Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express System Administrator Guide
Configuring Phones to Make Basic Calls
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Table of Contents

Configuring Phones to Make Basic Calls

Contents

Prerequisites for Configuring Phones to Make Basic Calls

Restrictions for Configuring Phones to Make Basic Calls

Information About Configuring Phones to Make Basic Calls

Phones in CiscoUnifiedCME

Cisco Unified 3905 SIP IP Phones

Cisco Unified 6901 and 6911 SIP IP Phones

Cisco Unified 6921, 6941, 6945, and 6961 SIP IP Phones

Cisco Unified 8941 and 8945 SIP IP Phones

Cisco Unified 6945, 8941, and 8945 SCCP IP Phones

Directory Numbers

Single-Line

Dual-Line

Octo-Line

SIP Shared-Line (Nonexclusive)

Two Directory Numbers with One Telephone Number

Dual-Number

Shared Line (Exclusive)

Mixed Shared Lines

Overlaid

Monitor Mode for Shared Lines

Watch Mode for Phones

PSTN FXO Trunk Lines

Codecs for CiscoUnifiedCME Phones

Analog Phones

Cisco ATAs in SCCP Mode

FXS Ports in SCCP Mode

FXS Ports in H.323 Mode

Fax Support

Cisco VG202, VG204, and VG224 Autoconfiguration

Secure IP Phone (IP-STE) Support

Secure Communications Between STU, STE, and IP-STE

SCCP Media Control for Secure Mode

Secure Communication Between STE, STU, and IP-STE Across SIP Trunk

Remote Teleworker Phones

Media Termination Point for Remote Phones

G.729r8 Codec on Remote Phones

Busy Trigger and Channel Huntstop for SIP Phones

Multiple Calls Per Line

Cisco Unified 8941 and 8945 SCCP IP Phones

Cisco Unified 6921, 6941, 6945, 6961, 8941, and 8945 SIP IP Phones

Digit Collection on SIP Phones

KPML Digit Collection

SIP Dial Plans

Session Transport Protocol for SIP Phones

Real-Time Transport Protocol Call Information Display Enhancement

Ephone-Type Configuration

Support for 7926G Wireless SCCP IP Phone

KEM Support for Cisco Unified 8961, 9951, and 9971 SIP IP Phones

Key Mapping

Call Control

XML Updates

Restrictions

Fast-Track Configuration Approach for Cisco Unified SIP IP Phones

Restrictions

How to Configure Phones for a PBX System

SCCP: Creating Directory Numbers

Prerequisites

Restrictions

Examples

What to Do Next

SCCP: Configuring Ephone-Type Templates

Prerequisites

Restrictions

Ephone-Type Parameters for Supported Phone Types

Examples

SCCP: Assigning Directory Numbers to Phones

Prerequisites

Restrictions

Examples

What to Do Next

SIP: Creating Directory Numbers

Prerequisites

Restrictions

Examples

SIP: Assigning Directory Numbers to Phones

Examples

What to Do Next

SIP: Configuring Dial Plans

Prerequisites

Examples

Troubleshooting Tips

What to Do Next

SIP: Verifying Dial Plan Configuration

SIP: Enabling KPML

Prerequisites

Restrictions

What to Do Next

SIP: Selecting Session-Transport Protocol for a Phone

Prerequisites

Restrictions

What to Do Next

SIP: Disabling SIP Proxy Registration for a Directory Number

Prerequisites

Restrictions

What to Do Next

Modifying the Global Codec

Prerequisites

Restrictions

What to Do Next

Configuring Codecs of Individual Phones for Calls Between Local Phones

Prerequisites

Restrictions

What to Do Next

How to Configure Phones for a Key System

SCCP: Creating Directory Numbers for a Simple Key System

Restrictions

SCCP: Configuring Trunk Lines for a Key System

SCCP: Configuring a Simple Key System Phone Trunk Line Configuration

SCCP: Configuring an Advanced Key System Phone Trunk Line Configuration

SCCP: Configuring Individual IP Phones for Key System

Restrictions

What to Do Next

How to Configure Cisco ATA, Analog Phone Support, Remote Phones, CiscoIPCommunicator, and Secure IP Phone (IP-STE)

Configuring Cisco ATA Support

Restrictions

What to Do Next

Verifying Cisco ATA Support

Troubleshooting Cisco ATA Support

Using Call Pickup and Group Call Pickup with Cisco ATA

Configuring Voice and T.38 Fax Relay on Cisco ATA-187

Prerequisites

Restrictions

SCCP: Enabling Auto-Configuration for Cisco VG202, VG204, and VG224

Prerequisites

Restrictions

Examples

What to Do Next

SCCP: Configuring Phones on SCCP Controlled Analog (FXS) Ports

Prerequisites

Restrictions

What to Do Next

SCCP: Verifying Analog Phone Support

SCCP: Enabling a Remote Phone

Prerequisites

Restrictions

What to Do Next

SCCP: Verifying Remote Phones

SCCP: Configuring CiscoIPCommunicator Support

Prerequisites

SCCP: Verifying CiscoIPCommunicator Support

SCCP: Troubleshooting CiscoIPCommunicator Support

SCCP: Configuring Secure IP Phone (IP-STE)

Prerequisites

Restrictions

SCCP: Configuring Phone Services XML File for Cisco Unified Wireless Phone 7926G

Prerequisites

How to Configure Phones to Make Basic Call

Configuring a Mixed Shared Line

Prerequisites

Restrictions

Troubleshooting Tips

SCCP: Configuring the Maximum Number of Calls

Prerequisites

SIP: Configuring the Busy Trigger Limit

Prerequisites

Restrictions

SIP: Configuring KEMs

Prerequisites

SIP: Provisioning Using the Fast-Track Configuration Approach

Prerequisites

Restrictions

New SIP Phone models validated for CME using Fast-track configuration

Configuration Examples for Making Basic Calls

Configuring SCCP Phones for Making Basic Calls: Example

Configuring SIP Phones for Making Basic Calls: Example

Disabling a Bulk Registration for a SIP Phone: Example

Configuring a Mixed Shared Line on a Second Common Directory Number: Example

Cisco ATA: Example

SCCP Analog Phone: Example

Remote Teleworker Phones: Example

Secure IP Phone (IP-STE): Example

Configuring PhoneServices XML File for Cisco Unified Wireless Phone 7926G: Example

Monitoring the Status of Key Expansion Modules: Example

Example: Fast-Track Configuration Approach

Where to Go Next

Additional References

Related Documents

Technical Assistance

Feature Information for Configuring Phones to Make Basic Calls

Configuring Phones to Make Basic Calls

Last Updated: July 25, 2013

 

This module describes how to configure Cisco Unified IP phones in Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express (Cisco Unified CME) so that you can make and receive basic calls.


Caution The Interactive Voice Response (IVR) media prompts feature is only available on the IAD2435 when running IOS version 15.0(1)M or later.

Finding Feature Information in This Module

Your Cisco Unified CME version may not support all of the features documented in this module. For a list of the versions in which each feature is supported, see the “Feature Information for Configuring Phones to Make Basic Calls” section.

Prerequisites for Configuring Phones to Make Basic Calls

Restrictions for Configuring Phones to Make Basic Calls

When you are configuring dial peers or ephone-dns, including park slots and conferencing extensions, on Cisco Integrated Services Router Voice Bundles, the following message may appear to warn you that free memory is not available:

%DIALPEER_DB-3-ADDPEER_MEM_THRESHOLD: Addition of dial-peers limited by available memory

To configure more dial peers or ephone-dns, increase the DRAM in the system. A moderately complex configuration may exceed the default 256 MB DRAM and require 512 MB DRAM. Note that many factors contribute to memory usage, in addition to the number of dial peers and ephone-dns configured.

Information About Configuring Phones to Make Basic Calls

To configure phones to make basic calls, you should understand the following concepts:

Phones in Cisco Unified CME

An ephone, or “Ethernet phone,” for SCCP or a voice-register pool for SIP is the software configuration for a phone in Cisco Unified CME. This phone can be either a Cisco Unified IP phone or an analog phone. Each physical phone in your system must be configured as an ephone or voice-register pool on the Cisco Unified CME router to receive support in the LAN environment. Each phone has a unique tag , or sequence number, to identify it during configuration.

Cisco Unified CME 8.8 and later versions support the following phones:

Cisco Unified 3905 SIP IP Phones

Firmware 9.2(1) or a later version should be installed on the Cisco Unified 3905 SIP IP phone.

Table 1 Features Supported on the Cisco Unified 3905 SIP IP Phone

Features
Cisco Unified 3905 SIP IP Phone

After Hours

Not Supported

Authenticate Register

Supported

Auto-Answer

Supported

Barge

Not Supported

Busy-Lamp-Field Monitoring

Not Supported

Button Layout

Not Supported

Call Forward

Supported

Call Park

Not Supported

Call Transfer

Supported

cBarge

Not Supported

Conferencing

Supported

Directory Services

Not Supported

Extension Mobility

Not Supported

Group Pickup

Supported

Hold

Supported

HTTP Firmware Download

Not Supported

Intercom

Not Supported

KEM

Not Supported

Live Record

Not Supported

Mobility

Not Supported

Multicast MOH

Supported

Multicast Paging

Not Supported

My Phone Apps

Not Supported

Night Service

Not Supported

Pickup

Supported

Privacy

Not Supported

Programmable Line Keys

Not Supported

Redial

Supported

Resume

Supported

Shared Lines

Supported

Speakerphone

Supported

Speed Dial

Not Supported

Unicast Paging

Not Supported

Video Telephony

Not Supported

For information on the Cisco Unified 3905 SIP IP Phone, see Cisco Unified IP Phone 3905 User Guide for Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express Version 8.8 (SIP).

Cisco Unified 6901 and 6911 SIP IP Phones

Cisco Unified CME 9.0 and later versions support the Cisco Unified 6901 and 6911 SIP IP Phones.

Table 2 Features Supported on the Cisco Unified 6901 and 6911 SIP IP Phones

Features
6901
6911

After Hour

Not Supported

Not Supported

Barge

Not Supported

Not Supported

Busy-Lamp-Field Monitoring

Not Supported

Not Supported

Button Layout

Not Supported

Not Supported

Call Forward All

Supported1

Supported 1

Call Park

Supported 1

Supported 1

Call Transfer

Supported

Supported

cBarge

Not Supported

Not Supported

Directory Service

Not Supported

Not Supported

Extension Mobility

Not Supported

Not Supported

Group Pickup

Supported 1

Supported 1

Hold

Supported

Supported

HTTP Firmware Download

Not Supported

Not Supported

Intercom

Not Supported

Not Supported

KEM

Not Supported

Not Supported

Meet-Me Conference

Not Supported

Supported2

Mobility

Not Supported

Not Supported

Multicast MoH

Supported

Supported

Multicast Paging

Not Supported

Supported

MyPhoneApp

Not Supported

Not Supported

Pickup

Not Supported

Supported 2

Privacy

Not Supported

Not Supported

Programmable Line Key

Not Supported

Supported

Redial

Supported

Supported

Resume

Supported

Supported

Shared Lines

Supported

Supported

Software Ad-Hoc Conference

Supported

Supported

Speakerphone

Not Supported

Supported

Speed Dial

Not Supported

Supported

Video

Not Supported

Not Supported

1.The fac command must be configured in telephony-service configuration mode.

2.The feature-button command must be configured in voice register pool configuration mode.

Prerequisites

  • Cisco IOS Release 15.2(2)T.
  • Correct firmware (9.2.1 or a later version) is installed on the Cisco Unified IP phone.

Restrictions

Cisco Unified 6901 and 6911 SIP IP Phones do not have LCD screens.

For more information on the Cisco Unified 6901 and 6911 SIP IP Phones, see Cisco Unified IP Phone 6901 and 6911 User Guide for Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express Version 9.0 (SIP) .

Cisco Unified 6921, 6941, 6945, and 6961 SIP IP Phones

Cisco Unified CME 9.0 and later versions support the Cisco Unified 6921, 6941, 6945, and 6961 SIP IP Phones.

Table 3 Features Supported on the
Cisco Unified 6921, 6941, 6945, and 6961 SIP IP Phones

Features
6921
6941
6945
6961

After Hour

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Barge

Not Supported

Not Supported

Not Supported

Not Supported

Busy-Lamp-Field Monitoring

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Button Layout

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Call Forward All Softkey

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Call Park

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Call Transfer

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

cBarge

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Directory Service

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Extension Mobility

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Group Pickup

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Hold

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

HTTP Firmware Download

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Intercom

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

KEM

Not Supported

Not Supported

Not Supported

Not Supported

Meet-Me Conference

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Mobility

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Multicast MoH

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Multicast Paging

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

MyPhoneApp

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Pickup

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Privacy

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Programmable Line Key

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Redial

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Resume

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Shared Lines

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Software Ad-Hoc Conference

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Speakerphone

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Speed Dial

Supported

Supported

Supported

Supported

Video

Not Supported

Not Supported

Not Supported

Not Supported

Prerequisites

  • Cisco IOS Release 15.2(2)T.
  • Correct firmware (9.2.1 or a later version) is installed on the Cisco Unified IP phone.

For more information on the Cisco Unified 6921, 6941, 6945, and 6961SIP IP Phones, see Cisco Unified IP Phone 6921, 6941, 6945, and 6961 User Guide for Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express Version 9.0 (SIP) .

Cisco Unified 8941 and 8945 SIP IP Phones

Cisco Unified CME 9.0 and later versions support the Cisco Unified 8941 and 8945 SIP IP Phones.

Table 4 Features Supported on the Cisco Unified 8941 and 8945 SIP IP Phones

Features
8941
8945

After Hour

Supported

Supported

Barge

Not Supported

Not Supported

Busy-Lamp-Field Monitoring

Supported

Supported

Button Layout

Supported

Supported

Call Forward All Softkey

Supported

Supported

Call Park

Supported

Supported

Call Transfer

Supported

Supported

cBarge

Supported

Supported

Directory Service

Supported

Supported

Extension Mobility

Supported

Supported

Group Pickup

Supported

Supported

Hold

Supported

Supported

HTTP Firmware Download

Supported3

Supported 1

Intercom

Supported

Supported

KEM

Not Supported

Not Supported

Meet-Me Conference

Supported

Supported

Mobility

Supported

Supported

Multicast MoH

Supported

Supported

Multicast Paging

Supported

Supported

MyPhoneApp

Supported

Supported

Pickup

Supported

Supported

Privacy

Supported

Supported

Programmable Line Key

Supported

Supported

Redial

Supported

Supported

Resume

Supported

Supported

Shared Lines

Supported

Supported

Software Ad-Hoc Conference

Supported

Supported

Speakerphone

Supported

Supported

Speed Dial

Supported

Supported

Video

Supported

Supported

3.For this feature, 9.2(2) or a later firmware version should be installed.

Prerequisites

  • Cisco IOS Release 15.2(2)T.
  • Correct firmware (9.2.1 or a later version) is installed on the Cisco Unified IP phone.

For more information on the Cisco Unified 8941 and 8945 SIP IP Phones, see Cisco Unified IP Phone 8941 and 8945 User Guide for Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express Version 9.0 (SIP) .

Cisco Unified 6945, 8941, and 8945 SCCP IP Phones

The Cisco Unified 6945, 8941, and 8945 SCCP IP Phones are supported in Cisco Unified CME, SRST, and CME-as-SRST.

Correct firmware should be installed on the Cisco Unified IP phones:

  • For Cisco Unified 6945 SCCP IP Phone, 9.1(1) or a later version.
  • For Cisco Unified 8941 and 8945 SCCP IP Phones, 9.1(2) or a later version.

Table 5 Features Supported
on the Cisco Unified 6945, 8941, and 8945 SCCP IP Phones

Features
6945
8941
8945

After Hours

Supported

Supported

Supported

Basic Automatic Call Distribution

Supported

Supported

Supported

Button Layout

Supported

Supported

Supported

Call Forward

Supported

Supported

Supported

Call Park

Supported

Supported

Supported

Call Transfer

Supported

Supported

Supported

Call Transfer Recall

Supported

Supported

Supported

cBarge

Not Supported

Not Supported

Not Supported

Conferencing

Supported

Supported

Supported

Directory Services

Supported

Supported

Supported

Enhanced Busy-Lamp-Field Monitoring

Supported

Supported

Supported

Extension Mobility

Supported

Supported

Supported

Forced Authorization Code

Supported

Supported

Supported

Hold

Supported

Supported

Supported

Intercom

Supported

Supported

Supported

Live Record

Supported

Supported

Supported

Multicast MOH

Supported

Supported

Supported

Multicast Paging

Supported

Supported

Supported

My Phone Apps

Supported

Supported

Supported

Night Service

Supported

Supported

Supported

Privacy

Supported

Supported

Supported

Programmable Line Keys

Supported

Supported

Supported

Resume

Supported

Supported

Supported

Secure Real-time Transport Protocol

Supported

Supported

Supported

Shared Lines

Supported

Supported

Supported

Single Number Reach

Supported

Supported

Supported

Speakerphone

Supported

Supported

Supported

Speed Dial

Supported

Supported

Supported

Transfer to Voicemail

Supported

Supported

Supported

Video Telephony

Supported4

Supported5

Supported6

Whisper Intercom

Supported

Supported

Supported

4.No built-in camera. CUVA is supported. Connection should be up between the Cisco Unified 6945 IP Phone and the Cisco Unified Video Advantage (CUVA) 2.2(1.7) or a later version.

5.With built-in camera.

6.With built-in camera.

For information on the Cisco Unified 6945 SCCP IP Phone, see Cisco Unified IP Phone 6945 User Guide for Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express Version 8.8 (SCCP).

For information on the Cisco Unified 8941 and 8945 SCCP IP Phones, see Cisco Unified IP Phone 8941 and 8945 User Guide for Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express Version 8.8 (SCCP).

Directory Numbers

A directory number, also known as an ephone-dn for SCCP or a voice-register dn for SIP, is the software configuration in Cisco Unified CME that represents the line connecting a voice channel to a phone. A directory number has one or more extension or telephone numbers associated with it to allow call connections to be made. Generally, a directory number is equivalent to a phone line, but not always. There are several types of directory numbers, which have different characteristics.

Each directory number has a unique dn-tag , or sequence number, to identify it during configuration. Directory numbers are assigned to line buttons on phones during configuration.

One virtual voice port and one or more dial peers are automatically created for each directory number, depending on the configuration for SCCP phones, or for SIP phones, when the phone registers in Cisco Unified CME.

Because each directory number represents a virtual voice port in the router, the number of directory numbers that you create corresponds to the number of simultaneous calls that you can have. This means that if you want more than one call to the same number to be answered simultaneously, you need multiple directory numbers with the same destination number pattern.

The directory number is the basic building block of a Cisco Unified CME system. Six different types of directory numbers can be combined in different ways for different call coverage situations. Each type will help with a particular type of limitation or call-coverage need. For example, if you want to keep the number of directory numbers low and provide service to a large number of people, you might use shared directory numbers. Or if you have a limited quantity of extension numbers that you can use and you need to have a large quantity of simultaneous calls, you might create two or more directory numbers with the same number. The key is knowing how each type of directory number works and its advantages.

Not all types of directory numbers can be configured for all phones or for all protocols. In the remaining information about directory numbers, we have used SCCP in the examples presented but that does not imply exclusivity. The following sections describe the types of directory numbers in a Cisco Unified CME system:

Single-Line

A single-line directory number has the following characteristics:

  • Makes one call connection at a time using one phone line button. A single-line directory number has one telephone number associated with it.
  • Should be used when phone buttons have a one-to-one correspondence to the PSTN lines that come into a Cisco Unified CME system.
  • Should be used for lines that are dedicated to intercom, paging, message-waiting indicator (MWI), loopback, and music-on-hold (MOH) feed sources.
  • Must have more than one single-line directory number on a phone when used with multiple-line features like call waiting, call transfer, and conferencing.
  • Can be combined with dual-line directory numbers on the same phone.

NoteYou must make the choice to configure each directory number in your system as either dual-line or single-line when you initially create configuration entries. If you need to change from single-line to dual-line later, you must delete the configuration for the directory number, then recreate it. You must make the choice to configure each directory number in your system as either dual-line or single-line when you initially create configuration entries. If you need to change from single-line to dual-line later, you must delete the configuration for the directory number, then recreate it.


Figure 1 shows a single-line directory number for an SCCP phone in Cisco Unified CME.

Figure 1 Single-Line Directory Number

 

Dual-Line

A dual-line directory number has the following characteristics:

  • Has one voice port with two channels.
  • Supported on IP phones that are running SCCP; not supported on IP phones that are running SIP.
  • Can make two call connections at the same time using one phone line button. A dual-line directory number has two channels for separate call connections.
  • Can have one number or two numbers (primary and secondary) associated with it.
  • Should be used for a directory number that needs to use one line button for features like call waiting, call transfer, or conferencing.
  • Cannot be used for lines that are dedicated to intercom, paging, message-waiting indicator (MWI), loopback, and music-on-hold (MOH) feed sources.
  • Can be combined with single-line directory numbers on the same phone.

NoteYou must make the choice to configure each directory number in your system as either dual-line or single-line when you initially create configuration entries. If you need to change from single-line to dual-line later, you must delete the configuration for the directory number, then recreate it. You must make the choice to configure each directory number in your system as either dual-line or single-line when you initially create configuration entries. If you need to change from single-line to dual-line later, you must delete the configuration for the directory number, then recreate it.


Figure 2 shows a dual-line directory number for an SCCP phone in Cisco Unified CME.

Figure 2 Dual-Line Directory Number

 

Octo-Line

An octo-line directory number supports up to eight active calls, both incoming and outgoing, on a single button of a SCCP phone. Unlike a dual-line directory number, which is shared exclusively among phones (after a call is answered, that phone owns both channels of the dual-line directory number), an octo-line directory number can split its channels among other phones that share the directory number. All phones are allowed to initiate or receive calls on the idle channels of the shared octo-line directory number.

Because octo-line directory numbers do not require a different ephone-dn for each active call, one octo-line directory number can handle multiple calls. Multiple incoming calls to an octo-line directory number ring simultaneously. After a phone answers a call, the ringing stops on that phone and the call-waiting tone plays for the other incoming calls. When phones share an octo-line directory number, incoming calls ring on phones without active calls and these phones can answer any of the ringing calls. Phones with an active call hear the call-waiting tone.

After a phone answers an incoming call, the answering phone is in the connected state. Other phones that share the octo-line directory number are in the remote-in-use state.

After a connected call on an octo-line directory number is put on-hold, any phone that shares this directory number can pick up the held call. If a phone user is in the process of initiating a call transfer or creating a conference, the call is locked and other phones that share the octo-line directory number cannot steal the call.

Figure 3 shows an octo-line directory number for SCCP phones in Cisco Unified CME.

Figure 3 Octo-Line Directory Number

 

The Barge and Privacy features control whether other phones are allowed to view call information or join calls on the shared octo-line directory number.

Feature Comparison by Directory Number Line-Mode (SCCP Phones)

Table 6 lists some common directory number features and their support based on the type of line mode defined with the ephone-dn command.

 

Table 6 Feature Comparison by Line Mode (SCCP Phones)

Feature
Single-Line
Dual-Line
Octo-Line

Barge

Yes

Busy Trigger

Yes

Conferencing (8-party)

4 directory numbers

1 directory number

FXO Trunk Optimization

Yes

Yes

Huntstop Channel

Yes

Yes

Intercom

Yes

Key System
(one call per button)

Yes

Maximum Calls

Yes

MWI

Yes

Overlay directory numbers
(c, o, x)

Yes

Yes

Paging

Yes

Park

Yes

Privacy

Yes

SIP Shared-Line (Nonexclusive)

Cisco Unified CME 7.1 and later versions support SIP shared lines to allow multiple phones to share a common directory number. All phones sharing the directory number can initiate and receive calls at the same time. Calls to the shared line ring simultaneously on all phones without active calls and any of these phones can answer the incoming calls. After a phone answers a call, the ringing stops on all phones and the call-waiting tone plays for other incoming calls to the connected phone.

The phone that answers an incoming call is in the connected state. Other phones that share the directory number are in the remote-in-use state. The first user that answers the call on the shared line is connected to the caller and the remaining users see the call information and status of the shared line.

Calls on a shared line can be put on hold like calls on a nonshared line. When a call is placed on hold, other phones with the shared-line directory number receive a hold notification so all phones sharing the line are aware of the held call. Any shared-line phone user can resume the held call. If the call is placed on hold as part of a conference or call transfer operation, the call cannot be resumed by other shared-line phone users. The ID of the held call is used by other shared-line members to resume the call. Notifications are sent to all associated phones when a held call is resumed on a shared line.

Shared lines support up to 16 calls, depending on the configuration in Cisco Unified CME, which rejects any new call that exceeds the configured limit. For configuration information, see the “SIP: Creating Directory Numbers” section.

The Barge and Privacy features control whether other phones are allowed to view call information or join calls on the shared-line directory number. See the “Configuring Barge and Privacy” section.


NoteWhen the When the no supplementary-service sip handle-replaces command is configured, SIP shared-line is not supported on CME.


Two Directory Numbers with One Telephone Number

Two directory numbers with one telephone or extension number have the following characteristics:

  • Have the same telephone number but two separate virtual voice ports, and therefore can have two separate call connections.
  • Can be dual-line (SCCP only) or single-line directory numbers.
  • Can appear on the same phone on different buttons or on different phones.
  • Should be used when you want the ability to make more call connections while using fewer numbers.

Figure 4 shows a phone with two buttons that have the same number, extension 1003. Each button has a different directory number (button 1 is directory number 13 and button 2 is directory number 14), so each button can make one independent call connection if the directory numbers are single-line and two call connections (for a total of four) if the directory numbers are dual-line.

Figure 5 shows two phones that each have a button with the same number. Because the buttons have different directory numbers, the calls that are connected on these buttons are independent of one another. The phone user at phone 4 can make a call on extension 1003, and the phone user on phone 5 can receive a different call on extension 1003 at the same time.

The two directory numbers-with-one-number situation is different than a shared line, which also has two buttons with one number but has only one directory number for both of them. A shared directory number will have the same call connection at all the buttons on which the shared directory number appears. If a call on a shared directory number is answered on one phone and then placed on hold, the call can be retrieved from the second phone on which the shared directory number appears. But when there are two directory numbers with one number, a call connection appears only on the phone and button at which the call is made or received. In the example in Figure 5, if the user at phone 4 makes a call on button 1 and puts it on hold, the call can be retrieved only from phone 4. For more information about shared lines, see the “Shared Line (Exclusive)” section.

The examples in Figure 4 and Figure 5 show how two directory numbers with one number are used to provide a small hunt group capability. In Figure 4, if the directory number on button 1 is busy or does not answer, an incoming call to extension 1003 rolls over to the directory number associated with button 2 because the appropriate related commands are configured. Similarly, if button 1 on phone 4 is busy, an incoming call to 1003 rolls over to button 1 on phone 5.

Figure 4 Two Directory Numbers with One Number on One Phone

 

Figure 5 Two Directory Numbers with One Number on Two Phones

 

Dual-Number

A dual-number directory number has the following characteristics:

  • Has two telephone numbers, a primary number and a secondary number.
  • Can make one call connection if it is a single-line directory number.
  • Can make two call connections at a time if it is a dual-line directory number (SCCP only).
  • Should be used when you want to have two different numbers for the same button without using more than one directory number.

Figure 6 shows a directory number that has two numbers, extension 1006 and extension 1007.

Figure 6 Dual-Number Directory

 

Shared Line (Exclusive)

An exclusively shared directory number has the following characteristics:

  • Has a line that appears on two different phones but uses the same directory number, and extension or phone number.
  • Can make one call at a time and that call appears on both phones.
  • Should be used when you want the capability to answer or pick up a call at more than one phone.

Because this directory number is shared exclusively among phones, if the directory number is connected to a call on one phone, that directory number is unavailable for calls on any other phone. If a call is placed on hold on one phone, it can be retrieved on the second phone. This is like having a single-line phone in your house with multiple extensions. You can answer the call from any phone on which the number appears, and you can pick it up from hold on any phone on which the number appears.

Figure 7 shows a shared directory number on phones that are running SCCP. Extension 1008 appears on both phone 7 and phone 8.

Figure 7 Shared Directory Number (Exclusive)

 

Mixed Shared Lines

Cisco Unified CME 9.0 and later versions support the mixed Cisco Unified SIP/SCCP shared line. This feature allows Cisco Unified SIP and SCCP IP phones to share a common directory number.

The mixed shared line supports up to 16 calls, depending on the configuration in Cisco Unified CME, which rejects any new call that exceeds the configured limit.

For configuration information, see the “SCCP: Creating Directory Numbers” section and the “SIP: Creating Directory Numbers” section.

Incoming and Outgoing Calls

All phones sharing the common directory number can initate and receive calls at the same time. Calls to the mixed shared line ring simultaneously on all phones without active calls and any of these phones can answer the incoming calls. After a phone answers a call, the ringing stops on all phones and the call-waiting tone plays for other incoming calls to the connected phone.

The phone that answers an incoming call is in the connected state. Other phones that share the common directory number are in the remote-in-use state. The first user who answers the call on the mixed shared line is connected to the caller and the remaining users see the call information and status of the mixed shared line.

When a mixed shared-line user makes an outgoing call on the shared line, all the other shared-line users are notified of the outgoing call. When the called party answers, the caller is connected while the remaining shared-line users see the call information and the status of the call on the mixed shared line.

Hold and Resume

Calls on a mixed shared line can be put on hold like calls on a nonshared line. When a call is placed on hold, other phones with the shared-line directory number receive a hold notification so all phones sharing the line are aware of the call on hold. Any shared-line phone user can resume the call on hold. The ID of the call on hold is used by other shared-line members to resume the call. Notifications are sent to all associated phones when a call on hold is resumed on a mixed shared line. If the call is placed on hold as part of a conference or call transfer operation, the resume feature is not allowed.

Privacy on Hold

The Privacy on Hold feature prevents other phone users from viewing call information or retrieving a call put on hold by another phone sharing a common directory number. Only the caller who put the call on hold can see the status of the held call.

By default, Privacy on Hold feature is disabled for all phones on a shared line. Use the privacy-on-hold command in telephony-service configuration mode to enable the Privacy feature for calls that are on hold on Cisco Unified SCCP IP phones on a mixed shared line. Use the privacy-on-hold command in voice register global configuration mode to enable the Privacy feature for calls that are on hold on Cisco Unified SIP IP phones on a mixed shared line.

The no privacy and privacy off commands override the privacy-on-hold command.

Call Transfer and Forwarding

Both blind transfer and consult transfer are supported on a mixed shared line. A mixed shared line can be the one transferring the call, the one receiving the transferred call, or the call being transferred.

There are four types of call forwarding: all calls, no answer, busy, and night service. Any of these can be configured under a shared SCCP ephone-dn or a shared SIP voice register dn. However, the user must keep the call forwarding parameters for the SCCP and SIP lines synchronized with each other. A mixed shared line can be the one forwarding the call, the one receiving the forwarded call, or the call being forwarded.

For more information, see the “Configuring Call Transfer and Forwarding” section.

Call Pickup

The Call Pickup feature is supported on a mixed shared line when the call-park system application command is configured in telephony-service configuration mode.

A user can answer a call that:

  • Originates from a shared line
  • Rings on a shared line
  • Originates from one shared line and rings on another shared line

For more information, see the “Call Pickup” section.

Call Park

The Call Park feature is supported on a mixed shared line when the call-park system application command is configured in telephony-service configuration mode.

For more information, see the “Configuring Call Park” section.

MWI

SCCP and SIP message-waiting indication (MWI) services are supported on Cisco Unity and Cisco Unity voice mails on mixed shared lines:

The following are two ways of registering a mixed shared line for an MWI service from a SIP-based MWI server with the shared-line option:

  • Configure the mwi sip command in ephone-dn or ephone-dn-template configuration mode.
  • Configure the mwi command in voice register dn configuration mode.

For SCCP MWI service on a mixed shared line, use the mwi { off | on | on-off } command in ephone-dn configuration mode to enable a specific Cisco Unified IP phone extension to receive MWI notification from an external voice-messaging system.

Software Conferencing

A local software conference can be created on a mixed shared line, with the mixed shared line acting as a conference creator and a conference participant.

For software conferencing on a mixed shared line, other shared-line users remain in remote-in-use state and do not see the calls on hold when the conference call is put on hold by a mixed-shared-line user acting as the conference creator.


NoteOnly the conference creator, who put a conference call on hold, can resume the conference call. Only the conference creator, who put a conference call on hold, can resume the conference call.


Dial Plans

A dial-plan pattern enables abbreviated extensions to be expanded into fully qualified E.164 numbers and builds additional dial peers for the expanded numbers it creates.

Features are effectively supported on a mixed shared line when dial-plan patterns have matching configurations in telephony-service and voice register global configuration modes using the dialplan pattern command.

Busy-Lamp-Field Speed-Dial Monitoring

A mixed shared line only supports directory number-based Busy-Lamp-Field (BLF) Speed-Dial monitoring and not device-based monitoring.

Restrictions

The following features are not supported on mixed Cisco Unified SIP/SCCP shared lines:

  • Privacy
  • Barge
  • cBarge
  • Single Number Reach
  • Hardware Conferencing.
  • Remote-resume on a local software conference call
  • Video calls
  • Overlay DNs on Cisco Unified SCCP IP phones
  • Features in the CTI CSTA protocol suite

Overlaid

An overlaid directory number has the following characteristics:

  • Is a member of an overlay set, which includes all the directory numbers that have been assigned together to a particular phone button.
  • Can have the same telephone or extension number as other members of the overlay set or different numbers.
  • Can be single-line or dual-line, but cannot be mixed single-line and dual-line in the same overlay set.
  • Can be shared on more than one phone.

Overlaid directory numbers provide call coverage similar to shared directory numbers because the same number can appear on more than one phone. The advantage of using two directory numbers in an overlay arrangement rather than as a simple shared line is that a call to the number on one phone does not block the use of the same number on the other phone, as would happen if it were a shared directory number.

For information about configuring call coverage using overlaid ephone-dns, see the “Configuring Call Coverage Features” section.

You can overlay up to 25 lines on a single button. A typical use of overlaid directory numbers would be to create a “10x10” shared line, with 10 lines in an overlay set shared by 10 phones, resulting in the possibility of 10 simultaneous calls to the same number. For configuration information, see the “SCCP: Creating Directory Numbers for a Simple Key System” section

Monitor Mode for Shared Lines

In Cisco CME 3.0 and later versions, monitor mode for shared lines provides a visible line status indicating whether the line is in-use or not. A monitor-line lamp is off or unlit only when its line is in the idle call state. The idle state occurs before a call is made and after a call is completed. For all other call states, the monitor line lamp is lit. A receptionist who monitors the line can see that it is in use and can decide not to send additional calls to that extension, assuming that other transfer and forwarding options are available, or to report the information to the caller; for example, “Sorry, that extension is busy, can I take a message?”

In Cisco CME 3.2 and later versions, consultative transfers can occur during Direct Station Select (DSS) for transferring calls to idle monitored lines. The receptionist who transfers a call from a normal line can press the Transfer button and then press the line button of the monitored line, causing the call to be transferred to the phone number of the monitored line. For information about consultative transfer with DSS, see the “Configuring Call Transfer and Forwarding” section.

In Cisco Unified CME 4.0(1) and later versions, the line button for a monitored line can be used as a DSS for a call transfer when the monitored line is idle or in-use , provided that the call transfer can succeed; for example, when the monitored line is configured for Call Forward Busy or Call Forward No Answer.


NoteTypically, Cisco Unified CME does not attempt a transfer that causes the caller (transferee) to hear a busy tone. However, the system does not check the state of subsequent target numbers in the call-forward path when the transferred call is transferred more than once. Multiple transfers can occur because a call-forward-busy target is also busy and configured for Call Forward Busy. Typically, Cisco Unified CME does not attempt a transfer that causes the caller (transferee) to hear a busy tone. However, the system does not check the state of subsequent target numbers in the call-forward path when the transferred call is transferred more than once. Multiple transfers can occur because a call-forward-busy target is also busy and configured for Call Forward Busy.


In Cisco Unified CME 4.3 and later versions, a receptionist can use the Transfer to Voicemail feature to transfer a caller directly to a voice-mail extension for a monitored line. For configuration information, see the “SCCP: Enabling Transfer to Voice Mail” section.

For configuration information for monitor mode, see the “SCCP: Assigning Directory Numbers to Phones” section.

Monitor mode is intended for use only in the context of shared lines so that a receptionist can visually monitor the in-use status of several users’ phone extensions; for example, for Busy Lamp Field (BLF) notification. To monitor all lines on an individual phone so that a receptionist can visually monitor the in-use status of that phone, see the “Watch Mode for Phones” section.

For BLF monitoring of speed-dial buttons and directory call-lists, see the “Configuring Presence Service” section.

Watch Mode for Phones

In Cisco Unified CME 4.1 and later versions, a line button that is configured for watch mode on one phone provides BLF notification for all lines on another phone (watched phone) for which watched directory number is the primary line. Watch mode allows a phone user, such as a receptionist, to visually monitor the in-use status of an individual phone. A user can use the line button that has been set in watch mode as a speed-dial to call the first extension of the watched phone. The watching phone button displays a red light when the watched phone is unregistered in a DND state or in an offhook state. Pressing the button when it is not displaying a red light will dial the number in the same manner it would for a monitor button or the speed-dial button. Incoming calls on a line button that is in watch mode do not ring and do not display caller ID or call-waiting caller ID.

The line button for a watched phone can also be used as a DSS for a call transfer when the watched phone is idle. In this case, the phone user who transfers a call from a normal line can press the Transfer button and then press the line button of the watched directory number, causing the call to be transferred to the phone number associated with the watched directory number.

For configuration information, see the “SCCP: Assigning Directory Numbers to Phones” section.

If the watched directory number is a shared line and the shared line is not idle on any phone with which it is associated, then in the context of watch mode, the status of the line button indicates that the watched phone is in use.

For best results when monitoring the status of an individual phone based on a watched directory number, the directory number configured for watch mode should not be a shared line. To monitor a shared line so that a receptionist can visually monitor the in-use status of several users’ phone extensions, see the “Monitor Mode for Shared Lines” section.


 

For BLF monitoring of speed-dial buttons and directory call-lists, see the “Configuring Presence Service” section.

PSTN FXO Trunk Lines

In Cisco CME 3.2 and later versions, IP phones running SCCP can be configured to have buttons for dedicated PSTN FXO trunk lines, also known as FXO lines. FXO lines may be used by companies whose employees require private PSTN numbers. For example, a salesperson may need a special number that customers can call without having to go through a main number. When a call comes in to the direct number, the salesperson knows that the caller is a customer. In the salesperson’s absence, the customer can leave a voice mail. FXO lines can use PSTN service provider voice mail: when the line button is pressed, the line is seized, allowing the user to hear the stutter dial tone provided by the PSTN to indicate that voice messages are available.

Because FXO lines behave as private lines, users do not have to dial a prefix, such as 9 or 8, to reach an outside line. To reach phone users within the company, FXO-line users must dial numbers that use the company's PSTN number. For calls to non-PSTN destinations, such as local IP phones, a second directory number must be provisioned.

Calls placed to or received on an FXO line have restricted Cisco Unified CME services and cannot be transferred by Cisco Unified CME. However, phone users are able to access hookflash-controlled PSTN services using the Flash soft key.

In Cisco Unified CME 4.0(1), the following FXO trunk enhancements were introduced to improve the keyswitch emulation behavior of PSTN lines on phones running SCCP in a Cisco Unified CME system:

  • FXO port monitoring—Allows the line button on IP phones to reliably show the status of an FXO port when the port is in use. The status indicator, either a lamp or an icon, depending on the phone model, accurately displays the status of the FXO port during the duration of the call, even after the call is forwarded or transferred. The same FXO port can be monitored by multiple phones using multiple trunk ephone-dns.
  • Transfer recall—If a transfer-to phone does not answer after a specified timeout, the call is returned to the phone that initiated the transfer and it resumes ringing on the FXO line button. The directory number must be dual-lined.
  • Transfer-to button optimization—When an FXO call is transferred to a private extension button on another phone, and that phone has a shared line button for the FXO port, after the transfer is committed and the call is answered, the connected call displays on the FXO line button of the transfer-to phone. This frees up the private extension line on the transfer-to phone. The directory number n must be dual-line.
  • Dual-line ephone-dns— Directory numbers for FXO lines can now be configured for dual-line to support the FXO monitoring, transfer recall, and transfer-to button optimization features.

For configuration information, see the “SCCP: Configuring Trunk Lines for a Key System” section.

Codecs for Cisco Unified CME Phones

In Cisco CME 3.4, support for connecting and provisioning SIP phones was added. The default codec of the POTS dial peer for an SCCP phone is G.711 and the default codec of a VoIP dial peer for a SIP phone is G.729. If neither the SCCP phone nor the SIP phone in Cisco Unified CME is specifically configured to change the codec, calls between the two phones on the same router will produce a busy signal caused by the mismatched default codecs. To avoid codec mismatch, specify the codec for individual IP phones in Cisco Unified CME. Modify the configuration for either SIP or SCCP phones to ensure that the codec for all phones match. Do not modify the configuration for both SIP and SCCP phones. For configuration information, see the “Configuring Codecs of Individual Phones for Calls Between Local Phones” section .

In Cisco Unified CME 4.3, support for G.722-64K and the Internet Low Bit Rate Codec (iLBC) was added. This enables Cisco Unified CME to support the same codecs that are used in newer Cisco Unified IP phones, mobile wireless networks, and internet telephony without transcoding. This feature provides support for the following:

  • iLBC and G.722-capable SIP and SCCP IP phones in Cisco Unified CME.
  • iLBC-capable SCCP analog endpoints and remote phones in Cisco Unified CME.
  • Conferencing support for G.722 and ILBC.
  • Supplementary services, such as transfer, call forward, MOH, support for G.722 and iLBC, including any supplementary services that require transcoding between G.722 and any other codec.
  • Transcoding for G.722 and iLBC, including G.722 to G.711 and G.722 to any other codec.

With the introduction of G.722 and iLBC codecs, there can be a disparity between codec capabilities of different phones and different firmware versions on same phone type. For example, when a H.323 call is established, the codec is negotiated based on the dial-peer codec and the assumption is that the codecs supported on H.323 side are supported by the phones. This assumption is not valid after G.722 and ILBC codec are introduced in your network. If the phones do not support the codecs on the H.323 side, a transcoder is required. To avoid transcoding in this situation, configure incoming dial-peers so that G.722 and iLBC codecs are not used for calls to phones that are not capable of supporting these codecs. Instead, configure these phones for G.729 or G.711. Also, when configuring shared directory numbers, ensure that phones with the same codec capabilities are connected to the shared directory number.

G.722-64K

Traditional PSTN telephony codecs, including G.711 and G.729, are classified as narrowband codecs because they encode audio signals in a narrow audio bandwidth, giving telephone calls a characteristic “tinny” sound. Wideband codecs, such as G.722, provide a superior voice experience because wideband frequency response is 200 Hz to 7 kHz compared to narrowband frequency response of 300 Hz to 3.4 kHz. At 64 kbps, the G.722 codec offers conferencing performance and good music quality.

A wideband handset for certain Cisco Unified IP phones, such as the Cisco Unified IP Phone 7906G, 7911G, 7941G-GE, 7942G, 7945G, 7961G-GE, 7962G, 7965G, and 7975G, take advantage of the higher voice quality provided by wideband codecs to enhance end-user experience with high-fidelity wideband audio. When users use a headset that supports wideband, they experience improved audio sensitivity when the wideband setting on their phones is enabled. You can configure phone-user access to the wideband headset setting on IP phones by setting the appropriate VendorConfig parameters in the phone’s configuration file. For configuration information, see the “Modifying Cisco Unified IP Phone Options” section .

If the system is not configured for a wideband codec, phone users may not detect any additional audio sensitivity, even when they are using a wideband headset.

You can configure the G.722-64K codec at a system-level for all calls through Cisco Unified CME. For configuration information, see the “Modifying the Global Codec” section . To configure individual phones and avoid codec mismatch for calls between local phones, see the “Configuring Codecs of Individual Phones for Calls Between Local Phones” section .

iLBC codec

Internet Low Bit Rate Codec (iLBC) enables graceful speech quality degradation in a network where frames get lost. Consider iLBC suitable for real-time communications, such as telephony and video conferencing, streaming audio, archival, and messaging. This codec is widely used by internet telephony softphones.The SIP, SCCP, and MGCP call protocols support use of the iLBC as an audio codec. iLBC provides better voice quality than G.729 but less than G.711. Supporting codecs that have standardized use in other networks, such as iLBC, enables end-to-end IP calls without the need for transcoding.

To configure individual SIP or SCCP phones, including analog endpoints in Cisco Unified CME, and avoid codec mismatch for calls between local phones, see the “Configuring Codecs of Individual Phones for Calls Between Local Phones” section .

Analog Phones

Cisco Unified CME supports analog phones and fax machines using Cisco Analog Telephone Adaptors (ATAs) or FXS ports in SCCP, H.323 mode, and fax pass-through mode. The FXS ports used for analog phones or fax can be on a Cisco Unified CME router, Cisco VG224 voice gateway, or integrated services router (ISR).

This section provides information on the following topics:

Cisco ATAs in SCCP Mode

You can configure the Cisco ATA 186 or Cisco ATA 188 to cost-effectively support analog phones using SCCP in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(11)T and later versions. Each Cisco ATA enables two analog phones to function as IP phones. For configuration information, see the “Configuring Cisco ATA Support” section.

FXS Ports in SCCP Mode

FXS ports on Cisco VG224 Voice Gateways and Cisco 2800 Series and Cisco 3800 Series ISRs can be configured for SCCP supplementary features. For information about using SCCP supplementary features on analog FXS ports on a Cisco IOS gateway under the control of a Cisco Unified CME router, see Supplementary Services Features for FXS Ports on Cisco IOS Voice Gateways Configuration Guide .

FXS Ports in H.323 Mode

FXS ports on platforms that cannot enable SCCP supplementary features can use H.323 mode to support call waiting, caller ID, hookflash transfer, modem pass-through, fax (T.38, Cisco fax relay, and pass-through), and PLAR. These features are provisioned as Cisco IOS voice features and not as Cisco Unified CME features.


NoteWhen using Cisco Unified CME, you can configure FXS ports in H.323 mode for call waiting or hookflash transfer, but not both at the same time. When using Cisco Unified CME, you can configure FXS ports in H.323 mode for call waiting or hookflash transfer, but not both at the same time.


See the following documents for details on configuring features for FXS ports in H.323 mode:

Fax Support

Cisco Unified CME 4.0 introduced the use of G.711 fax pass-through for SCCP on the Cisco VG224 voice gateway and Cisco ATA. In Cisco Unified CME 4.0(3) and later versions, fax relay using the Cisco-proprietary fax protocol is the only supported fax option for SCCP-controlled FXS ports on the Cisco VG224 and integrated service routers. For more information on fax relay, see the “Configuring Fax Relay” section.

Cisco ATA-187

Cisco Unified CME 9.0 and later versions provide voice and fax support on Cisco ATA-187.

Cisco ATA-187 is a SIP-based analog telephone adaptor that turns traditional telephone devices into IP devices. Cisco ATA-187 can connect with a regular analog FXS phone or fax machine on one end, while the other end is an IP side that uses SIP for signaling and registers to Cisco Unified CME as a Cisco Unfiied SIP IP phone.

Cisco ATA-187 functions as a Cisco Unified SIP IP phone that supports T.38 fax relay and fax pass-through, enabling the real-time transmission of fax over IP networks. The fax rate is from 7.2 to 14.4 kbps.

For information on how to configure voice and fax support on Cisco ATA-187, see the “Configuring Voice and T.38 Fax Relay on Cisco ATA-187” section.

Table 7 Features Supported on Cisco ATA-187

Features
ATA-187

Ad-Hoc Conference (Hardware DSP)

Not Supported

Ad-Hoc Conference (Three-Way)

Supported7

Barge

Not Supported

Call Forward All

Supported

Call Transfer

Supported

Call Waiting

Supported

cBarge

Not Supported

Hold

Supported

Meet-Me Conference

Supported

Pickup

Supported

Redial

Supported

Resume

Supported

Shared Lines

Supported

Speed Dial

Supported

Voice Mail

Supported