Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch Hardware Installation Guide - Releases 7 & 9
Chapter 2 - Cabling and Connections
Downloads: This chapterpdf (PDF - 808.0KB) The complete bookPDF (PDF - 789.0KB) | Feedback

Cabling and Connections

Table Of Contents

Cabling and Connections

Cabling A-Link and F-Link Connections

Cabling Cisco ITP-L Connections

Wiring for the Cisco ITP-L

Connecting Cisco ITP-Ls

Connecting the Cisco ITP-L to a Network

Connecting the Console Terminal and Modem to the Cisco ITP-L

Identifying a Rollover Cable

Connecting the Console Terminal to the Cisco ITP-L Console Port

Connecting a Modem to the Cisco ITP-L Auxiliary Port

Cabling the Control Signaling Network Connection

Cabling Simplex Configurations

Cabling Simplex Configurations on Sun Netra t 100, t 105, t 1120, t 1125, t 1400, and t 1405

Cabling Simplex Configurations on Sun Netra 120, 210, 240, 440, T5220, and X4270, and Sun Fire V120, V440, V40z, and X4640

Cabling High-Availability Configurations

Cabling High-Availability Configurations on Sun Netra t 1120, t 1125, t1400, and 1405

Cabling High-Availability Configurations on Sun Netra 120, 210, 240, 440, T5220, and X4270, and Sun Fire V120, V440, V40z, and X4640

Continuous-Service Control Signaling Network Cabling

Console and Auxiliary Port Cables and Pinouts for Access Servers

Console Port Cables and Pinouts

Auxiliary Port Signals and Pinouts

Ethernet Port Pinouts

Connecting the Sun Server Hardware

Connecting Cables to Sun Systems

Setting Up Serial Connections

Crossovers for Connecting to a Terminal Server

Using a DB-25 Adapter for Your Serial Link

Using a DB-9 Adapter for Your Serial Link

Settings for the Serial Connections


Cabling and Connections


Revised: March 11, 2011, OL-1184-12

This chapter describes how to connect hardware components to the network. It contains the following sections:

Cabling A-Link and F-Link Connections

Cabling Cisco ITP-L Connections

Cabling the Control Signaling Network Connection

Connecting the Sun Server Hardware

Crossovers for Connecting to a Terminal Server

Cabling A-Link and F-Link Connections

A-link and F-link connections lead from the PSTN signaling network to the Cisco ITP-L (formerly known as the Cisco SLT). In these configurations, SS7 signaling information is sent from the PSTN to the ITP-Ls. The ITP-Ls terminate MTP1 and MTP2 layers and use the Cisco Reliable User Datagram protocol (RUDP) to transport MTP3 and other upper layer SS7 protocols (such as ISUP and TCAP) across an IP network to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch hosts.


Note There are no cabling differences for A-link and F-link configurations. These configurations are treated the same during hardware installation. When the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch host is configured to use the links, the configuration procedures are different.


Cabling Cisco ITP-L Connections

Use the information in this section to cable your Cisco ITP-L (IP Transfer Point — LinkExtender, formerly known as the Cisco Signaling Link Terminal or SLT). Table 2-1 provides guidelines for Cisco ITP-L connections.


Warning Read the installation instructions before you connect the system to its power source.


Wiring for the Cisco ITP-L

This section describes the wiring requirements for the Cisco ITP-L.

For 2T WAN Interfaces Cards (WICs), an individual cable from the following list is needed for each interface being used for link termination:

RS-449: CAB-SS-449FC EIA/TIA-449 cable, data communications equipment (DCE) female to smart serial, 10 feet; CAB-SS-449MT EIA/TIA-449 cable, data terminal equipment (DTE) male to smart serial, 10 feet

RS-530: CAB-SS-530AMT RS-530 cable, DTE male to smart serial, 10 feet (no female RS-530 available)

V.35: CAB-SS-V35FC V.35 cable, DCE female to smart serial, 10 feet; CAB-SS-V35MT V.35 cable, DTE male to smart serial, 10 feet

For 1T WICs, an individual cable from the following list is needed for each interface being used for link termination:

EIA/TIA-449: CAB-449MT EIA/TIA-449 cable, DTE, male, 10 feet; CAB-449FC EIA/TIA-449 cable, DCE, female, 10 feet

RS-530: CAB-530MT RS-530 cable, DTE, male, 10 feet (no female RS-530 available)

V.35: CAB-V35MT V.35 cable, DTE, male, 10 feet; CAB-V35FC V.35 cable, DCE, female,
10 feet

For a T1/E1 VWIC, a T1/E1 cable with RJ-48 connector is required.

Cable connector selection—EIA/TIA-449, RS-530, V.35, and gender—depends upon your preference and requirements.

Table 2-1 Cisco ITP-L Connections 

CS-03 Connecting Arrangement Code
Model Number
Facility Interface Code
Service Order Code
Jack Type

CA81A

800-01226, 800-01227
(T1 DSUs)

04DU9-BN, 04DU9-DN, 04DU9-1KN, 04DU9-1SN, 04DU9-1ZN

6.0N

DSUB-15F with DSUB-15 cable

CA81A

800-01228, 800-01229
(T1 DSUs)

04DU9-BN, 04DU9-DN, 04DU9-1KN, 04DU9-1SN, 04DU9-1ZN

6.0N

RJ-48C

CA-A11

800-1238, 800-01239
(4- and 8-port BRI-U)

02IS5

6.0N

RJ-48

CA-A11

800-01834

02IS5

6.0N

RJ-48


Connecting Cisco ITP-Ls


Warning Do not work on the system or connect or disconnect cables during periods of lightning activity.


The SS7 signaling links connect the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch host running Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch software to an SS7 switch. You can connect the SS7 signaling links to a Cisco IPT-L, which connects to the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch host over IP (recommended).

Terminating SS7 signaling links at the Cisco IPT-L enhances the switchover performance of the system and is the preferred method for new or upgraded systems. For more information about moving signaling links, refer to the documentation that shipped with the Cisco IPT-L or to the online documentation at www.cisco.com.

Connecting the Cisco ITP-L to a Network

This section explains how to use the Ethernet or Token Ring ports to connect the router to the LAN.

The cables required to connect the router to a network are not provided with the router. For ordering information, see www.cisco.com. For cable pinouts, see the publication Cisco Modular Access Router Cabling Specifications, available on the Documentation CD-ROM that came with your router or at www.cisco.com.

Depending on the configuration you have, select one of the following options:

Connect the Ethernet 10BASET port to an Ethernet hub, as shown in Figure 2-1.

Connect the Ethernet 10BASET port directly to a switch, as shown in Figure 2-2.

Figure 2-1 Connecting an Ethernet Hub to the Cisco ITP-L

Figure 2-2 Connecting a Switch to the Cisco ITP-L

Connecting the Console Terminal and Modem to the Cisco ITP-L

Your router includes asynchronous serial console and auxiliary ports. These ports provide administrative access to your router either locally (with a console terminal) or remotely (with a modem).

Identifying a Rollover Cable

Use a rollover cable to connect to the asynchronous serial console and auxiliary ports. You can identify a rollover cable by comparing the two modular ends of the cable. If you hold the cable ends side-by-side, with the tab at the back, the wire connected to the pin on the outside of the left plug should be the same color as the wire connected to the pin on the outside of the right plug (see Figure 2-3). If your cable came from Cisco Systems, pin 1 is white on one connector, and pin 8 is white on the other (a rollover cable reverses pins 1 and 8, 2 and 7, 3 and 6, and 4 and 5).

Figure 2-3 Identifying a Rollover Cable

Connecting the Console Terminal to the Cisco ITP-L Console Port

Use the following steps to connect a terminal (an ASCII terminal or a PC running terminal emulation software) to the console port on the router:


Step 1 Connect the terminal using the thin, flat, RJ-45 to RJ-45 rollover cable (looks like a telephone cable) and an RJ-45 to DB-9 or RJ-45 to DB-25 adapter (labeled TERMINAL). (See Figure 2-4.)


Note The RJ-45 to DB-25 adapter (Cisco part number 29-0810-01) can be purchased from Cisco.


Step 2 Configure your terminal or PC terminal emulation software for 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, and 2 stop bits.


For more information on console port pinouts, see the online document Cisco Modular Access Router Cabling Specifications on the Documentation CD-ROM that accompanied your router package or on www.cisco.com.

Figure 2-4 Connecting the Cisco ITP-L to a Console Terminal

Connecting a Modem to the Cisco ITP-L Auxiliary Port


Warning This equipment is intended to be grounded. Ensure that the host is connected to earth ground during normal use.


Use the following steps to connect a modem to the auxiliary port on the router:


Step 1 Connect a modem to the auxiliary port using the thin, flat, RJ-45 to RJ-45 rollover cable (looks like a telephone cable) with the RJ-45 to DB-25 adapter (labeled MODEM) included with the router (see Figure 2-5).

Step 2 Make sure that your modem and the auxiliary port on the router are configured for the same transmission speed (38400 baud is typical) and hardware flow control with Data Carrier Detect (DCD) and Data Terminal Ready (DTR) operations.


For information on console port pinouts, see the Cisco Modular Access Router Cabling Specifications on the Documentation CD-ROM that accompanied your router package or on www.cisco.com.

Figure 2-5 Connecting the Cisco ITP-L to a Modem

Cabling the Control Signaling Network Connection

The control signaling network is the network that links the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch host with the media gateway that it controls. There are many ways to create the control signaling network, and you are free to design your own. This section provides the following:

Control signaling network cabling guidelines

An example of a fault-tolerant control signaling network

The control signaling network design guidelines help you create a control signaling network using any equipment you choose. The fault-tolerant example gives complete information on a specific network design using the Cisco Catalyst 5500.

The cabling instructions for the control signaling network are different for simplex and high-availability configurations and for different host types. Instructions for each configuration and host type are provided in the following sections:

"Cabling Simplex Configurations" section

"Cabling High-Availability Configurations" section

"Continuous-Service Control Signaling Network Cabling" section

"Console Port Cables and Pinouts" section

"Auxiliary Port Signals and Pinouts" section

"Ethernet Port Pinouts" section


Note The following sections describe how to connect the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch host to an Ethernet network. It is your responsibility to design and build the control signaling network to which the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch host connects.


Cabling Simplex Configurations

This section provides guidelines for simplex Ethernet cable configurations for the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.


Note A second interface is required only if you plan to use redundant routers or switches in your control signaling network.


Cabling Simplex Configurations on Sun Netra t 100, t 105, t 1120, t 1125, t 1400, and t 1405

Table 2-2 provides guidelines pertaining to simplex cabling configurations for Sun Netra t 100, t 105, t 1120, t 1125, t 1400, and t 1405. We recommend the use of a redundant routers or LAN switches with the Simplex cable configuration.

Table 2-2 Control Signaling Network Cabling for Simplex Configurations on the Sun Netra t 100, t 105, t 1120, t 1125, t 1400, and t 1405 

From
To
Wire/Cable
Comments

TPE motherboard connector (Ethernet)

Router/LAN switch A

Ethernet patch cable

Provided by customer. Use shielded cable. Both ends of the cable must be grounded.

PCI 1 to 4 slots (Ethernet)

Router/LAN switch B

Ethernet patch cable

Provided by customer. Use shielded cable. Both ends of the cable must be grounded.


Cabling Simplex Configurations on Sun Netra 120, 210, 240, 440, T5220, and X4270, and Sun Fire V120, V440, V40z, and X4640

Table 2-3 provides guidelines pertaining to simplex cabling configurations for Sun Netra 120, 210, 240, 440, T5220, and X4270, and Sun Fire V120, V440, V40z, and X4640. We recommend the use of redundant routers or LAN switches with the Simplex cable configuration.

Table 2-3 Control Signaling Network Cabling for Simplex Configurations on Sun Netra 120, 210, 240, 440, T5220, and X4270, and Sun Fire V120, V440, V40z, and X4640

From
To
Wire/Cable
Comments

Gigabit Ethernet port 0

Router/LAN switch A

Ethernet patch cable

Provided by customer. Use shielded cable. Both ends of the cable must be grounded.

Gigabit Ethernet port 1

Router/LAN switch B

Ethernet patch cable

Provided by customer. Use shielded cable. Both ends of the cable must be grounded.


Cabling High-Availability Configurations

This section provides guidelines for high-availability Ethernet cable configurations for the Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch. High-availability cable configurations help provide redundancy in the event of a device failure on the network. The cable configurations described in this section are for use with an active and standby Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch.


Note A second interface is required only if you plan to use redundant routers or switches in your control signaling network.


Cabling High-Availability Configurations on Sun Netra t 1120, t 1125, t1400, and 1405

Table 2-4 provides guidelines for cabling Ethernet networks to Sun Netra t 1120, t 1125, t1400, and 1405 in a high-availability configuration.

Table 2-4 Control Signaling Network Cabling for High-Availability Configurations on the Sun Netra t 1120, t 1125, t1400, and 1405 

From
To
Wire/Cable
Comments
Sun Netra Server

TPE motherboard connector

Router/LAN switch A

Ethernet patch cable

Provided by customer. Use shielded cable. Both ends of the cable must be grounded.

PCI 2 to PCI 4 slots (Ethernet)

Router/LAN switch B

Ethernet patch cable

Provided by customer. Use shielded cable. Both ends of the cable must be grounded.


Cabling High-Availability Configurations on Sun Netra 120, 210, 240, 440, T5220, and X4270, and Sun Fire V120, V440, V40z, and X4640

Table 2-5 provides guidelines pertaining to high-availability cabling configurations for Sun Netra 120, 210, 240, 440, T5220, and X4270, and Sun Fire V120, V440, V40z, and X4640.

Table 2-5 Control Signaling Network Cabling for Simplex Configurations on Sun Netra 120, 210, 240, 440, T5220, and X4270, and Sun Fire V120, V440, V40z, and X4640

From
To
Wire/Cable
Comments

Gigabit Ethernet port 0

Router/LAN switch A

Ethernet patch cable

Provided by customer. Use shielded cable. Both ends of the cable must be grounded.

Gigabit Ethernet port 1

Router/LAN switch B

Ethernet patch cable

Provided by customer. Use shielded cable. Both ends of the cable must be grounded.


Continuous-Service Control Signaling Network Cabling

This section provides cabling and pinout information for the Cisco universal access server.


Note This section specifies pinouts only for the pins used. Pins not listed in the tables in this section are not connected.


Console and Auxiliary Port Cables and Pinouts for Access Servers

The access server arrives with a console and auxiliary cable kit, which contains the cable and adapters you need to connect a console (an ASCII terminal or PC running terminal emulation software) or modem to your access server. The console and auxiliary cable kit includes the following:

RJ-45 to RJ-45 rollover cable. (See the section, "Console Port Cables and Pinouts," for more information.)

RJ-45 to DB-9 female DTE adapter (labeled TERMINAL).

RJ-45 to DB-25 female DTE adapter (labeled TERMINAL).

RJ-45 to DB-25 male DCE adapter (labeled MODEM).

For console connections, proceed to the "Console Port Cables and Pinouts" section; for modem connections, proceed to the "Auxiliary Port Signals and Pinouts" section.

Console Port Cables and Pinouts

Use the RJ-45 to RJ-45 rollover cable and RJ-45 to DB-9 female DTE adapter (labeled TERMINAL) to connect the console port to a PC running terminal emulation software. Figure 2-6 shows how to connect the console port to a PC. Table 2-6 lists the pinouts for the asynchronous serial console port, the RJ-45 to RJ-45 rollover cable, and the RJ-45 to DB-9 female DTE adapter (labeled TERMINAL).

Figure 2-6 Connecting the Console Port to a PC

Table 2-6 Console Port Signaling and Cabling Using a DB-9 Adapter

Console Port (DTE) Signal
RJ-45 to RJ-45
Rollover Cable (RJ-45 Pin)
RJ-45 to DB-9 Terminal Adapter (DB-9 Pin)
Console Device Signal

RTS

11

8

8

CTS

DTR

2

7

6

DSR

TxD

3

6

2

RxD

GND

4

5

5

GND

GND

5

4

5

GND

RxD

6

3

3

TxD

DSR

7

2

4

DTR

CTS

81

1

7

RTS

1 Pin 1 is connected internally to pin 8.


Use the RJ-45 to RJ-45 rollover cable and RJ-45 to DB-25 female DTE adapter (labeled TERMINAL) to connect the console port to a terminal. Figure 2-7 shows how to connect the console port to a terminal. Table 2-7 lists the pinouts for the asynchronous serial console port, the RJ-45 to RJ-45 rollover cable, and the RJ-45 to DB-25 female DTE adapter (labeled TERMINAL).

Figure 2-7 Connecting the Console Port to a Terminal

Table 2-7 Console Port Signaling and Cabling Using a DB-25 Adapter 

Console Port (DTE) 1 Signal
RJ-45 to RJ-45 Rollover Cable (RJ-45 Pin)
RJ-45 to DB-25 Terminal Adapter (DB-25 Pin)
Console Device Signal

RTS

12

8

5

CTS

DTR

2

7

6

DSR

TxD

3

6

3

RxD

GND

4

5

7

GND

GND

5

4

7

GND

RxD

6

3

2

TxD

DSR

7

2

20

DTR

CTS

81

1

4

RTS

1 You can use the same cabling to connect a console to the auxiliary port.

2 Pin 1 is connected internally to pin 8.


Auxiliary Port Signals and Pinouts

Use the RJ-45 to RJ-45 rollover cable and RJ-45 to DB-25 male DCE adapter (labeled MODEM) to connect the auxiliary port to a modem. Figure 2-8 shows how to connect the auxiliary port to a modem. Table 2-8 lists the pinouts for the asynchronous serial auxiliary port, the RJ-45 to RJ-45 rollover cable, and the RJ-45 to DB-25 male DCE adapter (labeled MODEM).

Figure 2-8 Connecting the Auxiliary Port to a Modem

Table 2-8 Auxiliary Port Signaling and Cabling Using a DB-25 Adapter 

AUX Port (DTE) Signal
RJ-45 to RJ-45 Rollover Cable (RJ-45 Pin)
RJ-45 to DB-25 Modem Adapter (DB-25 Pin)
Modem
Signal

RTS

1

8

4

RTS

DTR

2

7

20

DTR

TxD

3

6

3

TxD

GND

4

5

7

GND

GND

5

4

7

GND

RxD

6

3

2

RxD

DSR

7

2

8

DCD

CTS

8

1

5

CTS


Ethernet Port Pinouts

Table 2-9 and Table 2-10 list the pinouts for the Ethernet 10BaseT and 100BaseT ports, respectively.

Table 2-9 10BaseT Port Pinout

RJ-45 Pin
Description

1

TX+

2

TX-

3

RX+

4

5

6

RX-

7

8


Table 2-10 100BaseT Port Pinouts (continued)

RJ-45 Pin
Description

1

RXD+

2

RXD-

3

TXD+

4

5

6

TXD-

7

8


Figure 2-9 shows the RJ-48 to RJ-48 interface cable connection; Table 2-11, Table 2-12, and Table 2-13 show the cable pinouts.

Figure 2-9 RJ-48 to RJ-48 Interface Cable

Table 2-11 RJ-48 to RJ-48 TE Cable Pinouts 

RJ-48 Pin
Signal
Description
Direction
RJ-48 TE Pin

Shield

Ground

Shell/Braid

 

Shield

J1-1

RX Tip

Twisted pair number 1

      <—

J2-1

J1-2

RX Ring

Twisted pair number 1

      <—

J2-2

J1-3

RX Shield

Twisted pair number 3

 

J2-3

J1-4

TX Tip

Twisted pair number 2

      —>

J2-4

J1-5

TX Ring

Twisted pair number 2

      —>

J2-5

J1-6

TX Shield

Twisted pair number 4

 

J2-6


Table 2-12 RJ-48 to RJ-48 NT Cable Pinouts 

RJ-48 Pin
Signal
Description
Direction
Signal
RJ-48 NT Pin

Shield

Ground

Shell/Braid

 

Ground

Shield

J1-1

RX Tip

Twisted pair number 1

      <—

TX Tip

J2-4

J1-2

RX Ring

Twisted pair number 1

      <—

TX Ring

J2-5

J1-3

RX Shield

Twisted pair number 3

 

TX Shield

J2-6

J1-4

TX Tip

Twisted pair number 2

      —>

RX Tip

J2-1

J1-5

TX Ring

Twisted pair number 2

      —>

RX Ring

J2-2

J1-6

TX Shield

Twisted pair number 4

 

RX Shield

J2-3



Note Because this cable has polarity, the pinouts differ according to the end of the cable you use.


Table 2-13 RJ-48 to RJ-48 T1 Cable Pinouts 

RJ-48 Pin
Signal
Description
Direction
RJ-48 T1 Pin

Shield

Ground

Shell/Braid

 

Shield

J1-1

RX Tip

Twisted pair number 1

      <—

J2-1

J1-2

RX Ring

Twisted pair number 1

      <—

J2-2

J1-3

RX Shield

 

 

 

J1-4

TX Tip

Twisted pair number 2

      —>

J2-4

J1-5

TX Ring

Twisted pair number 2

      —>

J2-5

J1-6

TX Shield

 

 

 


Figure 2-10 shows the RJ-48 to bare wire interface; Table 2-14 shows the cable pinouts.

Figure 2-10 RJ-48 to Bare Wire Interface Cable

Table 2-14 RJ-45 to Bare Wire Interface Cable Pinouts

RJ-45 Pin
Signal
Description
Direction
Bare

Shield

Ground

Braid

 

 

J1-1

RX Tip

Twisted pair number 1

      <—

Wire-1

J1-2

RX Ring

Twisted pair number 1

      <—

Wire-2

J1-3

RX Shield

 

 

 

J1-4

TX Tip

Twisted pair number 2

      —>

Wire-3

J1-5

TX Ring

Twisted pair number 2

      —>

Wire-4

J1-6

TX Shield

 

 

 


For further information about the Cisco Catalyst 5500, see the documentation that shipped with the product. For a list of related documentation, see the Related Documentation section in the Preface.

Connecting the Sun Server Hardware

This section tells you how to connect the power cables and the Ethernet and serial cables to Sun server hardware. It also tells you how to set up the serial connections you need.

The section discusses the following subjects:

Connecting Cables to Sun Systems

Setting Up Serial Connections

Using a DB-25 Adapter for Your Serial Link

Using a DB-9 Adapter for Your Serial Link

Settings for the Serial Connections


Note Cisco does not provide empty racks.


Connecting Cables to Sun Systems

This section describes how to connect the hardware components to the network.


Step 1 Connect the power cord or cords.

Step 2 Connect the system to at least one Ethernet switch. You can connect to a maximum of two.

Step 3 Connect at least one serial device. For more information, see the "Setting Up Serial Connections" section.

Step 4 Plug the adapter into the DB-25 serial connector on the terminal or Sun workstation.


Note The Sun Fire V120 and Netra 120 external SCSI bus is compatible with single-ended and low voltage differential SCSI devices.


Step 5 Use the following diagrams to determine the available ports for your Sun server:

Connecting the Sun Fire V120 System

Connecting the Sun Netra 120 System

Connecting the Sun Netra 240 System

Connecting the Sun Netra 440 System

Connecting the Sun Netra T5220 System

Connecting the Sun Fire X4640 System

Connecting the Sun Netra X4270 System


Figure 2-11 Connecting the Sun Fire V120 System

Figure 2-12 Connecting the Sun Netra 120 System


Note The Netra 120 does not have a serial A/LOM port. Use the serial management port for this platform.


Figure 2-13 Connecting the Sun Netra 240 System


Note The Netra 240 does not have a serial A/LOM port. Use the serial management port for this platform.


Figure 2-14 Connecting the Sun Netra 440 System


Note Sun Netra 440 does not have a serial A/LOM port. Use the serial management port for this platform.


Figure 2-15 Connecting the Sun Netra T5220 System


Note Sun Netra T5220 does not have a serial A/LOM port. Use the serial management port for this platform.


Figure 2-16 Connecting the Sun Fire X4640 System


Note The Sun Fire X4640 system does not have a serial A/LOM port. Use the serial management port for this platform.


Figure 2-17 Connecting the Sun Netra X4270 System


Note The Sun Netra X4270 system does not have a serial A/LOM port. Use the serial management port for this platform.


The Sun Netra X4270 server has four Gigabit Ethernet interfaces (shown as GbE ports in Figure 2-17).

Net 0 (nge0)

Net 1 (nge1)

Net 2 (e1000g0)

Net 3 (e1000g1)

For Cisco PGW 2200 Softswitch deployments that use the Sun Netra X4270 platform, the nge interfaces can experience a hard hang if a network duplex mismatch occurs during operation. For stability purposes, we recommend that you use the Net 2 (e1000g0) and Net 3 (e1000g1) interfaces, and not the nge0 and nge1 interfaces.

Setting Up Serial Connections

To perform the initial configuration when you install your Sun system, and for on-going monitoring and management of the system, you need to use at least one of the serial ports on the system rear panel. You can connect serial A/LOM to any of the following devices:

A terminal—For this connection, you can use the standard RJ-45 patch cable supplied with the Sun Netra t 100 and Sun Netra t 105.

A Sun workstation—For this connection, you can use the standard RJ-45 patch cable supplied with the Sun Netra t 100 and Sun Netra t 105, but you need to insert one end into the DB-25 adapter also supplied with the Sun Netra t1 system.

A terminal server (or patch panel connected to a terminal server)—The pins in the Sun Netra t1 system serial ports correspond to the pins in the RJ-45 ports on the asynchronous serial interface breakout cable supplied by Cisco for use with the Cisco 26xx terminal server. For terminals from other manufacturers, you might need to make your own cross-over (null-modem) cable (see the "Crossovers for Connecting to a Terminal Server" section below.

Crossovers for Connecting to a Terminal Server

The serial ports on the Sun Netra t1 server are DTE ports. If you are connecting them to other DTE ports, the cabling between the devices must perform a crossover.


Note Do not use the Serial A/LOM port for modem connections. The DTE signal on this port changes temporarily to DCD when the Sun Netra t1 LOM device reports an event on the serial port. This can result in the loss of a modem connection. If you are connecting the Serial A/LOM port to a terminal server, disable modem control on the terminal server port.


The pins in the Sun Netra t1 serial ports correspond with the pins in the RJ-45 ports on the asynchronous serial interface breakout cable supplied by Cisco for use with the Cisco 26xx terminal server. This Cisco cable performs the pin crossovers listed in Table 2-15. This means that, if you are using a
Cisco 26xx terminal server (and you are connecting the Sun Netra t 100 or Sun Netra t 105 system to it using the asynchronous serial interface breakout cable), you do not need to do any pin crossovers yourself. You can use the straight-through RJ-45 patch cable supplied with the Sun Netra t 100 or
Sun Netra t 105 system to connect directly to the breakout cable or to connect directly to a patch panel that is then connected to the breakout cable (see Figure 2-18).


Note For other terminal servers, check the manufacturer documentation to see if the pin configuration used in the serial ports matches the pin configuration in the Sun Netra t1 serial ports. If it does not, you must make a cable that takes each pin on one of the
Sun Netra t1 serial ports to the corresponding pin in the serial port of the terminal server connection.


Figure 2-18 Breakout Cable Connection


Note When viewed from the rear of the Sun Netra t1 system, pin 1 of the RJ-45 serial port is on the left and pin 8 is on the right, as shown in Figure 2-19.


Figure 2-19

Pins 1 to 8 on the Sun Netra t1 Ethernet Ports

Table 2-15 Pin Crossovers Performed Inside Cisco's Cabling for the Cisco 26xx

Sun Serial Port (RJ-45 Connector) Pin
Cisco 26xx Serial Port Pin

Pin 1 (RTS)

Pin 1 (CTS)

Pin 2 (DTR)

Pin 2 (DSR)

Pin 3 (TXD)

Pin 3 (RXD)

Pin 4 (Signal Ground)

Pin 4 (Signal Ground)

Pin 5 (Signal Ground)

Pin 5 (Signal Ground)

Pin 6 (RXD)

Pin 6 (TXD)

Pin 7 (DSR)

Pin 7 (DTR)

Pin 8 (CTS)

Pin 8 (RTS)


Using a DB-25 Adapter for Your Serial Link

The pinouts are identical for both of the RJ-45 serial ports on Sun systems. To connect the Sun Netra t1 to a UNIX TIP session or a VT100 terminal, you need to use either the DB-25 (25-Pin DSUB male to 8-POS RJ-45 female) adapter that is supplied by Sun (part number 530-2889) with your system, or an alternative adapter that performs the same pin crossovers. The Sun-supplied DB-25 adapter enables you to connect to any Sun system. The crossovers that it performs are listed in Table 2-16.

Table 2-16 Pin Crossovers Performed Inside the Sun DB-25 (25-pin) Adapter 

Serial Port (RJ-45 Connector) Pin
25-Pin Connector

Pin 1 (RTS)

Pin 5 (CTS)

Pin 2 (DTR)

Pin 6 (DSR)

Pin 3 (TXD)

Pin 3 (RXD)

Pin 4 (Signal Ground)

Pin 7 (Signal Ground)

Pin 5 (Signal Ground)

Pin 7 (Signal Ground)

Pin 6 (RXD)

Pin 2 (TXD)

Pin 7 (DSR)

Pin 20 (DTR)

Pin 8 (CTS)

Pin 4 (RTS)


Using a DB-9 Adapter for Your Serial Link

To connect to a terminal that has a 9-pin serial connector, connect one of the Sun Netra t1 serial ports to a DB-9 (9-pin) adapter that performs the pin crossovers listed in Table 2-17.


Note When viewed from the rear of the Sun Netra t1 system, pin 1 of the RJ-45 serial port is on the left and pin 8 is on the right, as shown in Figure 2-19.


Table 2-17 Pin Crossovers that Your DB-9 (9-pin) Adapter Must Perform

Serial Port (RJ-45 Connector) Pin
9-Pin Connector

Pin 1 (RTS)

Pin 8 (CTS)

Pin 2 (DTR)

Pin 6 (DSR)

Pin 3 (TXD)

Pin 2 (RXD)

Pin 4 (Signal Ground)

Pin 5 (Signal Ground)

Pin 5 (Signal Ground)

Pin 5 (Signal Ground)

Pin 6 (RXD)

Pin 3 (TXD)

Pin 7 (DSR)

Pin 4 (DTR)

Pin 8 (CTS)

Pin 7 (RTS)


Settings for the Serial Connections

The settings you must use for a serial connection are listed in Table 2-18. Communication on the Serial A/LOM port is subject to interruption by the Lights Out Management device.

Table 2-18 Settings for Connecting to the Serial A/LOM

Parameter
Setting

Connector

Serial A/LOM

Rate

9600 baud

Parity

No

Stop bits

1

Data bits

8


.