Cisco IOS Multiprotocol Label Switching Configuration Guide, Release 12.2SR
MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label
Downloads: This chapterpdf (PDF - 194.0KB) The complete bookPDF (PDF - 10.81MB) | Feedback

MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label

Table Of Contents

MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label

Finding Feature Information

Contents

Prerequisites for the Per VRF Label Feature

Restrictions for the Per VRF Label Feature

Information About the Per VRF Label Feature

MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label Functionality

How to Configure the Per VRF Label Feature

Configuring the Per VRF Label Feature

Examples

Configuration Examples for the Per VRF Label feature

No Label Mode (Cisco 6500 Router Default): Example

Mixed Mode (with Global Per-Prefix): Example

Mixed Mode (with Global Per-VRF): Example

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

MIBs

RFCs

Technical Assistance

Command Reference

Feature Information for MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label


MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label


First Published: June 29, 2007
Last Updated: December 5, 2008

The MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label feature (hereafter, in this document, referred to as the Per VRF Label feature or the Per VRF feature) allows you to configure a single Virtual Private Network (VPN) label for all local routes in the entire VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) domain on Cisco 6500 routers. This MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label feature incorporates a single (per VRF) VPN label that for all local routes in the VRF table.

You can enable (or disable) the MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label feature in global configuration mode. This feature is available for the Cisco 6500 router only.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest feature information and caveats, see the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the "Feature Information for MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label" section.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco IOS and Catalyst OS software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Contents

This document includes the following topics:

Prerequisites for the Per VRF Label Feature

Restrictions for the Per VRF Label Feature

Information About the Per VRF Label Feature

How to Configure the Per VRF Label Feature

Configuration Examples for the Per VRF Label feature

Additional References

Command Reference

Feature Information for MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label

Prerequisites for the Per VRF Label Feature

If your VRF domain has the external/internal Border Gateway Protocol (EIBGP) multipath feature or the Carrier Supporting Carrier (CSC) feature enabled, disable those features before you configure the Per VRF Label feature.

Before configuring Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) Layer 3 VPNs, you must have MPLS, Label Distribution Protocol (LDP), and Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) installed in your network. All routers in the core, including the Provider Edge (PE) routers, must be able to support CEF and MPLS forwarding.

Restrictions for the Per VRF Label Feature

Enabling the Per VRF Label feature causes BGP reconvergence, which can result in data loss for traffic coming from the MPLS VPN core.


Note You can minimize network disruption by enabling this feature during a scheduled MPLS maintenance window. Also, if possible, avoid enabling this feature on a live router.


There is no performance degradation when you configure up to 511 VRFs; however, when you add more than 511 VRFs, your network might experience some minor performance degradation (similar to the normal degradation experienced by any of the directly connected VRF prefixes present in the router).

Per-prefix MPLS counters for VPN prefixes are lost when you enable the Per VRF Label feature.

You cannot use this feature with CSC and EIBGP multipath features.

Information About the Per VRF Label Feature

To configure the MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label feature, you should understand the following concept:

MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label Functionality

MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label Functionality

The PE stores both local and remote routes and includes a label entry for each route. For distributed platforms, the per-prefix labels consume memory. When there are many VRFs and routes, the amount of memory that the per-prefix labels consume can become an issue.

This new Per VRF Label feature allows the advertisement of a single VPN label for local routes throughout the entire VRF. The router uses a new VPN label for the VRF decoding and IP-based lookup to learn where to forward packets for the PE or customer edge (CE) interfaces.

The following conditions apply when you configure the Per VRF Label feature:

The VRF uses one label for all local routes.

When you enable the Per VRF Label feature, any existing Per VRF Aggregate label is used. If no Per VRF Aggregate label is present, the software creates a new Per VRF label.

When you enable the Per VRF Label feature, the CE router's learned local routes will experience some data loss.

The CE does not lose data when you disable the Per VRF Label feature because when you disable the feature, the configuration reverts to the default labeling configuration of the Cisco 6500 platform, which uses the Per VRF Aggregate label from the local nonCE-sourced routes.

When you disable the Per VRF Label feature, the configuration reverts to the default configuration of the Cisco 6500 routers.

A Per VRF label forwarding entry is deleted only if the VRF or the BGP configuration is removed.

Summarization of Label Allocation Modes

Table 1 defines the label allocations used with various route types.

Table 1 Label Allocation Modes

Route Types
Label Mode:
Cisco 6500 Default
Label Mode:
Per VRF Label Feature

Local to the PE (connected, static route to NULL0, BGP aggregates), redistributed to BGP

Per VRF Aggregate label

Per VRF label

Locally learned from CE (through EBGP or other PE or CE protocols)

Per Prefix label

Per VRF label


How to Configure the Per VRF Label Feature

This section describes the following required task:

Configuring the Per VRF Label Feature

Configuring the Per VRF Label Feature

To configure the Per VRF Label feature, perform the following task.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. enable

2. configure terminal

3. mpls label mode {vrf vrf-name | all-vrfs} protocol bgp-vpnv4 {per-prefix | per-vrf}

4. end

5. show ip vrf detail

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

configure terminal

Example:

Router# configure terminal

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 3 

mpls label mode {vrf vrf-name | all-vrfs} protocol bgp-vpnv4 {per-prefix | per-vrf}

Example:

Router(config)# mpls label mode all-vrfs protocol bgp-vpnv4 per-vrf

Configures the Per VRF Label feature.

Step 4 

end

Example:

Router(config)# end

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 5 

show ip vrf detail

Example:

Router# show ip vrf detail

Displays the VRF label mode.

Examples

The following command example shows how to verify the Per VRF Label configuration:

In this example output, the bold text indicates the label modes:

Router# show ip vrf detail

VRF vpn1; default RD 1:1; default VPNID <not set>
VRF Table ID = 1
  Interfaces:
    Ethernet0/0              Serial5/0                Loopback1
  Connected addresses are not in global routing table
  Export VPN route-target communities
    RT:1:1                  
  Import VPN route-target communities
    RT:1:1                  
  No import route-map
  No export route-map
CSC is not configured.
  VRF label allocation mode: per-vrf (Label 19)
VRF vpn2; default RD 2:1; default VPNID <not set>
VRF Table ID = 2
  Interfaces:
    Ethernet2/0              Loopback2               
  Connected addresses are not in global routing table
  Export VPN route-target communities
    RT:2:1                  
  Import VPN route-target communities
    RT:2:1                  
  No import route-map
  No export route-map
CSC is not configured.
  VRF label allocation mode: per-vrf (Label 20)
VRF vpn3; default RD 3:1; default VPNID <not set>
VRF Table ID = 3
  Interfaces:
    Ethernet3/0              Loopback3               
  Connected addresses are not in global routing table
  Export VPN route-target communities
    RT:3:1                  
  Import VPN route-target communities
    RT:3:1                  
  No import route-map
  No export route-map
CSC is not configured.
  VRF label allocation mode: per-vrf (Label 23)

Router# show ip bgp vpnv4 all labels

   Network          Next Hop      In label/Out label
Route Distinguisher: 1:1 (vpn1)
   127.0.0.1/32     192.168.1.1     IPv4 VRF Aggr:19/nolabel
   127.0.0.5/32     127.0.0.4       nolabel/19
   192.168.1.0/24   192.168.1.1     IPv4 VRF Aggr:19/nolabel
                    0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:19/aggregate(vpn1)
   192.168.4.0/24   127.0.0.4       nolabel/20
   172.16.0.0/16    0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:19/aggregate(vpn1)
   172.16.128.0/32  192.168.1.1     IPv4 VRF Aggr:19/nolabel
Route Distinguisher: 2:1 (vpn2)
   127.0.2.2/32     0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:20/aggregate(vpn2)
   127.0.0.6/32     192.168.5.1     IPv4 VRF Aggr:20/nolabel
   192.168.5.0/24   0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:20/aggregate(vpn2)
   172.17.128.0/32  192.168.5.1     IPv4 VRF Aggr:20/nolabel
Route Distinguisher: 3:1 (vpn3)
   127.0.3.2/32     0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:23/aggregate(vpn3)
   127.0.0.8/32     192.168.7.1     IPv4 VRF Aggr:23/nolabel
   192.168.7.0/24   0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:23/aggregate(vpn3)
   172.16.128.0/32  192.168.7.1     IPv4 VRF Aggr:23/nolabel

Router# show mpls forwarding-table 

Local  Outgoing    Prefix              Bytes tag  Outgoing   Next Hop    
tag    tag or VC   or Tunnel Id        switched   interface              
16     Pop tag     192.168.3.0/24    0          Et1/0      192.168.2.3     
17     Pop tag     127.0.0.3/32      0          Et1/0      192.168.2.3     
18     17          127.0.0.4/32      0          Et1/0      192.168.2.3     
19     Pop Label   IPv4 VRF[V]       0          aggregate/vpn1
20     Pop Label   IPv4 VRF[V]       0          aggregate/vpn2
23     Pop Label   IPv4 VRF[V]       0          aggregate/vpn3
PE1# 

Configuration Examples for the Per VRF Label feature

This section shows examples for three different configurations:

No Label Mode (Cisco 6500 Router Default): Example

Mixed Mode (with Global Per-Prefix): Example

Mixed Mode (with Global Per-VRF): Example

No Label Mode (Cisco 6500 Router Default): Example

The following example shows the default label mode configuration (no label mode) for the Cisco 6500 router.

In this example output, the bold text indicates the label modes:

Router# show ip vrf detail

VRF vpn1; default RD 1:1; default VPNID <not set>
VRF Table ID = 1
  Interfaces:
    Ethernet0/0              Serial5/0                Loopback1
  Connected addresses are not in global routing table
  Export VPN route-target communities
    RT:1:1                  
  Import VPN route-target communities
    RT:1:1                  
  No import route-map
  No export route-map
CSC is not configured.
  VRF label allocation mode: per-prefix 
    per-vrf-aggr for connected and BGP aggregates (Label 19) 
VRF vpn2; default RD 2:1; default VPNID <not set>
VRF Table ID = 2
  Interfaces:
    Ethernet2/0              Loopback2               
  Connected addresses are not in global routing table
  Export VPN route-target communities
    RT:2:1                  
  Import VPN route-target communities
    RT:2:1                  
  No import route-map
  No export route-map
CSC is not configured.
  VRF label allocation mode: per-prefix 
    per-vrf-aggr for connected and BGP aggregates (Label 20) 
VRF vpn3; default RD 3:1; default VPNID <not set>
VRF Table ID = 3
  Interfaces:
    Ethernet3/0              Loopback3               
  Connected addresses are not in global routing table
  Export VPN route-target communities
    RT:3:1                  
  Import VPN route-target communities
    RT:3:1                  
  No import route-map
  No export route-map
CSC is not configured.
  VRF label allocation mode: per-prefix 
    per-vrf-aggr for connected and BGP aggregates (Label 23) 
Router# show ip bgp vpnv4 all labels 

   Network          Next Hop      In label/Out label
Route Distinguisher: 1:1 (vpn1)
   127.0.0.1/32     192.168.1.1     27/nolabel
   127.0.0.5/32     127.0.0.4       nolabel/19
   192.168.1.0/24   192.168.1.1     IPv4 VRF Aggr:19/nolabel
                    0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:19/aggregate(vpn1)
   192.168.4.0/24   127.0.0.4       nolabel/20
   172.16.0.0/16    0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:19/aggregate(vpn1)
   172.16.128.0/32  192.168.1.1     28/nolabel
Route Distinguisher: 2:1 (vpn2)
   127.0.2.2/32     0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:20/aggregate(vpn2)
   127.0.0.6/32     192.168.5.1     21/nolabel
   192.168.5.0/24   0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:20/aggregate(vpn2)
   172.17.128.0/32  192.168.5.1     22/nolabel
Route Distinguisher: 3:1 (vpn3)
   127.0.3.2/32     0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:23/aggregate(vpn3)
   127.0.0.8/32     192.168.7.1     24/nolabel
   192.168.7.0/24   0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:23/aggregate(vpn3)
   172.16.128.0/32  192.168.7.1     25/nolabel

Router# show mpls forwarding-table

Local  Outgoing    Prefix              Bytes tag  Outgoing   Next Hop    
tag    tag or VC   or Tunnel Id        switched   interface              
16     Pop tag     192.168.3.0/24    0          Et1/0      192.168.2.3     
17     Pop tag     127.0.0.3/32      0          Et1/0      192.168.2.3     
18     17          127.0.0.4/32      0          Et1/0      192.168.2.3     
19     Pop Label   IPv4 VRF[V]       0          aggregate/vpn1
20     Pop Label   IPv4 VRF[V]       0          aggregate/vpn2
21     Untagged    127.0.0.6/32[V]   0          Et2/0      192.168.5.1     
22     Untagged    172.17.128.0/32[V]0          Et2/0      192.168.5.1     
23     Pop Label   IPv4 VRF[V]       0          aggregate/vpn3
24     Untagged    127.0.0.8/32[V]   0          Et3/0      192.168.7.1     
25     Untagged    172.16.128.0/32[V]0          Et3/0      192.168.7.1     
27     Untagged    127.0.0.1/32[V]   0          Et0/0      192.168.1.1     
28     Untagged    172.16.128.0/32[V]0          Et0/0      192.168.1.1 

Mixed Mode (with Global Per-Prefix): Example

For this example, the following commands set VPN 1 for per-vrf label mode, VPN 2 for per-prefix label mode, and all remaining VPNs for per-prefix (globally).

In this example output, the bold text indicates the label modes:

Router# mpls label mode vrf vpn1 protocol bgp-vpnv4 per-vrf 
Router# mpls label mode vrf vpn2 protocol bgp-vpnv4 per-prefix 

Use the following show commands to display the label mode settings:

Router# show ip vrf detail 

VRF vpn1; default RD 1:1; default VPNID <not set>
VRF Table ID = 1
  Interfaces:
    Ethernet0/0              Serial5/0                Loopback1
  Connected addresses are not in global routing table
  Export VPN route-target communities
    RT:1:1                  
  Import VPN route-target communities
    RT:1:1                  
  No import route-map
  No export route-map
CSC is not configured.
  VRF label allocation mode: per-vrf (Label 26)
VRF vpn2; default RD 2:1; default VPNID <not set>
VRF Table ID = 2
  Interfaces:
    Ethernet2/0              Loopback2               
  Connected addresses are not in global routing table
  Export VPN route-target communities
    RT:2:1                  
  Import VPN route-target communities
    RT:2:1                  
  No import route-map
  No export route-map
CSC is not configured.
  VRF label allocation mode: per-prefix 
    per-vrf-aggr for connected and BGP aggregates (Label 27) 
VRF vpn3; default RD 3:1; default VPNID <not set>
VRF Table ID = 3
  Interfaces:
    Ethernet3/0              Loopback3               
  Connected addresses are not in global routing table
  Export VPN route-target communities
    RT:3:1                  
  Import VPN route-target communities
    RT:3:1                  
  No import route-map
  No export route-map
CSC is not configured.
  VRF label allocation mode: per-prefix 
    per-vrf-aggr for connected and BGP aggregates (Label 28) 

Router# show ip bgp vpnv4 all label

   Network          Next Hop      In label/Out label
Route Distinguisher: 1:1 (vpn1)
   127.0.0.1/32     192.168.1.1     IPv4 VRF Aggr:26/nolabel
   127.0.0.5/32     127.0.0.4       nolabel/19
   192.168.1.0/24   0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:26/aggregate(vpn1)
                    192.168.1.1     IPv4 VRF Aggr:26/nolabel
   192.168.4.0/24   127.0.0.4       nolabel/20
   172.16.0.0/16    0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:26/aggregate(vpn1)
   172.16.128.0/32  192.168.1.1     IPv4 VRF Aggr:26/nolabel 
Route Distinguisher: 2:1 (vpn2)
   127.0.2.2/32     0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:27/aggregate(vpn2)
   127.0.0.6/32     192.168.5.1     20/nolabel
   192.168.5.0/24   0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:27/aggregate(vpn2)
   172.17.128.0/32  192.168.5.1     21/nolabel
Route Distinguisher: 3:1 (vpn3)
   127.0.3.2/32     0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:28/aggregate(vpn3)
   127.0.0.8/32     192.168.7.1     22/nolabel
   192.168.7.0/24   0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:28/aggregate(vpn3)
   172.16.128.0/32  192.168.7.1     23/nolabel

Router# show mpls forwarding-table 

Local  Outgoing    Prefix              Bytes tag  Outgoing   Next Hop    
tag    tag or VC   or Tunnel Id        switched   interface              
16     Pop tag     192.168.3.0/24    0          Et1/0      192.168.2.3     
17     Pop tag     127.0.0.3/32      0          Et1/0      192.168.2.3     
18     17          127.0.0.4/32      0          Et1/0      192.168.2.3     
20     Untagged    127.0.0.6/32[V]   0          Et2/0      192.168.5.1     
21     Untagged    172.17.128.0/32[V]0          Et2/0      192.168.5.1     
22     Untagged    127.0.0.8/32[V]   0          Et3/0      192.168.7.1     
23     Untagged    172.16.128.0/32[V]0          Et3/0      192.168.7.1     
26     Pop Label   IPv4 VRF[V]       0          aggregate/vpn1 
27     Pop Label   IPv4 VRF[V]       0          aggregate/vpn1 
28     Pop Label   IPv4 VRF[V]       0          aggregate/vpn1 

Mixed Mode (with Global Per-VRF): Example

For this example, the following commands set VPN 1 for per-vrf label mode, VPN 2 for per-prefix label mode, and all remaining VPNs for per-vrf (globally).

In this example output, the bold text indicates the label modes:

Router# mpls label mode vrf vpn1 protocol bgp-vpnv4 per-vrf 
Router# mpls label mode vrf vpn2 protocol bgp-vpnv4 per-prefix 
Router# mpls label mode all-vrfs protocol bgp-vpnv4 per-vrf 

Router# show ip vrf detail

VRF vpn1; default RD 1:1; default VPNID <not set>
VRF Table ID = 1
  Interfaces:
    Ethernet0/0              Serial5/0                Loopback1
  Connected addresses are not in global routing table
  Export VPN route-target communities
    RT:1:1                  
  Import VPN route-target communities
    RT:1:1                  
  No import route-map
  No export route-map
CSC is not configured.
  VRF label allocation mode: per-vrf (Label 26)
VRF vpn2; default RD 2:1; default VPNID <not set>
VRF Table ID = 2
  Interfaces:
    Ethernet2/0              Loopback2               
  Connected addresses are not in global routing table
  Export VPN route-target communities
    RT:2:1                  
  Import VPN route-target communities
    RT:2:1                  
  No import route-map
  No export route-map
CSC is not configured.
  VRF label allocation mode: per-prefix 
    per-vrf-aggr for connected and BGP aggregates (Label 27) 
VRF vpn3; default RD 3:1; default VPNID <not set>
VRF Table ID = 3
  Interfaces:
    Ethernet3/0              Loopback3               
  Connected addresses are not in global routing table
  Export VPN route-target communities
    RT:3:1                  
  Import VPN route-target communities
    RT:3:1                  
  No import route-map
  No export route-map
CSC is not configured.
  VRF label allocation mode: per-vrf (Label 28) 

Router# show ip bgp vpnv4 all label   

   Network          Next Hop      In label/Out label
Route Distinguisher: 1:1 (vpn1)
   127.0.0.1/32     192.168.1.1     IPv4 VRF Aggr:26/nolabel 
   127.0.0.5/32     127.0.0.4       nolabel/19
   192.168.1.0/24   0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:26/aggregate(vpn1)
                    192.168.1.1     IPv4 VRF Aggr:26/nolabel
   192.168.4.0/24   127.0.0.4       nolabel/20
   172.16.0.0/16    0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:26/aggregate(vpn1)
   172.16.128.0/32  192.168.1.1     IPv4 VRF Aggr:26/nolabel 
Route Distinguisher: 2:1 (vpn2)
   127.0.2.2/32     0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:27/aggregate(vpn2)
   127.0.0.6/32     192.168.5.1     20/nolabel
   192.168.5.0/24   0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:27/aggregate(vpn2)
   172.17.128.0/32  192.168.5.1     21/nolabel
Route Distinguisher: 3:1 (vpn3)
   127.0.3.2/32     0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:28/aggregate(vpn3)
   127.0.0.8/32     192.168.7.1     IPv4 VRF Aggr:28/nolabel 
   192.168.7.0/24   0.0.0.0         IPv4 VRF Aggr:28/aggregate(vpn3)
   172.16.128.0/32  192.168.7.1     IPv4 VRF Aggr:28/nolabel 

Router# show mpls forwarding-table    

Local  Outgoing    Prefix              Bytes tag  Outgoing      Next Hop    
tag    tag or VC   or Tunnel Id        switched   interface              
16     Pop tag     192.168.3.0/24    0          Et1/0           192.168.2.3     
17     Pop tag     127.0.0.3/32      0          Et1/0           192.168.2.3     
18     17          127.0.0.4/32      0          Et1/0           192.168.2.3     
20     Untagged    127.0.0.6/32[V]   0          Et2/0           192.168.5.1     
21     Untagged    172.17.128.0/32[V]0          Et2/0           192.168.5.1     
26     Pop Label   IPv4 VRF[V]       0          aggregate/vpn1 
27     Pop Label   IPv4 VRF[V]       0          aggregate/vpn2 
28     Pop Label   IPv4 VRF[V]       0          aggregate/vpn3 

Additional References

The following sections provide references related to the Per VRF Label feature.

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

MPLS VPNs

Cisco IOS Multiprotocol Label Switching Configuration Guide, Release 12.4
Part 4: MPLS Virtual Private Networks


Standards

Standard
Title

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature.


MIBs

MIB
MIBs Link

No new or modified MIBs are supported by this feature, and support for existing MIBs has not been modified by this feature.

To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms, Cisco IOS releases, and feature sets, use Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/mibs


RFCs

RFC
Title

RFC 2547

BGP/MPLS


Technical Assistance

Description
Link

The Cisco Support website provides extensive online resources, including documentation and tools for troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with Cisco products and technologies.

To receive security and technical information about your products, you can subscribe to various services, such as the Product Alert Tool (accessed from Field Notices), the Cisco Technical Services Newsletter, and Really Simple Syndication (RSS) Feeds.

Access to most tools on the Cisco Support website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

http://www.cisco.com/techsupport


Command Reference

The following commands are introduced or modified in the feature or features documented in this module. For information about these commands, see the Cisco IOS Multiprotocol Label Switching Command Reference at http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/mpls/command/reference/mp_book.html. For information about all Cisco IOS commands, use the Command Lookup Tool at http://tools.cisco.com/Support/CLILookup or the Cisco IOS Master Command List, All Releases, at http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/mcl/allreleasemcl/all_book.html.

debug ip bgp vpnv4 unicast

mpls label mode

Feature Information for MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label

Table 2 lists the release history for this feature.

Not all commands may be available in your Cisco IOS software release. For release information about a specific command, see the command reference documentation.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and software image support. Cisco Feature Navigator enables you to determine which Cisco IOS and Catalyst OS software images support a specific software release, feature set, or platform. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.


Note Table 2 lists only the Cisco IOS software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given Cisco IOS software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that Cisco IOS software release train also support that feature.


Table 2 Feature Information for MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label 

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label

12.2(33)SRD

This feature allows a user to configure a single VPN label for all local routes in the entire VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) domain on Cisco 6500 routers. The feature incorporates a single (per VRF) VPN label for all local routes in the VRF table.

You can enable (or disable) the MPLS VPN—Per VRF Label feature in global configuration mode using a new, hidden, command. This feature is available for the Cisco 6500 router only

In 12.2(33)SRD, this feature was integrated.