Network Processing Engine and Network Services Engine Installation and Configuration
Configuration Tasks and Troubleshooting Information
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Configuration Tasks and Troubleshooting Information

Table Of Contents

Configuration Tasks and Troubleshooting Information

NPE Configuration Tasks

NSE Configuration Tasks

Boot Changes in Cisco IOS Release 12.2

Troubleshooting the NPE-G1 or NPE-G2

.Troubleshooting the NPE-100 Through NPE-400

NPE or NSE show Commands

Using the show version Command

Using the show c7200 Command

Using the show environment Command with the NPE-G2—NPE-G2 -Specific Output

NSE-1 show Commands

Using the show pxf accounting ? Command and Subcommands

Using the show pxf crash Command

Using the show pxf info Command

Using the show pxf interface Command

Using the show pxf feature ? Command and Subcommands

NSE-1 Error Messages

Using Debugging Commands and PXF

PXF Troubleshooting Information

Removing and Replacing an AC-Input or DC-Input Power Supply

Removing a Power Supply from a Cisco 7200 Series Router

Replacing a Power Supply in a Cisco 7200 Series Router

Fiber Optic Cleaning Information


Configuration Tasks and Troubleshooting Information


This chapter provides configuration and troubleshooting information. Troubleshooting information includes general show commands, show commands specific to the NSE-1, and error messages and the like. Instructions for removing a power supply for easier removal or installation of the network services engine are also provided. The following topics are covered in this chapter:

NPE Configuration Tasks

NSE Configuration Tasks

Boot Changes in Cisco IOS Release 12.2

Troubleshooting the NPE-G1 or NPE-G2

.Troubleshooting the NPE-100 Through NPE-400

NPE or NSE show Commands

NSE-1 show Commands

NSE-1 Error Messages

Using Debugging Commands and PXF

PXF Troubleshooting Information

Removing and Replacing an AC-Input or DC-Input Power Supply

Fiber Optic Cleaning Information

NPE Configuration Tasks

Network processing engines (NPEs) NPE-100 through NPE-400 are not configurable. There are no tasks to perform.

For NPE-G1and NPE-G2 configuration tasks, see Chapter 7, "NPE-G1 and NPE-G2 Installation and Configuration Information."

NSE Configuration Tasks

The PXF processor is turned on by default. If it is ever disabled, you must enable it to take advantage of IP packet switching and feature acceleration.


Note Before enabling the PXF processor, you must have IP routing and IP CEF switching turned on.


To manually disable or enable the PXF processor, use the ip pxf global command. To see a current list of Cisco IOS features supported by the PXF processor, go to Cisco.com and search for Cisco 7200 product literature for the NSE-1.

Boot Changes in Cisco IOS Release 12.2

Cisco IOS Release 12.2 changed the behavior of the ROM monitor (ROMmon) during the bootup sequence. Previously, users could issue the break signal during the bootup sequence to break into ROMmon, and then immediately boot a new Cisco IOS image using the boot command.

This behavior is no longer allowed when the router is using a boot image that is based on Cisco IOS Release 12.2, because interrupting the boot process could leave the hardware and software registers in an unknown state. Instead, use the following procedure when using a router with a Cisco IOS Release 12.2 boot image:


Step 1 At the router console prompt, send a BREAK signal to interrupt the boot process and enter ROMmon.

Step 2 Set the configure register to boot into ROMmon by using the confreg 0x0 command.

Step 3 Use the reset command to reset the NPE and boot into ROMmon. This ensures a clean boot into ROMmon, with all registers set to a known state.

Step 4 Set the configuration register to boot a Cisco IOS image by using the confreg 0x2102 command.

Step 5 Use the boot command to boot the desired Cisco IOS image.


Troubleshooting the NPE-G1 or NPE-G2

The procedures in this section assume that the NPE-G1, NPE-G2, Cisco uBR7200-NPE-G1, or Cisco uBR7200-NPE-G2 is installed without an I/O controller. Unless otherwise indicated, all references to NPE-G1 refer to both the NPE-G1 and Cisco uBR7200-NPE-G1. Also, unless otherwise indicated, all references to NPE-G2 refer to both the NPE-G2 and Cisco uBR7200-NPE-G2.


Note The NPE-G2 has its own Cisco IOS software image with the prefix "c7200p-" in the software images filenames, including the boot image. The NPE-G2 does not boot up with a software image with the prefix "c7200-". Previous network processing engines, or the network services engine, do not boot up with the "c7200p-" boot image. They use the prefix "c7200-".



Note The Cisco uBR7200-NPE-G2 has its own Cisco IOS software image with the prefix "ubr7200p".


For NPE-G1 or NPE-G2 ROMmon upgrade error messages, see the "ROMmon Upgrade Error Messages" section on page 7-66.


Caution If an NPE-G1 or NPE-G2 is installed in a router with either an C7200-I/O-GE+E or C7200-I/O-2FE/E I/O controller, or if a Cisco uBR7200-NPE-G1 will be installed in a router with a C7200-I/O-2FE/E I/O controller, copy your running configuration to a TFTP server or Flash Disk, not a PC Card. PC Cards are not supported on these I/O controllers when an NPE-G1 or NPE-G2 are present. If you copy the running configuration to a PC Card with these I/O controllers present, you will not be able to retrieve the running configuration after the NPE-G1 or NPE-G2 is installed.


Note If an I/O controller is installed with the NPE-G1 or NPE-G2, only the EN (Enable) LED and LINK LED information in this section is applicable.


The procedures in this section assume that the NPE-G1 or NPE-G2 and the router itself are in the original factory configuration, and that you have not made changes to your configuration file.

If the NPE-G1 POWER ON LED or the NPE-G2 PWR OK LED does not go on as expected, make sure the power to the router is turned off, reseat the NPE-G1or NPE-G2 in its slot, and restart the router.

If the POWER ON LED or the PWR OK LED remains off, the system detected a processor hardware failure. (This LED should be on in normal operation.) Contact a service representative for instructions.

If the EN (Enable) LED does not come on when a Gigabit Ethernet RJ-45 port is selected, try using a different cable. If the EN (Enable) LED does not come on, check to be sure that in software the RJ-45 media is selected. See the "Changing the Media Type of the Native Gigabit Ethernet GBIC, SFP, or RJ-45 Ports" section on page 7-56.

If the EN LED remains off when the GBIC media or SFP media are selected, the LED is functioning properly. If the GBIC port or SFP port does not seem to be operating, try installing a different GBIC or a different SFP module, or a different cable. Also check in software to be sure the optical fiber media is selected. See the "Changing the Media Type of the Native Gigabit Ethernet GBIC, SFP, or RJ-45 Ports" section on page 7-56.

If any of these actions do not produce a functioning LED, contact an authorized service representative.

If the LINK LED does not come on only when any of the Gigabit Ethernet media are in use:

Check that the router is receiving power.

Check that the correct media type is selected in software. See the "Configuring the Native Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces" section on page 7-56.

Check that the media cables are functioning and are completely connected to the NPE-G1 or NPE-G2.

If the GBIC modules are being used, check to be sure they are connected to the NPE-G1. If SFP modules are being used, check to be sure they are connected to the NPE-G2.

If any of these actions do not produce a functioning LED, contact an authorized service representative.

If the SLOT ACTIVE LED on the NPE-G1, or the CF ACTV LED on the NPE-G2 does not comes on when the CompactFlash Disk slot is being used, try inserting a different CompactFlash Disk. If the SLOT ACTIVE LED on the NPE-G1 or the CF ACTV LED on the NPE-G2 still does not come on, contact an authorized service representative.

Check the Cisco IOS release running on the router. For minimum software release information, see the "Software Requirements" section on page 8-4

.Troubleshooting the NPE-100 Through NPE-400

The procedures in this section assume that the I/O controller, network processing engine or network services engine, and the router itself are in the original factory configuration, and that you have not made any changes to your configuration file.

If the I/O controller ENABLED LED does not go on as expected, make sure the power to the router is turned off, reseat the network processing engine or network services engine in its slot, and restart the router.

If the ENABLED LED remains off, the system detected a processor hardware failure. (This LED should be on in normal operation.) Contact a service representative for instructions.

Check the Cisco IOS release running on the router. For minimum software release information, see the "Software Requirements" section on page 8-4.

NPE or NSE show Commands

Use the global show version or show c7200 commands to obtain information about the NPE or NSE, hardware, and software installed on your router. Examples of each follow.

Using the show version Command

Use the show version command to display the configuration of the system hardware including the NPE or NSE and the software version.

The following example of the show version command identifies an NPE-400 installed in a Cisco 7206VXR router:

Router# show version
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software 
IOS (tm) 7200 Software (C7200-P-M), Released Version 12.1(20000622:181759) 
Copyright (c) 1986-2000 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Thu 22-Jun-00 11:18 by BIFF
Image text-base:0x60008950, data-base:0x60BD8000
 
  (display text omitted)
 
cisco 7206VXR (NPE400) processor (revision 0xFF) with 114688K/16384K bytes
of memory.
Processor board ID 8771013
R7000 CPU at 350Mhz, Implementation 39, Rev 2.1, 256KB L2, 4096KB L3 Cache
6 slot VXR midplane, Version 2.1
 
  (display text omitted)

The following example shows an NSE-1 installed in a Cisco 7206VXR router:

Router# show version
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
IOS (tm) 7200 Software (C7200-JS-M), Version 12.1(1)E 
Copyright (c) 1986-2000 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Wed 22-Mar-00 08:37 by Biff
Image text-base:0x60008900, data-base:0x6141C000

  (display text omitted)

cisco 7206VXR (NSE-1) processor (revision B) with 57344K/8192K bytes of memory.
R7000 CPU at 262Mhz, Implementation 39, Rev 1.0, 256KB L2 Cache6 slot VXR midplane, 
Version 2.0

  (display text omitted)

PXF processor tmc is running.
6 FastEthernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s)
10 Serial network interface(s)
2 HSSI network interface(s)
2 Channelized T3 port(s)
125K bytes of non-volatile configuration memory.

  (display text omitted)

Using the show c7200 Command

Use the show c7200 command to obtain information about the router.

Router# show c7200
Network IO Interrupt Throttling:
throttle count=0, timer count=0
active=0, configured=0
netint usec=4000, netint mask usec=200

C7200 Midplane EEPROM:
Hardware revision 2.0           Board revision A0
Serial number     16061833      Part number    73-3223-05
Test history      0x0           RMA number     00-00-00
MAC=00b0.4aae.4000, MAC Size=1024
EEPROM format version 1, Model=0x6
EEPROM contents (hex):
0x20:01 06 02 00 00 F5 15 89 49 0C 97 05 00 B0 4A AE
0x30:40 00 04 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 13 50 00 00 FF 00

C7206VXR CPU EEPROM:
Hardware revision 1.2           Board revision A0
Serial number     15053437      Part number    73-3453-04
Test history      0x0           RMA number     00-00-00
EEPROM format version 1
EEPROM contents (hex):
0x20:01 C2 01 02 00 E5 B2 7D 49 0D 7D 04 00 00 00 00
0x30:50 00 00 00 00 01 14 00 00 00 FF FF FF FF FF FF

C7200 PE EEPROM:
Hardware Revision        :1.0
Top Assy. Part Number    :800-05272-04
Part Number              :73-4068-02
Board Revision           :A0
PCB Serial Number        :12342775   
RMA History              :00
Fab Version              :02
Fab Part Number          :28-3146-02
Product Number           :NSE1
EEPROM format version 4
EEPROM contents (hex):
0x00:04 FF 40 00 DE 41 01 00 C0 46 03 20 00 14 98 04
0x10:82 49 0F E4 02 42 41 30 C1 8B 31 32 33 34 32 37
0x20:37 35 20 20 20 04 00 02 02 85 1C 0C 4A 02 CB 84
0x30:4E 53 45 31 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
0x40:FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
0x50:FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
0x60:FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
0x70:FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF

Using the show environment Command with the NPE-G2—NPE-G2 -Specific Output

The output for the show environment command has changed slightly for the NPE-G2. See the NPE-G2 Support for the show environment Command document for information about changes to the output of the show environment command with the NPE-G2 at: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/12_4/12_4x/12_4_4xd/showenv2.html.

NSE-1 show Commands

Following are five NSE-1-specific show pxf commands and several subcommands. Included in this section are examples for each command.

show pxf accounting ?

show pxf accounting summary

show pxf accounting interface

show pxf crash

show pxf info

show pxf interface

show pxf feature ?

Sample output for these commands and subcommands follows.

Using the show pxf accounting ? Command and Subcommands

The following is an example of the show pxf accounting ? command with sample output:

Router# show pxf accounting ?
  ATM           ATM interface
  Ethernet      IEEE 802.3
  FastEthernet  FastEthernet IEEE 802.3
  Hssi          High Speed Serial Interface
  Null          Null interface
  POS           Packet over Sonet
  Serial        Serial
  summary       PXF summary statistics

The following is an example of the show pxf accounting summary command with sample output:

Router# show pxf accounting summary
Pkts         Dropped   RP Processed        Ignored
Total              0             90              0

PXF complex busy       :  8%
PXF input pipeline full:  0%

PXF Statistic:
Packets RP -> PXF:
switch ip:                 0
switch raw:               90
qos fastsend:              0
qos enqueue:               0
Total:                        90

Packets PXF -> RP:
qos pkts:                  0
fast pkts:                 0
drops:total                0
punts:total               90
"    not IP :              89
"    CEF receive :          1
Total:                        90

Packets ignored:               0     |    ring space:
shadow ring full:          0     |    shadow ring: 16382
in ring full:              0     |    inring:        995
PXF inactive:              0

tx credits:                    0     |    delayed credits:    0
holdq enqueues:                0     |    requeue drops:      0
interrupts:                   90     |    pending read bytes: 0
L2TP tunnel read:              0     |    session stats:      0

Interface    Pkts In   Chars In   Pkts Out  Chars Out Punted     Dropped
Et0/0          0          0          0          0	 	     93          0
Gi0/0          0          0          0          0       0          0
Fa1/0          0          0          0          0       0          0
Fa4/0          0          0          0          0       0          0
Vt1            0          0          0          0       0          0
Lo0            0          0          0          0       0          0

The following is an example of the show pxf accounting interface command with sample output:


Router# show pxf accounting POS4/0

Interface    Pkts In   Chars In   Pkts Out  Chars Out     Punted
POS4/0         19       1064          0          0         44 

Using the show pxf crash Command

The following is an example of the show pxf crash command with sample output:

Router# show pxf crash

toaster-uut#sh pxf crash
  EX_Type = 0x80000000
  EX_ID(b0~3,16~17) = 0x00400
  CPU_EX_ID(b0~15) = 0x0004
  IHB_EX_Type(b0~5) = 0x00
  XRAM0(b0~13) = 0x00000
  XRAM1(b0~13) = 0x00000
  XRAM2(b0~13) = 0x00000
  XRAM3(b0~13) = 0x00000
  Pipeline:7FDEFD pdone[3210]:1F  17  17  1D

ICM0(b4~13) = 0x00000  ICM1(b4~13) = 0x00000
ICM2(b4~13) = 0x00010  ICM3(b4~13) = 0x00000
LOCK0(b0~4) = 0x00000  LOCK1(b0~4) = 0x00000
LOCK2(b0~4) = 0x00000  LOCK3(b0~4) = 0x00000
CPU0/2: SW EX Type=0x00000000 LBUS EX Type=0x00000081 HW EX
Type=0x00000400
CPU:row=0x0 column=0x2 cpu=0x2
 PC:0000098E  LR:0000087F  CR:002C4C00
 r0:00000000  r1:8001CEA0  r2:80784390  r3:00000000
 r4:00005400  r5:80D3BA04  r6:80A7CA00  r7:00000004
 r8:00000000  r9:00000008 r10:80092324 r11:800A6200
r12:00000033 r13:00000008 r14:00000000 r15:00000000
  misr1a:00000000 misr1bhi:00000000 misr1blo:00000000  misr2hi:00000000
 misr2lo:00000000  reserve:00000000  reserve:00000000  reserve:00000000
  sisr1a:01000040   sisr1b:00000000     irhi:4402200F     irlo:00000000
cAll:C20DE822 DCD1:00020400 DCD2:00000002 CNTL:00000000
TBuf intr 0:1111111F
TBuf intr 1:020FFFF0
TBuf intr 2:00003C80
TBuf intr 3:80000000
TBuf intr 4:00000400
Xram return:00000000
Icram return hi:80024E00
Icram return lo:800A4E00
TBuf addr 0:005E6800 TBuf sblock1 0:8078A374 TBuf sblock0 0:804FD600
TBuf addr 1:005E6800 TBuf sblock1 1:8078A374 TBuf sblock0 1:804FD600
TBuf addr 2:005E6800 TBuf sblock1 2:8078A374 TBuf sblock0 2:804FD600
TBuf addr 3:005E6800 TBuf sblock1 3:8078A374 TBuf sblock0 3:804FD600
TBuf addr 4:005E6800 TBuf sblock1 4:8078A374 TBuf sblock0 4:804FD600
TBuf addr 5:005E6800 TBuf sblock1 5:8078A374 TBuf sblock0 5:804FD600
TBuf addr 6:005E6800 TBuf sblock1 6:8078A374 TBuf sblock0 6:804FD600
TBuf addr 7:005E6800 TBuf sblock1 7:8078A374 TBuf sblock0 7:804FD600

Using the show pxf info Command

The following is an example of the show pxf info command with sample output:

 
   
Router# show pxf info
 
   
pxf:tmc type TMC ASIC Pass1 (no ECC) revision 3
ucode:filename 'system:pxf/ucode0' revision 1.1
state: is running, number of starts 1
uptime:15:24:18
Memory Configuration:
Bank Name                         Total     Reserved   In-use      Free
tmc internal memory column 0      16 Kb      10 Kb     0 bytes     6144 bytes
tmc column 0 memory bank 0        32 Mb      26 Mb      16 Kb      5554 Kb
  tmc internal memory column 1    16 Kb     512 bytes    0 bytes     15 Kb 
  tmc column 1 memory bank 0      32 Mb     669 Kb     2015 Kb       29 Mb
  tmc internal memory column 2    16 Kb    6656 bytes    0 bytes   9728 bytes
  tmc column 2 memory bank 0      32 Mb     441 Kb     800 Kb        30 Mb
  tmc internal memory column 3    16 Kb      15 Kb       0 bytes    512 bytes
  tmc column 3 memory bank 0      32 Mb    2092 Kb     128 Kb        29 Mb

Using the show pxf interface Command

The show pxf interface command provides a summary of the interfaces in the router and which PXF features or capabilities are enabled on these interfaces. The following is an example of the show pxf interface command:

Router# show pxf interface 
  Intf  I/f #  Attributes
Fa0/0    3    Raw, Encap, QoS(Cr 0, Thrsh 2, Max 101)
Et1/0    4    Raw, Encap
Et1/1    5    Raw, Encap, QoS(Cr 0, Thrsh 2, Max 13)
Et1/2    6    Raw, Encap
Et1/3    7    Raw, Encap
Se2/0    8    Raw, Encap, QoS(Cr 0, Thrsh 2, Max 5)
Se2/1    9    Raw, Encap, QoS(Cr 0, Thrsh 2, Max 5)
Se2/2    10   Raw, Encap, QoS(Cr 0, Thrsh 2, Max 5)
Se2/3    11   Raw, Encap, QoS(Cr 0, Thrsh 2, Max 5)
Fa3/0    12   Raw, Encap
PO4/0    13   Raw, Encap
AT5/0    14   Raw, Encap

Using the show pxf feature ? Command and Subcommands

The following is an example of the feature-specific show pxf feature ? command with sample output:

Router# show pxf feature ?
  cef  PXF CEF info
  nat  PXF NAT info

show pxf feature cef ?

display pxf entry

Router# show pxf feature cef entry
Shadow 16-4-4-8 PXF Mtrie:
  41 leaves, 1968 leaf bytes, 15 nodes, 267000 node bytes
  5 invalidations
  46 prefix updates
  refcounts: 66746 leaf, 66720 node
 
Prefix/Length        Refcount   Parent
0.0.0.0/0           62282    
0.0.0.0/32          3           0.0.0.0/0
171.69.12.128/27    34          0.0.0.0/0
171.69.12.128/32    3           171.69.12.128/27
171.69.12.129/32    3           171.69.12.128/27
171.69.12.130/32    3           171.69.12.128/27
171.69.12.131/32    3           171.69.12.128/27
171.69.12.132/32    3           171.69.12.128/27
171.69.12.138/32    3           171.69.12.128/27
171.69.12.139/32    3           171.69.12.128/27
171.69.12.140/32    3           171.69.12.128/27
171.69.12.141/32    3           171.69.12.128/27
171.69.12.142/32    3           171.69.12.128/27
171.69.12.143/32    3           171.69.12.128/27
171.69.12.145/32    3           171.69.12.128/27
171.69.12.146/32    3           171.69.12.128/27
171.69.12.147/32    3           171.69.12.128/27
(display text omitted) 

show pxf feature nat ?

Router# show pxf feature nat ?
  entry  toaster nat entry
  stat   toaster nat processing info
  tcp    toaster nat tcp logging info

Router# show pxf feature nat entry
--- 171.69.12.175      192.168.0.129      ---                ---
--- 171.69.12.161      192.168.0.7        ---                ---
--- 171.69.12.162      192.168.0.2        ---                ---
--- 171.69.12.163      192.168.0.3        ---                ---
--- 171.69.12.164      192.168.0.4        ---                ---
--- 171.69.12.165      192.168.0.13       ---                ---
--- 171.69.12.166      192.168.0.5        ---                ---

Router# show pxf feature nat stat 
NAT translation processing information
total nat entries = 0x1000, entries (used, free) = (0x7, 0xFF9)
untranslated flows:0x7022D
translated flows:0x1030
icmp extendable flows:0x0
noop alloc miss:0x0
entry alloc miss:0x0
entry delete miss:0x0

NSE-1 Error Messages

If the PXF processor crashes or hangs, check the syslog for any error messages.

You may see error messages similar to the following messages.

PXF processor crash and error message:

WARNING:PXF Exception:mac_xid=0x10000
        *** IHB watchdog timer expired
6d16h:%PXF-2-EXCEPTION:pxf exception on pxf tmc. 

Workaround: Run the show pxf crash command to obtain more information.

PXF processor hang and error message:

WARNING:PXF Exception:mac_xid=0x8
        *** External Memory Column 3 exception, type = 20

If you see this error message, the PXF processor has been left in HALT state. During bootup, the PXF processor is in error state and cannot be brought up.

Workaround: Reboot the router.

PXF processor crash and error message:

00:49:37:Fatal pxf interrupt, int_reg=0x80, int_mask=0xFFFF, config=0x1FF40
00
00:49:37:-Traceback= 6055B9CC 60530D10 

This message indicates the PXF processor encountered a serious error and crashed.

Workaround: Reboot the router.


Note The most current product documentation is online. For information on accessing documentation, see "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section on page iv.


Using Debugging Commands and PXF

To enable all normal Cisco IOS packet debugging facilities, disable PXF. In configuration mode, use the no ip pxf command:

hostname (config)# no ip pxf

Then use the Cisco IOS debugging commands to troubleshoot the problem.


Note The most current product documentation is online. For information on accessing documentation, see "Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request" section on page iv.


PXF Troubleshooting Information

Use the information in this section to troubleshoot PXF problems.

Cisco IOS Statistics Not Supported by PXF

Some standard Cisco IOS statistics are not supported in the PXF path, including:

Subinterface counters

ATM VC counters

Class-match statistics on classes with neither policing nor class-based weighted fair queueing (CBWFQ)

Features Not Supported by PXF

Features that are not supported by PXF are punted to the Route Processor (RP), which can cause high RP CPU usage.

High PXF CPU Usage

Enter the show pxf accounting summary command to display information about PXF CPU usage:

Router# show pxf accounting summary
.
.
.
10 second averages: PXF complex busy: 1% PXF read pipeline full: 0%

The PXF has 16 processors, only one of which is in use at a time when there is a low traffic rate. Even though only one of the processors is working, all of the PXF processors are slightly slowed. At higher traffic rates many of the PXF processors are working at the same time, but there is no additional slow down.

High Route Processor CPU Usage

High RP CPU usage may result from punting of packets from the PXF processors to the RP. Enter the show pxf accounting summary command to view the number and cause of punts.

Router# show pxf accounting summary

Pkts        Dropped   RP Processed        Ignored
                Total              0          48360              0
      
     PXF Statistic:
     Packets RP -> PXF:
         switch ip:                 0
         switch raw:         30048360
         qos fastsend:              0
         qos enqueue:            1938
     Total:                  30050298
      
     Packets PXF -> RP:
         qos pkts:               1938
         fast pkts:          30000000
         drops:total                0
         punts:total            48360
           "    not IP            :      40572
           "    CEF no adjacency  :       7788
     Total:                  30050298
      
     Packets ignored:               0     |    ring space:
         shadow ring full:          0     |        shadow ring:           16384
         in ring full:              0     |        inring:                  968
         PXF inactive:              0
      
     tx credits:             16230330     |    delayed credits:               0
     holdq enqueues:                0     |    requeue drops:                 0
     interrupts:                40538     |    interrupt misses:           1947
     interrupt packets:         53326
     pending read bytes:            0
      
          Interface    Pkts In   Chars In   Pkts Out  Chars Out     Punted    Dropped
              Fa0/0          0          0   30000000 1740000000        970          0
              Et1/0          0          0          0          0      21309          0
              Et1/1          0          0          0          0          0          0
              Et1/2          0          0          0          0          0          0
              Et1/3          0          0          0          0          0          0
              Se2/0          0          0          0          0        963          0
              Se2/1          0          0          0          0          0          0
              Se2/2          0          0          0          0          0          0
              Se2/3          0          0          0          0          0          0
              Fa3/0          0          0          0          0        963          0
              PO4/0   30000000 1440000000          0          0        963          0
              AT5/0          0          0          0          0      23192          0
                Vi1          0          0          0          0          0          0
                Vt1          0          0          0          0          0          0
                Vi2          0          0          0          0          0          0
                Vt2          0          0          0          0          0          0

Note CPU usage becomes more efficient as packet load increases. For example, if you are running at 60 percent CPU with only 33 percent of customer load on the system, this does not mean that you need 180 percent CPU for 100 percent of customers. Part of the original 60 percent CPU usage is overhead usage, which does not increase as packet load increases.


Ignored Packets

Packet ignores on an interface may result from high CPU usage. Enter the show interfaces command to display any input ignores:

Router# show interfaces ethernet 0/0 
        Ethernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up 
        ... 
        21 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 21 ignored 

Packets are ignored if there is no available CPU to accept the new packets. This can happen if the router is overloaded with traffic, but can also happen if the interface is faulty. If ignores are present on all interfaces, then the router is probably overloaded with traffic, or does not have sufficient free buffers in the pool that match the maximum transmission unit (MTU) on interfaces. In the latter case, an increment of the ignored counter is followed by an increment of the no buffer counter:

Router# show interfaces serial 0/0 
        ... 
        1567 packets input, 0 bytes, 22 no buffer 
        22 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 22 ignored, 0 abort 

No Buffers

If there are too many buffers configured for the output hold queue on an interface, this can use memory and result in dropped input packets. Enter the show running-config command and the show interfaces command to display the status of the incoming packet interfaces.

Priority and Policing Configured in the Class Policy

PXF does not support a configured priority and policing in the same class of a policy.

PXF Punts

If a feature that is supported in the PXF path appears not to be working, it could be the result of PXF failing to punt packets when it should. If you have only particular interfaces running the feature, you can configure a feature that PXF does not support on that interface to force PXF to punt packets.

QoS Fast-send and QoS Enqueue

PXF is responsible for managing the outbound traffic queues on an interface on which output QoS queueing is configured. All traffic destined for this interface must be processed by PXF, including both keepalive packets that originate in the router, known as QoS Fast-send packets, and packets that are switched in Cisco IOS, known as QoS Enqueue packets. If there is excessive traffic on the QoS Enqueue or on the QoS Fast-send path, QoS functionality can be disrupted. Use the show pxf accounting summary feature to display the QoS Fast-send and QoS Enqueue packets:

Router# show pxf accounting summary
.
.
.
qos fastsend:              8
qos enqueue:               5

WFQ Queues

When there is an increase in ignored packets and in the no buffer count, it is possible that the output weighted fair queueing (WFQ) queues are too long. To specify the number of dynamic queues to be reserved for use by the class-default class as part of the default class policy, use the fair-queue policy-map class configuration command; for example:

policy-map policy9 
 class class-default
 fair-queue 16

queue-limit 20

Removing and Replacing an AC-Input or DC-Input Power Supply

The weight of power supplies installed in a Cisco 7200 series router or Cisco 7200 VXR router might make it difficult for you to pull the network processing engine from its chassis slot. If this is the case, first remove the installed power supplies from the chassis, and then remove the network processing engine. The following sections explain how to remove and replace an AC-input or a DC-input power supply in a Cisco 7200 series router.


Note The network processing engine is installed above the power supplies in a Cisco uBR7200 series router. You do not need to remove the power supplies from a Cisco uBR7200 series router to pull the network processing engine from its chassis slot.



Caution Do not mix AC-input and DC-input power supplies in the same router.

Removing a Power Supply from a Cisco 7200 Series Router

The steps for removing an AC-input and DC-input power supply from a Cisco 7200 series router are the same. The two power supplies share the same dimensions and faceplates, except for the AC-input receptacle on the AC-input power supply and the DC-input lead receptacles on the DC-input power supply.

To remove an AC-input or DC-input power supply from a Cisco 7200 series router, complete the following steps:


Step 1 Ensure that the power switch on the power supply is in the off (O) position and input power is disconnected from the power supply and its power source. (See the "Removing and Replacing the NPE or NSE" section on page 9-2.)


Note When powering off the router, wait a minimum of 30 seconds before powering it on again.


Step 2 Using a number 2 Phillips or a 3/16-inch flat-blade screwdriver, loosen the two captive installation screws on the faceplate of the power supply. (See Figure 10-1.)

If the router is not installed in a standard 19-inch, 4-post rack or in a telco-type rack, skip to Step 6. If the router is installed in a rack, determine if any permanent rack fixtures, such as a power strip, are obstructing access to the power supply. If a rack fixture is obstructing access to the power supply, proceed to Step 3.

Figure 10-1 Power Supply Captive Installation Screws and Handle—Cisco 7200 Series AC-Input Power Supply Shown

1

Captive installation screw

2

Handle


Step 3 Using a 3/16-inch flat-blade screwdriver, loosen the screws that secure the router to the front mounting strips of the rack.

Step 4 Position at least one person in front of the rack to support the front underside of the router.

Step 5 From the rear of the rack, carefully push the front of the router out of the rack until there is enough clearance to remove the power supply.

Step 6 Grasp the power supply handle and pull the power supply from the router.


Caution To maintain agency compliance requirements and meet EMI emissions standards for the Cisco 7200 series chassis with a single power supply, the power supply filler plate must remain in the power supply adjacent to the installed power supply. Do not remove this filler plate from the router unless you intend to install a redundant power supply.

Step 7 Repeat Step 1 through Step 6 for the other installed power supply (if present).


This completes the procedure for removing an AC-input or DC-input power supply from a Cisco 7200 series router.

Replacing a Power Supply in a Cisco 7200 Series Router

To install a new AC-input or DC-input power supply in a Cisco 7200 series router, complete the following steps:


Step 1 Make sure that the power switch on the power supply is in the off (O) position.

Step 2 Grasp the power supply handle with one hand and place your other hand underneath the power supply for support. (See Figure 10-2.)

Figure 10-2 Holding the Power Supply—Cisco 7200 Series AC-Input Power Supply Shown

Step 3 Align the power supply to the power supply bay.

Step 4 Slide the power supply completely into the power supply bay until its faceplate is flush with the router's rear panel.


Caution When inserting a power supply into the router, do not use unnecessary force; slamming the power supply into the bay can damage the connectors on the rear of the supply and on the midplane.

Step 5 Seat the power supply in the router by tightening its captive installation screws with a number 2 Phillips or a 3/16-inch flat-blade screwdriver.


Note The power supply is not fully seated in the router midplane until you tighten its captive installation screws (use a number 2 Phillips or a 3/16-inch flat-blade screwdriver).


Step 6 Repeat Step 1 through Step 5 for a second power supply (if present).

Step 7 If there is no second power supply, replace the filler plate on the empty power supply bay. Using a number 2 Phillips or a 3/16-inch flat-blade screwdriver, tighten the filler plate's captive installation screws.

Step 8 If you pushed the router from the rack, slowly guide the router back into the rack.

Step 9 Use a 3/16-inch flat-blade screwdriver to tighten the screws that secure the router to the front mounting strips of the rack.


Note When powering on the router, wait a minimum of 30 seconds before powering it off again.



This completes the procedures for replacing an AC-input or DC-input power supply in a Cisco 7200 series router.


Caution To maintain agency compliance requirements and meet EMI emissions standards for the Cisco 7200 series routers with a single power supply, the power supply filler plate must remain in the power supply adjacent to the installed power supply. Do not remove this filler plate from the router unless you intend to install a redundant power supply.

Fiber Optic Cleaning Information

We strongly recommend cleaning all optical connections before reconnecting any optical cables to equipment. For information about cleaning optical connectors, see the Inspection and Cleaning Procedures for Fiber-Optic Connections document and the Compressed Air Cleaning Issues for Fiber-Optic Connections document.