example, a dual-stacked PxTR can be used to provide a return-traffic path from non-LISP IPv6 sites to IPv6 LISP sites that contain only IPv4 RLOCs.

                  To resolve EID-to-RLOC mappings for creating non-LISP-to-LISP flows, configure PITR to query the LISP mapping system. In this task, the PITR is configured to send Map-Rrequest messages via the LISP alternate logical topology (ALT) to resolve EID-to-RLOC mappings.

                  Note


                  To attract non-LISP traffic destined to LISP sites, the PITR must advertise coarse-aggregate EID prefixes into the underlying network infrastructure. In an Internet-as-the-core example, attracting non-LISP traffice destined to LISP sites is typically managed via external BGP (eBGP) and by advertising the coarse-aggregate that includes all appropriate EID prefixes into the Internet. The example configuration in the figure utilizes this approach. Because this is a standard BGP configuration, summary and detailed command guidance is not provided in the task table for this task, although the complete configuration example that follows the task table does include an accurate example of this eBGP peering. Any other approach that advertises coarse-aggregates that include all appropriate EID prefixes into the core are also acceptable.


                  The topology used in this example is shown in the figure. The PITR is deployed as a separate device, with both an IPv4 and an IPv6 locator. A map resolver and core-peering router are also shown in the figure for reference because they are required components for completing the PITR configuration shown in the figure.

                  Figure 17. Proxy Ingress Tunnel Router with both an IPv4 and an IPv6 RLOC

                  The components illustrated in the topology shown in the figure are described below:

                  PITR
                  • When deployed as a standalone LISP device, the PITR has dual-stack connectivity to the core network.
                  • The PITR IPv4 locator is 10.10.10.11/24 and the IPv6 locator is 2001:db8:e000:2::2/64.
                  • The use of LISP EID prefixes throughout this task (172.16.1.0/24 and 2001:db8:a::/48 configuration) is assumed and are part of LISP EID blocks that can be summarized in coarse-aggregates and advertised by the PITR into the core network. The advertisement of the IPv4 coarse-aggregate of 172.16.0.0/16 and the IPv6 coarse-aggregate of 2001:db8::/33 by the PITR into the IPv4 and IPv6 core networks is also assumed.
                  • The PITR eBGP peers with the core router with locators 10.10.11.1 and 2001:db8:e000:3::1 in order to advertise the coarse-aggregate IPv4 EID prefix of 172.16.0.0/16 and the IPv6 EID prefix of 2001:db8::/33 into the IPv4 and IPv6 cores, respectively.
                  • The PITR is configured to use the LISP ALT (GRE+BGP) via the map server with locators 10.10.10.13 and 2001:db8:e000:2::3. The relevant configuration is shown for the PITR.

                  Other Infrastructure

                  • The MS has IPv4 and IPv6 tunnel endpoints in the VRF table (named lisp) of 192.168.5/30 and 2001:db8:ffff::5/64, respectively. The configuration of the map server is not in the task table.
                  • The core router has an IPv4 address of 10.10.11.1 and an IPv6 address of 2001:db8:e000:3::1. These addresses will be used for eBGP peering. The core router configuration is assumed to be familiar as a typical ISP peering router and is therefore not included in the task table.
                  SUMMARY STEPS

                    1.    configure terminal

                    2.    vrf definition vrf-name

                    3.    rd route-distinguisher

                    4.    address-family ipv4 [unicast]

                    5.    exit-address-family

                    6.    address-family ipv6

                    7.    exit-address-family

                    8.    exit

                    9.    interface type number

                    10.    vrf forwarding vrf-name

                    11.    ip address ip-address mask

                    12.    ipv6 address ipv6-address/mask

                    13.    tunnel source interface-type interface-number

                    14.    tunnel destination ipv4-address

                    15.    exit

                    16.    router lisp

                    17.    ipv4 alt-vrf vrf-name

                    18.    ipv4 proxy-itr ipv4-locator [ipv6-locator]

                    19.    ipv4 map-cache-limit map-cache-limit

                    20.    ipv6 alt-vrf vrf-name

                    21.    ipv6 proxy-itr ipv6-locator [ipv4-locator]

                    22.    ipv6 map-cache-limit map-cache-limit

                    23.    exit

                    24.    router bgp autonomous-system-number

                    25.    address-family ipv4 [unicast | multicast | vrf vrf-name]

                    26.    neighbor ip-address remote-as autonomous-system-number

                    27.    neighbor ip-address activate

                    28.    exit

                    29.    address-family ipv6 [unicast | multicast | vrf vrf-name]

                    30.    neighbor ip-address remote-as autonomous-system-number

                    31.    neighbor ip-address activate

                    32.    exit

                    33.    exit

                    34.    ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop

                    35.    ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop

                    36.    ipv6 route ipv6-prefix next-hop

                    37.    ipv6 route ipv6-prefix next-hop

                    38.    exit


                  DETAILED STEPS
                     Command or ActionPurpose
                    Step 1 configure terminal


                    Example:
                    Router# configure terminal
                     

                    Enters global configuration mode.

                     
                    Step 2 vrf definition vrf-name


                    Example:
                    Router(config)# vrf definition lisp
                     

                    Configures a virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) table and enters VRF configuration mode.

                    • Use the vrf-name argument to specify a name to be assigned to the VRF. In this example, a VRF named lisp is created to hold EID prefixes.
                     
                    Step 3 rd route-distinguisher


                    Example:
                    Router(config-vrf)# rd 1:1
                     

                    Creates routing and forwarding tables for a VRF.

                     
                    Step 4 address-family ipv4 [unicast]


                    Example:
                    Router(config-vrf)# address-family ipv4
                     

                    Enters VRF IPv4 address family configuration mode to specify an IPv4 address family for a VRF table.

                    • In this example, the VRF named lisp handles IPv4 EID prefixes.
                     
                    Step 5 exit-address-family


                    Example:
                    Router(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family
                     

                    Exits VRF address family configuration mode and returns to VRF configuration mode.

                     
                    Step 6 address-family ipv6


                    Example:
                    Router(config-vrf)# address-family ipv6
                     

                    Enters VRF IPv6 address family configuration mode to specify an IPv6 address family for a VRF table.

                    • In this example, the VRF table named lisp handles IPv6 EID prefixes.
                     
                    Step 7 exit-address-family


                    Example:
                    Router(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family
                     

                    Exits VRF address family configuration mode and returns to VRF configuration mode.

                     
                    Step 8 exit


                    Example:
                    Router(config-vrf)# exit
                     

                    Exits VRF configuration mode and enters global configuration mode.

                     
                    Step 9 interface type number


                    Example:
                    Router(config)# interface tunnel 191
                     

                    Specifies the interface type of tunnel and the interface number and enters interface configuration mode.

                     
                    Step 10 vrf forwarding vrf-name


                    Example:
                    Router(config-if)# vrf forwarding lisp
                     

                    Associates a VRF instance configured in Step 2 with the tunnel interface configured in Step 9.

                    • When the interface is bound to a VRF, previously configured IP addresses are removed, and the interface is disabled.
                     
                    Step 11 ip address ip-address mask


                    Example:
                    Router(config-if)# ip address 192.168.1.6 255.255.255.252
                     

                    Configures an IPv4 address for the tunnel interface.

                     
                    Step 12 ipv6 address ipv6-address/mask


                    Example:
                    Router(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:DB8:ffff::6/64
                     

                    Configures an IPv6 address for the tunnel interface.

                     
                    Step 13 tunnel source interface-type interface-number


                    Example:
                    Router(config-if)# tunnel source GigabitEthernet 0/0/0
                     

                    Configures the tunnel source.

                     
                    Step 14 tunnel destination ipv4-address


                    Example:
                    Router(config-if)# tunnel destination 10.10.10.13
                     

                    Configures the tunnel destination IPv4 address for the tunnel interface.

                     
                    Step 15 exit


                    Example:
                    Router(config-if)# exit
                     

                    Exits interface configuration mode and enters global configuration mode.

                     
                    Step 16 router lisp


                    Example:
                    Router(config)# router lisp
                     

                    Enters LISP configuration mode (Cisco IOS XE software only).

                     
                    Step 17 ipv4 alt-vrf vrf-name


                    Example:
                    Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 alt-vrf lisp
                     

                    Associates a VRF table with the LISP ALT for IPv4 EIDs.

                    • In this example, the VRF table named lisp (created in Step 2) is associated with the LISP ALT.
                     
                    Step 18 ipv4 proxy-itr ipv4-locator [ipv6-locator]


                    Example:
                    Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 proxy-itr 10.10.10.11 2001:db8:e000:2::2
                     

                    Enables Proxy Ingress Tunnel Router (PITR) functionality for IPv4 EIDs, and specifies the IPv4 and (optionally) the IPv6 RLOCs (local to the PITR) to use when LISP-encapsulating packets to LISP sites.

                     
                    Step 19 ipv4 map-cache-limit map-cache-limit


                    Example:
                    Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv4 map-cache-limit 100000
                     

                    Specifies the maximum number of IPv4 map-cache entries to be maintained by the PITR.

                    • When the map-cache reaches this limit, existing entries are removed according to the rules described in the command reference guide. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)
                    • The default map-cache-limit is 10000. In this example, since the device is being configured as a PITR, a larger map-cache limit is configured.
                     
                    Step 20 ipv6 alt-vrf vrf-name


                    Example:
                    Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 alt-vrf lisp
                     

                    Associates a VRF table with the LISP ALT for IPv6 EIDs.

                    • In this example, the VRF table named lisp (created in Step 2) is associated with the LISP ALT.
                     
                    Step 21 ipv6 proxy-itr ipv6-locator [ipv4-locator]


                    Example:
                    Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 proxy-itr 2001:db8:e000:2::2 10.10.10.11
                     

                    Enables Proxy Ingress Tunnel Router (PITR) functionality for IPv6 EIDs, and specifies the IPv6 and (optionally) the IPv4 RLOCs (local to the PITR) to use when LISP-encapsulating packets to LISP sites.

                     
                    Step 22 ipv6 map-cache-limit map-cache-limit


                    Example:
                    Router(config-router-lisp)# ipv6 map-cache-limit 100000
                     

                    Specifies the maximum number of IPv6 map-cache entries to be maintained by the PITR.

                    • When the map-cache reaches this limit, existing entries are removed according to the rules described in the command reference guide. (See the LISP Command Reference for more details.)

                    The default map-cache-limit is 10000. In this example, since the device is being configured as a PITR, a larger map-cache limit is configured.

                     
                    Step 23 exit


                    Example:
                    Router(config-router-lisp)# exit
                     

                    Exits LISP configuration mode and returns to global configuration mode.

                     
                    Step 24 router bgp autonomous-system-number


                    Example:
                    Router(config)# router bgp 65015
                     

                    Enters router configuration mode for the specified routing process.

                     
                    Step 25 address-family ipv4 [unicast | multicast | vrf vrf-name]


                    Example:
                    Router(config-router)# address-family ipv4 vrf lisp
                     
                    Specifies the IPv4 address family and enters IPv4 address family configuration mode.
                    • The vrf keyword and vrf-name argument specify the name of the VRF instance to associate with subsequent commands.
                    • In this example, the VRF table named lisp (created in Step 2) is associated with the BGP IPv4 VRF that carries EID prefixes in the LISP ALT.
                     
                    Step 26 neighbor ip-address remote-as autonomous-system-number


                    Example:
                    Router(config-router-af)# neighbor 192.168.1.5 remote-as 65011
                     

                    Adds the IP address of the neighbor in the specified autonomous system to the IPv4 multiprotocol BGP neighbor table of the local router.

                     
                    Step 27 neighbor ip-address activate


                    Example:
                    Router(config-router-af)# neighbor 192.168.1.5 activate
                     

                    Enables the neighbor to exchange prefixes for the IPv4 unicast address family.

                     
                    Step 28 exit


                    Example:
                    Router(config-router-af)# exit
                     

                    Exits address family configuration mode.

                     
                    Step 29 address-family ipv6 [unicast | multicast | vrf vrf-name]


                    Example:
                    Router(config-router-af)# address-family ipv6 vrf lisp
                     
                    Specifies the IPv6 address family and enters IPv6 address family configuration mode.
                    • The vrf keyword and vrf-name argument specify the name of the VRF instance to associate with subsequent commands.
                    • In this example, the VRF table named lisp (created in Step 2) is associated with the BGP IPv6 VRF that carries EID prefixes in the LISP ALT.
                     
                    Step 30 neighbor ip-address remote-as autonomous-system-number


                    Example:
                    Router(config-router-af)# neighbor 2001:db8:ffff::5 remote-as 65011
                     

                    Adds the IPv6 address of the neighbor in the specified autonomous system to the IPv6 multiprotocol BGP neighbor table of the local router.

                     
                    Step 31 neighbor ip-address activate


                    Example:
                    Router(config-router-af)# neighbor 2001:db8:ffff::5 activate
                     

                    Enables the neighbor to exchange prefixes for the IPv6 unicast address family.

                     
                    Step 32 exit


                    Example:
                    Router(config-router-af)# exit
                     

                    Exits address family configuration mode.

                     
                    Step 33 exit


                    Example:
                    Router(config-router)# exit
                     

                    Exits router configuration mode.

                     
                    Step 34 ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop


                    Example:
                    Router(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.10.1
                     

                    Configures an IPv4 static route.

                    • In this example, a default route to the upstream next hop for all IPv4 destinations is created.
                     
                    Step 35 ip route ipv4-prefix next-hop


                    Example:
                    Router(config)# ip route 172.16.0.0 255.255.0.0 Null0 tag 123
                     

                    Configures an IPv4 static route.

                    • In this example, a static route is configured to Null0 for the coarse-aggregate IPv4 EID prefix 172.16.0.0/16. This static route is required to ensure proper operation of LISP in querying the mapping system for LISP EIDs. The tag 123 is added to this null route as a reference point for the route map used to permit the advertisement of this coarse aggregate to the upstream ISP BGP peer.
                     
                    Step 36 ipv6 route ipv6-prefix next-hop


                    Example:
                    Router(config)# ipv6 route ::/0 2001:db8:e000:2::f0f
                     

                    Configures an IPv6 static route.

                    • In this example, a default route to the upstream next hop for all IPv6 destinations is created.
                     
                    Step 37 ipv6 route ipv6-prefix next-hop


                    Example:
                    Router(config)# ipv6 route 2001:db8::/33 Null0 tag 123
                     

                    Configures an IPv6 static route.

                    • In this example, a static route is configured to Null0 for the coarse-aggregate IPv6 EID prefix 2001:db8::/33. This is required to ensure proper operation of LISP in querying the mapping system for LISP EIDs. The tag 123 is added to this null route as a handy reference point for the route-map used to permit the advertisement of this coarse-aggregate to the upstream ISP BGP peer.
                     
                    Step 38 exit


                    Example:
                    Router(config)# exit
                     

                    Exits global configuration mode.

                     
                    Example:
                    Figure 18. Proxy Ingress Tunnel Router with both an IPv4 and an IPv6 RLOC

                    The example below shows the full configuration for a PITR includes some basic IP, BGP, and route map configuration not included in the task table for this task:

                    !
                    hostname PITR
                    !
                    no ip domain lookup
                    ip cef
                    ipv6 unicast-routing
                    ipv6 cef
                    !
                    interface Loopback0
                     no ip address
                    !
                    interface Tunnel191
                     vrf forwarding lisp
                     ip address 192.168.1.6 255.255.255.252
                     ipv6 address 2001:db8:ffff::6/64
                     tunnel source GigabitEthernet 0/0/0
                     tunnel destination 10.10.10.13
                    !
                    interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/0
                     description Link to Core (RLOC)
                     ip address 10.10.10.11 255.255.255.0
                     ipv6 address 2001:db8:e000:2::2/64
                    !
                    router lisp
                     ipv4 alt-vrf lisp
                     ipv4 map-cache-limit 100000
                     ipv4 proxy-itr 10.10.10.11 2001:db8:e000:2::2
                     ipv6 alt-vrf lisp
                     ipv6 map-cache-limit 100000
                     ipv6 proxy-itr 2001:db8:e000:2::2 10.10.10.11
                     exit
                    !
                    router bgp 65015
                     bgp asnotation dot
                     bgp log-neighbor-changes
                     neighbor 10.10.11.1 remote-as 65111
                     neighbor 2001:db8:e000:3::1 remote-as 65111
                     !
                     address-family ipv4
                      no synchronization
                      redistribute static route-map populate-default
                      neighbor 10.10.11.1 activate
                      neighbor 10.10.11.1 send-community both
                      neighbor 10.10.11.1 route-map dfz-out out
                     exit-address-family
                     !
                     address-family ipv6
                      redistribute static route-map populate-default
                      neighbor 2001:db8:e000:3::1  activate
                      neighbor 2001:db8:e000:3::1  send-community both
                      neighbor 2001:db8:e000:3::1  route-map dfz-out out
                     exit-address-family
                     !
                     address-family ipv4 vrf lisp
                      no synchronization
                      neighbor 192.168.1.5 remote-as 65011
                      neighbor 192.168.1.5 activate
                     exit-address-family
                     !
                     address-family ipv6 vrf lisp
                      no synchronization
                      neighbor 2001:db8:ffff::5 remote-as 65011
                      neighbor 2001:db8:ffff::5 activate
                     exit-address-family
                    !
                    ip bgp-community new-format
                    ip community-list standard dfz-upstream permit 65100:123
                    !
                    ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.10.1
                    ip route 172.16.0.0 255.255.0.0 Null0 tag 123
                    !
                    ipv6 route 2001:db8::/33 Null0 tag 123
                    ipv6 route ::/0 2001:db8:e000:2::f0f
                    !
                    route-map populate-default permit 10
                     match tag 123
                     set origin igp
                     set community 65100:123
                    !
                    route-map dfz-out permit 10
                     match community dfz-upstream 
                    !
                    

                    Verify and Troubleshoot Locator ID Separation Protocol

                    Once LISP is configured, you can verify and troubleshoot LISP configuration and operations by following the optional steps in this task. Note that certain verification and troubleshooting steps are specific to certain LISP devices and only apply if configured in your LISP site.

                    SUMMARY STEPS

                      1.    enable

                      2.    show running-config | section router lisp

                      3.    show [ip | ipv6] lisp

                      4.    show [ip | ipv6] lisp map-cache

                      5.    show [ip | ipv6] lisp database

                      6.    show lisp site [name site-name]

                      7.    lig {[self {ipv4 | ipv6}] | {hostname | destination-EID}}

                      8.    ping {hostname | destination-EID}

                      9.    clear [ip | ipv6] lisp map-cache


                    DETAILED STEPS
                      Step 1   enable

                      Enables privileged EXEC mode. Enter your password if prompted.



                      Example:
                      Router> enable
                      
                      Step 2   show running-config | section router lisp

                      The show running-config | section router lisp command is useful for quickly verifying the LISP configuration on the device. This command applies to any Cisco IOS LISP device.

                      The following is sample output from the show running-config | section router lisp command when a mulithomed LISP site is configured with IPv4 and IPv6 EID prefixes:



                      Example:
                      Router# show running-config | section router lisp
                      
                      router lisp
                       database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
                       database-mapping 172.16.1.0/24 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
                       database-mapping 2001:DB8:A::/48 10.1.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
                       database-mapping 2001:DB8:A::/48 10.2.1.2 priority 1 weight 50
                       ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
                       ipv4 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
                       ipv4 itr
                       ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key some-key 
                       ipv4 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key some-key 
                       ipv4 etr
                       ipv6 use-petr 10.10.10.11
                       ipv6 use-petr 10.10.30.11
                       ipv6 itr map-resolver 10.10.10.10
                       ipv6 itr map-resolver 10.10.30.10
                       ipv6 itr
                       ipv6 etr map-server 10.10.10.10 key some-key 
                       ipv6 etr map-server 10.10.30.10 key some-key 
                       ipv6 etr
                       exit
                      
                      Step 3   show [ip | ipv6] lisp

                      The show ip lisp and show ipv6 lisp commands are useful for quickly verifying the operational status of LISP as configured on the device, as applicable to the IPv4 and IPv6 address families, respectively. This command applies to any Cisco IOS LISP device.



                      Example:

                      The following example shows LISP operational status and IPv4 address family information:

                      Router# show ip lisp
                      
                      Ingress Tunnel Router (ITR):      enabled
                        Egress Tunnel Router (ETR):       enabled
                        Proxy-ITR Router (PITR):          disabled
                        Proxy-ETR Router (PETR):          disabled
                        Map Server (MS):                  disabled
                        Map Resolver (MR):                disabled
                        Map-Request source:               172.16.1.1
                        ITR Map-Resolver(s):              10.10.10.10, 10.10.30.10
                        ETR Map-Server(s):                10.10.10.10 (00:00:56), 10.10.30.10 (00:00:12)
                        ETR accept mapping data:          disabled, verify disabled
                        ETR map-cache TTL:                1d00h
                        Locator Status Algorithms:
                          RLOC-probe algorithm:           disabled
                        Static mappings configured:       0
                        Map-cache size/limit:             2/1000
                        Map-cache activity check period:  60 secs
                        Map-database size:                1
                      


                      Example:

                      The following example shows LISP operational status and IPv6 address family information:

                      Router# show ip lisp
                      
                      Ingress Tunnel Router (ITR):      enabled
                        Egress Tunnel Router (ETR):       enabled
                        Proxy-ITR Router (PITR):          disabled
                        Proxy-ETR Router (PETR):          disabled
                        Map Server (MS):                  disabled
                        Map Resolver (MR):                disabled
                        Map-Request source:               2001:DB8:A::1
                      ITR Map-Resolver(s):                10.10.10.10, 10.10.30.10
                        ETR Map-Server(s):                10.10.10.10 (00:00:23), 10.10.30.10 (00:00:40)
                        ETR accept mapping data:          disabled, verify disabled
                        ETR map-cache TTL:                1d00h
                        Locator Status Algorithms:
                          RLOC-probe algorithm:           disabled
                        Static mappings configured:       0
                        Map-cache size/limit:             1/1000
                        Map-cache activity check period:  60 secs
                        Map-database size:                1
                      
                      Step 4   show [ip | ipv6] lisp map-cache

                      The show ip lisp map-cache and show ipv6 lisp map-cache commands are useful for quickly verifying the operational status of the map-cache on a device configured as an ITR or PITR, as applicable to the IPv4 and IPv6 address families, respectively. Based on a configuration when a mulithomed LISP site is configured with IPv4 and IPv6 EID prefixes, this example output assumes that a map-cache entry has been received for another site with the IPv4 EID prefix of 172.16.2.0/24 and the IPv6 EID prefix of 2001:db8:b::/48.



                      Example:

                      The following example shows IPv4 mapping cache information:

                      Router# show ip lisp map-cache
                      
                      LISP IPv4 Mapping Cache, 2 entries
                      
                      0.0.0.0/0, uptime: 02:48:19, expires: never, via static send map-request
                        Negative cache entry, action: send-map-request
                      172.16.2.0/24, uptime: 01:45:24, expires: 22:14:28, via map-reply, complete
                        Locator   Uptime    State      Pri/Wgt
                        10.0.0.6  01:45:24  up           1/1
                      


                      Example:

                      The following example shows IPv6 mapping cache information:

                      Router# show ipv6 lisp map-cache
                      
                      LISP IPv6 Mapping Cache, 2 entries
                      
                      ::/0, uptime: 02:49:39, expires: never, via static send map-request
                        Negative cache entry, action: send-map-request
                      2001:DB8:B::/48, uptime: 00:00:07, expires: 23:59:46, via map-reply, complete
                        Locator   Uptime    State      Pri/Wgt
                        10.0.0.6  00:00:07  up           1/1 
                      
                      
                      Step 5   show [ip | ipv6] lisp database

                      The show ip lisp database and show ipv6 lisp database commands are useful for quickly verifying the the operational status of the database mapping on a device configured as an ETR, as applicable to the IPv4 and IPv6 address families, respectively. The following example output is based on a configuration when a mulithomed LISP site is configured with IPv4 and IPv6 EID prefixes.



                      Example:

                      The following example shows IPv4 mapping database information:

                      Router# show ip lisp database
                      
                      LISP ETR IPv4 Mapping Database, LSBs: 0x3, 1 entries
                      
                      172.16.1.0/24
                        Locator   Pri/Wgt  Source     State
                        10.1.1.2    1/50   cfg-addr   site-self, reachable
                        10.2.1.2    1/50   cfg-addr   site-other, report-reachable
                      


                      Example:

                      The following example shows IPv6 mapping database information:

                      Router# show ipv6 lisp database
                      
                      LISP ETR IPv6 Mapping Database, LSBs: 0x1, 1 entries
                      
                      2001:DB8:A::/48
                        Locator   Pri/Wgt  Source     State
                        10.1.1.2    1/50   cfg-addr   site-self, reachable 
                        10.2.1.2    1/50   cfg-addr   site-other, report-reachable
                      
                      Step 6   show lisp site [name site-name]

                      The show lisp site command is useful for quickly verifying the operational status of LISP sites, as configured on a map server. This command applies only to a device configured as a map server.

                      The following examples are based on configurations where a mulithomed LISP site is configured with both IPv4 and IPv6 EID prefixes:



                      Example:
                      Router# show lisp site
                      
                      LISP Site Registration Information
                      
                      Site Name      Last      Up   Who Last             EID Prefix
                                     Register       Registered           
                      Site-1         00:00:15  yes  10.1.1.2             172.16.1.0/24
                                     00:00:11  yes  10.1.1.2             2001:DB8:A::/48
                      Site-2         00:00:27  yes  10.0.0.6             172.16.2.0/24
                                     00:00:37  yes  10.0.0.6             2001:DB8:B::/48
                      


                      Example:
                      Router# show lisp site name Site-1
                      
                      Site name: Site-1
                      Allowed configured locators: any
                      Allowed EID-prefixes:
                        EID-prefix: 172.16.1.0/24 
                          First registered:     00:04:51
                          Routing table tag:    0
                          Origin:               Configuration
                          Merge active:         No
                          Proxy reply:          No
                          TTL:                  1d00h
                          Registration errors:  
                            Authentication failures:   0
                            Allowed locators mismatch: 0
                          ETR 10.1.1.2, last registered 00:00:01, no proxy-reply, map-notify
                                       TTL 1d00h, no merge
                            Locator  Local  State      Pri/Wgt
                            10.1.1.2  yes   up          1/50  
                          ETR 10.2.1.2, last registered 00:00:03, no proxy-reply, map-notify
                                       TTL 1d00h, merge
                            Locator  Local  State      Pri/Wgt
                            10.1.1.2 yes    up          1/50  
                            10.2.1.2 yes    up          1/50  
                        EID-prefix: 2001:DB8:A::/48 
                          First registered:     00:04:51
                          Routing table tag:    0
                          Origin:               Configuration
                          Merge active:         No
                          Proxy reply:          No
                          TTL:                  1d00h
                          Registration errors:  
                            Authentication failures:   0
                            Allowed locators mismatch: 0
                          ETR 10.1.1.2, last registered 00:00:01, no proxy-reply, map-notify
                                       TTL 1d00h, no merge
                            Locator  Local  State      Pri/Wgt
                            10.1.1.2  yes   up          1/50  
                          ETR 10.2.1.2, last registered 00:00:03, no proxy-reply, map-notify
                                       TTL 1d00h, merge
                            Locator  Local  State      Pri/Wgt
                            10.1.1.2 yes    up          1/50  
                            10.2.1.2 yes    up          1/50  
                      
                      
                      Step 7   lig {[self {ipv4 | ipv6}] | {hostname | destination-EID}}

                      The LISP Internet Groper (lig) command is useful for testing the LISP control plane. The lig command can be used to query for the indicated destination hostname or EID, or the router's local EID prefix. This command provides a simple means of testing whether a destination EID exists in the LISP mapping database system, or whether your site is registered with the mapping database system. This command is applicable for both the IPv4 and IPv6 address families and applies to any Cisco IOS LISP device that maintains a map-cache (i.e. configured as an ITR or PITR).

                      The following examples are based on configurations where a mulithomed LISP site is configured with both IPv4 and IPv6 EID prefixes:



                      Example:
                      Router# lig self ipv4
                      
                      Mapping information for EID 172.16.1.0 from 10.1.1.2 with RTT 12 msecs
                      172.16.1.0/24, uptime: 00:00:00, expires: 23:59:52, via map-reply, self
                        Locator   Uptime    State      Pri/Wgt
                        10.1.1.2  00:00:00  up, self     1/50  
                        10.2.1.2  00:00:00  up           1/50
                      


                      Example:
                      Router# lig self ipv6
                      
                      Mapping information for EID 2001:DB8:A:: from 10.0.0.2 with RTT 12 msecs
                      2001:DB8:A::/48, uptime: 00:00:00, expires: 23:59:52, via map-reply, self
                        Locator   Uptime    State      Pri/Wgt
                        10.1.1.2  00:00:00  up, self     1/50  
                        10.2.1.2  00:00:00  up           1/50
                      


                      Example:
                      Router# lig 172.16.2.1
                      
                      Mapping information for EID 2001:DB8:A:: from 10.0.0.2 with RTT 12 msecs
                      2001:DB8:A::/48, uptime: 00:00:00, expires: 23:59:52, via map-reply, self
                        Locator   Uptime    State      Pri/Wgt
                        10.1.1.2  00:00:00  up, self     1/50  
                        10.2.1.2  00:00:00  up           1/50
                      


                      Example:
                      Router# lig 2001:db8:b::1
                      
                      Mapping information for EID 172.16.2.1 from 10.0.0.6 with RTT 4 msecs
                      2001:DB8:B::/48, uptime: 01:52:45, expires: 23:59:52, via map-reply, complete
                        Locator   Uptime    State      Pri/Wgt
                        10.0.0.6  01:52:45  up           1/1 
                      
                      Step 8   ping {hostname | destination-EID}

                      The ping command is useful for testing basic network connectivity and reachability and liveness of a destination EID or RLOC address. It is important to be aware that because LISP uses encapsulation, you should always specify a source address when using ping. Never allow the ping application to assign its own default source address because there are four possible ways to use ping and unless the source address is explicitly named, the wrong address may be used by the application and return erroneous results that complicate operational verification or troubleshooting.

                      The four possible uses of ping are:
                      • RLOC-to-RLOC—Sends out “echo�? packets natively (no LISP encapsulation) and receives the “echo-reply�? back natively. This use of ping can test the underlying network connectivity between locators of various devices, such as between an xTR and a map server or map resolver.
                      • EID-to-EID—Sends out “echo�? packets with LISP encapsulation and receives the “echo-reply�? back as LISP encapsulated. This use of ping can be used to test the LISP data plane (encapsulation) between LISP sites.
                      • EID-to-RLOC—Sends out “echo�? packets natively (no LISP encapsulation) and receives the "echo-reply" back as LISP encapsulated through a PITR mechanism. This use of ping can be used to test the PITR infrastructure.
                      • RLOC-to-EID - Sends out “echo�? packets with LISP encapsulation and receives the “echo-reply�? back natively (no LISP encapsulation. This use of ping can be used to test PETR capabilities.
                      The ping command is applicable to the IPv4 and IPv6 address families, respectively, and can be used on any Cisco IOS XE LISP device but is limited by the LISP device and site configuration. (For example, the ability to do LISP encapsulation requires the device to be configured as either an ITR or PITR.)

                      The following examples are based on configurations where a mulithomed LISP site is configured with both IPv4 and IPv6 EID prefixes:



                      Example:
                      Router# ping 172.16.2.1 source 172.16.1.1
                      
                      Type escape sequence to abort.
                      Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 172.16.2.1, timeout is 2 seconds:
                      Packet sent with a source address of 172.16.1.1 
                      !!!!!
                      Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/3/8 ms
                      


                      Example:
                      Router# ping 2001:db8:b::1 source 2001:db8:a::1
                      
                      Type escape sequence to abort.
                      Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 2001:DB8:B::1, timeout is 2 seconds:
                      Packet sent with a source address of 2001:DB8:A::1
                      !!!!!
                      Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/3/8 ms
                      
                      Step 9   clear [ip | ipv6] lisp map-cache

                      The clear ip lisp map-cache and clear ipv6 lisp map-cache commands remove all IPv4 or IPv6 dynamic LISP map-cache entries stored by the router. This command applies to a LISP device that maintains a map-cache (like one configured as an ITR or PITR) and can be useful if trying to quickly verify the operational status of the LISP control plane. Based on a configuration when a mulithomed LISP site is configured with both IPv4 and IPv6 EID prefixes, the following example output assumes that a map-cache entry has been received for another site with the IPv4 EID prefix of 172.16.2.0/24 or an IPv6 EID prefix of 2001:db8:b::/48.



                      Example:

                      The following example shows IPv4 mapping cache information, how to clear the mapping cache, and the show information after the cache is cleared.

                      Router# show ip lisp map-cache
                      
                      LISP IPv4 Mapping Cache, 2 entries
                      
                      0.0.0.0/0, uptime: 02:48:19, expires: never, via static send map-request
                        Negative cache entry, action: send-map-request
                      172.16.2.0/24, uptime: 01:45:24, expires: 22:14:28, via map-reply, complete
                        Locator   Uptime    State      Pri/Wgt
                        10.0.0.6  01:45:24  up           1/1
                      
                      Router# clear ip lisp map-cache
                      
                      Router# show ip lisp map-cache
                      
                      LISP IPv4 Mapping Cache, 1 entries
                      
                      0.0.0.0/0, uptime: 00:00:02, expires: never, via static send map-request
                        Negative cache entry, action: send-map-request
                      
                      


                      Example:

                      The following example shows IPv6 mapping cache information, how to clear the mapping cache, and the show information after the cache is cleared.

                      Router# show ipv6 lisp map-cache
                      
                      LISP IPv6 Mapping Cache, 2 entries
                      
                      ::/0, uptime: 02:49:39, expires: never, via static send map-request
                        Negative cache entry, action: send-map-request
                      2001:DB8:B::/48, uptime: 00:00:07, expires: 23:59:46, via map-reply, complete
                        Locator   Uptime    State      Pri/Wgt
                        10.0.0.6  00:00:07  up           1/1 
                      
                      Router# clear ip lisp map-cache
                      
                      Router# show ip lisp map-cache
                      
                      LISP IPv6 Mapping Cache, 1 entries
                      
                      ::/0, uptime: 00:00:02, expires: never, via static send map-request
                        Negative cache entry, action: send-map-request
                      

                      Additional References

                      The following sections provide references related to the Locator ID Separation Protocol.

                      Related Documents

                      Document Title

                      Location

                      Cisco IOS LISP Lab Test Configuration Application Note

                      http:/​/​lisp4.cisco.com/​lisp_​tech.html

                      Cisco IOS IP Routing: LISP Command Reference

                      http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​en/​US/​docs/​ios-xml/​ios/​iproute_lisp/​command/​ip-lisp-cr-book.html

                      MIBs

                      MIB

                      MIBs Link

                      None

                      To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS software releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL: http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​go/​mibs

                      RFCs

                      RFC

                      Title

                      draft-ietf-lisp-07

                      Locator/ID Separation Protocol (LISP) http:/​/​tools.ietf.org/​html/​draft-ietf-lisp-07

                      draft-ietf-lisp-alt-04

                      LISP Alternative Topology (LISP+ALT) http:/​/​tools.ietf.org/​html/​draft-ietf-lisp-alt-04

                      draft-ietf-lisp-interworking-01

                      Interworking LISP with IPv4 and IPv6 http:/​/​tools.ietf.org/​html/​draft-ietf-lisp-interworking-01

                      draft-ietf-lisp-lig-00

                      LISP Internet Groper (LIG) http:/​/​tools.ietf.org/​html/​draft-ietf-lisp-lig-00

                      draft-ietf-lisp-ms-05

                      LISP Map Server http:/​/​tools.ietf.org/​html/​draft-ietf-lisp-ms-05

                      Technical Assistance

                      Description

                      Link

                      The Cisco Support website provides extensive online resources, including documentation and tools for troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with Cisco products and technologies.

                      To receive security and technical information about your products, you can subscribe to various services, such as the Product Alert Tool (accessed from Field Notices), the Cisco Technical Services Newsletter, and Really Simple Syndication (RSS) Feeds.

                      Access to most tools on the Cisco Support website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

                      http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​cisco/​web/​support/​index.html

                      Feature Information for LISP

                      The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

                      Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

                      Table 1 Feature Information for Locator/ID Separation Protocol

                      Feature Name

                      Release

                      Feature Configuration Information

                      Configure LISP

                      Cisco IOS Release 15.1(4)M

                      15.1(1)SY1

                      Introduces LISP functionality to support ITR, ETR, PITR, PETR, MS, MR, and LISP ALT devices for IPv4 and IPv6 address families on Cisco IOS Release 15.1M&T and later releases.

                      LISP Multicast

                      15.4(2)T

                      The LISP Multicast feature introduces support for Multicast traffic over LISP overlay and allows source multicast sites and receiver multicast sites to send and receive multicast packets over a unicast RLOC core.