Configuring the VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure
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Configuring the VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure

Configuring the VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure

The VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure feature allows you to apply services such as, access control lists (ACLs), Network Address Translation (NAT), policing, and zone-based firewalls, to traffic that flows across two different virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instances. VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure (VASI) interfaces support the redundancy of Route Processors (RPs) and Forwarding Processors (FPs), IPsec, and IPv4 and IPv6 unicast and multicast traffic.

This module describes how to configure VASI interfaces.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Restrictions for Configuring the VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure

  • Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) traffic over VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure (VASI) interfaces is not supported.

  • VASI interfaces do not support the attachment of queue-based features. The following commands are not supported on Modular QoS CLI (MQC) policies that are attached to VASI interfaces:
    • bandwidth (policy-map class)
    • fair-queue
    • priority
    • queue-limit
    • random-detect
    • shape
  • VASI 2000 pairs are not supported on Open Shortest Path First (OSPF).

  • Web Cache Communication Protocol (WCCP) is not supported.

Information About Configuring the VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure

VASI Overview

VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure (VASI) provides the ability to apply services such as, a firewall, IPsec, and Network Address Translation (NAT), to traffic that flows across different virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instances. VASI is implemented by using virtual interface pairs, where each of the interfaces in the pair is associated with a different VRF instance. The VASI virtual interface is the next-hop interface for any packet that needs to be switched between these two VRF instances. VASI interfaces provide the framework to configure a firewall or NAT between VRF instances.

Each interface pair is associated with two different VRF instances. The pairing is done automatically based on the two interface indexes such that the vasileft interface is automatically paired to the vasiright interface. For example, in the figure below, vasileft1 and vasiright1 are automatically paired, and a packet entering vasileft1 is internally handed over to vasiright1.

On VASI interfaces, you can configure either static routing or dynamic routing with Internal Border Gateway Protocol (IBGP), Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP), or Open Shortest Path First (OSPF). IBGP dynamic-routing protocol restrictions and configurations are valid for IBGP routing configurations between VASI interfaces.

The following figure shows an inter-VRF VASI configuration on the same device.

Figure 1. Inter-VRF VASI Configuration

When an inter-VRF VASI is configured on the same device, the packet flow happens in the following order:
  1. A packet enters the physical interface that belongs to VRF 1 (Gigabit Ethernet 0/2/0.3).

  2. Before forwarding the packet, a forwarding lookup is done in the VRF 1 routing table. Vasileft1 is chosen as the next hop, and the Time to Live (TTL) value is decremented from the packet. Usually, the forwarding address is selected on the basis of the default route in the VRF. However, the forwarding address can also be a static route or a learned route. The packet is sent to the egress path of vasileft1 and then automatically sent to the vasiright1 ingress path.

  3. When the packet enters vasiright1, a forwarding lookup is done in the VRF 2 routing table, and the TTL is decremented again (second time for this packet).

  4. VRF 2 forwards the packet to the physical interface, Gigabit Ethernet 0/3/0.5.

The following figure shows how VASI works in a Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) VPN configuration.


Note


In the following figure, MPLS is enabled on the Gigabit Ethernet interface, but MPLS traffic is not supported across VASI pairs.


Figure 2. VASI with an MPLS VPN Configuration

When VASI is configured with a Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) VPN, the packet flow happens in the following order:
  1. A packet arrives on the MPLS interface with a VPN label.

  2. The VPN label is stripped from the packet, a forwarding lookup is done within VRF 2, and the packet is forwarded to vasiright1. The TTL value is decremented from the packet.

  3. The packet enters vasileft1 on the ingress path, and another forwarding lookup is done in VRF 1. The packet is sent to the egress physical interface in VRF1 (Gigabit Ethernet 0/2/0.3). The TTL is again decremented from the packet.

Multicast and Multicast VPN on VASI

VRF-Aware Service Infrastructure (VASI) applies services like the zone-based firewall, Network Address Translation (NAT), and IPsec to traffic that travels across different virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instances. The Multicast and MVPN on VASI feature supports IPv4 and IPv6 multicast and multicast VPN (MVPN) on VASI interfaces. This feature is independent of the multicast modes (sparse, source-specific multicast [SSM] and so on) configured at the customer site and also independent of the MVPN mode—generic routing encapsulation (GRE)-based or Multicast Label Distribution Protocol (MLDP)-based—in the core network.

Multicast reduces traffic in a network by simultaneously delivering a single stream of information to potentially thousands of recipients. Multicast delivers source traffic from an application to multiple receivers without burdening the source or receivers and uses a minimum of network bandwidth. Multicast VPN (MVPN) provides the ability to support multicast over Layer 3 VPNs.

VASI is implemented using virtual interface pairs, where each of the interfaces in the pair is associated with a different VRF. VASI virtual interface is the next hop interface for any packet that needs to be switched between these two VRFs. VASI interfaces are virtual interfaces and you can configure IP address and other services like other logical interfaces. You need to enable multicast on VASI interface pairs for this feature to work.

How to Configure the VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure

Configuring a VASI Interface Pair

To configure a VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure (VASI) interface pair, you must configure the interface vasileft command on one interface and the interface vasiright command on the second interface. The interface numbers must be identical to pair vasileft with vasiright. You can configure a virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instance on any VASI interface.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    enable

    2.    configure terminal

    3.    interface type number

    4.    vrf forwarding table-name

    5.    ip address {ip-address mask [secondary] | pool pool-name}

    6.    exit

    7.    ip route [vrf vrf-name] destination-prefix destination-prefix-mask interface-type interface-number

    8.    interface type number

    9.    vrf forwarding table-name

    10.    ip address {ip-address mask [secondary] | pool pool-name}

    11.    exit

    12.    ip route [vrf vrf-name] destination-prefix destination-prefix-mask interface-type interface-number

    13.    end


DETAILED STEPS
     Command or ActionPurpose
    Step 1 enable


    Example:
    Device> enable
     

    Enables privileged EXEC mode.

    • Enter your password if prompted.

     
    Step 2 configure terminal


    Example:
    Device# configure terminal
     

    Enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 3 interface type number


    Example:
    Device(config)# interface vasileft 100
     
    Configures a VASI interface and enters interface configuration mode.
    • In this example, the vasileft interface is configured.

     
    Step 4 vrf forwarding table-name


    Example:
    Device(config-if)# vrf forwarding VRFLEFT
     

    Configures a VRF table.

    Note   

    You can configure VRF forwarding on any VASI interface. You need not configure VRF instances on both VASI interfaces.

     
    Step 5 ip address {ip-address mask [secondary] | pool pool-name}


    Example:
    Device(config-if)# ip address 192.168.0.1 255.255.255.0
     

    Configures a primary or secondary IP address for an interface.

     
    Step 6 exit


    Example:
    Device(config-if)# exit
     

    Exits interface configuration mode and enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 7 ip route [vrf vrf-name] destination-prefix destination-prefix-mask interface-type interface-number


    Example:
    Device(config)# ip route vrf VRFLEFT 
    172.16.0.0 255.255.0.0 VASILEFT 100
     

    Establishes a static route for a VRF instance and a VASI interface.

    Note   

    To add an IP route for a VRF instance, you must specify the vrf keyword.

     
    Step 8 interface type number


    Example:
    Device(config)# interface vasiright 100
     
    Configures a VASI interface and enters interface configuration mode.
    • In this example, the vasiright interface is configured.

     
    Step 9 vrf forwarding table-name


    Example:
    Device(config-if)# vrf forwarding VRFRIGHT
     

    Configures the VRF table.

     
    Step 10 ip address {ip-address mask [secondary] | pool pool-name}


    Example:
    Device(config-if)# ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
     

    Configures a primary or secondary IP address for an interface.

     
    Step 11 exit


    Example:
    Device(config-if)# exit
     

    Exits interface configuration mode and enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 12 ip route [vrf vrf-name] destination-prefix destination-prefix-mask interface-type interface-number


    Example:
    Device(config)# ip route vrf VRFRIGHT 
    10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 VASIRIGHT 100
     

    Establishes a static route for a VRF instance and a VASI interface.

    Note   

    To add an IP route for a VRF instance, you must specify the vrf keyword.

     
    Step 13 end


    Example:
    Device(config)# end
     

    Exits global configuration mode and returns to privileged EXEC mode.

     

    Configuration Examples for the VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure

    Example: Configuring a VASI Interface Pair

    A virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instance must be enabled for each interface of the VASI pair (VASILEFT and VASIRIGHT). The below example shows how to configure a VASI interface pair.

    Device(config)# interface vasileft 100
    Device(config-if)# vrf forwarding VRFLEFT
    Device(config-if)# ip address 192.168.0.1 255.255.255.0
    Device(config-if)# exit
    Device(config)# ip route vrf VRFLEFT 172.16.0.0 255.255.0.0 vasileft 100
    Device(config)# interface vasiright 100
    Device(config-if)# vrf forwarding VRFRIGHT
    Device(config-if)# ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
    Device(config-if)# exit
    Device(config)# ip route vrf VRFRIGHT 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 vasiright 100
    Device(config)# end

    Example: Configuring Multicast and MVPN on VASI

    Figure 3. GRE-Based MVPN and GETVPN Configuration

    The following example shows how to configure generic routing encapsulation (GRE)-based Multicast VPN (MVPN) and GETVPN on VASI interface pairs. Here, the cryptomap is applied to the vasileft interface. The vasileft interface acts as the customer edge (CE) device and does encryption; the interface is part of the vrf-cust1 virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instance. The vasiright interface is part of the vrf-core1 VRF instance, to pass traffic across the Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) core and for applied crypto services. The core network supports multicast, and multicast in the VRFs is in stateful switchover (SSO) mode.

    ! PE1 Configuration
    Device(config)# vrf definition Mgmt-intf
    Device(config-vrf)# address-family ipv4
    Device(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family
    Device(config-vrf)# address-family ipv6
    Device(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family
    Device(config-vrf)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# vrf definition vrf-core1
    Device(config-vrf)# rd 2:1
    Device(config-vrf)# address-family ipv4
    Device(config-vrf-af)# mdt default 203.0.113.1 ! Enables GRE-based MVPN and mdt default tree
    Device(config-vrf-af)# mdt data 203.0.113.33 255.255.255.224 ! Enables the mdt data tree
    Device(config-vrf-af)# route-target export 2:1
    Device(config-vrf-af)# route-target import 2:1
    Device(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family
    Device(config-vrf)# address-family ipv6
    Device(config-vrf-af)# mdt default 203.0.113.1
    Device(config-vrf-af)# mdt data 203.0.113.33 255.255.255.224
    Device(config-vrf-af)# route-target export 2:1
    Device(config-vrf-af)# route-target import 2:1
    Device(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family
    Device(config-vrf)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# vrf definition vrf-cust1
    Device(config-vrf)# rd 1:1
    Device(config-vrf)# address-family ipv4
    Device(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family
    Device(config-vrf)# address-family ipv6
    Device(config-vrf-af)# exit-address-family
    Device(config-vrf)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# logging buffered 10000000
    Device(config)# no logging console
    !
    Device(config)# no aaa new-model
    Device(config)# clock timezone CST 8 0
    !
    Device(config)# ip multicast-routing distributed
    Device(config)# ip multicast-routing vrf vrf-core1 distributed
    Device(config)# ip multicast-routing vrf vrf-cust1 distributed
    !
    Device(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing
    Device(config)# ipv6 multicast-routing
    Device(config)# ipv6 multicast-routing vrf vrf-core1
    Device(config)# ipv6 multicast-routing vrf vrf-cust1
    !
    Device(config)# subscriber templating
    Device(config)# mpls label protocol ldp
    Device(config)# multilink bundle-name authenticated
    Device(config)# spanning-tree extend system-id
    !
    Device(config)# cdp run
    Device(config)# ip ftp source-interface GigabitEthernet 0
    Device(config)# ip tftp source-interface GigabitEthernet 0
    Device(config)# ip tftp blocksize 8192
    !
    Device(config)# class-map match-any maincampus-ratelimit
    Device(config-cmap)# match access-group 101
    Device(config-cmap)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# policy-map transit-limt
    Device(config-pmap)# description 160mb transit rate limit
    Device(config-pmap)# class maincampus-ratelimit
    Device(config-pmap-c)# police 160000000 30000000 60000000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop
    Device(config-pmap-c-police)# exit
    Device(config-pmap-c)# exit
    Device(config-pmap)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# crypto keyring vrf-cust1 vrf vrf-cust1 ! enables GETVPN
    Device(conf-keyring)# pre-shared-key address 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 key cisco
    Device(conf-keyring)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# crypto isakmp policy 1
    Device(config-isakmp)# encryption 3des
    Device(config-isakmp)# authentication pre-share
    Device(config-isakmp)# group 2
    Device(config-isakmp)# exit
    Device(config)# crypto isakmp key cisco address 10.0.3.2
    !
    Device(config)# crypto gdoi group secure-wan
    Device(config-gkm-group)# identity number 12345
    Device(config-gkm-group)# server address ipv4 10.0.3.4
    Device(config-gkm-group)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# crypto gdoi group ipv6 ipv6-secure-wan
    Device(config-gkm-group)# identity number 123456
    Device(config-gkm-group)# server address ipv4 10.0.3.6
    Device(config-gkm-group)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# crypto map getvpn 1 gdoi
    Device(config-crypto-map)# set group secure-wan
    Device(config-crypto-map)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# crypto map ipv6 getvpn-v6 1 gdoi
    Device(config-crypto-map)# set group ipv6-secure-wan
    Device(config-crypto-map)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# interface loopback 0
    Device(config-if)# ip address 198.51.100.241 255.255.255.240
    Device(config-if)# ip pim sparse-mode
    Device(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:DB8::1/32
    Device(config-if)# ipv6 enable
    Device(config-if)# ospfv3 100 ipv6 area 0
    Device(config-if)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/0
    Device(config-if)# vrf forwarding vrf-cust1
    Device(config-if)# ip address 192.0.2.1 255.255.255.240
    Device(config-if)# shutdown
    Device(config-if)# negotiation auto
    !
    Device(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/1
    Device(config-if)# no ip address
    Device(config-if)# negotiation auto
    Device(config-if)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/2/0
    Device(config-if)# ip address 192.0.2.18 255.255.255.240
    Device(config-if)# ip pim sparse-mode
    Device(config-if)# negotiation auto
    Device(config-if)# mpls ip
    Device(config-if)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/2/1
    Device(config-if)# vrf forwarding vrf-cust1
    Device(config-if)# ip address 10.0.3.1 255.255.255.0
    Device(config-if)# negotiation auto
    Device(config-if)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/2/2
    Device(config-if)# no ip address
    Device(config-if)# negotiation auto
    Device(config-if)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/2/3 
    Device(config-if)# vrf forwarding vrf-cust1
    Device(config-if)# ip address 192.0.2.34 255.255.255.240
    Device(config-if)# ip pim sparse-mode
    Device(config-if)# ip igmp version 3
    Device(config-if)# negotiation auto
    Device(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:DB8:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0001/48
    Device(config-if)# ospfv3 100 ipv6 area 0
    Device(config-if)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0/2/4
    Device(config-if)# no ip address
    Device(config-if)# negotiation auto
    Device(config-if)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# interface GigabitEthernet 0
    Device(config-if)# vrf forwarding Mgmt-intf
    Device(config-if)# ip address 10.74.30.161 255.255.255.0
    Device(config-if)# negotiation auto
    Device(config-if)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# interface vasileft 1 ! On the vasileft interface, enable multicast and GETVPN.
    Device(config-if)# vrf forwarding vrf-cust1
    Device(config-if)# ip address 209.165.202.129 255.255.255.0
    Device(config-if)# ip pim sparse-mode
    Device(config-if)# ipv6 address FE80::CEEF:48FF:FEEA:C501 link-local
    Device(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:B000::2/64
    Device(config-if)# ipv6 crypto map getvpn-v6
    Device(config-if)# ospfv3 100 ipv6 area 0
    Device(config-if)# no keepalive
    Device(config-if)# crypto map getvpn
    Device(config-if)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# interface vasiright 1 ! On the vasiright interface, only enable multicast.
    Device(config-if)# vrf forwarding vrf-core1
    Device(config-if)# ip address 209.165.202.130 255.255.255.0
    Device(config-if)# ip pim sparse-mode
    Device(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:B000::1/64
    Device(config-if)# ospfv3 100 ipv6 area 0
    Device(config-if)# no keepalive
    Device(config-if)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# router ospfv3 100
    Device(config-router)# address-family ipv6 unicast
    Device(config-router-af)# redistribute bgp 1
    Device(config-router-af)# exit-address-family
    !
    Device(config-router)# address-family ipv6 unicast vrf vrf-cust1
    Device(config-router-af)# redistribute bgp 1
    Device(config-router-af)# exit-address-family
    !
    Device(config-router)# address-family ipv6 unicast vrf vrf-core1
    Device(config-router-af)# redistribute bgp 1
    Device(config-router-af)# exit-address-family
    !
    Device(config)# router ospf 1
    Device(config-router)# network 1.1.1.1 0.0.0.0 area 0
    Device(config-router)# network 192.0.2.0 0.0.0.255 area 0
    Device(config-router)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# router bgp 1 ! Use BGP routing protocol to broadcast vrf-cust1 routing entry. 
    Device(config-router)# bgp log-neighbor-changes
    Device(config-router)# neighbor 172.16.0.1 remote-as 1
    Device(config-router)# neighbor 172.16.0.1 update-source Loopback0
    !
    Device(config-router)# address-family ipv4
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 172.16.0.1 activate
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 172.16.0.1 send-community both
    Device(config-router-af)# exit-address-family
    !
    Device(config-router)# address-family vpnv4
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 172.16.0.1 activate
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 172.16.0.1 send-community both
    Device(config-router-af)# exit-address-family
    !
    Device(config-router)# address-family ipv4 mdt ! For MVPN neighbor setup
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 172.16.0.1 activate
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 172.16.0.1 send-community both
    Device(config-router-af)# exit-address-family
    !
    Device(config-router)# address-family vpnv6
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 192.168.0.1 activate
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 192.168.0.1 send-community both
    Device(config-router-af)# exit-address-family
    !
    Device(config-router)# address-family ipv4 vrf vrf-core1
    Device(config-router-af)# bgp router-id 209.165.202.130
    Device(config-router-af)# redistribute connected
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 209.165.202.129 remote-as 65002
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 209.165.202.129 local-as 65001 no-prepend replace-as
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 209.165.202.129 activate
    Device(config-router-af)# exit-address-family
    !
    Device(config-router)# address-family ipv6 vrf vrf-core1
    Device(config-router-af)# redistribute connected
    Device(config-router-af)# redistribute ospf 100 include-connected
    Device(config-router-af)# bgp router-id 209.165.202.130
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 2001:B000::2 remote-as 10000
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 2001:B000::2 local-as 65000 no-prepend replace-as
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 2001:B000::2 activate
    Device(config-router-af)# exit-address-family
    !
    Device(config-router)# address-family ipv4 vrf vrf-cust1
    Device(config-router-af)# bgp router-id 209.165.202.129
    Device(config-router-af)# redistribute connected
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 209.165.202.130 remote-as 65001
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 209.165.202.130 local-as 65002 no-prepend replace-as
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 209.165.202.130 activate
    Device(config-router-af)# exit-address-family
    Device(config-router)# exit
    !
    Device(config-router)# address-family ipv6 vrf vrf-cust1
    Device(config-router-af)# redistribute connected
    Device(config-router-af)# redistribute ospf 100 include-connected
    Device(config-router-af)# bgp router-id 209.165.202.129
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 2001:B000::1 remote-as 65000
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 2001:B000::1 local-as 10000 no-prepend replace-as
    Device(config-router-af)# neighbor 2001:B000::1 activate
    Device(config-router-af)# exit-address-family
    !
    Device(config)# ip forward-protocol nd
    !
    Device(config)# no ip http server
    Device(config)# no ip http secure-server
    Device(config)# ip pim rp-address 1.1.1.1
    Device(config)# ip pim vrf vrf-core1 ssm default
    Device(config)# ip pim vrf vrf-cust1 ssm default
    Device(config)# ip route 192.0.2.0 255.255.255.240 10.11.12.10
    Device(config)# ip route vrf Mgmt-intf 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.74.9.1
    !
    Device(config)# ip access-list standard bidir
    Device(config-std-nacl)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# access-list 101 deny ip 198.51.100.1 255.255.255.240 198.51.100.177 255.255.255.240
    Device(config)# ipv6 router eigrp 300
    Device(config-rtr)# passive-interface Loopback 0
    Device(config-rtr)# redistribute connected
    Device(config-rtr)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# mpls ldp router-id Loopback 0
    Device(config)# control-plane
    Device(config-cp)# exit
    !
    Device(config)# line con 0
    Device(config-line)# exec-timeout 0 0
    Device(config-line)# privilege level 15
    Device(config-line)# logging synchronous
    Device(config-line)# stopbits 1
    Device(config-line)# exit
    Device(config)# line vty 0 4
    Device(config-line)# exec-timeout 0 0
    Device(config-line)# privilege level 15
    Device(config-line)# logging synchronous
    Device(config-line)# no login
    Device(config-line)# end
    
    

    Additional References for Configuring the VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure

    Technical Assistance

    Description

    Link

    The Cisco Support and Documentation website provides online resources to download documentation, software, and tools. Use these resources to install and configure the software and to troubleshoot and resolve technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. Access to most tools on the Cisco Support and Documentation website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

    http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​cisco/​web/​support/​index.html

    Feature Information for Configuring the VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure

    The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

    Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

    Table 1 Feature Information for Configuring the VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure

    Feature Name

    Releases

    Feature Information

    Multicast and Multicast VPN on VASI

    Cisco IOS XE Release 3.14S

    The Multicast and MVPN on VASI feature supports IPv4 and IPv6 multicast and multicast VPN (MVPN) on VASI interfaces. This feature is independent of the multicast modes (sparse, source-specific multicast [SSM] and so on) configured at the customer site and also independent of the MVPN mode—generic routing encapsulation (GRE)-based or Multicast Label Distribution Protocol (MLDP)-based—in the core network.

    No new commands have been introduced or modified for this feature.

    VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure

    Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6

    The VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure feature allows you to apply services such as ACLs, NAT, policing, and zone-based firewalls to traffic that flows across two different VRF instances. The VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure (VASI) interfaces support redundancy of the RP and FP. This feature supports IPv4 and IPv6 unicast and multicast traffic on VASI interfaces.

    VASI (VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure) Enhancements Phase I

    Cisco IOS XE Release 3.1S

    The VASI Enhancements Phase I feature provides the following enhancements to VASI:

    • Support for 500 VASI interfaces.

    • Support for IBGP dynamic routing between VASI interfaces.

    VASI (VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure) Enhancements Phase II

    Cisco IOS XE Release 3.2S

    The VASI Enhancements Phase II feature provides the following enhancements to VASI:

    • Support for IPv6 unicast traffic over VASI interfaces.

    • Support for OSPF and EIGRP dynamic routing between VASI interfaces.

    VASI (VRF-Aware Software Infrastructure) Scale

    Cisco IOS XE Release 3.3S

    The VASI Scale feature provides support for 1000 VASI interfaces.

    The following command was introduced or modified: interface (VASI).

    VASI 2000 Pair Scale

    Cisco IOS XE Release 3.10S

    The VASI 2000 Pair Scale feature provides support for 2000 VASI interfaces. 2000 VASI interfaces are supported on Border Gateway Protocol (BGP).

    The following command was introduced or modified: interface (VASI).