Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS System Management Configuration Guide, Release 4.x
Overview
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Overview

Table Of Contents

Overview

Cisco NX-OS Device Configuration Methods

Configuring with CLI or XML Management Interface

Configuring with DCNM or a Custom GUI

Cisco Fabric Services

Network Time Protocol

Cisco Discovery Protocol

System Messages

Call Home

Rollback

Session Manager

Scheduler

SNMP

RMON

Online Diagnostics

Embedded Event Manager

SPAN

On-Board Failure Logging

NetFlow

Troubleshooting Features


Overview


This chapter describes the system management features that you can use to monitor and manage Cisco NX-OS devices.

This chapter includes the following sections:

Cisco NX-OS Device Configuration Methods

Cisco Fabric Services

Network Time Protocol

Cisco Discovery Protocol

System Messages

Call Home

Rollback

Session Manager

Scheduler

SNMP

RMON

Online Diagnostics

Embedded Event Manager

On-Board Failure Logging

SPAN

NetFlow

Troubleshooting Features

Cisco NX-OS Device Configuration Methods

You can configure devices using direct network configuration methods or web services hosted on a Data Center Network Management (DCNM) server.

Figure 1-1 shows the device configuration methods available to a network user.

Figure 1-1 Cisco NX-OS Device Configuration Methods

Table 1-1 lists the configuration method and the document where you can find more information.

Table 1-1 Configuration Methods Book Links

Configuration Method
Document

CLI from SSH1 , Telnet session or console port

Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Fundamentals Configuration Guide, Release 4.x

XML management interface

Cisco NX-OS XML Management Interface User Guide, Release 4.x

DCNM client

Cisco DCNM Fundamentals Configuration Guide, Release 4.2

User-defined GUI

Cisco DCNM Web Services API Guide, Release 4.2

1 Secure shell (SSH).


This section includes the following topics:

Configuring with CLI or XML Management Interface

Configuring with DCNM or a Custom GUI

Configuring with CLI or XML Management Interface

You can configure Cisco NX-OS devices using the command-line interface (CLI) or the XML management interface over Secure Shell (SSH) as follows:

CLI from an SSH session, a Telnet Session, or the Console Port—You can configure devices using the CLI from an SSH session, a Telnet session. or the console port. SSH provides a secure connection to the device. For more information, see the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Fundamentals Configuration Guide, Release 4.x.

XML Management Interface over SSH—You can configure devices using the XML management interface, which is a programmatic method based on the NETCONF protocol that complements the CLI functionality. For more information, see the Cisco NX-OS XML Management Interface User Guide.

Configuring with DCNM or a Custom GUI

You can configure Cisco NX-OS devices using the DCNM client or from your own GUI as follows:

DCNM Client—You can configure devices using the DCNM client, which runs on your local PC and uses web services on the DCNM server. The DCNM server configures the device over the XML management interface. For more information about the DCNM client, see the Cisco DCNM Fundamentals Configuration Guide.

Custom GUI—You can create your own GUI to configure devices using the DCNM web services application program interface (API) on the DCNM server. You use the SOAP protocol to exchange XML-based configuration messages with the DCNM server. The DCNM server configures the device over the XML management interface. For more information about creating custom GUIs, see the Cisco DCNM Web Services API Guide, Release 4.2.

Cisco Fabric Services

Cisco Fabric Services (CFS) is a Cisco proprietary feature that distributes data, including configuration changes, to all Cisco NX-OS devices in a network. For more information about CFS, see Chapter 2, "Configuring CFS."

Network Time Protocol

The Network Time Protocol (NTP) synchronizes the time of day among a set of distributed time servers and clients so that you can correlate time-specific information, such as system logs, received from the devices in your network. For more information about NTP, see Chapter 3, "Configuring NTP."

Cisco Discovery Protocol

You can use the Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) to discover and view information about all Cisco equipment that is directly attached to your device. CDP runs on all Cisco-manufactured equipment including routers, bridges, access and communication servers, and switches. CDP is media and protocol independent, and gathers the protocol addresses of neighboring devices, discovering the platform of those devices. CDP runs over the data link layer only. Two systems that support different Layer 3 protocols can learn about each other. For more information about CDP, see Chapter 4, "Configuring CDP."

System Messages

You can use system message logging to control the destination and to filter the severity level of messages that system processes generate. You can configure logging to a terminal session, a log file, and syslog servers on remote systems.

System message logging is based on RFC 3164. For more information about the system message format and the messages that the device generates, see the Cisco NX-OS System Messages Reference.

For information about configuring system messages, see Chapter 5, "Configuring System Message Logging."

Call Home

Call Home provides an e-mail-based notification of critical system policies. Cisco NX-OS provides a range of message formats for optimal compatibility with pager services, standard e-mail, or XML-based automated parsing applications. You can use this feature to page a network support engineer, e-mail a Network Operations Center, or use Cisco Smart Call Home services to automatically generate a case with the Technical Assistance Center.

For information about configuring Call Home, see Chapter 6, "Configuring Smart Call Home."

Rollback

The rollback feature allows you to take a snapshot, or checkpoint, of the device configuration and then reapply that configuration at any point without having to reload. Rollback allows any authorized administrator to apply this checkpoint configuration without requiring expert knowledge of the features configured in the checkpoint.

Session Manager allows you to create a configuration session and apply all commands within that session atomically.

For more information, see the Chapter 7, "Configuring Rollback."

Session Manager

Session Manager allows you to create a configuration and apply it in batch mode after the configuration is reviewed and verified for accuracy and completeness.

For more information, see the Chapter 8, "Configuring Session Manager."

Scheduler

The scheduler allows you to create and manage jobs such as routinely backing up data or making QoS policy changes. The scheduler can start a job according to your needs—only once at a specified time or at periodic intervals.

For more information, see Chapter 9, "Configuring the Scheduler."

SNMP

The Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is an application-layer protocol that provides a message format for communication between SNMP managers and agents. SNMP provides a standardized framework and a common language used for the monitoring and management of devices in a network.

For more information, see Chapter 10, "Configuring SNMP."

RMON

RMON is an Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standard monitoring specification that allows various network agents and console systems to exchange network monitoring data. Cisco NX-OS supports RMON alarms, events, and logs to monitor Cisco NX-OS devices.

For more information, see Chapter 11, "Configuring RMON."

Online Diagnostics

Cisco Generic Online Diagnostics (GOLD) define a common framework for diagnostic operations across Cisco platforms. The online diagnostic framework specifies the platform-independent fault-detection architecture for centralized and distributed systems, including the common diagnostics CLI and the platform-independent fault-detection procedures for boot-up and run-time diagnostics.

The platform-specific diagnostics provide hardware-specific fault-detection tests and allow you to take appropriate corrective action in response to diagnostic test results.

For information about configuring online diagnostics, see Chapter 12, "Configuring Online Diagnostics."

Embedded Event Manager

The Embedded Event Manager (EEM) allows you to detect and handle critical events in the system. EEM provides event detection and recovery, including monitoring of events either as they occur or as thresholds are crossed.

For information about configuring EEM, see Chapter 13, "Configuring the Embedded Event Manager."

SPAN

You can configure an Ethernet switched port analyzer (SPAN) to monitor traffic in and out of your device. The SPAN features allow you to duplicate packets from source ports to destination ports.

For information about configuring SPAN, see Chapter 14, "Configuring SPAN."

On-Board Failure Logging

You can configure a device to log failure data to persistent storage, which you can retrieve and display for analysis at a later time. This on-board failure logging (OBFL) feature stores failure and environmental information in nonvolatile memory on the module. This information is useful for analysis of failed modules. For information about configuring OBFL, see Chapter 15, "Configuring Onboard Failure Logging."

NetFlow

NetFlow allows you to identify packet flows for both ingress and egress IP packets and provide statistics based on these packet flows. NetFlow does not require any change to either the packets themselves or to any networking device.

For information about configuring NetFlow, see Chapter 16, "Configuring NetFlow."

Troubleshooting Features

Cisco NX-OS provides troubleshooting tools such as ping, traceroute, Ethanalyzer, and the Blue Beacon feature. See the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Troubleshooting Guide for details on these features.

When a service fails, the system generates information that can be used to determine the cause of the failure. The following sources of information are available:

Every service restart generates a syslog message of level LOG_ERR.

If the Smart Call Home service is enabled, every service restart generates a Smart Call Home event.

If SNMP traps are enabled, the SNMP agent sends a trap when a service is restarted.

When a service failure occurs on a local module, you can view a log of the event by entering the show processes log command in that module. The process logs are persistent across supervisor switchovers and resets.

When a service fails, a system core image file is generated. You can view recent core images by entering the show cores command on the active supervisor. Core files are not persistent across supervisor switchovers and resets, but you can configure the system to export core files to an external server using a file transfer utility such as Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) by entering the system cores command.

CISCO-SYSTEM-MIB contains a table for cores (cseSwCoresTable).

For information on collecting and using the generated information relating to service failures, see the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Troubleshooting Guide.