Cisco DCNM Installation and Licensing Guide, Release 5.x
Preparing Cisco DCNM-LAN Database
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Preparing a Database for DCNM-LAN

Table Of Contents

Preparing a Database for DCNM-LAN

Information About Preparing a Database

Oracle Database Preparation

PostgreSQL Database Preparation

Preparing an Oracle Database

Information About the Oracle SQL*Plus Command-Line Tool

Linux Environment Variables

Logging Into Oracle

Information About the init.ora File

Increasing the SYSTEM Tablespace

Increasing the Number of Sessions and Processes to 150 Each

Increasing the Number of Open Cursors to 1000

Preparing a PostgreSQL Database

Feature History for Preparing a Database


Preparing a Database for DCNM-LAN


This chapter describes how to prepare a database for a successful Cisco Data Center Network Manager for LAN (DCNM-LAN) installation.

This chapter includes the following sections:

Information About Preparing a Database

Preparing an Oracle Database

Preparing a PostgreSQL Database

Feature History for Preparing a Database

Information About Preparing a Database

A Cisco DCNM-LAN server installation can make use of an existing database if the database is a supported database; however, you might need to prepare the database.

This section includes the following topics:

Oracle Database Preparation

PostgreSQL Database Preparation

Oracle Database Preparation

If you plan to use an Oracle database, Cisco DCNM-LAN requires that some Oracle database configuration settings exceed the Oracle default values. Table 8-1 and Table 8-2 list the specific requirements for each supported Oracle database.

Table 8-1 Oracle 10g Database Configuration Requirements

Oracle Setting
Oracle Default
Cisco DCNM-LAN Minimum Requirement

SYSTEM tablespace

1 GB

2 GB

Sessions

50

150

Processes

50

150

Open cursors

50

1000


Table 8-2 Oracle 11g Database Configuration Requirements

Oracle Setting
Oracle Default
Cisco DCNM-LAN Minimum Requirement

Sessions

50

150

Processes

50

150

Open cursors

300

1000


PostgreSQL Database Preparation

If you plan to use a PostgreSQL database that is remote to any Cisco DCNM-LAN server in your deployment, you must ensure that the PostgreSQL server software is configured to permit remote connections from Cisco DCNM-LAN server systems. The pg_hba.conf file in a PostgreSQL database installation controls whether remote connections are allowed. You must ensure that the records in the pg_hba.conf file permit connections from remote Cisco DCNM-LAN server systems prior to installing Cisco DCNM-LAN.


Note When PostgreSQL is chosen as the database, ensure that the Microsoft Windows user installing the software has administrative privileges and not the domain admin privileges. This is a prerequisite for successful installation.


For more information about the pg_hba.conf file, see the documentation for your PostgreSQL server or see the following location:

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.2/interactive/auth-pg-hba-conf.html

Preparing an Oracle Database

You can prepare an Oracle database for use by Cisco DCNM-LAN.

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 (Oracle 10g only) Increase the SYSTEM tablespace to 2 GB from the default of 1 GB. For more information, see the "Increasing the SYSTEM Tablespace" section.

Step 2 Increase the number of sessions and processes to 150 each. For more information, see the "Increasing the Number of Sessions and Processes to 150 Each" section.

Step 3 Increase the number of open cursors to 1000. For more information, see the "Increasing the Number of Open Cursors to 1000" section.


Information About the Oracle SQL*Plus Command-Line Tool

The Oracle database procedures in this section require the use of the SQL*Plus command-line tool. The SQL*Plus executable is typically installed in the bin directory under the Oracle home directory. In Microsoft Windows, the default location for the SQL*Plus executable is as follows:

C:\oraclexe\app\oracle\product\10.2.0\server\bin

In Linux, the default location for the SQL*Plus binary file is as follows:

/usr/lib/oracle/xe/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/server/bin

Linux Environment Variables

If you are using Linux, before you use the SQL*Plus command-line tool, ensure that the ORACLE_HOME and ORACLE_SID environment variables are set to correct values. For example, if you are using Oracle 10g on Linux, the following commands set the environment variables to the default Oracle home directory and SID if you are using a bash shell:

export ORACLE_HOME=/usr/lib/oracle/xe/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/server
export ORACLE_SID=XE
 
   

Logging Into Oracle

You can log into the Oracle database by using the SQL*Plus command-line tool.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Ensure that you know the database administrator username and password.

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 Run the SQL*Plus executable.

A command prompt appears.

Step 2 Enter the connect command.

The Username prompt appears.

Step 3 Enter the database administrator username.

The Password prompt appears.

Step 4 Enter the password for the username that you specified.

For example, if the Oracle administrator username is system and the password is oracle, you would log in as follows:

Username: sys as sysdba
Password: oracle
 
   

For more information about using SQL*Plus, see the documentation for the Oracle database version that you are using.

Information About the init.ora File

The init.ora file specifies startup parameters. The default name and location of the file is platform specific, as shown in Table 8-3.

Table 8-3 Name and Default Location of init.ora File 

Oracle Version
Operating System
Content of init.ora File

10g

Microsoft Windows

C:\oraclexe\app\oracle\product\10.2.0\server\database\initXE.ora

Linux

/usr/lib/oracle/xe/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/server/dbs\initXE.ora

11g

Microsoft Windows

C:\app\Administrator\product\11.1.0\db_1\dbs\initORCL.ora

Linux

/usr/lib/oracle/orcl/app/oracle/product/11.1.0/db_1/dbs/initORCL.ora


The init.ora file should contain only one line, which is the full path of the server parameter file, as shown in Table 8-4.

Table 8-4 Content of init.ora File 

Oracle Version
Operating System
Content of init.ora File

10g

Microsoft Windows

SPFILE='C:\oraclexe\app\oracle\product\10.2.0\server\dbs\spfileXE.ora

Linux

SPFILE='/usr/lib/oracle/xe/app/oracle/product/10.2.0/server/dbs/spfileXE.ora'

11g

Microsoft Windows

SPFILE='C:\oraclexe\app\oracle\product\11.1.0\server\dbs\spfileXE.ora

Linux

SPFILE='/usr/lib/oracle/orcl/app/oracle/product/11.1.0/db_1/dbs/spfileXE.ora


Increasing the SYSTEM Tablespace

You can increase the SYSTEM tablespace.

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 Use the SQL*Plus command-line tool to log in to the Oracle database. For more information, see the "Information About the Oracle SQL*Plus Command-Line Tool" section.

Step 2 Enter the following command:

select file_name, bytes, autoextensible, maxbytes
from dba_data_files
where tablespace_name='SYSTEM';
 
   

Step 3 Enter the following command:

alter database datafile `filename' autoextend on next 100m maxsize 2000m;
 
   

where file_name is the filename from the output of the select command in Step 2.

The SYSTEM tablespace is increased.

Step 4 Enter the exit command.


Increasing the Number of Sessions and Processes to 150 Each

You can increase the number of sessions and processes to 150 each.

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 Ensure that the init.ora file exists and that it contains the single line that is applicable for your Oracle database installation. If there are additional lines, remove them.

For more information, see the "Information About the init.ora File" section.

Step 2 Use the SQL*Plus command-line tool to log in to the Oracle database. For more information, see the "Information About the Oracle SQL*Plus Command-Line Tool" section.

Step 3 Shut down the system by entering the shutdown command. If the command fails, use the shutdown abort command.

Step 4 Enter the following command:

startup pfile='init_file_name';
 
   

where init_file_name is the init.ora filename for your Oracle database installation. For more information, see the "Information About the init.ora File" section.

Step 5 Set the number of sessions to 150 by entering the following command:

alter system set sessions = 150 scope=spfile;
 
   

Step 6 Set the number of processes to 150 by entering the following command:

alter system set processes = 150 scope=spfile;
 
   

Step 7 Shut down the system by entering the shutdown command. If the command fails, use the shutdown abort command.

Step 8 Start up the system by entering the startup command.

Step 9 Verify that the number of sessions and processes is changed to 150 by entering the following command:

show parameter sessions
 
   

Step 10 Exit by entering the exit command.


Increasing the Number of Open Cursors to 1000

You can increase the number of open cursors to 1000.

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 Ensure that the init.ora file exists and that it contains the single line that is applicable for your Oracle database installation. If there are additional lines in the file, remove them.

For more information, see the "Information About the init.ora File" section.

Step 2 Use the SQL*Plus command-line tool to log in to the Oracle database. For more information, see the "Information About the Oracle SQL*Plus Command-Line Tool" section.

Step 3 Shut down the system by entering the shutdown command. If the command fails, use the shutdown abort command.

Step 4 Enter the following command:

startup pfile='init_file_name';
 
   

where init_file_name is the init.ora filename for your Oracle database installation. For more information, see the "Information About the init.ora File" section.

Step 5 Set the number of open cursors to 1000 by entering the following command:

alter system set open_cursors = 1000 scope=spfile;
 
   

Step 6 Shut down the system by entering the shutdown command. If the command fails, use the shutdown abort command.

Step 7 Start up the system by entering the startup command.

Step 8 Verify that the number of open cursors is changed to 1000 by entering the following command:

show parameter open_cursors
 
   

Step 9 Exit by entering the exit command.


Preparing a PostgreSQL Database

This procedure describes how to configure the PostgreSQL server to permit connections from Cisco DCNM-LAN server systems that are remote to the PostgreSQL server system.

For more information about the pg_hba.conf file, see the documentation for your PostgreSQL server or see the following location:

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.2/interactive/auth-pg-hba-conf.html

BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Ensure that the PostgreSQL server is a supported version of PostgreSQL. If you used the Cisco DCNM installer software to install the PostgreSQL server, the version of PostgreSQL is supported. For information about supported databases, see the Cisco DCNM Release Notes, Release 5.x.

Determine the IP address of the Cisco DCNM-LAN servers that are remote to the PostgreSQL database server system.

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 Stop the PostgreSQL database service.

Step 2 Go to the data directory in the PostgreSQL server installation location. In Microsoft Windows, the default location of the data directory for PostgreSQL 8.2 is C:\Program Files\PostgreSQL\8.2\data.

Step 3 In the data directory, use a text editor to open the pg_hba.conf file.

Step 4 In the pg_hba.conf file, locate the connection records for IPv4 connections.

Step 5 For each Cisco DCNM-LAN server system that is remote to the PostgreSQL server system, add one record, as follows:

host all all IP-address/32 md5
 
   

where IP-address is the IPv4 address of the Cisco DCNM-LAN server system.


Tip If you want to allow all remote connections, add the following single record:
host all all 0.0.0.0/0 md5


Step 6 Save and close the pg_hba.conf file.

Step 7 Start the PostgreSQL database service.


Feature History for Preparing a Database

Table 8-5 lists the release history for this feature.

Table 8-5 Feature History for Preparing a Database 

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

PostgreSQL remote connections

5.0(2)

Information about this requirement was added.

Oracle database configuration

5.0(2)

No change from Release 4.2.