Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS System Management Configuration Guide, Release 4.x
Configuring the Embedded Event Manager
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Configuring the Embedded Event Manager

Table Of Contents

Configuring the Embedded Event Manager

Information About EEM

EEM Overview

Policies

Event Statements

Action Statements

VSH Script Policies

Environment Variables

High Availability

Virtualization Support

Licensing Requirements for EEM

Prerequisites for EEM

Guidelines and Limitations

Configuring EEM

Defining an Environment Variable

Defining a User Policy Using the CLI

Configuring Event Statements

Configuring Action Statements

Defining a Policy using a VSH Script

Registering and Activating a VSH Script Policy

Overriding a Policy

Configuring Memory Thresholds

Verifying EEM Configuration

EEM Example Configuration

Default Settings

Additional References

Related Documents

Standards

Feature History for EEM


Configuring the Embedded Event Manager


This chapter describes how to configure the Embedded Event Manager (EEM) to detect and handle critical events on Cisco NX-OS devices.

This chapter includes the following sections:

Information About EEM

Licensing Requirements for EEM

Prerequisites for EEM

Guidelines and Limitations

Configuring EEM

Verifying EEM Configuration

EEM Example Configuration

Default Settings

Additional References

Feature History for EEM

Information About EEM

EEM monitors events that occur on your device and takes action to recover or troubleshoot these events, based on your configuration.

This section includes the following topics:

EEM Overview

Policies

Event Statements

Action Statements

VSH Script Policies

Environment Variables

High Availability

Virtualization Support

EEM Overview

EEM consists of three major components:

Event statements—Events to monitor from another Cisco NX-OS component that may require some action, workaround, or notification.

Action statements —An action that EEM can take, such as sending an e-mail, or disabling an interface, to recover from an event.

Policies—An event paired with one or more actions to troubleshoot or recover from the event.

Policies

An EEM policy consists of an event statement and one or more action statements. The event statement defines the event to look for as well as the filtering characteristics for the event. The action statement defines the action EEM takes when the event occurs.

Figure 13-1 shows the two basic statements in an EEM policy.

Figure 13-1 EEM Policy Statements

You can configure EEM policies using the CLI or using a VSH script.

EEM gives you a device-wide view of policy management. You configure EEM policies on the supervisor, and EEM pushes the policy to the correct module based on the event type. EEM takes any actions for a triggered event either locally on the module or on the supervisor (the default option).

EEM maintains event logs on the supervisor.

Cisco NX-OS has a number of preconfigured system policies. These system policies define many common events and actions for the device. System policy names begin with two underscore characters (__).

You can create user policies to suit your network. If you create a user policy, any actions in your policy occur after EEM triggers any system policy actions related to the same event as your policy. To configure a user policy, see the "Defining a User Policy Using the CLI" section.

You can also override some system policies. The overrides that you configure take the place of the system policy. You can override the event or the actions.

Use the show event manager system-policy command to view the preconfigured system policies and determine which policies that you can override.

To configure an overriding policy, see the "Overriding a Policy" section.


Note You should use the show running-config eem command to check the configuration of each policy. An override policy that consists of an event statement and no action statement triggers no action and no notification of failures.



Note Your override policy should always include an event statement. An override policy without an event statement overrides all possible events in the system policy.


Event Statements

An event is any device activity for which some action, such as a workaround or a notification, should be taken. In many cases, these events are related to faults in the device such as when an interface or a fan malfunctions.

EEM defines event filters so only critical events or multiple occurrences of an event within a specified time period trigger an associated action.

Figure 13-2 shows events that are handled by EEM.

Figure 13-2 EEM Overview

Event statements specify the event that triggers a policy to run. You can configure only one event statement per policy.

EEM schedules and runs policies on the basis of event statements. EEM examines the event and action commands and runs them as defined.


Note If you want to allow the triggered event to process any default actions, you must configure the EEM policy to allow the event default action statement.


Action Statements

Action statements describe the action triggered by a policy. Each policy can have multiple action statements. If no action is associated with a policy, EEM still observes events but takes no actions.

EEM supports the following actions in action statements:

Execute any CLI commands.

Update a counter.

Log an exception.

Force the shutdown of any module.

Reload the device.

Shut down specified modules because the power is over budget.

Generate a syslog message.

Generate a Call Home event.

Generate an SNMP notification.

Use the default action for the system policy.


Note If you want to allow the triggered event to process any default actions, you must configure the EEM policy to allow the default action. For example, if you match a CLI command in a match statement, you must add the event-default action statement to the EEM policy or EEM will not allow the CLI command to execute.



Note Verify that your action statements within your user policy or overriding policy do not negate each other or adversely affect the associated system policy.


VSH Script Policies

You can also write policies in a VHS script, using a text editor. These policies have an event statement and action statement(s) just as other policies, and these policies can either augment or override system policies. After you write your script policy, copy it to the device and activate it. To configure a policy in a script, see the "Defining a Policy using a VSH Script" section.

Environment Variables

You can define environment variables for EEM that are available for all policies. Environment variables are useful for configuring common values that you can use in multiple policies. For example, you can create an environment variable for the IP address of an external e-mail server.

You can use an environment variable in action statements by using the parameter substitution format.

Example 13-1 shows a sample action statement to force a module 1 shutdown, with a reset reason of "EEM action."

Example 13-1 Action Statement

switch (config-eem-policy)# action 1.0 forceshut module 1 reset-reson "EEM action."

If you define an environment variable for the shutdown reason, called default-reason, you can replace that reset reason with the environment variable, as shown in Example 13-2.

Example 13-2 Action Statement with Environment Variable

switch (config-eem-policy)# action 1.0 foreshut module 1 reset-reason $default-reason

You can reuse this environment variable in any policy. For more information on environment variables, see the "Defining an Environment Variable" section.

High Availability

Cisco NX-OS supports stateless restarts for EEM. After a reboot or supervisor switchover, Cisco NX-OS applies the running configuration.

Virtualization Support

You configure EEM in the virtual device context (VDC) that you are logged into. By default, Cisco NX-OS places you in the default VDC. You must be in this VDC to configure policies for module-based events.

Not all actions or events are visible in all VDCs. You must have network-admin or vdc-admin privileges to configure policies.

See the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Virtual Device Context Configuration Guide, Release 4.x, for more information on VDCs.

Licensing Requirements for EEM

Product
License Requirement

NX-OS

EEM requires no license. Any feature not included in a license package is bundled with the Cisco NX-OS system images and is provided at no extra charge to you. For a complete explanation of the NX-OS licensing scheme. For more information, see the Cisco NX-OS Licensing Guide.


Prerequisites for EEM

EEM has the following prerequisites:

You must have network-admin or vdc-admin user privileges to configure EEM.

Guidelines and Limitations

EEM has the following configuration guidelines and limitations:

The maximum number of configurable EEM policies is 500.

Action statements within your user policy or overriding policy should not negate each other or adversely affect the associated system policy.

If you want to allow a triggered event to process any default actions, you must configure the EEM policy to allow the default action. For example, if you match a CLI command in a match statement, you must add the event-default action statement to the EEM policy or EEM will not allow the CLI command to execute.

An override policy that consists of an event statement and no action statement triggers no action and no notification of failures.

An override policy without an event statement overrides all possible events in the system policy.

Configuring EEM

You can create policies that contain actions to take based on system policies. To display information about the system policies, use the show event manager system-policy command. For more information about system policies, see the "Embedded Event Manager System Events and Configuration Examples" appendix.

This section includes the following topics:

Defining an Environment Variable

Defining a User Policy Using the CLI

Defining a Policy using a VSH Script

Registering and Activating a VSH Script Policy

Overriding a Policy

Configuring Memory Thresholds

Defining an Environment Variable

You can define a variable to serve as a parameter in an EEM policy.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Make sure that you are in the correct VDC. To change the VDC, use the switchto vdc command.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. config t

2. event manager environment variable-name variable-value

3. show event manager environment

4. copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

config t


Example:

switch# config t

Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.

switch(config)#

Places you in global configuration mode.

Step 2 

event manager environment variable-name variable-value


Example:

switch(config)# event manager environment emailto "admin@anyplace.com"

Creates an environment variable for EEM. The variable-name can be any case-sensitive alphanumeric string up to 29 characters. The variable-value can be any quoted alphanumeric string up to 39 characters,

Step 3 

show event manager environment


Example:

switch(config-applet)# show event manager environment

(Optional) Displays information about the configured environment variables.

Step 4 

copy running-config startup-config


Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves this configuration change.

Defining a User Policy Using the CLI

You can define a user policy using the CLI to the device.

This section includes the following topics:

Configuring Event Statements

Configuring Action Statements

BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Make sure that you are in the correct VDC. To change the VDC, use the switchto vdc command.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. config t

2. event manager applet applet-name

3. description policy-description

4. event event-statement

5. action number[.number2] action-statement
(Repeat Step 5 for multiple action statements.)

6. show event manager policy-state name [module module-id]

7. copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

config t


Example:

switch# config t

Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.

switch(config)#

Places you in global configuration mode.

Step 2 

event manager applet applet-name


Example:

switch(config)# event manager applet monitorShutdown

switch(config-applet)#

Registers the applet with EEM and enters applet configuration mode. The applet-name can be any case-sensitive alphanumeric string up to 29 characters.

Step 3 

description policy-description


Example:

switch(config-applet)# description "Monitors interface shutdown."

(Optional) Configures a descriptive string for the policy. The string can be any alphanumeric string up to 80 characters. Enclose the string in quotation marks.

Step 4 

event event-statement


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event cli match "shutdown"

Configures the event statement for the policy. See the "Configuring Event Statements" section.

Step 5 

action number[.number2] action-statement


Example:

switch(config-applet)# action 1.0 cli show interface e 3/1

Configures an action statement for the policy. See the "Configuring Action Statements" section.

Repeat Step 5 for multiple action statements.

Step 6 

show event manager policy-state name [module module-id]


Example:

switch(config-applet)# show event manager policy-state monitorShutdown

(Optional) Displays information about the status of the configured policy.

Step 7 

copy running-config startup-config


Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves this configuration change.

Configuring Event Statements

Use one the following commands in EEM configuration mode to configure an event statement:

Command
Purpose

event cli match expression [count repeats | time seconds]


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event cli match "shutdown"

Triggers an event if you enter a command that matches the regular expression. The repeats range is from 0 to 65000. The time range, in seconds, is from 0 to 4294967295, where 0 indicates no time limit.

event counter name counter entry-val entry entry-op {eq | ge | gt | le | lt |ne} [exit-val exit exit-op {eq | ge | gt | le | lt |ne}]


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event counter name mycounter entry-val 20 gt


Triggers an event if the counter crosses the entry threshold based on the entry operation. The event resets immediately. Optionally, you can configure the event to reset after the counter passes the exit threshold. The counter name can be any case-sensitive, alphanumeric string up to 28 characters. The entry and exit value ranges are from 0 to 2147483647.

event fanabsent [fan number] time seconds


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event fanabsent time 300

Triggers an event if a fan is removed from the device for more than the configured time, in seconds. The number range is module dependent. The seconds range is from 10 to 64000.

event fanbad [fan number] time seconds


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event fanbad time 3000

Triggers an event if a fan fails for more than the configured time, in seconds. The number range is module dependent. The seconds range is from 10 to 64000.

event gold module {slot | all} test test-name [severity {major | minor | moderate}] testing-type {bootup | monitoring | ondemand | scheduled} consecutive-failure count


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event gold module 2 test ASICRegisterCheck testing-type ondemand consecutive-failure 2

Triggers an event if the named online diagnostic test experiences the configured failure severity for the configured number of consecutive failures. The slot range is from 1 to 10. The test-name is the name of a configured online diagnostic test. The count range is from 1 to 1000.

event memory {critical | minor | severe}


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event memory critical

Triggers an event if a memory threshold is crossed. See also the "Configuring Memory Thresholds" section.

event module-failure type failure-type module {slot | all} count repeats [time seconds]


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event module-failure type lc-failed module 3 count 1

Triggers an event if a module experiences the failure type configured. See the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS System Management Command Reference, for information on the failure types.

The repeats range is from 0 to 4294967295. The seconds range is from 0 to 4294967295, where 0 indicates no time limit.

event module status {online | offline | any} module {all | module-num}


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event module status offline module all

Triggers an event if the specified module enters the selected status.

event oir {fan | module | powersupply} {anyoir | insert | remove} [number]


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event oir fan remove 4

Triggers an event if the configured device element (fan, module, or power supply) is inserted or removed from the device. You can optionally configure a specific fan, module, or power supply number. The number range is as follows:

Fan number—Module dependent.

Module number—Device dependent.

Power supply number—The range is from 1 to 3.

event policy-default count repeats [time seconds]


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event policy-default count 3

Uses the event configured in the system policy. Use this option for overriding policies.

The repeats range is from 1 to 65000. The seconds range is from 0 to 4294967295, where 0 indicates no time limit.

event poweroverbudget


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event poweroverbudget

Triggers an event if the power budget exceeds the capacity of the configured power supplies.

event snmp oid oid get-type {exact | next} entry-op {eq | ge | gt | le | lt |ne} entry-val entry [exit-comb {and | or}] exit-op {eq | ge | gt | le | lt |ne} exit-val exit exit-time time polling-interval interval


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event snmp oid 1.3.6.1.2.1.31.1.1.1.6 get-type next entry-op lt 300 entry-val 0 exit-op eq 400 exit-time 30 polling-interval 300

Triggers an event if the SNMP OID crosses the entry threshold based on the entry operation. The event resets immediately or optionally, you can configure the event to reset after the counter passes the exit threshold. The OID is in dotted decimal notation. The entry and exit value ranges are from 0 to 18446744073709551615. The time, in seconds, is from 0 to 2147483647. The interval, in seconds, is from 1 to 2147483647.

event storm-control


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event storm-control

Triggers an event if traffic on a port exceeds the configured storm control threshold.

event sysmgr memory [module module-num] major major-percent minor minor-percent clear clear-percent


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event sysmgr memory minor 80

Triggers an event if the specified system manager memory threshold is exceeded. The range for the percentage is from 1 to 99.

event sysmgr switchover count count time interval


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event sysmgr switchover counet 10 time 1000

Triggers an event if the specified switchover count is exceeded within the time interval specified. The switchover count is from 1 to 65000. The time interval is from 0 to 2147483647.

event temperature [module slot] [sensor number] threshold {any | major | minor}


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event temperature module 2 threshold any

Triggers an event if the temperature sensor exceeds the configured threshold. The sensor range is from 1 to 18.

event track object-number state {any | down | up}


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event track 1 state down

Triggers an event if the tracked object is in the configured state. The object-number range is from 1 to 500.


Configuring Action Statements

Use the following commands in EEM configuration mode to configure action statements:

Command
Purpose

action number[.number2] cli command1 [command2...] [local]


Example:

switch(config-applet)# action 1.0 cli "show interface e 3/1"

Runs the configured CLI commands. You can optionally run the commands on the module where the event occurred. The action label is in the format number1.number2.

number can be any number up to 16 digits. The range for number2 is from 0 to 9.

action number[.number2] counter name counter value val op {dec | inc | nop | set}


Example:

switch(config-applet)# action 2.0 counter name mycounter value 20 op inc


Modifies the counter by the configured value and operation. The action label is in the format number1.number2.

number can be any number up to 16 digits. The range for number2 is from 0 to 9.

The counter name can be any case-sensitive, alphanumeric string up to 28 characters. The val can be an integer from 0 to 2147483647 or a substituted parameter.

action number[.number2] event-default


Example:

switch(config-applet)# action 1.0 event-default

Executes the default action for the associated event. The action label is in the format number1.number2.

number can be any number up to 16 digits. The range for number2 is from 0 to 9.

action number[.number2] forceshut [module slot | xbar xbar-number] reset-reason seconds


Example:

switch(config-applet)# action 1.0 forceshut module 2 reset-reason "flapping links"

Forces a module, crossbar, or the entire system to shut down. The action label is in the format number1.number2.

number can be any number up to 16 digits. The range for number2 is from 0 to 9.

The reset reason is a quoted alphanumeric string up to 80 characters.

action number[.number2] overbudgetshut [module slot [- slot]]


Example:

switch(config-applet)# action 1.0 overbudgetshut module 3-5

Forces one or more modules or the entire system to shut down because of a power overbudget issue.

number can be any number up to 16 digits. The range for number2 is from 0 to 9.

action number[.number2] policy-default


Example:

switch(config-applet)# action 1.0 policy-default

Executes the default action for the policy that you are overriding. The action label is in the format number1.number2.

number can be any number up to 16 digits. The range for number2 is from 0 to 9.

action number[.number2] reload [module slot [- slot]]


Example:

switch(config-applet)# action 1.0 reload module 3-5

Forces one or more modules or the entire system to reload.

number can be any number up to 16 digits. The range for number2 is from 0 to 9.

action number[.number2] snmp-trap {[intdata1 data [intdata2 data] [strdata string]}


Example:

switch(config-applet)# action 1.0 snmp-trap strdata "temperature problem"

Sends an SNMP trap with the configured data. number can be any number up to 16 digits. The range for number2 is from 0 to 9.

The data arguments can by any number up to 80 digits. The string can be any alphanumeric string up to 80 characters.

action number[.number2] syslog [priority prio-val] msg error-message


Example:

switch(config-applet)# action 1.0 syslog priority notifications msg "cpu high"

Sends a customized syslog message at the configured priority. number can be any number up to 16 digits. The range for number2 is from 0 to 9.

The error-message can be any quoted alphanumeric string up to 80 characters.



Note If you want to allow the triggered event to process any default actions, you must configure the EEM policy to allow the default action. For example, if you match a CLI command in a match statement, you must add the event-default action statement to the EEM policy or EEM will not allow the CLI command to execute. You can use the terminal event-manager bypass command to allow all EEM policies with CLI matches to execute the CLI command.


Defining a Policy using a VSH Script

You can define a policy using a VSH script.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Make sure that you are in the correct VDC. To change the VDC, use the switchto vdc command.

Ensure that you are logged in with administrator privileges.

Ensure that your script name is the same name as the script filename.

DETAILED STEPS


Step 1 In a text editor, list the commands that define the policy.

Step 2 Name the text file and save it.

Step 3 Copy the file to the following system directory:

bootflash://eem/user_script_policies


Registering and Activating a VSH Script Policy

You can register and activate a policy defined in a VSH script.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Make sure that you are in the correct VDC. To change the VDC, use the switchto vdc command.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. config t

2. event manager policy policy-script

3. show event manager policy name

4. copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

config t


Example:

switch# config t

Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.

switch(config)#

Places you in global configuration mode.

Step 2 

event manager policy policy-script


Example:

switch(config)# event manager policy moduleScript

Registers and activates an EEM script policy. The policy-script can be any case-sensitive alphanumeric string up to 29 characters.

Step 3 

show event manager policy name


Example:

switch(config-applet)# show event manager policy moduleScript

(Optional) Displays information about the configured policy.

Step 4 

copy running-config startup-config


Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves this configuration change.

Overriding a Policy

You can override a system policy.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Make sure that you are in the correct VDC. To change the VDC, use the switchto vdc command.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. config t

2. show event manager policy-state system-policy

3. event manager applet applet-name override system-policy

4. description policy-description

5. event event-statement

6. action number action-statement
(Repeat Step 6 for multiple action statements.)

7. show event manager policy-state name

8. copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

config t


Example:

switch# config t

Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.

switch(config)#

Places you in global configuration mode.

Step 2 

show event manager policy-state system-policy


Example:

switch(config-applet)# show event manager policy-state __ethpm_link_flap

Policy __ethpm_link_flap

Cfg count : 5

Cfg time interval : 10.000000 (seconds)

Hash default, Count 0


(Optional) Displays information about the system policy that you want to override, including thresholds. Use the show event manager system-policy command to find the system policy names. For information about system policies, see the "Embedded Event Manager System Events and Configuration Examples" appendix.

Step 3 

event manager applet applet-name override system-policy


Example:

switch(config)# event manager applet ethport override __ethpm_link_flap

switch(config-applet)#

Overrides a system policy and enters applet configuration mode. The applet-name can be any case-sensitive alphanumeric string up to 29 characters. The system-policy must be one of the existing system policies.

Step 4 

description policy-description


Example:

switch(config-applet)# description "Overrides link flap policy."

(Optional) Configures a descriptive string for the policy. The string can be any alphanumeric string up to 80 characters. Enclose the string in quotation marks.

Step 5 

event event-statement


Example:

switch(config-applet)# event policy-default count 2 time 1000

Configures the event statement for the policy. See the "Configuring Event Statements" section.

Step 6 

action number action-statement


Example:

switch(config-applet)# action 1.0 syslog priority warnings msg "Link is flapping."

Configures an action statement for the policy. See the "Configuring Action Statements" section.

Repeat Step 6 for multiple action statements.

Step 7 

show event manager policy-state name


Example:

switch(config-applet)# show event manager policy-state ethport

(Optional) Displays information about the configured policy.

Step 8 

copy running-config startup-config


Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves this configuration change.

Configuring Memory Thresholds

You can set the memory thresholds used to trigger events and set whether the operating system should kill processes if it cannot allocate memory.

BEFORE YOU BEGIN

Make sure that you are in the correct VDC. To change the VDC, use the switchto vdc command.

Ensure that you are logged in with administrator privileges.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. config t

2. system memory-thresholds minor minor severe severe critical critical

3. system memory-thresholds threshold critical no-process-kill

4. show running-config | include "system memory"

5. copy running-config startup-config

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

config t


Example:

switch# config t

Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.

switch(config)#

Places you in global configuration mode.

Step 2 

system memory-thresholds minor minor severe severe critical critical


Example:

switch(config)# system memory-thresholds minor 60 severe 70 critical 80

Configures the system memory thresholds that generate EEM memory events. The default values are as follows:

Minor—85

Severe—90

Critical—95

When these memory thresholds are exceeded, the system generates the following syslogs:

2009 May 7 17:06:30 switch %$ VDC-1 %$ %PLATFORM-2-MEMORY_ALERT: Memory Status Alert : MINOR

2009 May 7 17:06:30 switch %$ VDC-1 %$ %PLATFORM-2-MEMORY_ALERT: Memory Status Alert : SEVERE

2009 May 7 17:06:30 switch %$ VDC-1 %$ %PLATFORM-2-MEMORY_ALERT: Memory Status Alert : CRITICAL

2009 May 7 17:06:35 switch %$ VDC-1 %$ %PLATFORM-2-MEMORY_ALERT: Memory Status Alert : MINOR ALERT RECOVERED

2009 May 7 17:06:35 switch %$ VDC-1 %$ %PLATFORM-2-MEMORY_ALERT: Memory Status Alert : SEVERE ALERT RECOVERED

2009 May 7 17:06:35 switch %$ VDC-1 %$ %PLATFORM-2-MEMORY_ALERT: Memory Status Alert : CRITICAL ALERT RECOVERED

Step 3 

system memory-thresholds threshold critical no-process-kill


Example:

switch(config)# system memory-thresholds threshold critical no-process-kill

(Optional) Configures the system to not kill processes when the memory cannot be allocated. The default value is to allow the system to kill processes, starting with the one that consumes the most memory.

Step 4 

show running-config | include "system memory"


Example:

switch(config-applet)# show running-config | include "system memory"

(Optional) Displays information about the system memory configuration.

Step 5 

copy running-config startup-config


Example:

switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves this configuration change.

Verifying EEM Configuration

To display EEM configuration information, perform one of the following tasks:

Command
Purpose

show event manager environment [variable-name | all]

Displays information about the event manager environment variables.

show event manager event-types [event | all | module slot]

Displays information about the event manager event types.

show event manager history events [detail] [maximum num-events] [severity {catastrophic | minor | moderate | severe}]

Displays the history of events for all policies.

show event manager policy internal [policy-name] [inactive]

Displays information about the configured policies.

show event manager policy-state policy-name

Displays information about the policy state, including thresholds.

show event manager script system [policy-name | all]

Displays information about the script policies.

show event manager system-policy [all]

Displays information about the predefined system policies.

show running-config eem

Displays information about the running configuration for EEM.

show startup-config eem

Displays information about the startup configuration for EEM.


EEM Example Configuration

This example shows how to override the __lcm_module_failure system policy by changing the threshold for just module 3 hitless upgrade failures. This example also sends a syslog message. The settings in the system policy, __lcm_module_failure, apply in all other cases.

event manager applet example2 override __lcm_module_failure
 event module-failure type hitless-upgrade-failure module 3 count 2
 action 1 syslog priority errors msg module 3 "upgrade is not a hitless upgrade!"
 action 2 policy-default

This example shows how to override the __ethpm_link_flap system policy and shuts down the interface.

event manager applet ethport override __ethpm_link_flap
  event policy-default count 2 time 1000
  action 1 cli conf t
  action 2 cli int et1/1
  action 3 cli no shut

This example creates an EEM policy that allows the CLI command to execute but triggers an SNMP notification when a user enters configuration mode on the device:

event manager applet TEST
  event cli match "conf t"
  action 1.0 snmp-trap strdata "Confiiguration change"
  action 2.0 event-default


Note You must add the default-event action statement to the EEM policy or EEM will not allow the CLI command to execute.


Default Settings

Table 13-1 lists the default settings for EEM parameters.

Table 13-1 Default EEM Parameters 

Parameters
Default

system policies

Active.


Additional References

For additional information related to implementing EEM, see the following sections:

Related Documents

Standards

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

EEM commands

Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS System Management Command Reference

VDCs

Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Virtual Device Context Configuration Guide, Release 4.x


Standards

Standards
Title

No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature.


Feature History for EEM

Table 13-2 lists the release history for this feature.

Table 13-2 Feature History for EEM

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

Memory thresholds

4.2(4)

Changed the minor, severe, and critical default memory thresholds from 70, 80, and 90 to 85, 90, and 95.

Memory Thresholds Configuration

4.1(3)

Added a configuration section for memory thresholds.

See the "Configuring Memory Thresholds" section.