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Cisco Unity

Unity: Use MFCMAPI to Test MAPI Access to Mailboxes

Document ID: 116657

Updated: Oct 21, 2013

Contributed by Scott Hills, Cisco TAC Engineer.

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Introduction

This document describes the process to troubleshoot Unity issues with the use of Messaging Application Programming Interface (MAPI) Editor from Microsoft (MFCMAPI.EXE).

Background Information

It is common for Technical Assistance Center (TAC) engineers to troubleshoot Unity with a tool called MFCMAPI. However, this is a tool that users can also use to troubleshoot issues with MAPI access to Microsoft Exchange mailboxes.

Problem

Unity might occasionally be unable to access voice mail messages, and the messages might not be delivered to
Exchange. The application log of Unity might show events similar to:

Event Type: Error
Event Source: CiscoUnity_MALEx
Event Category: Error
Event ID: 30012
Date:
Time:
User:
Computer: TestComputer

This error can be described as an occurrence which prevents successful Exchange access by the AvCsMgr service via MAPI. This is typically an indication of configuration issues with Unity, Exchange, or the MAPI subsystem.

Event Type: Error
Event Source: CiscoUnity_MALEx
Event Category: Error
Event ID: 30003
Date:
Time:
User:
Computer: TestComputer

This error can be described as an attempt to access the Primary Exchange Mailbox Store by the AvCsMgr service via MAPI which has failed. The MAPI subsystem returns this error:

The information store could not be opened.

Solution

MFCMAPI is a low level MAPI client. It uses the same Application Programming Interfaces (API/Dynamic Link Libraries (DLL) and so on. that Unity and Outlook use to
access Exchange. When necessary, you can use this tool to see if it can successfully make a MAPI connection to Exchange.

Follow these steps to conduct this test:

  1. Download MFCMAPI  and copy it on to the Unity server.
  2. Log in to the server as the message store account (the account that runs AvCsMgr) or execute RunAs and launch the MFCMAPI.
  3. From the Session menu, choose Logon and Display Store Table.
  4. Select the MAPI profile you wish to use. Choose Unity System Profile. If you do not see that option, it is probable that you are either not logged in as the message store account, or the Unity MAPI profile does not exist.
  5. Open the MDB menu and choose Open Other User's Mailbox.
  6. Choose the mailbox where you wish to log in.

    Note: The list contains the display names rather than aliases. When you search for the Unity_<servername> mailbox, you should search for 'Unity Messaging System...'.

  7. In previous versions of MFCMAPI, you are asked if you want to use an administrative privilege to access the mailbox. Unselect this option.
    In more recent versions, you receive a window that permits you to select the flags to pass CreateStoreEntryID. If not already selected, change the flag from 0x9 (or 0x00000009) to 0x8 (or 0x00000008).
  8. If the settings are correct, a new window appears with the user's mailbox name. If not, you receive a series of cryptic errors.
    The most important error is the first one received. Take note of the 0x8004xxxx code that you receive and execute an Internet search for more details. Additional windows display errors too, but these are triggered by the first. These are less important.
    From the mailbox, expand the Root Container. From here, you can view the Cisco Search Folders that get created by Unity.  You can double-click any of these folders to see what is in that view. You can also right-click Edit Search Criteria to see the current state as well as the definition. If you further expand Top of the Information Store, you see the folders that are normally seen within Outlook (Inbox, Deleted Items, and so on). Double-click any folder to open it.

    Note: Each time you open a new mailbox or folder, a new window is opened for each. There is no Back button, so close them as needed.

  9. When complete, close each of the windows that have opened. When you return to the first window, go to the Session menu and choose Logoff.
Updated: Oct 21, 2013
Document ID: 116657