Cisco Context-Aware Service Configuration Guide, Release 7.3.101.0
Chapter 10: Working with Maps
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Working with Maps

Table Of Contents

Working with Maps

About Maps

Adding a Campus Map

Adding a Building to a Campus Map

Adding a Standalone Building

Adding Floor Areas

Adding Floor Areas to a Campus Building

Adding Floor Plans to a Standalone Building

Monitoring the Floor Area

Panning and Zooming with Next Generation Maps

Adding Access Points to a Floor Area

Placing Access Points

Using the Automatic Hierarchy to Create Maps

Using the Map Editor

Guidelines for Using the Map Editor

Guidelines for Inclusion and Exclusion Areas on a Floor

Opening the Map Editor

Map Editor Icons

Using the Map Editor to Draw Coverage Areas

Using the Map Editor to Draw Obstacles

Map Editor Edit Mode

Defining an Inclusion Region on a Floor

Defining an Exclusion Region on a Floor

Defining a Rail Line on a Floor

Adding an Outdoor Area

Using Planning Mode

Using Chokepoints to Enhance Tag Location Reporting

Guidelines and Limitations

Adding Chokepoints to the Prime Infrastructure

Adding a Chokepoint to a Prime Infrastructure Map

Positioning Chokepoints

Removing Chokepoints from the Prime Infrastructure

Configuring Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers

Prerequisites for Using TDOA Receiver Within the Cisco Unified Wireless Network

Adding Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers to the Prime Infrastructure Database

Adding Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers to a Map

Positioning Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers

Removing Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers from the Prime Infrastructure


Working with Maps


Maps provide a summary view of all your managed systems on campuses, buildings, outdoor areas, and floors.

This chapter contains the following sections:

About Maps

Adding a Campus Map

Adding a Building to a Campus Map

Adding Floor Areas

Monitoring the Floor Area

Using the Automatic Hierarchy to Create Maps

Using the Map Editor

Adding an Outdoor Area

Using Planning Mode

Using Chokepoints to Enhance Tag Location Reporting

Configuring Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers

About Maps

In addition to the features of the legacy maps, the 7.3 Release enables you to use the features of the Next Generation Maps. The Next Generation Maps feature is enabled by default. Use the Administration > User Preferences page to enable or disable this feature.

The Next Generation Maps feature provides you the following benefits:

Displays large amount of information on the map. When you have various clients, interferers, and access points, they may clutter the display on the Prime Infrastructure map pages and sometimes pages load slowly. The Release 7.3 introduces clustering and layering of information. Information cluster reduces clutter at the high level and reveals more information when you click an object. For details, see the "Monitoring the Floor Area" section.

Simplifies and accelerates the process of adding APs to the map. In the legacy maps, the process of adding access points to maps was manual and tedious. With Release 7.3, you can use the automated hierarchy creation to add and name the access points. For details, see the "Using the Automatic Hierarchy to Create Maps" section.

Provides high quality map images with easy navigation and zoom/pan controls. In the legacy maps, the map image quality was low and the navigating, zooming, and panning was slow. With Release 7.3, you can use the next-generation tile-aware map engine to load maps faster and zoom/pan easily. The Next Generation Maps enables you to load high resolution maps faster and navigate around the map easily. For details, see the "Panning and Zooming with Next Generation Maps" section.

This section contains the following topics:

"Adding a Campus Map" section

"Adding Floor Areas" section

"Using the Map Editor" section

Adding a Campus Map

To add a single campus map to the Prime Infrastructure database, follow these steps:


Step 1 Save the map in.PNG,.JPG,.JPEG, or.GIF format.


Note The map can be of any size because the Prime Infrastructure automatically resizes the map to fit the working areas.


Step 2 Browse to and import the map from anywhere in your file system.

Step 3 Choose Design > Site Maps to display the Maps page.

Step 4 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose New Campus, and click Go.

Step 5 In the Maps > New Campus page, enter the campus name and campus contact name.

Step 6 Browse to and choose the image filename containing the map of the campus, and click Open.

Step 7 Select the Maintain Aspect Ratio check box to prevent length and width distortion when the Prime Infrastructure resizes the map.

Step 8 Enter the horizontal and vertical span of the map in feet.


Note To change the unit of measurement (feet or meters), choose Design > Site Maps and choose Properties from the Select a command drop-down list. The horizontal and vertical span should be larger than any building or floor plan to be added to the campus.


Step 9 Click OK to add this campus map to the Prime Infrastructure database. The Prime Infrastructure displays the Maps page, which lists maps in the database, map types, and campus status.

Step 10 (Optional) To assign location presence information, click the newly created campus link in the
Design > Site Maps page.


Adding a Building to a Campus Map

To add a building to a campus map in the Prime Infrastructure database, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Design > Site Maps to display the Maps page.

Step 2 Click the desired campus. The Site Maps > Campus Name page appears.

Step 3 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose New Building, and click Go.

Step 4 In the Campus Name > New Building page, follow these steps to create a virtual building in which you can organize related floor plan maps:

a. Enter the building name.

b. Enter the building contact name.

c. Enter the number of floors and basements.

d. Enter the horizontal position (distance from the corner of the building rectangle to the left edge of the campus map) and the vertical position (distance from the corner of the building rectangle to the top edge of the campus map) in feet.


Note To change the unit of measurement (feet or meters), choose Design > Site Maps, and choose Properties from the Select a command drop-down list.


e. Enter an approximate building horizontal span and vertical span (width and depth on the map) in feet.


Note The horizontal and vertical span should be larger than or the same size as any floors that you might add later.



Tip You can also use Ctrl-click to resize the bounding area in the upper-left corner of the campus map. As you change the size of the bounding area, the horizontal span and the vertical span parameters of the building change to match your actions.


f. Click Place to put the building on the campus map. The Prime Infrastructure creates a building rectangle scaled to the size of the campus map.

g. Click the building rectangle and drag it to the desired position on the campus map.


Note After adding a new building, you can move it from one campus to another without having to recreate it.


h. Click Save to save this building and its campus location to the database. The Prime Infrastructure saves the building name in the building rectangle on the campus map.


Note A hyperlink associated with the building takes you to the corresponding Map page.


Step 5 (Optional) To assign location presence information for the new outdoor area, do the following:

a. Choose Edit Location Presence Info from the Select a command drop-down list. Click Go. The Location Presence page appears.


Note By default, the Presence Info check box of the Override Child Element is selected. This option should remain selected if you want to propagate the campus location to all buildings and floors on that campus. When adding buildings to the campus map, you can import the campus location information. The campus address cannot be imported to a building if the check box is unselected.
This option should be unselected if you want to assign building-specific addresses to buildings on its campus rather than one campus address to all.


b. Click the Civic Address or Advanced tab.

Civic Address identifies the campus by name, street, house number, house number suffix, city (address line2), state, postal code, and country.

Advanced identifies the campus with expanded civic information such as neighborhood, city division, country, and postal community name.


Note Each selected field is inclusive of all of those above it. For example, if you choose Advanced, it can also provide civic location information upon client demand. The selected setting must match what is set on the location server level (Services > Mobility Services).


c. By default, the Override Child's Presence Information check box is selected. There is no need to alter this setting for standalone buildings.

Step 6 Click Save.


Adding a Standalone Building

To add a standalone building to the Prime Infrastructure database, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Design > Site Maps to display the Maps page.

Step 2 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose New Building, and click Go.

Step 3 In the Maps > New Building page, follow these steps to create a virtual building in which you can organize related floor plan maps:

a. Enter the building name.

b. Enter the building contact name.


Note After adding a new building, you can move it from one campus to another without having to recreate it.


c. Enter the number of floors and basements.

d. Enter an approximate building horizontal span and vertical span (width and depth on the map) in feet.


Note To change the unit of measurement (feet or meters), choose Design > Site Maps, and choose Properties from the Select a command drop-down list.



Note The horizontal and vertical span should be larger than or the same size as any floors that you might add later.


e. Click OK to save this building to the database.

Step 4 (Optional) To assign location presence information for the new building, do the following:

a. Choose Location Presence from the Select a command drop-down list. Click Go. The Location Presence page appears.

b. Click the Civic or Advanced tab.

Civic Address identifies the campus by name, street, house number, house number suffix, city (address line2), state, postal code, and country.

Advanced identifies the campus with expanded civic information such as neighborhood, city division, county, and postal community name.


Note Each selected field is inclusive of all of those above it. For example, if you select Advanced, it can also provide Civic location information upon client demand. The selected setting must match what is set on the location server level (Services > Mobility Services).


c. By default, the Presence Info check box of the Override Child Element is selected. This option should remain selected if you want to propagate the campus location to all buildings and floors on that campus. When adding buildings to the campus map, you can import the location information. The campus address cannot be imported to a building if the check box is unselected. This option should be deselected if you want to assign building-specific addresses to buildings on its campus rather than one campus address to all.

Step 5 Click Save.


Note The standalone buildings are automatically placed in the system campus.



Adding Floor Areas

This section describes how to add floor plans to either a campus building or a standalone building in the Prime Infrastructure database.

This section contains the following topics:

"Adding Floor Areas to a Campus Building" section

"Adding Floor Plans to a Standalone Building" section

Adding Floor Areas to a Campus Building

After you add a building to a campus map, you can add individual floor plan and basement maps to the building.


Note Use the zoom controls at the top of the campus image to enlarge or decrease the size of the map view and to hide or show the map grid (which displays the map size in feet or meters).


To add a floor area to a campus building, follow these steps:


Step 1 Save your floor plan maps in .PNG, .JPG, ,JPEG, or .GIF format.


Note The maps can be of any size because Prime Infrastructure automatically resizes the maps to fit the workspace.



Note If there are problems converting the auto-cad file, an error message is displayed. The Prime Infrastructure uses a native image conversion library to convert auto-cad files into raster formats like .png. If the native library cannot be loaded, the Prime Infrastructure displays an "unable to convert the auto-cad file" message. If you receive this error, make sure all the required dependencies are met for the native library. To find any dependency problems, use ldd on Linux platforms. The following DLLs must be present under the /webnms/rfdlls Prime Infrastructure installation directory: LIBGFL254.DLL, MFC71.DLL, MSVCR71.DLL, and MSVCP71.DLL. If dependency problems occurs, you have to install the required libraries and restart Prime Infrastructure.



Note The floor map image is enhanced for zooming and panning. The floor image is not visible completely until this operation is complete. You can zoom in and out to view the complete map image. For example, if you have a high resolution image (near 181 megapixels) whose size is approximately 60 megabytes, it may take two minutes to appear on the map.


Step 2 Choose Design > Site Maps.

Step 3 From the Maps Tree View or the Design > Site Maps list, choose the applicable campus building to open the Building View page.

Step 4 Hover your mouse cursor over the name within an existing building rectangle to highlight it.


Note You can also access the building from the Campus View page. In the Campus View page, click the building name to open the Building View page.


Step 5 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose New Floor Area.

Step 6 Click Go. The New Floor Area page appears.

Step 7 In the New Floor Area page, follow these steps to add floors to a building in which to organize related floor plan maps:

a. Enter the floor area and contact names.

b. Choose the floor or basement number from the Floor drop-down list.

c. Choose the floor or basement type (RF Model).

d. Enter the floor-to-floor height in feet.


Note To change the unit of measurement (feet or meters), choose Design > Site Maps, and choose Properties from the Select a command drop-down list.


e. Select the Image or CAD File check box.

f. Browse to and choose the desired floor or basement image or CAD filename, and click Open.


Note If you are importing a CAD file, use the Convert CAD File drop-down list to determine the image file for conversion.



Tip We do not recommend a .JPEG (.JPG) format for an auto-cad conversion. Unless a JPEG is specifically required, use .PNG or .GIF format for higher quality images.


g. Click Next. At this point, if a CAD file was specified, a default image preview is generated and loaded.


Note The Prime Infrastructure uses a native image conversion library to convert auto-cad files into raster formats like .PNG. When there are issues loading the native library, Prime Infrastructure displays the following error: "Unable to convert the auto-cad file. Reason: Error while loading the auto-cad image conversion library." For more information see Prime Infrastructure online help or Prime Infrastructure documentation.


The names of the CAD file layers are listed with check boxes to the right side of the image indicating which are enabled.


Note When you choose the floor or basement image filename, the Prime Infrastructure displays the image in the building-sized grid.



Note The maps can be of any size because the Prime Infrastructure automatically resizes the maps to fit the workspace.



Note The map must be saved in .PNG, .JPG, .JPEG, or .GIF format.


h. If you have CAD file layers, you can select or deselect as many as you want and click Preview to view an updated image. Click Next when you are ready to proceed with the selected layers.

Enter the remaining parameters for the floor area

i. Either leave the Maintain Aspect Ratio check box selected to preserve the original image aspect ratio or unselect the check box to change the image aspect ratio.

j. Enter an approximate floor or basement horizontal and vertical span (width and depth on the map) in feet.


Note The horizontal and vertical spans should be smaller than or the same size as the building horizontal and vertical spans in the Prime Infrastructure database.


k. If applicable, enter the horizontal position (distance from the corner of the outdoor area rectangle to the left edge of the campus map) and vertical position (distance from the corner of the outdoor area rectangle to the top edge of the campus map) in feet or meters.


Tip Use Ctrl-click to resize the image within the building-sized grid.


l. If desired, select the Launch Map Editor after floor creation check box to rescale the floor and draw walls.

m. Click OK to save this floor plan to the database. The floor is added to the Maps Tree View and the Design > Site Maps list.


Note Use different floor names in each building. If you are adding more than one building to the campus map, do not use a floor name that exists in another building. This overlap causes incorrect mapping information between a floor and a building.


Step 8 Click any of the floor or basement images to view the floor plan or basement map.


Note You can zoom in or out to view the map at different sizes and you can add access points.



Adding Floor Plans to a Standalone Building

After you have added a standalone building to the Prime Infrastructure database, you can add individual floor plan maps to the building.

To add floor plans to a standalone building, follow these steps:


Step 1 Save your floor plan maps in .PNG, .JPG, or .GIF format.


Note The maps can be of any size because the Prime Infrastructure automatically resizes the maps to fit the workspace.


Step 2 Browse to and import the floor plan maps from anywhere in your file system. You can import CAD files in DXF or DWG formats or any of the formats you created in Step 1.


Note If there are problems converting the auto-cad file, an error message is displayed. the Prime Infrastructure uses a native image conversion library to convert auto-cad files into raster formats like .PNG. If the native library cannot be loaded, the Prime Infrastructure displays an "unable to convert the auto-cad file" message. If you receive this error, make sure all the required dependencies are met for the native library. To find any dependency problems, use ldd on Linux platforms. The following DLLs must be present under the /webnms/rfdlls the Prime Infrastructure installation directory: LIBGFL254.DLL, MFC71.DLL, MSVCR71.DLL, and MSVCP71.DLL. If dependency problems occurs, you must install the required libraries and restart the Prime Infrastructure.


Step 3 Choose Design > Site Maps.

Step 4 From the Maps Tree View or the Design > Site Maps left sidebar menu, choose the desired building to display the Building View page.

Step 5 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose New Floor Area.

Step 6 Click Go.

Step 7 In the New Floor Area page, add the following information:

Enter the floor area and contact names.

Choose the floor or basement number from the Floor drop-down list.

Choose the floor or basement type (RF Model).

Enter the floor-to-floor height in feet.

Select the Image or CAD File check box.

Browse to and choose the desired floor or basement Image or CAD file, and click Open.


Note If you are importing a CAD file, use the Convert CAD File drop-down list to determine the image file for conversion.



Tip A .JPEG (.JPG) format is not recommended for an auto-cad conversion. Unless a .JPEG is specifically required, use a .PNG or .GIF format for higher quality images.


Step 8 Click Next. At this point, if a CAD file was specified, a default image preview is generated and loaded.


Note The Prime Infrastructure uses a native image conversion library to convert auto-cad files into raster formats like .PNG. When there are issues loading the native library, the Prime Infrastructure displays the following error: "Unable to convert the auto-cad file. Reason: Error while loading the auto-cad image conversion library. For more information, see the Prime Infrastructure online help or the Prime Infrastructure documentation".


The names of the CAD file layers are listed with check boxes to the right side of the image indicating which are enabled.


Note When you choose the floor or basement image filename, the Prime Infrastructure displays the image in the building-sized grid.



Note The maps can be any size because the Prime Infrastructure automatically resizes the maps to fit the workspace.



Note The map must be saved in .PNG, .JPG, .JPEG, or .GIF format.


If you have CAD file layers, you can select or deselect as many as you want and click Preview to view an updated image. Click Next when you are ready to proceed with the selected layers.

Step 9 Enter the remaining parameters for the floor area.

Either leave the Maintain Aspect Ratio check box selected to preserve the original image aspect ratio or unselect the check box to change the image aspect ratio.

Enter an approximate floor or basement horizontal and vertical span (width and depth on the map) in feet.


Note The horizontal and vertical spans should be smaller than or the same size as the building horizontal and vertical spans in the Prime Infrastructure Prime Infrastructure database.


If applicable, enter the horizontal position (distance from the corner of the outdoor area rectangle to the left edge of the campus map) and vertical position (distance from the corner of the outdoor area rectangle to the top edge of the campus map) in feet or meters.


Tip Use Ctrl-click to resize the image within the building-sized grid.


Adjust the floor characteristics with the Prime Infrastructure map editor by selecting the check box next to Launch Map Editor. See the "Using the Map Editor" section for more information regarding the map editor feature.

Step 10 Click OK to save this floor plan to the database. The floor is added to the Maps Tree View and the Design > Site Maps list.

Step 11 Click any of the floor or basement images to view the floor plan or basement map.


Note You can zoom in or out to view the map at different sizes and you can add access points. (done till here)



Monitoring the Floor Area

The floor area is the area of each floor of the building measured to the outer surface of the outer walls. This includes the area of lobbies, cellars, elevator shafts, and in multi-dwelling buildings it includes all the common spaces.

This section contains the following topics:

Panning and Zooming with Next Generation Maps

Adding Access Points to a Floor Area

Placing Access Points

Panning and Zooming with Next Generation Maps

Panning

To move the map click and hold the left mouse button and drag the map to a new place.

You can also move the map North, South, East, or West using the pan arrows. These can be found on the top left-hand corner of the map (see Figure 10-1).

Figure 10-1

Panning Control


Note You can also perform the panning operations using the arrow keys on a keyboard.


Zooming in and out - changing the scale

The zooming levels depend upon the resolution of an image. A high resolution image may provide more zoom levels. Each zoom level is made of a different style map shown at different scales, each one showing more or less detail. Some maps will be of the same style, but at a smaller or larger scale.

To see a map with more detail you need to zoom in. You can do this using the zoom bar on the left hand side of the map (see Figure 10-2). Click the + sign on the top of the zoom bar. To centre and zoom in on a location, double-click the location. To see a map with less detail you need to zoom out. To do this, click the - sign on the bottom of the zoom bar.

Figure 10-2

Zooming Control


Note You can perform zooming operations using the mouse or keyboard. With the keyboard, click the + or - signs to zoom in or zoom out. With the mouse, use the mouse scroll wheel to zoom in or zoom out or double-click to zoom in.


Adding Access Points to a Floor Area

After you add the .PNG, .JPG, .JPEG, or .GIF format floor plan and outdoor area maps to the Prime Infrastructure database, you can position lightweight access point icons on the maps to show where they are installed in the buildings. To add access points to a floor area and outdoor area, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Design > Site Maps.

Step 2 From the Maps Tree View or the Design > Site Maps left sidebar menu, choose the applicable floor to open the Floor View page.

Step 3 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose Add Access Points, and click Go.

Step 4 In the Add Access Points page, select the check boxes of the access points that you want to add to the floor area.


Note If you want to search for access points, enter AP name or MAC address (Ethernet/Radio)/IP in the Search AP [Name/Mac Address (Ethernet/Radio)/IP] text box, and then click Search. The search is case-insensitive.



Note Only access points that are not yet assigned to any floor or outdoor area appear in the list.



Note Select the check box at the top of the list to select all access points.


Step 5 When all of the applicable access points are selected, click OK located at the bottom of the access point list.

The Position Access Points page appears.

Each access point you have chosen to add to the floor map is represented by a gray circle (differentiated by access point name or MAC address) and is lined up in the upper left part of the floor map.

Step 6 Click and drag each access point to the appropriate location. Access points turn blue when selected.


Note When you drag an access point on the map, its horizontal and vertical position appears in the Horizontal and Vertical text boxes.



Note The small black arrow at the side of each access point represents Side A of each access point, and each access point arrow must correspond with the direction in which the access points were installed. Side A is clearly noted on each 1000 series access point and has no relevance to the 802.11a/n radio. To adjust the directional arrow, choose the appropriate orientation from the Antenna Angle drop-down list.


When selected, the access point details are displayed on the left side of the page. Access point details include the following:

AP Model—Indicates the model type of the selected access point.

Protocol—Choose the protocol for this access point from the drop-down list.

Antenna—Choose the appropriate antenna type for this access point from the drop-down list.

Antenna/AP Image—The antenna image reflects the antenna selected from the Antenna drop-down list. Click the arrow at the top right of the antenna image to expand the image size.

Antenna Orientation—Depending on the antenna type, enter the Azimuth and the Elevation orientations in degrees.


Note The Azimuth option does not appear for Omnidirectional antennas because their pattern is non directional in azimuth.



Note For internal antennas, the same elevation angle applies to both radios.


The antenna angle is relative to the map X axis. Because the origin of the X (horizontal) and Y (vertical) axes is in the upper left corner of the map, 0 degrees points side A of the access point to the right, 90 degrees points side A down, 180 degrees points side A to the left, and so on.

The antenna elevation is used to move the antenna vertically, up or down, to a maximum of 90 degrees.


Note Make sure each access point is in the correct location on the map and has the correct antenna orientation. Accurate access point positioning is critical when you use the maps to find coverage holes and rogue access points.


See the following URL for further information about the antenna elevation and azimuth patterns:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps469/tsd_products_support_series_home.html

Step 7 When you are finished placing and adjusting each access point, click Save.


Note Clicking Save causes the antenna gain on the access point to correspond to the selected antenna. This might cause the radio to reset.


The Prime Infrastructure computes the RF prediction for the coverage area. These RF predictions are popularly known as heat maps because they show the relative intensity of the RF signals on the coverage area map.


Note This display is only an approximation of the actual RF signal intensity because it does not take into account the attenuation of various building materials, such as drywall or metal objects, nor does it display the effects of RF signals bouncing off obstructions.



Note Antenna gain settings have no effect on heatmaps and location calculations. Antenna gain is implicitly associated to the antenna name. Because of this, the following apply:
- If an antenna is used and marked as "Other" in the Prime Infrastructure, it is ignored for all heatmap and location calculations;
- If an antenna is used and marked as a Cisco antenna in the Prime Infrastructure, that antenna gain setting (internal value on the Prime Infrastructure) is used no matter what gain is set on the controller.



Note See the "Placing Access Points" section for more information on placing access points on a map.



Note You can change the position of access points by importing or exporting a file. See the "Positioning Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers" section for more information.



Placing Access Points

To determine the best location of all devices in the wireless LAN coverage areas, you need to consider the access point density and location.

Ensure that no fewer than 3 access points, and preferably 4 or 5, provide coverage to every area where device location is required. The more access points that detect a device, the better. This high level guideline translates into the following best practices, ordered by priority:

1. Most importantly, access points should surround the desired location.

2. One access point should be placed roughly every 50 to 70 linear feet (about 17 to 20 meters). This translates into one access point every 2,500 to 5000 square feet (about 230 to 450 square meters).


Note The access point must be mounted so that it is under 20 feet high. For best performance, a mounting at 10 feet would be ideal.


Following these guidelines makes it more likely that access points detect tracked devices. Rarely do two physical environments have the same RF characteristics. Users might need to adjust these parameters to their specific environment and requirements.


Note Devices must be detected at signals greater than -75 dBm for the controllers to forward information to the location appliance. No fewer than three access points should be able to detect any device at signals below -75 dBm.



Note If you have a ceiling-mounted AP with an integrated omni-directional antenna, the antenna orientation does not really need to be set in the Prime Infrastructure. However, if you mount that same AP on the wall, you must set the antenna orientation to 90 degrees.


Table 10-1 describes the orientation of the access points.

Table 10-1 Antenna Orientation of the Access Points 

Access Point
Antenna Orientation

1140 mounted on the ceiling

The Cisco logo should be pointing to the floor. Elevation: 0 degrees.

1240 mounted on the ceiling

The antenna should be perpendicular to the access point.

Elevation: 0 degrees.

1240 mounted on the wall

The antenna should be parallel to the access point.

Elevation: 0 degrees.

If the antenna is perpendicular to the AP then the angle is 90 degrees (up or down does not matter as the dipole is omni).



Using the Automatic Hierarchy to Create Maps

Automatic Hierarchy Creation is a way for you to quickly create maps and assign access points to maps in Prime Infrastructure. You can use Automatic Hierarchy Creation to create maps, once you have added wireless LAN controllers to Prime Infrastructure and named your access points. Also, you can use it after adding access points to your network to assign access points to maps in Prime Infrastructure.


Note To use the Automatic Hierarchy Creation feature, you must have an established naming pattern for your wireless access points that provides the campus, building, floor, or outdoor area names for the maps.

For example, San Jose-01-GroundFloor-AP3500i1.



Step 1 Choose Design > Automatic Hierarchy Creation to display the Automatic Hierarchy Creation page.

Step 2 In the text box, enter the name of an access point on your system. Or, you can choose one from the list.

This name is used to create a regular expression to create your maps.


Note To update a previously created regular expression, select Load and Continue next to the expression and update the expression accordingly.


To delete a regular expression, select Delete next to the expression.


Step 3 Click Next.

Step 4 If your access point`s name has a delimiter, enter it in the text box and click Generate. The system generates a regular expression that matches your access point's name based on the delimiter.

For example, using the dash (-) delimiter in the access point name San Jose-01-GroundFloor-AP3500i1, produces the regular expression /(.*)-(.*)-(.*)-(.*)/.
If you have a more complicated access point name, you can manually enter the regular expression.


Note You are not required to enter the leading and trailing slashes.


Step 5 Click Test. The system displays the maps that will be created for the access point name and the regular expression entered.

Step 6 Using the Group fields, assign matching groups to hierarchy types.

For example, if your access point is named: SJC14-4-AP-BREAK-ROOM

In this example, the campus name is SJC, the building name is 14, the floor name is 4, and the AP name is AP-BREAK-ROOM.

Use the regular expression: /([A-Z]+)(\d+)-(\d+)-(.*)/

From the AP name, the following groups are extracted:

1. SJC

2. 14

3. 4

4. AP-BREAK-ROOM

The matching groups are assigned from left to right, starting at 1.

To make the matching groups match the hierarchy elements, use the drop-down list for each group number to select the appropriate hierarchy element.

This enables you to have almost any ordering of locations in your access point names.

For example, if your access point is named: EastLab-Atrium2-3-San Francisco

If you use the regular expression: /(.*)-(.*)-(.*)-(.*)/

with the following group mapping:

1. Building

2. Device Name

3. Floor

4. Campus

Automatic Hierarchy Creation produces campus named San Francisco, a building under that campus named EastLab, and a floor in EastLab named 3.


Note The two hierarchy types, Not in device name and Device have no effect, but enable you to skip groups in case you need to use a matching group for some other purpose.


Automatic Hierarchy Creation requires the following groups to be mapped in order to compute a map on which to place the access point:

Campus group present in match?
Building group present in match?
Floor group present in match?
Resulting location

Yes

Yes

Yes

Campus > Building > Floor

Yes

Yes

No

Failed match

Yes

No

Yes

Campus > Floor (where Floor is an outdoor area)

Yes

No

No

Failed match

No

Yes

Yes

System Campus > Building > Floor

No

Yes

No

Failed match

No

No

Yes

Failed match

No

No

No

Failed match


Automatic Hierarchy Creation attempts to guess the floor index from the floor name. If the floor name is a number, AHC will assign the floor a positive floor index. If the floor name is a negative number or starts with the letter B (for example, b1, -4, or B2), AHC assigns the floor a negative floor index. This indicates that the floor is a basement.

When searching for an existing map on which to place the access point, AHC considers floors in the access point's building with the same floor index as the access point's name.

For example, if the map SF > MarketStreet > Sublevel1 exists and has a floor index of -1, then the access point SF-MarketStreet-b1-MON1 will be assigned to that floor."

Step 7 Click Next. You can test against more access points. You may test your regular expression and matching group mapping against more access points by entering the access point's names in the Add more device names to test against field, and clicking the Add button.

You then click the Test button to test each of the access points names in the table. The result of each test is displayed in the table.

If required, return to the previous step to edit the regular expression or group mapping for the current regular expression.

Step 8 Click Next, then click Save and Apply. This applies the regular expression to the system. The system processes all the access points that are not assigned to a map.


Note You can edit the maps to include floor images, correct dimensions, and so on. When Automatic Hierarchy Creation creates a map, it uses the default dimensions of 20 feet by 20 feet. You will need to edit the created maps to specify the correct dimensions and other attributes.

Maps created using Automatic Hierarchy Creation appear in the maps list with an incomplete icon. Once you have edited a map, the incomplete icon disappears. You may hide the column for incomplete maps by clicking the Edit View link.


Using the Map Editor

You use the Map Editor to define, draw, and enhance floor plan information. The map editor allows you to create obstacles so that they can be taken into consideration while computing RF prediction heatmaps for access points. You can also add coverage areas for location appliances that locate clients and tags in that particular area.

Guidelines for Using the Map Editor

Consider the following when modifying a building or floor map using the map editor:

We recommend that you use the map editor to draw walls and other obstacles rather than importing an .FPE file from the legacy floor plan editor.

If necessary, you can still import .FPE files. To do so, navigate to the desired floor area, choose Edit Floor Area from the Select a command drop-down list, click Go, select the FPE File check box, and browse to choose the .FPE file.

You can add any number of walls to a floor plan with the map editor; however, the processing power and memory of a client workstation might limit the refresh and rendering aspects of the Prime Infrastructure.

We recommend a practical limit of 400 walls per floor for machines with 1GB RAM or less.

All walls are used by the Prime Infrastructure when generating RF coverage heatmaps.

Guidelines for Inclusion and Exclusion Areas on a Floor

Inclusion and exclusion areas can be any polygon shape and must have at least three points.

You can only define one inclusion region on a floor. By default, an inclusion region is defined for each floor when it is added to the Prime Infrastructure. The inclusion region is indicated by a solid aqua line, and generally outlines the region.

You can define multiple exclusion regions on a floor.

Newly defined inclusion and exclusion regions appear on heatmaps only after the mobility services engine recalculates location.

Opening the Map Editor

Follow these steps to use the map editor:


Step 1 Choose Design > Site Map Design.

Step 2 Click the desired campus. The Site Maps > Campus Name page appears.

Step 3 Click a campus and then click a building.

Step 4 Click the desired floor area. The Site Maps > Campus Name > Building Name > Floor Area Name page appears.

Step 5 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose Map Editor, and click Go. The Map Editor page appears.


Map Editor Icons

Table 10-2 Next Generation Maps Icons 

Icon
Description

Scale Floor—Click anywhere on the map to start drawing line. Double-click to finish the line and enter the new line length in the pop up shown. This will modify the floor dimensions to the new dimensions.

Measure Distance—Click anywhere on the map to start drawing line. Double-click to finish the line. Measured line length in ft/meters is shown on the top.

Copy/Move Obstacles—Select obstacles either by drawing a box on the map or by clicking on the obstacles. To copy obstacles, click the 'Copy' button. This will create new obstacles just above the selected obstacles. To move the obstacles, drag the selected obstacles to new position. Clicking anywhere on the map will unselect all the elements.

Delete Mode—Select the elements to be deleted either by drawing a box on the map or clicking on each element. Use Shift key to select multiple elements. Use the Ctrl key to toggle selection of elements, one at a time. Clicking anywhere on the map will unselect all the elements. Click the 'Delete' button to delete the selected elements

Modify Mode—Click an element and click the vertices to reshape or drag the element to move to a new position. Clicking anywhere on the map will unselect the selected element.

Draw Coverage Area

Draw Location Region

Draw Rail

Draw Obstacle—Click anywhere on the map to start drawing. Double-click to finish drawing. Use Ctrl-z to undo, Ctrl-y to redo, and, the `Esc' key to cancel the current drawing.

Place Marker

Navigation—Remove any selected modes such as drawing or editing and switches to navigation mode where you can view the map and perform zooming or panning.


Using the Map Editor to Draw Coverage Areas

If you have a building that is non-rectangular or you want to mark a non-rectangular area within a floor, you can use the map editor to draw a coverage area.


Step 1 Add the floor plan if it is not already represented in the Prime Infrastructure.

Step 2 Choose Design > Site Maps.

Step 3 Click the Map Name that corresponds to the outdoor area, campus, building, or floor you want to edit.

Step 4 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose Map Editor, and click Go.

Step 5 It the Map Editor page, click the Draw Coverage Area icon on the toolbar.

A pop-up appears.

Step 6 Enter the name of the area that you are defining. Click OK.

A drawing tool appears.

Step 7 Move the drawing tool to the area you want to outline.

Click the left mouse button to begin and end drawing a line.

When you have completely outlined the area, double-click the left mouse button and the area is highlighted in the page.

The outlined area must be a closed object to appear highlighted on the map.

Step 8 Click the disk icon on the toolbar to save the newly drawn area.


Using the Map Editor to Draw Obstacles

Table 10-3 describes the obstacle color coding.

Table 10-3 Obstacle Color Coding 

Type of obstacle
Color coding
Loss (in dB)

Thick wall

13

Light wall

2

Heavy door

15

Light door

4

Cubicle

1

Glass

1.5



Map Editor Edit Mode

In the Next generation map editor, you can edit the area using the Edit Mode option available. The In the legacy maps, if you have made mistake in drawing, then you have to delte it and redraw again. But in the Next generation map editor, you can choose Edit Mode and click on the area tobe edited and drag the verticles or hold down the mouse key and move the entire area to a different place.

Defining an Inclusion Region on a Floor

To define an inclusion area, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Design > Site Maps.

Step 2 Click the name of the appropriate floor area.

Step 3 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose Map Editor.

Step 4 Click Go.

Step 5 At the map, click the aqua box on the toolbar.


Note A message box appears reminding you that only one inclusion area can be defined at a time. Defining a new inclusion region automatically removes the previously defined inclusion region. By default, an inclusion region is defined for each floor when it is added to the Prime Infrastructure. The inclusion region is indicated by a solid aqua line and generally outlines the region.


Step 6 Click OK in the message box that appears. A drawing icon appears to outline the inclusion area.

Step 7 To begin defining the inclusion area, move the drawing icon to a starting point on the map and click once.

Step 8 Move the cursor along the boundary of the area you want to include and click to end a border line. Click again to define the next boundary line.

Step 9 Repeat Step 8 until the area is outlined and then double-click the drawing icon. A solid aqua line defines the inclusion area.

Step 10 Choose Save from the Command menu or click the disk icon on the toolbar to save the inclusion region.


Note If you made an error in defining the inclusion area, click the area. The selected area is outlined by a dashed aqua line. Next, click the X icon on the toolbar. The area is removed from the floor map.


Step 11 Select the Location Regions check box if it is not already selected. If you want it to apply to all floor maps, click Save settings. Close the Layers configuration page.

Step 12 To resynchronize the Prime Infrastructure and MSE databases, choose Services > Synchronize Services.


Note If the two DBs are already synchronized then a resynchronization happens automatically every time there is a change. There is no need for an explicit resynch.


Step 13 In the Synchronize page, choose Network Designs from the Synchronize drop-down list and then click Synchronize.

You can confirm that the synchronization is successful by viewing two green arrows in the Sync. Status column.


Note Newly defined inclusion and exclusion regions appear on heatmaps only after the mobility services engine recalculates location.



Defining an Exclusion Region on a Floor

To further refine location calculations on a floor, you can define areas that are excluded (exclusion areas) in the calculations. For example, you might want to exclude areas such as an atrium or stairwell within a building. As a rule, exclusion areas are generally defined within the borders of an inclusion area.

To define an exclusion area, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Design > Site Maps.

Step 2 Click the name of the appropriate floor area.

Step 3 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose Map Editor.

Step 4 Click Go.

Step 5 At the map, click the purple box on the toolbar.

Step 6 Click OK in the message box that appears. A drawing icon appears to outline the exclusion area.

Step 7 To begin defining the exclusion area, move the drawing icon to the starting point on the map, and click once.

Step 8 Move the drawing icon along the boundary of the area you want to exclude. Click once to start a boundary line, and click again to end the boundary line.

Step 9 Repeat Step 8 until the area is outlined and then double-click the drawing icon. The defined exclusion area is shaded in purple when the area is completely defined. The excluded area is shaded in purple.

Step 10 To define additional exclusion regions, repeat Step 5 to Step 9.

Step 11 When all exclusion areas are defined, choose Save from the Command menu or click the disk icon on the toolbar to save the exclusion region.


Note To delete an exclusion area, click the area to be deleted. The selected area is outlined by a dashed purple line. Next, click the X icon on the toolbar. The area is removed from the floor map.


Step 12 Select the Location Regions check box if it is not already selected, click Save settings, and close the Layers configuration page when complete.

Step 13 To resynchronize the Prime Infrastructure and location databases, choose Services > Synchronize Services.

Step 14 In the Synchronize page, choose Network Designs from the Synchronize drop-down list and then click Synchronize.

You can confirm that the synchronization is successful by viewing two green arrows in the Sync. Status column.


Defining a Rail Line on a Floor

You can define a rail line on a floor that represents a conveyor belt. Additionally, you can define an area around the rail area known as the snap-width to further assist location calculations. This represents the area in which you expect clients to appear. Any client located within the snap-width area is plotted on the rail line (majority) or just outside of the snap-width area (minority).


Note Rail line configurations do not apply to tags.


The snap-width area is defined in feet or meters (user-defined) and represents the distance that is monitored on either side (east and west or north and south) of the rail.

To define a rail with a floor, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Design > Site Maps.

Step 2 Click the name of the appropriate floor area.

Step 3 Choose Map Editor from the Select a command drop-down list.

Step 4 Click Go.

Step 5 In the map, click the rail icon (to the right of the purple exclusion icon) on the toolbar.

Step 6 In the message dialog box that appears, enter a snap-width (feet or meters) for the rail and then click OK. A drawing icon appears.

Step 7 Click the drawing icon at the starting point of the rail line. Click again when you want to stop drawing the line or change the direction of the line.

Step 8 Click the drawing icon twice when the rail line is completely drawn on the floor map. The rail line appears on the map and is bordered on either side by the defined snap-width region.


Note To delete a rail line, click the area to be deleted. The selected area is outlined by a dashed purple line. Next, click the X icon on the toolbar. The area is removed from the floor map.


Step 9 At the floor map, choose the Layers drop-down list.

Step 10 Select the Rails check box for if it is not already selected, click Save settings, and close the Layers configuration panel when complete.

Step 11 To resynchronize the Prime Infrastructure and mobility services engine, choose Services > Synchronize Services.

Step 12 In the Synchronize page, choose Network Designs from the Synchronize drop-down list and then click Synchronize.

You can confirm that the synchronization is successful by viewing two green arrows in the Sync. Status column.


Adding an Outdoor Area


Note You can add an outdoor area to a campus map in the Prime Infrastructure database regardless of whether you have added outdoor area maps to the database.


To add an outdoor area to a campus map, follow these steps:


Step 1 If you want to add a map of the outdoor area to the database, save the map in .PNG, .JPG, .JPEG, or .GIF format. Then browse to and import the map from anywhere in your file system.


Note You do not need a map to add an outdoor area. You can simply define the dimensions of the area to add it to the database. The map can be any size because the Prime Infrastructure automatically resizes the map to fit the workspace.


Step 2 Choose Design > Site Maps.

Step 3 Click the desired campus to display the Design > Site Maps > Campus View page.

Step 4 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose New Outdoor Area.

Step 5 Click Go. The Create New Area page appears.

Step 6 In the New Outdoor Area page, enter the following information:

Name—The user-defined name of the new outdoor area.

Contact—The user-defined contact name.

Area Type (RF Model)—Cubes And Walled Offices, Drywall Office Only, Outdoor Open Space (default).

AP Height (feet)—Enter the height of the access point.

Image File—Name of the file containing the outdoor area map. Click Browse to find the file.

Step 7 Click Next.

Step 8 Click Place to put the outdoor area on the campus map. the Prime Infrastructure creates an outdoor area rectangle scaled to the size of the campus map.

Step 9 Click and drag the outdoor area rectangle to the desired position on the campus map.

Step 10 Click Save to save this outdoor area and its campus location to the database.


Note A hyperlink associated with the outdoor area takes you to the corresponding Maps page.


Step 11 (Optional) To assign location presence information for the new outdoor area, choose Edit Location Presence Info, and click Go.


Note By default, the Override Child Element Presence Info check box is selected. There is no need to alter this setting for outdoor areas.



Using Planning Mode

The planning mode opens the map editor in the browser window from which the planning tool is launched. If the original browser window has navigated away from the floor page, you need to navigate back to the floor page to launch the map editor.

You can calculate the recommended number and location of access points based on whether data and/or voice traffic and/or location are active.


Note Based on the throughput specified for each protocol (802.11a or 802.11 b/g), planning mode calculates the total number of access points required that would provide optimum coverage in your network.


Planning Mode options:

Add APs—Enables you to add access points on a map. See the "Adding Access Points to a Floor Area" section for details.

Delete APs—Deletes the selected access points.

Map Editor—Opens the Map Editor window. See the "Using the Map Editor" section for more details.

Synchronize with Deployment—Synchronizes your planning mode access points with the current deployment scenario.

Generate Proposal—View a planning summary of the current access points deployment.

Planned AP Association Tool—Allows you to perform add, delete or import an AP Association from an excel or CSV file. Once an access point is defined, it can be associated to a base radio MAC address using the Planned AP Association Tool. If the AP is not discovered they get pushed into a standby bucket and get associated when discovered.


Note AP association is subjected to a limitation that AP should not belong to any floor or outdoor area. If the AP is already assigned to a floor or outdoor area, then the standby bucket holds the AP and when removed from the floor or outdoor, get positioned to the given floor. One Mac address cannot be put into bucket for multiple floor or outdoor areas.



Note The map synchronizations works only if the AP is associated to a base radio MAC address and not to its Ethernet MAC address.



Using Chokepoints to Enhance Tag Location Reporting

Chokepoints are installed and configured as recommended by the Chokepoint vendor. After the chokepoint installation is complete and operational, the chokepoint can be entered into the location database and plotted on the Prime Infrastructure map.

Using chokepoints in conjunction with active Cisco CX compliant tags provides immediate location information on a tag and its asset. When a Cisco CX tag moves out of the range of a chokepoint, its subsequent beacon frames do not contain any identifying chokepoint information. Location determination of the tag defaults to the standard calculation methods based on RSSIs reported by access point associated with the tag.


Note See the AeroScout Context-Aware Engine for Tags, for Cisco Mobility Services Engine Users Guide for chokepoint installation, configuration, and management details at the following URL: http://support.aeroscout.com


This section contains the following topics:

Guidelines and Limitations

Adding Chokepoints to the Prime Infrastructure

Removing Chokepoints from the Prime Infrastructure

Guidelines and Limitations

The chokepoint range is product-specific and is supplied by the chokepoint vendor.

You generally enable a chokepoint that is placed near an exit to function as an entry/exit (perimeter) chokepoint. When a client or tag shows strong RSSIs on two floors, you can check for the last perimeter chokepoint that the tag or client passed to determine the current floor location of that client or tag.

The rings around the chokepoint icon indicate the coverage area. When a Cisco CX tag and its asset pass within the coverage area, location details are broadcast and the tag is automatically mapped on the chokepoint coverage circle. When the tag moves out of the chokepoint range, its location is calculated as before and it is no longer mapped on the chokepoint rings.

Adding Chokepoints to the Prime Infrastructure

To add a chokepoint to the Prime Infrastructure database, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Configure > Chokepoints.

Step 2 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose Add Chokepoints.

Step 3 Click Go.

Step 4 Enter the MAC address and name for the chokepoint.

Step 5 Select the Entry/Exit Chokepoint check box.

Step 6 Enter the coverage range for the chokepoint.


Note The Chokepoint range is a visual representation only. It is product-specific. The actual range must be configured separately using the applicable chokepoint vendor software.


Step 7 Click OK.


Note After the chokepoint is added to the database, it can be placed on the appropriate the Prime Infrastructure floor map.



Adding a Chokepoint to a Prime Infrastructure Map

To add the chokepoint to a map, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Design > Site Maps.

Step 2 In the Maps page, choose the link that corresponds to the floor location of the chokepoint.

Step 3 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose Add Chokepoints.

Step 4 Click Go.


Note The Add Chokepoints summary page lists all recently added chokepoints that are in the database but are not yet mapped.


Step 5 Select the check box next to the chokepoint that you want to place on the map.

Step 6 Click OK.

A map appears with a chokepoint icon located in the top left-hand corner. You are now ready to place the chokepoint on the map.

Step 7 Left-click the chokepoint icon and drag it to the proper location.


Note The MAC address, name, and coverage range of the chokepoint appear in the dialog box in the left when you click the chokepoint icon for placement.


Step 8 Click Save.

You are returned to the floor map and the added chokepoint appears on the map.


Note The newly created chokepoint icon might or might not appear on the map depending on the display settings for that floor.



Note The rings around the chokepoint icon indicate the coverage area. When a CCX tag and its asset passes within the coverage area, location details are broadcast, and the tag is automatically mapped on the chokepoint coverage circle. When the tag moves out of the chokepoint range, its location is calculated as before and is no longer mapped on the chokepoint rings.



Note The MAC address, name, entry/exit chokepoint, static IP address, and range of the chokepoint appear when you hover your mouse cursor over its map icon.


Step 9 If the chokepoint does not appear on the map, select the Chokepoints check box located in the Floor Settings menu.


Note Do not click Save Settings unless you want to save this display criteria for all maps.



Note You must synchronize network design to the mobility services engine or location server to push chokepoint information.



Positioning Chokepoints

To position chokepoints on the map, follow these steps:


Step 1 Left-click the Chokepoint icon and drag it to the proper location.


Note The MAC address, name, and coverage range of the chokepoint appear in the dialog box in the left when you click the chokepoint icon for placement.


Step 2 Click Save when the icon is correctly placed on the map.

Step 3 The newly created chokepoint icon might or might not appear on the map depending on the display settings for that floor.


Note The rings around the chokepoint icon indicate the coverage area. When a Cisco Compatible Extensions tag and its asset passes within the coverage area, location details are broadcast, and the tag is automatically mapped on the chokepoint coverage circle. The chokepoint range is provided as a visual only, but chokepoint vendor software is required to actually configure the range. When the tag moves out of the chokepoint range, its location is calculated as before and is no longer mapped on the chokepoint rings.



Note The MAC address, name, and range of a chokepoint are displayed when you hover your mouse cursor over its map icon.


Step 4 If the chokepoint does not appear on the map, choose Layers to view a drop-down list of possible elements to display on the map. Select the Chokepoints check box.


Note Do not click Save Settings unless you want to save this display criteria for all maps.



Note You can change the position of chokepoints by importing or exporting a file.



Removing Chokepoints from the Prime Infrastructure

You can remove one or more chokepoints at a time.

To delete a chokepoint, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Configure > Chokepoints. The Chokepoints page appears.

Step 2 Select the check box next to the chokepoint to be deleted.

Step 3 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose Remove Chokepoints, and click Go.

Step 4 To confirm the chokepoint deletion, click OK in the dialog box that appears.

The Chokepoints page reappears and confirms the deletion of the chokepoints. The deleted chokepoints are no longer listed in the page.


Configuring Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers

The Wi-Fi TDOA receiver is an external system designed to receive signals transmitted from a tagged, tracked asset. These signals are then forwarded to the mobility services engine for used in calculating the location of a tagged asset. TDOA receivers use the Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) method to calculate tag location. TDOA uses data from a minimum of three TDOA receivers to generate the location of a tagged asset.


Note If a TDOA receiver is not in use, then the location calculations for tags are generated using RSSI readings from access points.


This section contains the following topics:

Prerequisites for Using TDOA Receiver Within the Cisco Unified Wireless Network

Adding Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers to the Prime Infrastructure Database

Adding Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers to a Map

Positioning Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers

Removing Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers from the Prime Infrastructure

Prerequisites for Using TDOA Receiver Within the Cisco Unified Wireless Network

Before using a TDOA receiver within the Cisco Unified Wireless Network, you must do the following:

1. Have a mobility services engine active in the network.

2. Add the TDOA receiver to the Prime Infrastructure database and map.

3. Synchronize the Prime Infrastructure and mobility services engines.

4. Set up the TDOA receiver using the AeroScout System Manager.


Note See the AeroScout Context-Aware Engine for Tags, for Cisco Mobility Services Engine Users Guide for configuration details at the following URL: http://support.aeroscout.com.


Adding Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers to the Prime Infrastructure Database

To add Wi-Fi TDOA receivers to the Prime Infrastructure database, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Configure > WiFi TDOA Receivers.

Step 2 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose Add WiFi TDOA Receivers.

Step 3 Click Go.

Step 4 Enter the MAC address, name, and static IP address for the Wi-Fi TDOA receiver.


Note Wi-Fi TDOA receivers are configured separately using the Wi-Fi TDOA receiver vendor software.


Step 5 Click OK to save the Wi-Fi TDOA receiver entry to the database.


Note After the Wi-Fi TDOA receiver is added to the database, place it on the appropriate Prime Infrastructure floor map. See the "Adding Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers to the Prime Infrastructure Database" section for more information.



Adding Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers to a Map

To add a Wi-Fi TDOA receiver to a map, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Design > Site Maps.

Step 2 Choose the link that corresponds to the floor location of the Wi-Fi TDOA receiver.

Step 3 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose Add WiFi TDOA Receivers.

Step 4 Click Go.


Note The Add WiFi TDOA Receivers summary page lists all recently added Wi-Fi TDOA receivers that are in the database but are not yet mapped.


Step 5 Select the check box next to the Wi-Fi TDOA receiver to be added to the map.

Step 6 Click OK.

A map appears with a green WiFi TDOA receiver icon located in the top left-hand corner. You are now ready to position the Wi-Fi TDOA receiver on the map.


Positioning Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers

To position Wi-Fi TDOA receivers on the map, follow these steps:


Step 1 Left-click the WiFi TDOA receiver icon and drag it to the proper location.


Note The MAC address and name of the Wi-Fi TDOA receiver appear in the left pane when you click the WiFi TDOA receiver icon for placement.


Step 2 Click Save when the icon is correctly placed on the map.


Note The MAC address of the Wi-Fi TDOA receiver appears when you hover your mouse cursor over its map icon.


Step 3 If the chokepoint does not appear on the map, click Layers to view a drop-down list of possible elements to display on the map. Select the WiFi TDOA Receivers check box.


Note Do not select Save Settings unless you want to save this display criteria for all maps.



Note You can change the position of Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers by importing or exporting a file.


Removing Wi-Fi TDOA Receivers from the Prime Infrastructure

You can remove one or more Wi-Fi TDOA receivers at a time. If you remove a TDOA receiver from a map, it remains in the Prime Infrastructure database but is labeled as unassigned.

To delete a TDOA receiver from Prime Infrastructure, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Configure > WiFi TDOA Receivers. The WiFi TDOA Receivers summary page appears.

Step 2 Select the check box next to each TDOA receiver to be deleted.

Step 3 From the Select a command drop-down list, choose Remove WiFi TDOA Receivers, and click Go.

Step 4 To confirm TDOA receiver deletion, click OK in the pop-up dialog box that appears.

The All WiFi TDOA Receivers page appears. A message confirming deletion of the TDOA receiver appears. The deleted TDOA receiver is no longer listed in the page.