Cisco Compliance Solution for HIPAA Security Rule Design and Implementation Guide
Solution Implementation
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Table Of Contents

Solution Implementation

Overview

Infrastructure

Healthcare Facilities—Clinics and Hospitals

Small Clinic Architecture

Small Clinic Design

Small Clinic—Mini Design

Small Clinic—Managed Service Provider Design

Medium Clinic Architecture

Medium Clinic Design

Hospital Architecture

Hospital Design

Data Center

WAN Aggregation Layer

Core Layer Design

Aggregation Block Design

Vblock Design

Internet Edge Design

Administration

Authentication

Components Selected

PHI Encryption

Components Selected

Management

Components Selected

Monitoring

Components Selected

Endpoints and Applications

Physical

Components Selected

Voice

Components Selected

Services

Cisco Compliance Solution for HIPAA Security Rule Result Summary


Solution Implementation


Overview

Cisco customers have asked Cisco to provide insight on how Cisco products can be used to address their HIPAA compliance requirements. To fully accomplish this goal, Cisco hired an auditor and went through the same process as covered entities or business associates. To assess Cisco's products for the capability and applicability to satisfy compliance safeguards and controls, they had to be installed and configured within a representative design.

This chapter demonstrates how the Cisco Compliance Solution for HIPAA Security Rule reference architecture provides a solution that was installed and configured to address commonly understood healthcare security controls. Cisco partnered with RSA, Hytrust, EMC, VCE, and Verizon to create a comprehensive design that reflected the framework and architectural principles discussed in earlier chapters.

Cisco's solution was reviewed and validated in the Cisco lab in San Jose, California. Prototype hospital, clinic, data center, WAN, and Internet edge network infrastructures were built using Cisco's best practice design guides, as represented by the Cisco designs and architectures (http://www.cisco.com/go/designzone). The individual components were installed and configured to best support HIPAA Security Rule control requirements and management of data protection. Verizon conducted an assessment of this design and advised on how Cisco security devices and features could provide direct and compensating controls in support of addressing the administrative, operational, physical, and technical Safeguards called in the HIPAA Security Rule. Verizon Business provided a detailed Healthcare Security Requirements Assessment, provided in Appendix C, "Reference Architecture Assessment Report—Cisco Healthcare Solution."


Tip An architecture is a strategic structure for the consistent design, construction, and operation of systems to achieve a desired set of outcomes.

A design is a tactical implementation of an architectural strategy, using specific configurations of products to satisfy business requirements.

Chapter 3, "Solution Architecture," describes the enterprise architecture with regards to compliance. This chapter demonstrates a design or, in other words, a specific implementation of components to achieve these principles. Various designs can result from the solution architecture. The design that was implemented is not intended to represent the only way that Cisco and partner products can be installed to protect PHI. It is intended to provide an example showing how and what was used to achieve the principles described in Chapter 3, "Solution Architecture."


Although every company has specific considerations that vary from this implementation, these designs and the configurations of the components in "Detailed Full Running Configurations," provide an instructive example of what is needed to secure PHI. Each component selected was assessed for its capabilities and applicability, and that assessment is covered in the next chapter.

In each section, a reference architecture is shown with the corresponding design that was implemented and validated within Cisco's laboratories. The full configurations of each individual component are available in "Detailed Full Running Configurations."

Infrastructure

The infrastructure layer of the solution framework addresses the components such as routers, switches, firewalls, and security components. These are used for reference architectures for a variety of locations such as hospitals or data centers as shown in Figure 4-1.

Figure 4-1 Infrastructure Layer of the Solution Framework

The following sections describe the designs that were implemented from the reference architecture.

Figure 4-2 shows the enterprise-wide reference architecture.

Figure 4-2 Enterprise-Wide Reference Architecture

Referencing an enterprise-wide architecture as shown in Figure 4-2, the design shown in Figure 4-3 was created in the Cisco lab.

Figure 4-3 Cisco Lab Reference Architecture

Note the following:

Three clinic designs and one hospital design were elected to represent typical healthcare group IT needs.

The data center consists of a single aggregation block based on the Data Center 3.0 architecture.

The Internet edge is representative of both the e-commerce/health and partner edge for the purposes of validation.

The following sections describe this enterprise-wide design in more detail, and demonstrate what was implemented within the lab.

Healthcare Facilities—Clinics and Hospitals

Multiple healthcare facility footprints were implemented that address a variety of business objectives. Each footprint section contains designs that were extracted from the reference architecture. Each design contains the following:

Reference architecture

Healthcare facility design

Logical topology

Addressing plan

Components selected

For component compliance functionality, see Chapter 5, "Component Assessment." For full device configurations, see "Detailed Full Running Configurations."


Note Each of these designs includes a variety of components that can be interchangeably used between them, depending on business requirements. For validation purposes, it was not necessary to implement all possible components in each design.


Small Clinic Architecture

Small clinics, such as a single physician or small physician practice, as shown in Figure 4-4, meet the following design requirements:

Office size averages between 2000-6000 square feet; often the IT closet is outside of the control of the clinic in leased space, or is shared with other tenants. Often there is only one entry/exit and a fire door as an emergency escape, with remote or landlord-provided monitoring for fire and hazard controls.

Fewer than 25 devices requiring network connectivity; many devices are standalone with widely variable networking and support requirements.

Single router and integrated Ethernet switch.

Preference for integrated services within fewer network components because of physical space requirements.

Wireless connectivity for physician tablets and laptops to support physician mobility between treatment rooms.

Treatment rooms and administrative offices designed to support specific clinical or administrative functions.

Desire on the part of the physician to improve treatment options with advanced technology, but the need to control costs and make use of shared technology options such as video conferencing, remote audio dictation, and remote review of local medical instrumentation.

Figure 4-4 Small Clinic Architecture

The small clinic reference architecture is a powerful and modular platform for running multiple parallel and independent healthcare practices, all operating under a common operational and technical infrastructure. The small clinic module dictates simplicity and a compact form factor. This combination appeals to many clinical formats that can include the following:

Traditional single doctor offices

Small physician practices with 2-5 treatment rooms and basic functional organization

Health specialty clinics and out-patient treatment facilities, designed specifically for one specialty —cancer treatment, OB/GYN, optical care, and out-patient surgical procedures, and so on

Standardized clinic models running under a common "clinic" model—emergency care clinics, rehabilitation facilities, and so on

This network architecture is modular and consolidates many services into few infrastructure components. It supports a variety of clinic application models because an integrated Ethernet switch supports high-speed LAN services. Clinics routinely have minimal space for the technology infrastructure. The ability to implement the technological components securely in minimal space is an advantage.

Advantages include the following:

Lower cost per site

Fewer parts to spare, less complex remote maintenance required

Less need to update software with fewer software images

Lower equipment maintenance costs

Limitations include the following:

Compromises in network resilience commensurate with the priority of treatment

Some potential downtime because of single points of failure, demanding local replacement support

Small Clinic Design

Figure 4-5 shows the small clinic network design.

Figure 4-5 Small Clinic

Components Required

Cisco 2921 Integrated Services Router (ISR)

Cisco Catalyst 2960S 48-port PoE switch

Cisco Aironet 3502i Access Points

Cisco Video Surveillance 4500 Series IP Cameras

Cisco Physical Access Gateway

Small Clinic—Mini Design

The mini clinic represents an alternate design for the small architecture, using different components.

Figure 4-6 shows the mini clinic network design.

Figure 4-6 Mini Clinic Network Design

Components Selected

Cisco 1941 Integrated Services Router (ISR)

Cisco Catalyst 2960 Switch

Cisco Aironet 3502e Access Point

Small Clinic—Managed Service Provider Design

The managed service provider office represents an alternate design for the small clinic architecture. Figure 4-7 shows the managed service provider network design.

Figure 4-7 Managed Service Provider Office Network Design

Components Selected

Cisco ASA 5515-x Firewall with vIPS

Cisco Catalyst 2960S Switch

Cisco Aironet 3502e Access Points

Medium Clinic Architecture

Medium clinics such as a physician practice or multi-practice, shown in Figure 4-8, meet the following design requirements:

Facility space between 5000 and 30000 square feet with one of more floors of dedicated office and clinic spaces, waiting rooms, purpose-built treatment rooms, storage facilities of various types, and dedicated IT and utility spaces

Number of devices connecting to the network averages 25-100 devices with most requiring IP network connectivity, and providing integrated telephone switching/call routing throughout the facility

Redundant LAN and WAN infrastructures, and more purpose-specific devices for greater control and flexibility

Wireless connectivity for mobile carts and wireless medical devices to support physician mobility between treatment rooms and review of patient data

Treatment rooms and administrative offices designed to support specific clinical or administrative functions

Figure 4-8 Medium Clinic Architecture

The medium clinic architecture provides for flexibility to support a wide range of clinic operations under a common and cost-effective networking model. This model stresses the adaptability of the architecture to multiple functions and data types, all brought under a common control structure so the healthcare security requirements can be controlled either at the clinic or centrally across the larger organization. The medium clinic architecture is optimized for efficient business operation without sacrificing centralized controls and layered security control to best resist breach.

Owing to the flexibility of the architecture, the medium clinic model can be adapted to many configurations of out-patient clinics and today's small hospitals.

The reference architecture is designed for clinical operations that require network resiliency and increased levels of application availability over the small clinic architecture and its single-threaded, simple approach. As more mission-critical applications and services converge onto the IP infrastructure, network uptime and application availability are more important. The dual-router and dual-LAN switch design of the medium clinic supports these requirements. Each of the ISR routers can run Cisco IOS security services and other clinic communication services simultaneously. Each of the Cisco ISR routers is connected to a dedicated WAN connection. Hot-Standby Routing Protocol (HSRP) is used to ensure network resilience in the event that the network connection fails.

The access layer of the network offers enhanced levels of flexibility and more access ports compared to the small clinic. Up to 12 wireless access points can be installed in the clinic, supported by the Cisco Wireless LAN Controller (WLC) as tested and without adding more controllers. The distributed Cisco Catalyst switches can support a combination of larger physical buildings or a larger number of endpoints than the small clinic.

Advantages include the following:

More adaptive access layer with support for a greater number of endpoints and more diverse building requirements (multiple floors, sub-areas, and so on)

Improved network resilience through parallel device design

Improved network and application availability through parallel paths

Limitations include the following:

No distribution layer between core layer (the ISR) and the access layer switches

A single WLC controller decreases in-clinic resilience of the wireless network; the recommendation is to have clinic APs fallback to the central WLC controller if the local WLC controller fails, or to install dual-local WLC controllers.

Medium Clinic Design

Figure 4-9 shows the medium clinic design.

Figure 4-9 Medium Clinic Design

Components Selected

Cisco 2951 Integrated Services Router (ISR)

Cisco Catalyst 3750X 48-port PoE Switch

Cisco Catalyst 2960 Compact Switch

Cisco Aironet 3502e and 1262N Access Points

Cisco Video Surveillance 2421 IP Dome Camera

Cisco Video Surveillance 2500 Series IP Camera

Cisco Operations Manager v4.1

Cisco Physical Access Gateway

Hospital Architecture

The hospital reference architecture model shown in Figure 4-10 meets the following design requirements:

Facility space between 3,000 to 3,000,000 square feet with one of more floors of dedicated office and clinic spaces, waiting rooms, purpose-built treatment rooms, storage facilities of various types, and dedicated IT and utility spaces

Number of devices connecting to the network averages 250-1000 devices with most requiring IP network connectivity, and providing integrated telephone switching/call routing throughout the facility

Redundant LAN and WAN infrastructures, and more purpose-specific devices for greater control and flexibility

Large capacity network infrastructure to support high bandwidth demands for imaging, video conferencing, and telemedicine

Wireless connectivity for mobile carts and wireless medical devices to support physician mobility between treatment rooms and review of patient data on laptops, tablets, and specialty devices

Unified communications integration for current and future needs including VoIP, calling stations, IPTV, web conferencing, video conferencing, and telemedicine

Treatment rooms and administrative offices designed to support specific clinical or administrative functions

Figure 4-10 Hospital Architecture

The hospital reference architecture uses Cisco campus network architecture recommendations and adapts them to a healthcare environment. Network traffic can be better segmented (logically and physically) to meet business requirements. The distribution layer architecture can greatly improve LAN performance while offering enhanced physical media connections (that is, fiber and copper for connection to remote access layer switches and wireless access points). A larger number of endpoints can be added to the network to meet business requirements. Dual routers and distribution layer media flexibility greatly improve network serviceability because the network is highly available and scales to support the site requirements. Routine maintenance and upgrades can be scheduled and performed more frequently or during normal business hours because of parallel path design.

Advantages include the following:

Highest network resilience based on highly available design

Port density and fiber density for large locations

Increase segmentation of traffic

Scalable to accommodate shifting requirements

Limitations include the following:

Higher cost because of network resilience based on highly available design

These network designs are capable of helping an organization achieve compliance, and also serve as the scalable platform for new services and applications

Hospital Design

Figure 4-11 shows the hospital network design.

Figure 4-11 Hospital Network Design

Components Selected

Cisco 3945 Integrated Services Router (ISR)

Cisco Catalyst 3560X and 4500 switches

Cisco Aironet 3502e and 3502i Access Points

Cisco 5508 Wireless Controller

Cisco 4500 Video Surveillance Camera

Cisco Physical Access Gateway

Data Center

The data center is where centralized data communications occur and are stored (see Figure 4-12). The data center is also the place where management systems are deployed. The data center provides centralized control from an administrative perspective because it is typically where the tools that are used to monitor and enforce compliance are deployed.

Figure 4-12 Data Center Architecture

Design considerations are as follows:

Centralized solution management supports all aspects of network, security, and systems management; and supports remote access from anywhere on the network.

Standardized equipment and software images, deployed in a modular, layered approach, simplify configuration management and increase the systems availability.

The highly available data center design permits highly resilient access from clinics to core data and storage services.

WAN aggregation alternatives allow flexible selection of service provider network offerings.

The service aggregation design allows for a modular approach to adding new access layers and managing shared network services (for example, firewall, IDS, application networking, wireless management).

Firewall, IDS, and application networking services are available at the service and aggregation layers of the data center.

Scalability to accommodate shifting requirements in data center compute and storage requirements.

WAN access speeds are typically the limiting factor between the clinic network systems and the WAN aggregation layer.

It is typical for implementers to over-subscribe the WAN circuits between the clinics and the WAN edge aggregation router. Over-subscription can cause inconsistent results and packet loss of PHI in the event that more traffic enters the WAN circuit simultaneously.

Backup network connections from clinic networks to the data center are recommended when PHI is transported via the WAN.

Figure 4-13 shows the data center design.

Figure 4-13 Data Center Design

Data centers can house many types of functions, and the term itself can encompass narrow and broad aspects. For the purposes of this guide, data centers include the following functions:

WAN aggregation layer—Aggregates the clinic and backstage WAN connections to the core

Core layer—Highly available, high-speed area that is the central point of connectivity to all data center areas

Aggregation block—Aggregates the services of one area and connects that area to the core, including Vblock1 design

Internet edge—Secure connectivity to the Internet

WAN Aggregation Layer

Figure 4-14 shows the WAN aggregation layer design.

Figure 4-14 WAN Aggregation Layer Design

Components Selected

Cisco ASR 1002-Fixed Router

Cisco ASA 5555-X Adaptive Security Appliance

Cisco Catalyst 3750X Switch

Core Layer Design

Figure 4-15 shows the core layer design.

Figure 4-15 Core Layer Design

Components Selected

Cisco Catalyst 6500-E Switch


Note In Chapter 3, "Solution Architecture," the Cisco Nexus switch is recommended as the core layer component. At the time of this solution validation, the Cisco Catalyst was used in the core switching layer.


Aggregation Block Design

Figure 4-16 shows the aggregation block design.

Figure 4-16 Aggregation Block Design

Components Selected

Cisco ASA 5585-X Adaptive Security Appliance

Cisco Nexus 7010 Switch

Cisco Catalyst 6500-E Switch

Cisco ACE 20

Cisco IDSM-2

Cisco Nexus 5020 Switch

Cisco Catalyst 3750-X Switch

Vblock Design

Figure 4-17 shows the Vblock design.

Figure 4-17 Vblock Design

Components Selected

Cisco UCS 5108 Blade Server Chassis

Cisco B200 Blade

Cisco UCS 6120 Fabric Interconnect

Cisco MDS 9506 Multilayer Director

EMC CLARiion CX4 Model 240

Internet Edge Design

Figure 4-18 shows the Internet edge design.

Figure 4-18 Internet Edge Design

Components Selected

Cisco ASR 1002 Series Router

Cisco Catalyst 6500-E Switch

Cisco ASASM

Cisco ACE 30

Cisco IDSM-2

Cisco Catalyst 3750X Switch

Cisco MDS 9204i Switch

Cisco IronPort C670

Administration

The administration layer of the solution framework addresses the components such as authentication, encryption, management, and monitoring, as shown in Figure 4-19.

Figure 4-19 Scope Administration Layer of the Solution Framework

Authentication

Components Selected

Cisco Secure Access Control Server (ACS)

Cisco Identity Services Engine (ISE)

RSA Authentication Manager

Windows Active Directory

PHI Encryption

Components Selected

Cisco Security Manager

Cisco Key Manager

Cisco AnyConnect VPN

RSA Data Protection Manager

Management

Components Selected

Cisco Prime LAN Management Solution (LMS)

Cisco Security Manager

Cisco Wireless Control Server Manager

EMC Unified Infrastructure Manager

VMware vSphere vCenter

Cisco Video Surveillance Manager

Cisco Physical Access Manager

RSA Archer

Monitoring

Components Selected

RSA enVision

HyTrust

Endpoints and Applications

The endpoints and applications layer of the solution framework addresses the components such as voice and physical security, as shown in Figure 4-20.

Figure 4-20 Endpoints and Applications Layer of the PHI Solution Framework

Physical

Components Selected

Cisco Physical Access Gateway

Cisco Video Surveillance Cameras (2421, 2500, 4500)

Voice

Components Selected

Cisco Unified Communications Manager

Cisco IP Phones (9971, 7975)

Cisco Survivable Remote Site Telephony (SRST)

Services

The right-hand element that spans endpoint, administration, and infrastructure layers includes services to plan, build, and manage the network to address the HIPAA Security Rule. These can be provided by Cisco, Cisco partners, and Verizon Business. Sample services can include the following:

Strategy and analysis

Assessments

Design

Validation

Deployment

Migration

Product and solution support

Optimization and operation services


Note For a complete Bill of Materials, see "Bill Of Material." For assessment of components selected for PHI compliance, see Chapter 5, "Component Assessment." For complete running configurations of components, see "Detailed Full Running Configurations."


Cisco Compliance Solution for HIPAA Security Rule Result Summary

This solution combines components to create an end-to-end solution conforming to the security controls requirements as outlined in the HIPAA Security Rule Safeguards (see Table 4-1). The result is a set of recommended clinic, hospital, data center, and Internet-edge architectures and designs that can simplify the process of developing and maintaining healthcare security controls in support of a risk management program as required by HIPAA.

Table 4-1 HIPAA Safeguards Supported 

Endpoints
HIPAA Safeguards Supported

Cisco Physical Access Manager/Gateway

Security Management Process:

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

Physical Access, IDS, Surveillance:

164.310(a)(1) Physical Access Control

Identity/Authorization/Access Control:

164.308(a)(3)(ii)(A) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(3)(ii(C)) Termination Procedures

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(C) Access Est./ Modification

Cisco UCS and UCS Express

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(3)(ii)(A) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(A) Isolating Clearinghouse Functions

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(i) Security Incident Procedures

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(c)(1) Data Integrity

Administration

CISCO ACS

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(3)(ii)(A) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(C) Access Establishment and Modification

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(i) Security Incident Procedures

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)(2)(i) Unique User Identification

164.312(a)(2)(ii) Emergency Access Procedures

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(d) Person or Entity Authentication

Cisco Identity Services Engine

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(3)(ii)(A) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(C) Access Establishment and Modification

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(5)(ii)(D) Password Management

164.308(a)(6)(i) Security Incident Procedures

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(a)(2)(ii) Emergency Access Procedures

164.312(a)(d) Person or Entity Authentication

Cisco Prime LMS

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(3)(ii)(A) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(b) Audit Controls

Cisco Security Manager

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(3)(ii)(A) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(C) Access Establishment and Modification

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(5)(ii)(D) Password Management

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)((2)(i) Unique User Identification

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(a)(d) Person or Entity Authentication

HyTrust Enterprise

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(3)(ii)(A) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(b) Audit Controls

RSA Authentication Manager

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(3)(ii)(A) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(C) Access Establishment and Modification

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(5)(ii)(D) Password Management

164.308(a)(6)(i) Security Incident Procedures

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(a)(2)(ii) Emergency Access Procedures

164.312(a)(d) Person or Entity Authentication

Security Management Process:

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

Logging/Auditing/Monitoring:

164.308(a)(1)(ii)(D) Information System Activity Review

RSA Protection Manager

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(3)(ii)(A) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(i) Security Incident Procedures

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(c)(1) Data Integrity

RSA enVision

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(1)(ii)(D) Information System Activity Review

164.308(a)(3)(ii)(A) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(b) Audit Controls

Infrastructure

Cisco ASA Branch

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(A) Isolating health care clearinghouse function

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(C) Access Establishment and Modification

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(a)(2)(i) Unique User Identification

164.312(a)(2)(ii) Emergency Access procedures

164.312(a)(2)(iii) Automatic Logoff

164.312(a)(ii)(iv) Encryption and Decryption

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(c)(1) Data Integrity

164.312(d) Person or Entity Authentication

164.312(e)(i) Transmission Security

164.312(e)(2)(i) Integrity Controls

164.312(e)(2)(ii) Encryption

Cisco ASA Data Center

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(A) Isolating health care clearinghouse function

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(C) Access Establishment and Modification

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(a)(2)(i) Unique User Identification

164.312(a)(2)(ii) Emergency Access procedures

164.312(a)(2)(iii) Automatic Logoff

164.312(a)(ii)(iv) Encryption and Decryption

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(c)(1) Data Integrity

164.312(d) Person or Entity Authentication

164.312(e)(i) Transmission Security

164.312(e)(2)(i) Integrity Controls

164.312(e)(2)(ii) Encryption

Cisco Branch Routers

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(A) Isolating health care clearinghouse function

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(C) Access Establishment and Modification

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(a)(2)(i) Unique User Identification

164.312(a)(2)(ii) Emergency Access procedures

164.312(a)(2)(iii) Automatic Logoff

164.312(a)(ii)(iv) Encryption and Decryption

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(c)(1) Data Integrity

164.312(d) Person or Entity Authentication

164.312(e)(i) Transmission Security

164.312(e)(2)(i) Integrity Controls

164.312(e)(2)(ii) Encryption

Cisco Branch Switches

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(3)(i) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(c)(1) Data Integrity

164.312(e)(i) Transmission Security

164.312(e)(2)(i) Integrity Controls

164.312(e)(2)(ii) Encryption

Cisco Data Center Routers

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(A) Isolating health care clearinghouse function

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(C) Access Establishment and Modification

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(a)(2)(i) Unique User Identification

164.312(a)(2)(ii) Emergency Access procedures

164.312(a)(2)(iii) Automatic Logoff

164.312(a)(ii)(iv) Encryption and Decryption

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(c)(1) Data Integrity

164.312(d) Person or Entity Authentication

164.312(e)(i) Transmission Security

164.312(e)(2)(i) Integrity Controls

164.312(e)(2)(ii) Encryption

Cisco Data Center Switches

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(3)(i) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(c)(1) Data Integrity

164.312(e)(i) Transmission Security

164.312(e)(2)(i) Integrity Controls

164.312(e)(2)(ii) Encryption

Cisco DC IDSM

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(3)(i) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(5)(ii)(B) Protection from Malicious Software

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(i) Security Incident Procedures

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(c)(1) Data Integrity

164.312(e)(i) Transmission Security

Cisco MDS Switches

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(i) Security Incident Procedures

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(a)(2)(iv) Encryption and Decryption

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(c)(1) Data Integrity

Cisco Nexus Switches

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(3)(i) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(A) Isolating health care clearinghouse function

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(i) Security Incident Procedures

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(c)(1) Data Integrity

Security Management Process:

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

Network Access Control:

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(C) Access Est./ Modification

Logging/Auditing/Monitoring:

164.308(a)(5)(ii)(C) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(b) Audit Controls

Cisco Nexus VSG

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(1)(ii)(D) Information System Activity Review

164.308(a)(3)(i) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(A) Isolating health care clearinghouse function

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(C) Access Establishment and Modification

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(a)(2)(i) Unique User Identification

164.312(a)(2)(ii) Emergency Access procedures

164.312(a)(2)(iii) Automatic Logoff

164.312(a)(ii)(iv) Encryption and Decryption

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(c)(1) Data Integrity

164.312(d) Person or Entity Authentication

164.312(e)(i) Transmission Security

164.312(e)(2)(i) Integrity Controls

164.312(e)(2)(ii) Encryption

Cisco Wireless

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(3)(i) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(i) Security Incident Procedures

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)(i) Access Control

164.312(a)(2)(i) Unique User Identification

164.312(a)(2)(ii) Emergency Access procedures

164.312(a)(2)(iii) Automatic Logoff

164.312(a)(ii)(iv) Encryption and Decryption

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(c)(1) Data Integrity

164.312(d) Person or Entity Authentication

164.312(e)(i) Transmission Security

164.312(e)(2)(i) Integrity Controls

164.312(e)(2)(ii) Encryption

Security Management Process:

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

Network Access Control:

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(C) Access Est./ Modification

Logging/Auditing/Monitoring:

164.308(a)(5)(ii)(C) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(b) Audit Controls

EMC Clarion SAN

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

164.308(a)(3)(i) Authorization/Supervision

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

164.308(a)(5)(i) Log-in Monitoring

164.308(a)(6)(ii) Response and Reporting

164.312(a)(2)(i) Unique User Identification

164.312(b) Audit Controls

164.312(c)(1) Data Integrity

Security Management Process:

164.308(a)(1)(i) Security Management Process

Security Management Process:

164.308(a)(1)(ii)(D) Information System Activity Review

Information Access Management:

164.308(a)(4)(ii)(B) Access Authorization

Security Awareness and Training

164.308(a)(5)(ii)(C) Log-in Monitoring

Access Controls:

164.312(a)(2) Access Controls

Access Controls:

164.312(a)(2)(i) Unique User Identification

Audit Controls:

164.312(b) Audit Controls

Integrity:

164.312(c)(1) Data Integrity

Integrity:

164.312(c)(2) Mechanism to Authenticate PHI

Authentication:

164.312(d) person or Entity Authentication