Cisco Network Building Mediator User Guide
Ports and Protocols
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Ports and Protocols

Table Of Contents

Ports and Protocols

About the I/O Ports

Understanding I/O Ports

Analog Inputs

Analog Outputs

Digital Inputs

Digital Outputs

Counter Points

Understanding Mediator Communications Ports

About Protocols Over RS-232

Before You Begin Configuring the Protocols

Configuring AirLink Redwing CDPD Modem Nodes

Configuring Alpha Plus Meter Nodes

Configuring Capstone Micro-Turbine Protocol Nodes

Configuring EDF Labview Device Nodes

Configuring PPP Connection Nodes

Configuring RS-232 to RS-485 Converter Nodes

About Communication Protocols Over RS-485 and IP

Overview

BACnet

Dallas

Modbus

SNMP

C-Bus

Johnson N2

Barber-Colman

ALC WebCTRL SOAP Interface

Lennox SysBus

Trane Com3

Trane Com4

TCS Basys

Secure Remote Node Abstraction (SRNA) Protocol

ETC-USAP

Omnimeter

Delphi Web Service

Before You Begin Configuring the Protocols

Configuring the BACnet Protocol

Prerequisites

Configuring BACnet Over IP

Configuring BACnet Over MSTP

Configuring BACnet Over Ethernet

Discovering BACnet Devices

Configuring the BACnet Multiport and Proxy

BACnet Multi-port Usage Configuration Guidelines and Restrictions

Configuring BACnet Multi-port

Adding BACnet Server and Proxy Objects

BACnet Proxy Server Usage Guidelines and Restrictions

Configuring BACnet Broadcast Management Device

Configuring Static Devices

BACnet COV

BACnet COV Deployment Model

Enabling BACnet COV

Configuring BACnet Schedules and BACnet Time Synchronization

Configuring the Dallas Sensor Protocol

Connecting a Dallas Sensor Point

Configuring the Dallas Sensor Point

Configuring Modbus Protocol

Prerequisites

Configuring a Modbus RTU over an RS-232 Bus Network Node

Configuring a Modbus RTU over an RS-485 Bus Network Node

Configuring Modbus TCP/IP Devices

Configuring a Modbus TCP/IP Client

Configuring a Modbus Device Node

Configuring the Modbus Holding Registers

Configuring Modbus Input Registers

Configuring the Modbus Coil Registers

Configuring the Modbus Input Status Registers

Configuring Modbus Groups

Configuring the Modbus Proxy

Configuring the SNMP Protocol

Prerequisites

Configuring SNMP devices on the Mediator

Configuring C-Bus Protocol

Prerequisites

Configuring C-Bus Devices

Configuring the Johnson N2 Protocol

Prerequisites

Configuration Instructions

Configuring the Barber-Colman ASD Protocol

Prerequisites

Configuring Barber-Colman ASD Devices

Configuring the ALC WebCTRL SOAP Interface

Prerequisites

Configuring an ALC WebCTRL SOAP Interface

Determining WebCTRL Expressions of WebCTRL Points

Configuring the Lennox SysBus Protocol

Prerequisites

Configuring Lennox SysBus Devices

Configuring the Trane Com3 Protocol on the Mediator

Prerequisites

Configuring the Trane Com3 Protocol

Configuring the Trane PCM Controller

Configuring the Trane RTA Controller

Configuring the Trane Scroll Controller

Configuring the Trane TCM Controller

Configuring the Trane VariTrane II \ III Controller

Configuring the Trane Com4 Protocol on the Mediator

Prerequisites

Configuring the Trane Com4 Protocol

Configuring the Trane Intellipak Controller

Configuring the Trane Voyager Controller

Configuring the Trane 3 Non Isolated Controller

Configuring the Trane VariTrane II \ III Controller

Configuring the TCS Basys Protocol

Prerequisites

Configuring TCS Basys Devices

Configuring Secure Remote Node Abstraction Protocol

Configuring the ETC-USAP Protocol

Prerequisites

Configuring ETC-USAP Devices

Configuring the Omnimeter Protocol

Configuring the Delphi Web Service Protocol

Prerequisites

Configuring the Delphi Web Service Protocol on the Mediator

Viewing Delphi Nodes


Ports and Protocols


This chapter describes how to use the Cisco Network Building Mediator (Mediator) configTOOL to configure I/O port nodes and protocols on the Cisco Network Building Mediator and includes the following sections:

About the I/O Ports

Understanding Mediator Communications Ports

About Protocols Over RS-232

About Communication Protocols Over RS-485 and IP


Note For more information on the configTOOL interface, see Chapter 4 "Mediator configTOOL."



Note A few protocols, which are documented in this chapter, have specific support and implementation requirements. These requirements are available in the Ordering Guide and Protocol White List. Please contact your account representative to obtain these documents.


About the I/O Ports

This section describes the I/O ports on the Mediator and includes the following topics:

Understanding I/O Ports

Analog Inputs

Analog Outputs

Digital Inputs

Digital Outputs

Counter Points

Understanding I/O Ports

The Mediator provides the following I/O ports:

Analog Inputs—Four analog inputs are available that have a minimum resolution of 24 bits and a maximum input voltage of 10 V. These inputs can be connected with a thermistor and used as a temperature sensor.

Analog Outputs—Three analog outputs are available that have a 12-bit resolution digital-to-analog converter (DAC) and meet the 10-bit requirement. The outputs can be used to perform digital to analog conversions.

Digital Inputs—Four digital inputs are available that serve as non-volatile counter inputs. The inputs are required to handle a maximum frequency of 1 KHz.

Digital Outputs—Two optically isolated digital outputs are available.

You need to configure the I/O ports using the configTOOL.

The Analog Inputs (AI) and Analog Outputs (AO) ports that are found in 2500 and 5000. These ports are not in 2400 and 4800. For information on the wiring guidelines and different I/O ports , see the Wiring Guidelines section in the Cisco Network Building Mediator 2500 and 5000 Hardware Installation Guide.

Analog Inputs

Analog inputs can be configured. The analog input configuration determines the type of signal that is displayed. All values are measured relative to the ground terminals.

The defined range of values for the different signal types are as follows:

Voltage Mode—From 0-10 V and is protected for a voltage of 32 V and above.

Resistance Mode—From 0-100,000 ohms. It can display higher values, but accuracy is reduced.

Current Mode—From 0-20 mA and is protected against higher values.

To configure analog inputs, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Launch the configTOOL main window.

For more information, see the following sections:

Starting configTOOL

Accessing Mediators Using configTOOL.

The configTOOL window appears. (See Figure 4-1).

Step 2 In the node tree pane, click the host node (represented by an IP address) of the Mediator to display the anchor nodes (aliases, interfaces, services).

Step 3 Click interfaces to display the available interfaces.

Step 4 Click the desired analog (AI1, AI2, AI3, or AI4) port to configure. For example, click A1.

The A1 tab displays the following information about the A1 analog port:


Note You cannot change the default name of the analog port.


Step 5 (Optional) In the Description text box, enter a description for the analog port to help you identify the purpose of the port.

Step 6 From the Signal Type drop-down list, choose the signal value to configure the analog port to that value.


Note The available signal values are in volts, ohms, and ma. All the four analog inputs can be configured for these signal values. The default option is Volts.


Step 7 Click Save Configuration to save your configuration.


Analog Outputs

The analog outputs cannot be configured. It can display a voltage between 0 to 10 Volts. Floating point values in the range of 0.0 to 10 V are accepted, while the values that do not fall in the range are limited to 0-10 Volts.


Note The Analog Outputs can be set by a Periodic Driver or a TIM mpx_set template similarly to that of the digital output.


Digital Inputs

The digital inputs cannot be configured. They display a value of 1 for high input values and 0 for low input values in a contact closure that is wired between the input and ground terminals.

Digital Outputs

The digital outputs cannot be configured. They accept values, such as 1 or 0. Setting a value of 1 turns the digital output On (closes it contact), while setting a value of 0, turns the digital output Off.


Note The digital outputs can be set by the mpx_set template node reference within a TIM application.


Counter Points

The Mediator 2500 and Mediator 5000 have four counter inputs. These counter points are soft points that can be accessed under Nodes >  Interfaces. The configTOOL represents these inputs as Nodes (counter1, counter2, counter3, and counter4). These inputs serve as both pulse counter inputs and digital inputs. In a typical pulse counter application, a pulse counter input is connected to a pulse meter that produces a series of dry contact closures that vary in frequency with the size of the electrical load. The number of times per second the circuit opens and closes is proportional to the amount of measured current in the meter.

Understanding Mediator Communications Ports

The Mediator has two RS-232 DB-9 serial communications ports and four RS-485 screw terminal ports.

You can configure the communications ports using the configTOOL. In the configTOOL, the RS-232 (com1 and com 2) and RS-485 (com3, com4, com5, and com6) communication ports of the Mediator are represented as nodes. An RS-232 com port node supports virtual nodes, devices, and multiple protocols. You can configure a com port node to add virtual nodes or devices connected to the Mediator.

About Protocols Over RS-232

This section describes how to configure the communication protocols over RS-232 (com1 and com2) communications ports on the Mediator and includes the following topics:

Before You Begin Configuring the Protocols

Configuring AirLink Redwing CDPD Modem Nodes

Configuring Alpha Plus Meter Nodes

Configuring Capstone Micro-Turbine Protocol Nodes

Configuring EDF Labview Device Nodes

Configuring PPP Connection Nodes

Configuring RS-232 to RS-485 Converter Nodes

Before You Begin Configuring the Protocols

Before you begin configuring the desired protocols over the communication ports on the Mediator, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Launch the configTOOL main window.

For more information, see the following sections:

Starting configTOOL

Accessing Mediators Using configTOOL.

The configTOOL window appears.

In the node tree pane, click the host node (represented by an IP address) of the Mediator to display the anchor nodes (aliases, interfaces, services). The protocols can be configured either on any of the physical ports like com1, com2, com3, com4, eth0, and eth1, or under /services/network.

Step 2 Click the desired com1 or com2 node to configure. For example, click com1.

The com1 tab displays the following information about the com1 node:

The default name and description of the node.


Note You cannot change the default name of the RS-232 com1 (or com2) node.


The default communication parameters of the node.

Step 3 (Optional) In the Description text box, enter a description for the node that will help you identify the purpose of the node.


Note In the node tree pane, when you position the cursor over the node, a tooltip appears. The tooltip displays the text provided in the Description text box.


Step 4 You can change the default values of the com1 node parameters. To do so, choose an appropriate value from the relevant drop-down list.

Step 5 You can add a device to a com1 node. The device will appear as a child node under the com1 node.

To add a device to a com1 node, in the node tree pane, right-click com1, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears and displays the list of available communications protocols and devices supported by the Mediator.

Step 6 Click the protocol or device that you want to configure, and then click OK.

A new child node appears under the com1 (or com2) node in the node tree pane.

The tab displays the default name and description of the child node, and the configurable parameters for the child node. For each text box on the tab, enter or choose the appropriate parameter value to configure the child node.


Note All mandatory text boxes appear in red color.


For information on the default parameter values of the com nodes, see the "Configuring the Mediator" section


Configuring AirLink Redwing CDPD Modem Nodes

To configure AirLink Redwing CDPD modem nodes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 6 of the "Before You Begin Configuring the Protocols" section.

Step 2 In the Available Devices dialog box, click AirLink Redwing CDPD modem (redwing_modem), and then click OK.

A new child node, redwing_modem, appears under the com1 node in the node tree pane. The configTOOL automatically adds the ppp0_ext child node to the redwing_modem node.

The com1 tab displays the following information about the com1 node:

The redwing_modem tab displays the following information about the redwing_modem child node:

The default name and description of the modem node.

The configurable parameters.

Step 3 (Optional) To change the default name of the child node, in the Name text box, enter the new name for the modem, and then press Enter.

The redwing_modem child node is renamed to the name that you provided, and appears in the node tree pane.

Step 4 (Optional) In the Description text box, enter a description to identify the purpose of the redwing-modem child node.

Step 5 (Optional) The redwing_modem node is enabled by default. If not, check the Enabled check box to enable the node.


Note You cannot change the default value of the Initialization String text box.


Step 6 In the node tree pane, click ppp0_ext.

The pp0_ext tab the default name, description and the configurable parameters of the pp0_ext node.

Step 7 (Optional) To change the default description of the ppp0_ext node, in the Description text box, enter a description to identify the purpose of the ppp0_ext node.

Step 8 In the node tree pane, expand the ppp0_ext node, and then click outgoing.

The outgoing tab displays the default name, description and the configurable parameters of the outgoing node.


Note You cannot change the default name of the outgoing node.


Step 9 (Optional) To change the description of the outgoing node, in the Description text box, enter a description to identify the purpose of this node.


Note In the node tree pane, when you position the cursor over the outgoing node, a tooltip appears. The tooltip displays the description text provided in the Description text box.


Step 10 Check the Enabled check box to enable the outgoing node.


Note The outgoing node is disabled by default.


Step 11 To connect to the modem, check the Connect on-demand only check box.


Note By default, connect on-demand is enabled.


By default, the modem is not connected until the Mediator framework needs to send a message, such as a log message. For the connection to be active at all times, uncheck the Connect on-demand check box.

Step 12 In the Phone number text box, enter the telephone number of your local Internet Service Provider (ISP).


Note Include any prefixes, such as 9, to dial out. Some telephone systems require the comma to add a delay before getting a dial tone.


Step 13 In the User ID text box, enter the user ID you use to log in to your ISP.

Step 14 In the Password text box, enter the password you use to log in to your ISP.

Step 15 In the Primary name server text box, enter the IP address of the primary server of your ISP.

Step 16 In the Secondary name server text box, enter the IP address of the secondary server of your ISP.

Step 17 You can define routes to remote hosts. To do so, in the Routes area, click + to add a route to a remote host. A row is added to the Routes area. Do the following:

a. In the Host/Net IP Address tab, enter the IP address of the remote host.

b. In the Netmask tab, enter the appropriate subnet mask value of the remote host. For example, 255.255.255.0.

Step 18 Repeat Step 17 to define additional routes for the modem.


Configuring Alpha Plus Meter Nodes

To configure Alpha Plus Meter nodes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 7 of the "Before You Begin Configuring the Protocols" section.

Step 2 In the Available Devices dialog box, click Alpha Plus meter (meter), and then click OK.

A new child node, meter, appears under the com1 node in the node tree pane. The configTOOL automatically adds the inherent child nodes of the Alpha Plus meter node.

The meter tab displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters of the meter node.

Step 3 (Optional) To change the default name and description of the meter node, do the following:

a. In the Name text box, enter the new name, and then press Enter.

The meter node is renamed to the name that you provided, and appears in the node tree pane.

b. In the Description text box, enter a description to identify the purpose of this node.


Note In the node tree pane, when you position the cursor over the meter node, a tooltip appears. The tooltip displays the description text provided in the Description text box.


Step 4 In the Device Number text box, enter a number from 0 to 255 as the address of the Alpha Plus Meter device.

Step 5 In the Password text box, enter alphaplus, the default password of the Alpha Plus Meter device.


Configuring Capstone Micro-Turbine Protocol Nodes

To configure Capstone Micro-Turbine Protocol nodes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 6 of the "Before You Begin Configuring the Protocols" section.

Step 2 In the Available Devices dialog box, click Capstone Micro-turbine protocol (capstone protocol), and then click OK.

A new child node, capstone protocol, appears under the com1 node in the node tree pane.

The capstone protocol_1 tab displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters of the capstone protocol node.

Step 3 (Optional) To change the default name of the capstone protocol node, in the Name text box, enter the new name, and then press Enter.

The capstone protocol node is renamed to the name that you provided, and appears in the node tree pane.

Step 4 (Optional) To change the description of the capstone protocol node, in the Description text box, enter a description to identify the purpose of this node.


Note In the node tree pane, when you position the cursor over the capstone protocol node, a tooltip appears. The tooltip displays the description text provided in the Description text box.


Step 5 In the Timeout text box, enter the time (in seconds) for the capstone protocol node to wait for a response to the request made to one of its data points. The default time out value is one second.

Step 6 In the node tree pane, right-click capstone protocol, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears listing the available Capstone Micro-Turbine devices.

Step 7 Click Capstone Micro-Turbine (capstone protocol), and then click OK.

A new child node, capstone_micro_turbine, appears under the capstone protocol node in the node tree pane. The configTOOL automatically adds the inherent ppp0_ext child node to the capstone_micro_turbine node.

The capstone_micro_turbine tab for the capstone_micro_turbine node displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters.

Step 8 (Optional) To change the default name of the capstone_micro_turbine node, in the Name text box, enter the new name, and then press Enter.

The capstone_micro_turbine node is renamed to the name that you provided, and appears in the node tree pane.

Step 9 (Optional) To change the description of the capstone_micro_turbine node, in the Description text box, enter a description to identify the purpose of this node.


Note In the node tree pane, when you position the cursor over the capstone_micro_turbine node, a tooltip appears. The tooltip displays the description text provided in the Description text box.


Step 10 From the Turbine Address drop-down list, choose a value from 0 to 15 for the micro-controller that supervises the micro-turbine.

Step 11 (Optional) In the Password text box, enter the password of the micro-controller.


Configuring EDF Labview Device Nodes

To configure EDF Labview device nodes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 6 of the "Before You Begin Configuring the Protocols" section.

Step 2 In the Available Devices dialog box, click EDF Labview device (labview), and then click OK.

A new child node, labview, appears under the com1 node in the node tree pane.

The labview_1 for the labview node displays the default name and description of the node.


Note The labview node does not have any configurable parameters.


Step 3 (Optional) To change the default name of the labview node, in the Name text box, enter the new name, and then press Enter.

The labview node is renamed to the name that you provided, and appears in the node tree pane.

Step 4 (Optional) To change the description of the labview node, in the Description text box, enter a description to identify the purpose of this node.


Note In the node tree pane, when you position the cursor over the labview node, a tooltip appears. The tooltip displays the description text provided in the Description text box.



Configuring PPP Connection Nodes

You can configure a Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) connection node when you connect a modem to one of the com ports of the Mediator. PPP is the standard for encapsulating and transmitting Internet Protocol (IP) datagrams over a point-to-point connection. PPP provides full-duplex, bi-directional connections that deliver data packets in order.

To configure PPP connection nodes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 6 of the "Before You Begin Configuring the Protocols" section.

Step 2 In the Available Devices dialog box, click Internet access via a direct PPP connection (ppp), and then click OK.

A new child node, ppp, appears under the com1 node in the node tree pane. The configTOOL automatically adds the incoming child node to the ppp node.

The ppp_1 tab for the ppp node displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters.

Step 3 (Optional) To change the default name of the ppp node, in the Name text box, enter the new name, and then press Enter.

The ppp node is renamed to the name that you provided, and appears in the node tree pane.

Step 4 (Optional) To change the description of the ppp node, in the Description text box, enter a description to identify the purpose of this node.


Note In the node tree pane, when you position the cursor over the ppp node, a tooltip appears. The tooltip displays the description text provided in the Description text box.


Step 5 To enable the ppp node, check the Enabled check box.

Step 6 In the node tree pane, click incoming.


Note If you do not see the incoming node in the node tree pane, then click ppp to expand the node.


The incoming tab for the incoming node displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters of the node.


Note You cannot change the default name and user ID used in a PPP connection.


Step 7 (Optional) To change the description of the incoming node, in the Description text box, enter a description to identify the purpose of this node.


Note In the node tree pane, when you position the cursor over the incoming node, a tooltip appears. The tooltip displays the description text provided in the Description text box.


Step 8 To enable the incoming PPP node, check the Enabled check box.

Step 9 In the Password text box, enter the password required by the remote dial-up application, such as HyperTerminal.

Step 10 In the Local IP address text box, enter the IP address of the Mediator that establishes the PPP connection.


Note Do not enter an IP address that is in the IP address range assigned to the local network. For example, if the IP address of the Mediator is 192.168.2.12, and machines in the local network use the IP address range 192.168.2.*, then do not enter the IP address 192.168.2.12 for the Mediator in the Local IP address text box. Instead, use an alternate IP address (for example, 192.168.0.12) as the local IP address of the Mediator for the PPP connection to work correctly on the 192.168.2.* local network.


Step 11 In the Client IP address text box, enter the IP address of the Windows client machine (or any other client machine) that is used to dial in to a PPP connection.


Note Do not enter an IP address that is in the IP address range assigned to the local network. For example, if the IP address of the Windows client machine is 192.168.2.14, and machines in the local network use the IP address range 192.168.2.*, then do not enter the IP address 192.168.2.14 for the Windows client machine in the Client IP address text box. Instead, use an alternate IP address (for example, 192.168.0.14) as the client IP address of the Windows client machine for the PPP connection to work correctly on the 192.168.2.* local network.



Configuring RS-232 to RS-485 Converter Nodes

The Mediator allows you to convert one or both of its RS-232 ports to an RS-485 port.

To configure RS-232 to RS-485 converter nodes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 7 of the "Before You Begin Configuring the Protocols" section.

Step 2 In the Available Devices dialog box, click RS-232 to RS-485 converter (rs485), and then click OK.

A new child node, rs485_1 tab, appears under the com_1 node in the node tree pane.

The rs485_1 tab for the rs485_1 node displays the default name and description of the node.


Note The rs485 node does not have any configurable parameters.


Step 3 (Optional) To change the default name of the rs485_1 tab node, in the Name text box, enter the new name, and then press Enter.

The rs485_1 tab node is renamed to the name that you provided, and appears in the node tree pane.

Step 4 (Optional) To change the description of the rs485_1 tab node, in the Description text box, enter a description to identify the purpose of this node.


Note In the node tree pane, when you position the cursor over the rs485_1 tab node, a tooltip appears. The tooltip displays the description text provided in the Description text box.


Step 5 In the node tree pane, right-click rs485_1 tab, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears listing the supported devices.


Note The RS-485 devices are also supported by the dedicated RS-485 ports of the Mediator.


Step 6 Configure the RS-485 node.

For information on configuring RS-485 protocol nodes, see the "About Communication Protocols Over RS-485 and IP" section


About Communication Protocols Over RS-485 and IP

This section explains how to configure the communication protocols over RS-485 communication ports and over IP port, and also describes how to configure specific devices that are connected to the Mediator, and includes the following topics:

Overview

Before You Begin Configuring the Protocols

Configuring the BACnet Protocol

Configuring the Dallas Sensor Protocol

Configuring Modbus Protocol

Configuring the SNMP Protocol

Configuring the Johnson N2 Protocol

Configuring the Barber-Colman ASD Protocol

Configuring the ALC WebCTRL SOAP Interface

Configuring the Lennox SysBus Protocol

Configuring the Trane Com3 Protocol on the Mediator

Configuring the Trane Com4 Protocol on the Mediator

Configuring the TCS Basys Protocol

Configuring Secure Remote Node Abstraction Protocol

Configuring the ETC-USAP Protocol

Configuring the Omnimeter Protocol

Configuring the Delphi Web Service Protocol

Overview

This section explains the overview of the supported protocols on the Mediator and includes the following topics:

BACnet

Dallas

Modbus

SNMP

C-Bus

Johnson N2

Barber-Colman

ALC WebCTRL SOAP Interface

Lennox SysBus

Trane Com3

Trane Com4

TCS Basys

Secure Remote Node Abstraction (SRNA) Protocol

ETC-USAP

Omnimeter

Delphi Web Service

BACnet

Building Automation and Control Networks (BACnet) is an open-communication protocol. BACnet protocol was developed by the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE).

Initially, the BACnet protocol supported only HVAC systems. It now supports the objects for lighting, life safety, elevators, and other building systems. BACnet relies to a great extent on the use of common local area network (LAN) technologies, such as Ethernet and Attached Resource Computer Network (ARCNET). To achieve interoperability across a wide spectrum of equipment, the BACnet specification consists of three major parts. The first part describes a method for representing any type of building automation equipment in a standardized manner. The second part defines messages that can be sent across a computer network to monitor and control such equipment. The third part defines a set of acceptable LANs that can be used to convey BACnet communications.

BACnet Multi-port

BACnet Multi-port allows the Cisco Network Building Mediator to communicate with remote devices through one or more communications channel at a time without having to go through a BACnet router. A communications channel consists of a Master Slave Token Passing (MSTP) network connected to an RS-485 com port, a BACnet IP or BACnet Ethernet network.

BACnet Broadcast Management Device

If your Mediator or any other BACnet device has multiple routers that reside on different IP subnets, you must set up one router on each IP subnet as a BACnet/IP Broadcast Management Device (BBMD). Every subnet with a router must have a BBMD configured for broadcasts from controllers on that subnet to reach the other routers on the network.

BACnet COV

The BACnet Change-of-Value (COV) reporting is part of the BACnet Alarm and Event services. The COV reporting allows a COV-client to subscribe with a COV-server to get notifications of changes in the value of a specified property of a specified object. The BACnet COV implementation saves system load and network bandwidth by eliminating the need to periodically poll property values where possible. The COV reporting also eliminates the need to modify the polling interval to the expected rate of change in the values of properties.

Dallas

The Mediator includes physical Dallas wire ports. These ports are the physical interfaces on the Mediator and act as interfaces to the devices. Depending on the Mediator model, the number of ports vary.

The available wire ports are as follows:

Mediator 2400 - Four Dallas wire ports

Mediator 2500 - Two Dallas wire ports

Mediator 4800 - Four Dallas wire ports

Mediator 5000 - Two Dallas wire ports

The configTOOL represents these ports as nodes that communicate through Dallas ports.

These nodes are named as follows:

Dallas1, Dallas2, Dallas3, and Dallas4 in Mediator 2400 and 4800

Dallas1 and Dallas2 in Mediator 2500 and 5000


Note You cannot change the names of the Dallas1, Dallas2, Dallas3, and Dallas4 nodes.


The Mediator currently supports two dallas devices: 18B20 and 18S20 temperature sensors.

Modbus

The Modbus protocol was developed and published in the late 1970s by Modicon, Inc. It was designed as a communication protocol for Modicon programmable logic controllers. Modbus has now become one of the major communications standards, which has been widely adopted by vendors and users of industrial controls and building automation equipment and systems.

Modbus is a master/slave protocol with half-duplex transmission. The master device can initiate transactions (called queries). The other devices, called slaves, respond by supplying the requested data to the master, or by taking the action requested in the query. A slave can be any device that processes information and sends its output to the master using Modbus (for example, a Veris meter). A standard Modbus network can have one master and up to 247 slave devices. Some Modbus derivatives, such as JBus, support up to 255 slave devices.

The master initiates all Modbus transactions. The master initiates only one transaction at a time. In general, slave devices do not transmit data without a request from the master, nor do they communicate with other slaves. The master can address individual slaves, or it can initiate a broadcast message to all slaves. Slaves return a response to all queries addressed to them individually; however, they do not respond to broadcast queries.

Modbus does not specify physical network architecture. The Mediator supports RS-232 and RS-485 serial physical networks, including the multi-drop capability of Modbus over RS-485. The Mediator also supports Modbus TCP, an open standard for sending Modbus messages over Ethernet using TCP/IP packeting. The Modbus protocol specifies an address range from 1 to 247 (some versions support up to 255) for the RS 232 or RS 485 networks. The Mediator supports an unlimited address range. For example, while configuring Modbus TCP/IP network, the IP address of the device must be entered.

For RS-232 and RS-485 serial line bus networks, the Mediator supports Modbus RTU, which specifies the format for sending data in the binary format using the character-gap timing. Modbus RTU is suitable for one-on-one RS-232 or multi-drop RS-485 connections. The Mediator does not support Modbus ASCII. The Mediator also supports Modbus TCP, an open standard for sending Modbus messages over Ethernet using TCP/IP packeting.

The Modbus protocol describes a set of addressable registers that can store binary, numeric, or text data. These include two types of 16-bit data registers (Holding Registers and Input Registers,) and two types of 1-bit registers (Coils and Input Status Registers). The larger data elements must be configured as multiple register groups.

Because the user can assign registers to data points of a device, Modbus can be used as the communication protocol for many different types of devices. The Mediator implementation of Modbus supports generic (user-defined) device configuration, which allows the user to configure any type of device compliant with the Modbus protocol. In addition, it supports several pre-defined devices produced by specific Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs).

The Mediator allows the user to communicate with devices that are compliant with the Modbus protocol, and thereby incorporates Modbus devices into installations that include components that are not Modbus-compliant. Communication is two-way: the Mediator brings data in from Modbus devices, and also allows the user to send commands out to those devices. In addition, the Mediator makes information acquired from Modbus devices available to other devices on the network that are not Modbus-compliant. Therefore, information acquired from non-Modbus devices becomes available to Modbus devices through the Mediator.

SNMP

SNMP is used in network management systems to monitor network-attached devices for conditions that warrant administrative attention. SNMP is a component of the Internet Protocol Suite as defined by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). It consists of a set of standards for network management, including an application layer protocol, a database schema, and a set of data objects.

SNMP exposes management data in the form of variables on the managed systems, which describe the system configuration. These variables can be queried (and sometimes set) by managing applications. SNMP is essentially a request-reply protocol running over User Defined Protocol (UDP) ports 161 and 162, though Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) operation is possible. SNMP itself does not define what information (variables) a managed system should offer. However, SNMP uses an extensible design, where the available information is defined by Management Information Bases (MIBs). A MIB is a database of the objects that can be managed on a device. The managed objects, or variables, can be set or read to provide information on the network devices and interfaces. MIBs use a hierarchical namespace containing object identifiers (OID). Each OID identifies a variable that can be read or set via SNMP.

SNMP standards are defined in a series of documents called request for comments or RFCs, proposed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). There are three versions of SNMP available - SNMPv1, SNMPv2c, and SNMPv3, of which the Mediator currently supports SNMPv1 and SNMPv2c.

C-Bus

C-Bus (or Clipsal Bus) is a closed protocol. The C-Bus protocol was developed using the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Layer 7 reference model. The C-Bus protocol supports a number of interfaces, such as RS-232 and TCP/IP.

The C-Bus system is available in both wired and wireless versions. A default gateway is available to allow messages to be sent between wired and wireless networks. The maximum number of C-Bus networks in a single installation cannot exceed 255. This limitation does not apply if a C-Bus Ethernet interface is used. The C-Bus system size is then limited only to the IP address of the Ethernet interface.

A disadvantage of the wired C-Bus protocol is that it does not work with standard mains wire installation. A completely new wiring system must be installed for a wired C-Bus system, which means it is normally used for new constructions. The C-Bus wireless (RF) system can, however, be provided using the existing mains wiring.

The C-Bus system can be used along with several standard protocols, such as TCP/IP, Crestron, AMX, LonWorks, ModBus, and Charmed Quark Controller protocols. The C-Bus system can be used to control lighting, electrical systems, and products through remote control. For example, C-Bus can be used to enable the interface on a home security system, AV products, or other electrical equipments.

Johnson N2

The N2 Communications Bus is a local network that links controllers and point interfaces to a Master device. The N2 Bus uses a master/slave protocol, in which the master device initiates all communication with the N2 Bus devices.

N2 is based on the Opto-22 protocol, which was designed for industrial applications, and is a proven communication network. The N2 Bus follows the electrical characteristics of Electronics Industry Alliance (EIA) Standard RS-485.

The N2 protocol uses an Auto discovery mode that creates N2 nodes only as they are requested, either from a Nodebrowser URL or as a request from a web express widget. To force a search for all N2 devices on a network, a call to the function force_discovery on the n2 node queries all 255 addresses for the presence of a device.

Barber-Colman

The Mediator can connect through one of its RS-485 ports to the Application Specific Device (ASD) bus of several Network 8000 Barber-Colman MicroZone II devices, MICROFLOW II devices, or Packaged Equipment Module (PEM) devices. If an MN3 (integrator) controller is present on the network, the Mediator will detect any device on its J-bus.

ALC WebCTRL SOAP Interface

The Mediator communicates with the ALC WebCTRL server through a Web Services interface that uses SOAP/XML technology.

Lennox SysBus

Lennox SysBus is a proprietary communications protocol used to manage Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC), zoning, and building operations. The Mediator communicates directly with the Lennox IMC Controller using the native Lennox SysBus protocol.

Trane Com3

Trane Com3 is a proprietary communication protocol that typically links controllers and Trane BCUs. The Mediator supports communication directly with supported Trane Com3 devices.

Trane Com4

Trane Com4 is a proprietary communication protocol that typically links controllers and Trane BCUs. The Mediator supports communication directly with supported Trane Com4 devices.

TCS Basys

TCS Basys is a proprietary master/slave communication protocol. The TCS Basys communication network consists of a master device and multiple slave devices, such as SZ and SL controllers. A standard TCS Basys network has one master device and up to 255 slave devices. All the slave devices on the network have a unique address from 0-255.

The master device initiates communication to a specific slave device. It sends only one message at a time on the network. The slave devices are always in the received mode, and respond by supplying the requested data to the master, or by taking the action requested in the message.

Secure Remote Node Abstraction (SRNA) Protocol

The Remote Node Abstraction (RNA) is a Cisco proprietary protocol that enables application-specific communication between the Mediators as well as between a Mediator and a Mediator Manager over a TCP socket. The System Integrator (SI) uses the Secure Remote Node Abstraction protocol (SRNA) to secure the RNA communication through an un-encrypted authentication (Auth-only) mode or with Full Encrypted authentication (Full-Enc) mode.


Note The option of using no security for the RNA communications remains available.


There are three levels of security that can be configured on the Mediator and the Mediator Manager.

NoSec—No authentication involved between the Mediators.

Auth-only—Authentication happens through the packets that are transferred in plain text.

Full-Enc—Authentication happens through the packets that are encrypted.

Securing the RNA communication requires execution of the SRNA installation scripts (one time installation activity) on the Cisco Network Building Mediator Manager (Manager). These scripts generate a private/public key-pairs for each of the Mediator and Mediator Manager, based on its IP address. Each Mediator and Mediator Manager uses its key-pairs as authentication credentials for establishing persistent SRNA connections with other Mediators and/or Mediator Managers. Currently, there is a restriction that the keys can be generated only for one single IP address (per physical interface) for a given Mediator.


Note This restriction does not affect un-secured RNA communications.


If the network uses NAT protocol, typically each Mediator interface to the gateway router will have at least two IP addresses: An internal IP (configured on the physical interface) and an external IP (Network Address Translated or NAT-ed IP configured at the gateway router).

ETC-USAP

The ETC (Electronic Theatre Controls) Unison Serial Access Protocol (USAP) controls the Unison lighting control system. The standard is applied for the point-to-point command exchange between Mediator devices and the Unison system.

Omnimeter

Omnimeter protocol is an RS-485 based communication protocol used to communicate with electricity meters, gas meters, water meters and heating meters.This protocol makes use of master-slave protocol in which the Mediator acts as a master and polls the Omnimeters connected to the interface to read data. The Omnimeter protocol is deployed in two ways:

1. RS-1- Deployed in offices and is used to read electricity meters.

2. RS-5- Deployed in homes and is used to read gas meter, water meters and heating meter readings.

Both RS-1 and RS-5 will have simple Request and Response packets. The protocol is a Request- Response model in which the Mediator sends a Request and Omnimeter responds with the data. The NBM sends a 'Read Data' Request to Omnimeter and the Omnimeter replies with a Response. The 'Request and Response' packet differs depending on whether the device is of RS-1 or RS-5 type. Omnimeter protocol is configured under any of the RS-485 interfaces in the Mediator. The address and type of the Omnimeter devices connected under each RS-485 bus needs to be preconfigured.

Delphi Web Service

The Delphi web server provides you with the Banquet Event Order (BEO) service and the Meeting Space Request service. The Delphi web servers are typically installed in a Hotel or in Conference Centers. The Delphi web service that runs on the Cisco Network Building Mediator supports only the Meeting Space Request service.

The Meeting Space Request service can be used for the following external systems:

Energy and Climate Control Systems

Digital Signage

Labor Management

The Delphi Event Management System (EMS) interface enables a property, which can be used to read the detailed meeting, function, and booking information entered into the Delphi database. The interface application produces a file of event information that can be used to provide up-to-date information on digital sign boards (running on the Interface PC) or other systems.

Before You Begin Configuring the Protocols

To begin configuring the desired protocols that are supported on the Mediator, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start configTOOL and connect to the Mediator.

For more information, see the following sections:

Starting configTOOL.

Accessing Mediators Using configTOOL.

Step 2 Click Interfaces to view the list of services options.

Step 3 Right-click the services > control node to view the node tree right-click menu, and then choose Add.

The Available Devices dialog box appears and displays the list of supported available devices for a specific protocol that you want to configure.


Configuring the BACnet Protocol

This section explains how to configure the BACnet protocol on the Mediator to enable it to interact with various BACnet devices and includes the following topics:

Prerequisites

Configuring BACnet Over IP

Configuring BACnet Over MSTP

Configuring BACnet Over Ethernet

Discovering BACnet Devices

Prerequisites

The prerequisites for the BACnet Protocol configuration are as follows:

Device instance number of BACnet devices

Network number of BACnet network

BACnet communication medium for the network should be MSTP or IP or Ethernet.

Configuring BACnet Over IP

To configure the BACnet protocol over IP on the Mediator, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 3 in the "Before You Begin Configuring the Protocols" section.

Step 2 In the node tree pane, expand the node tree, click services, and then click network.

Step 3 In the node tree pane, right-click network, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears listing the protocols supported by the Mediator.

Step 4 Click Bacnet protocol service (BACnet), and then click OK.

A new child node, BACnet, appears under the network node in the node tree pane. The BACnet tab for the BACnet node displays the default name and description.

Step 5 Choose services > network > BACnet > internetwork.

The internetwork node is an inherent child node under the BACnet node. The internetwork tab displays the default name and description along with the Write Priority text box.You can change the default value in the Write Priority text box. The default value is 11. You can choose any value between 0 to 16.


Note Write Priority value is the priority at which the Mediator writes to the properties of BACnet Devices using the WriteProperty service request. For example, if the value is 11, then the Mediator writes values to different properties of BACnet Devices at a priority of 11.


Step 6 To change the write priority value, enter the new value in the write priority check box.

Step 7 To configure BACnet over IP, choose services > network > BACnet > internetwork Configuration > IP.

Step 8 In the IP tab, check the Enabled check box to enable BACnet over IP.

Step 9 In the network text box, enter network number that is between 1 to 65,634. The default value is 1.

Step 10 To change the default value of the UDP port number, enter the new port number in the Port text box. The default value is 47808.

Step 11 In the node tree pane, right-click IP, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 12 Click Ethernet or Com port assignment (eth_or_com_port_name), and then click OK.

A child node, eth_or_com_port_name, appears under the IP node in the node tree pane. The data entry pane for the eth_or_com_port_name node displays the default name and description.

Step 13 Click eth_or_com_port_name node.

A new tab, eth_or_com_port_name tab, appears with the default name, description, and the configurable parameter.

Step 14 In the Name text box, enter eth0 to configure BACnet over IP on eth0 or enter eth1 to configure BACnet/IP on eth1.

Step 15 To enable BACnet IP over the interface eth0 or eth1, check the Enabled check box.

Step 16 Save the configuration.


Configuring BACnet Over MSTP

To configure the BACnet protocol over MSTP, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 5 in the "Configuring BACnet Over IP" section.

Step 2 In the node tree pane, expand the node tree, click interfaces, and then click com4.

The com4 tab for the com4 node displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters of the node.


Note This example assumes you are configuring BACnet/MSTP on com4. Com 3-6 can be used for BACnet/MSTP, and Eth0 or Eth1 can be used for BACnet/IP or BACnet/Ethernet.


Step 3 (Optional) You can change the default values of the com4 node parameters located in the lower area of the data entry window. To do so, choose an appropriate value from the relevant drop-down list or enter a value in the text boxes provided.

Step 4 In the node tree pane, expand the internetwork node, click Configuration, and then click MSTP.

Step 5 In the lower area of the MSTP tab, check the Enabled check box to configure the network number and address.

Step 6 In the Network text box, enter the network number.

Step 7 In the Address text box, enter the IP address.


Note Every network must have a unique number, and every device instance on the combined network must be unique.


Step 8 In the node tree pane, right-click MSTP, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 9 Click Ethernet or Com port assignment (eth_or_com_port_name), and then click OK.

A child node, eth_or_com_port_name, appears under the MSTP node in the node tree pane. The data entry pane for the eth_or_com_port_name node displays the default name and description. i

Step 10 Click the eth_or_com_port_name node, and change the entry in the Name text box. You can choose to enter com4, com3, com5, or com6.

The name change is required based on whether you want to configure BACnet over MSTP to be enabled on the desired com port.

Step 11 Save the configuration.


Configuring BACnet Over Ethernet

To configure the BACnet protocol over Ethernet, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 5 in the "Configuring BACnet Over IP" section.

Step 2 In the node tree pane, expand the internetwork node, click Configuration, and then click Ethernet.

Step 3 In the lower area of the Ethernet tab, check the Enabled check box, and configure the network number.

Step 4 In the Network text box, enter the network number.

Step 5 In the node tree pane, right-click Ethernet, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 6 Click Ethernet or Com port assignment (eth_or_com_port_name), and then click OK.

A child node, eth_or_com_port_name, appears under the Ethernet node in the node tree pane. The data entry pane for the eth_or_com_port_name node displays the default name and description.

Step 7 Click the eth_or_com_port_name node, and change the entry in the Name text box to eth0 or eth1, based on whether you want to enable BACnet/Ethernet on eth0 or eth1.

Step 8 Save the configuration.


Discovering BACnet Devices

To discover BACnet devices in the network and to get a complete list of discovered BACnet objects, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Launch an Internet browser (for example, Internet Explorer) and browse to the Mediator web client homepage. To do so, enter the IP address of the Mediator in the Address bar of the browser and log in when prompted.

The Mediator web client homepage appears in the Internet browser window.

Step 2 Click NodeBrowser.

The Mediator web client NodeBrowser homepage appears.

Step 3 Choose services > network > BACnet > Internetwork > Devices.

Step 4 In the Commands area, do the following:

a. To change the discovery mode to broad, click directed.

b. Click send Who-Is.

Wait until the previous page is loaded and refreshed.

Step 5 Click any of the discovered devices.

The discovered devices have their own device instance number. For example, 61.

Step 6 In the Commands area, click CSV file of Objects Info.

You will be prompted to save the output, which is in an excel format. The file extension is .csv. You can either choose to save or open it from the browser. The output excel sheet contains a complete list of discovered BACnet objects in the device.


Note If you do not see any objects under the discovered devices, click any of the devices object type. For example, nodes  > services > network > BACnet >  internetwork > Devices > 2112236 > 6, and then in the Commands area, click Discovered object instances.


Step 7 Save the result and use it to create aliases for all the required nodes by using the Mediator configTOOL.

The following is an example of the nodepath for a BACnet point:

/services/network/BACnet/internetwork/Devices/95001/0/1

95001 = Device Instance Number

0 = Object Type

1 = Object Instance


Configuring the BACnet Multiport and Proxy

This section describes how to configure BACnet Multiport and includes the following topics:

BACnet Multi-port Usage Configuration Guidelines and Restrictions

Configuring BACnet Multi-port

BACnet Proxy Server Usage Guidelines and Restrictions

Adding BACnet Server and Proxy Objects

BACnet Multi-port Usage Configuration Guidelines and Restrictions

When configuring BACnet Multi-port, follow these configuration guidelines and restrictions:

The Cisco Network Building Mediator does not act as a router between the various communication channels.

All devices that are connected in the entire network should be assigned a unique ID.

Each communication channel must have a unique network number.

You must configure only one BACnet Server Device node with the unique network number for each channel.

BACnet Server Device nodes with network numbers that do not match any physical channel are called Virtual Devices.

All BACnet server device nodes are accessible through any communication channel.

The BACnet client devices from all channels are accessible to the Mediator.

The BACnet client devices on a channel are not accessible by the remote devices on a different channel. This is because the Mediator does not act as a router.

Configuring BACnet Multi-port

The Mediator supports BACnet/IP, BACnet/MSTP, and BACnet/Ethernet as communication media, and supports the Multi-Port capability that enables the Mediator to communicate with remote devices through one or more communication channels at the same time without having to go through a BACnet Router.

To configure BACnet Multi-port, based on the combination of BACnet over IP, BACnet over MSTP, or BACnet Over Ethernet, perform the tasks that are described in the "Configuring BACnet Over IP" section, or the "Configuring BACnet Over MSTP" section, or the "Configuring BACnet Over Ethernet" section, and save the configuration.


Adding BACnet Server and Proxy Objects

To add a BACnet server device and proxy objects, perform the following steps:


Step 1 In the node tree pane, expand the node tree, right-click Devices, and then click Add.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 2 Click BACnet Server Device (device_instance_number_goes_here) and then click OK.

A new child node and a device number appear under the device node in the node tree pane. The number tab for the device node displays the default name and description.

Step 3 In the Name text box, enter the BACnet Device ID of the BACNet server device. For example, enter 95001.


Note The Device ID of the BACnet server device must be unique in the network and should not be same as the other devices in the network.


Step 4 In the Network Number text box, enter the network number.

The network number must be the same value as:

The proxied BACnet device (or)

The network number of the Mediator network in which the Mediator acts as a server device.

Step 5 Right-click the new device node to view the node tree right-click menu, and then choose Add.

The Available Devices dialog box appears listing the available objects.

Step 6 Choose Bacnet Analog Value Objects Type Group (2), and then click OK.

A new BACnet analog value object 2 under the new device node appears.

Step 7 Right-click the new object node to view the node tree right-click menu, and then choose Add.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 8 Click Bacnet Analog Value Object Instance, and then click OK.

Step 9 In the node tree pane, a new BACnet Analog Instance Number appears.

The data entry pane for the Bacnet Analog value Instance node displays the default Name, Description, and the Proxy Link.

Step 10 In the Name text box, enter the unique instance ID.

Step 11 In the Description text box, enter the description of the device property.

Step 12 Choose a proxy link from the Proxy Link drop-down list.

A Node Selector dialog box appears.

Step 13 Choose the desired node to link to the object, and then click Select.


Note You can select any node, interface, or protocols configured in the Mediator.


Step 14 Repeat Step 7 to Step 13 to add different objects.


BACnet Proxy Server Usage Guidelines and Restrictions

The BACnet analog value and binary value objects can be either Commandable or Writeable, depending on the presence of the following Optional Properties:

Relinquish Default (104)

Priority Array (87)

For example, see Figure 6-1 for the analog value without Optional Properties.

Figure 6-1 configTOOL - Analog Value Object instance

If you provide the objects as Commandable, the Optional Properties need to be added as children of the Value Object.

For example, see Figure 6-2 for adding Properties 87 and 104.

Figure 6-2 configTOOL - Properties 87 and 104

Configuring BACnet Broadcast Management Device

This section describes how to configure BACnet Broadcast Management Device (BBMD) and static devices.

The BACnet Broadcast Management Device (BBMD) configuration enables communications under multiple subnets. The BBMD directly forwards a BACnet broadcast message initiated by a BACnet/IP device on its subnet to the other subnets with BACnet/IP devices. The message that arrives at a destination subnet broadcasts on that subnet. The BBMDs allow BACnet to operate through IP routers. Their primary purpose is to redistribute the essential broadcast messages that BACnet requires.


Caution Multiple BBMDs on an IP subnet disrupt BACnet communications. Therefore, define only one BBMD per subnet.


Caution Unless explicitly modified, the UDP Port for BACnet/IP is 47808. Do not change this parameter unless you have made a change in the router.

To configure the BACnet Broadcast Management Device, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform the steps described in the "Adding BACnet Server and Proxy Objects" section to configure BBMD on a BACnet supported device.

Step 2 Perform the steps for all the other BBMD-supported BACnet devices that are on a different subnet.


Note The BBMD address table should be identically configured for all BBMD-supported BACnet devices.



Note If you have configured the BACnet over an IP device that needs to communicate with the other BACnet text box devices in a different subnet, you need to configure BBMD.


Step 3 In the node tree pane, expand the node tree, click IP, and then eth0.

Step 4 Right-click eth0 and choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Device dialog box appears.

Step 5 Click Table of BBMD device IP addresses, and then click OK.

A new child node BBMD appears under the eth0.

Step 6 In the Description text box, enter the description of the configured BBMD device.

In the lower area of the BBMD tab, in the BBMD Device Table area, click + to add the IP address, UDP port, and Broadcast mask of all the BBMD supported BACnet devices.

The default broadcast mask is 255.255.255.255.

Step 7 Save the configuration.


Note All BBMD-supported BACnet devices should have an identical BBMD device table.


Step 8 To view the configured BACnet BBMD devices, launch an Internet browser (for example, Internet Explorer), and browse to the Mediator web client homepage. To do so, enter the IP address of the Mediator in the Address bar of the browser and log in when prompted.

The Mediator web client homepage appears in the Internet browser page.

Figure 6-3 configTOOL - Nodes

Step 9 Click Nodes.

The Mediator web client NodeBrowser homepage appears. (See Figure 6-3.)

Step 10 Choose services > network > BACnet > Internetwork > Devices.

All the BBMD devices that are configured in the BBMD table are discovered. (See Figure 6-4.)

Figure 6-4 configTOOL - Discovered Devices


Configuring Static Devices

To configure static devices that are on a different IP subnet, where you cannot use a BBMD on multiple interfaces, perform the following steps:


Step 1 In the node tree pane, choose BACnet > internetwork > Devices.

Step 2 In the Device tab, enter the name and description of the static device.

Step 3 In the Remote Static Devices text box, click the + button to add the Device ID, IP Address, MAC address, Network Number, and the MAC Network.


Note If there is a router in between two networks, the IP address is the IP address of the Mediator, and the MAC address should be the IP address of the router.



BACnet COV

This section describes BACnet Change-of-Value (COV) functionality and includes the following topics:

BACnet COV Deployment Model

Enabling BACnet COV

Usage Guidelines and Restrictions

BACnet COV Deployment Model

The Cisco Network Building Mediator supports client-side functionality of the COV service. The Mediator subscribes to COV notifications from field devices that are capable of generating COV notifications. The Mediator can function as a server for BACnet COV notifications when it acts as a proxy server for the BACnet objects.

The COV client-side functionality is not enabled by default on the Mediator. To enable COV client-side functionality on the Mediator, see the "Enabling BACnet COV" section. In deployments where the field devices do not support the COV server functionality, the behavior of the Mediator is set to the default behavior, which is active polling for the property values.


Note BACnet server device configuration is mandatory for enabling the BACnet COV functionality. To configure the BACnet server device, perform Step 1 and Step 2 of the "Adding BACnet Server and Proxy Objects" section.


Enabling BACnet COV

You need to enable the client-side functionality of the BACnet COV service on the Mediator.

To enable the BACnet COV functionality, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Depending on whether you are configuring BACnet over IP, BACnet over MSTP, or BACnet over Ethernet, follow the instructions outlined in the following sections:

Configuring BACnet Over IP

Configuring BACnet Over MSTP

Configuring BACnet Over Ethernet

Step 2 In the node tree pane, choose services > network > BACnet > internetwork.

Step 3 On the internetwork tab, check the Enable Change of Value (COV) check box.

Step 4 Save the configuration.


Usage Guidelines and Restrictions

The Mediator subscribes to SubscribeCOV service.

SubscribeCOVProperty service is not supported in 3.1.1.

Mediator subscribes to confirmed COV notifications. Subscription to unconfirmed COV notifications is not supported in the Mediator. The Mediator ignores the unconfirmed COV notifications.

The Mediator supports the COV service for the following BACnet objects:

Binary Input

Binary Output

Binary Value

Analog Input

Analog Output

Analog Value

Multi-state Input

Multi-state Output

Multi-state Value

The Mediator supports the COV service for the following BACnet properties:

Present Value

Status Flags

When the field device that acts as the COV server has the COV service capability for the other objects or properties (standard or proprietary), the Mediator does not utilize the same.

The COV service at the Mediator client addresses the following situations:

The COV subscription attempts can fail due to temporary resource constraints on the COV server and transient network conditions (in this case, the Mediator attempts to a re-subscription after 30 minutes).

The COV server device may reboot and lose the data on active subscriptions (to deal with this situation, a re-subscription is performed periodically every 45 minutes).

The default life time of the subscription is set to one hour.


Configuring BACnet Schedules and BACnet Time Synchronization

To configure BACnet schedule and BACnet Time Synchronization, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 5 in the "Configuring BACnet Over IP" section.

Step 2 In the node tree pane, expand the node tree, choose services time local.

Step 3 In the node tree pane, right-click local, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 4 Click BACnet Client Device Schedules holder (bacnet_device_time_schedules), and then click OK.

A new child node, BACnet Client Device Schedules holder, appears under the local node in the node tree pane.

The BACnet_device_time_schedules tab for the BACnet node displays the default name and description of the BACnet schedule. For example, MySite_SignageSchd for OutdoorLgtsSched

Step 5 In BACnet Device text box, enter the BACnet device path to the BACnet device where the schedules are added. For example, /services/network/BACnet/internetwork/Devices/<device instance>

Step 6 In the Auto Discover text box, choose never from the drop-down list.

The other options available in the drop-down list are: numberic, name, and name_and_numberic.

Step 7 In the node tree pane, you can add individual schedules to the schedules holder.

Step 8 To add an individual schedule, right-click the Schedules node.

Step 9 From the right-click menu, choose the schedule that you want to configure, and click Add Schedule.

Step 10 In the BACnet device schedule object text box, enter /services/network/BACnet/internetwork/Devices/<device instance>17/1

17= BACnet schedules type object

1= Schedule Object instance

Step 11 From the Default BACnet Data Type drop-down-list, choose the desired data type.

The options available for the schedule properties are: auto, integer, real, boolean, and enumerated. By default, the data type is auto.

Step 12 If the data type is not auto, check the Force Default Data Type checkbox.


Note For the KMC BACnet device, the data type should be set to enumerated and also select the Force Default Data Type check box.


Step 13 Repeat Step 1 to Step 7 for all the schedules that you want to add.

Step 14 If the BACnet server device on the Mediator is not defined, perform Step 1 to Step 15 as described in the "Adding BACnet Server and Proxy Objects" section.


Note It is recommended that you enable Time Synchronization to synchronize with the clocks on the Mediator and the BACnet Devices.


When a new BACnet server device with a unique device ID is added to the Mediator, an inherent child node is created under the server device node. The default inherent child node is 8.

Step 15 Right-click the inherent child node 8, and then click Add.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 16 Click Bacnet Device Object Instance, and then click OK.

A new BACnet device object instance number appears in the node tree pane. The data entry pane for the new BACnet device instance node displays the default Name, Description, and the Proxy Link.

Step 17 In the Name text box, enter the value of the device instance ID of the new BACnet server device, which is added in Step 14.

The instance number of the device object must be the same as that of the BACnet server device. For example, if the BACnet server device has been assigned a Device ID as 95001, then the value in the Name text box for the newly added BACnet device object instance is 95001. The added BACnet device Object Instance node has all the mandatory properties of the Device object as that of the inherent child nodes.

Step 18 Right-click the Device Object Instance node, and then click Add. For example, 95001.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 19 Click Generic BACnet Property.

A new property node appears under the Device Object Instance node.

Step 20 In the Name Text Box, enter 116.

116 is the property ID of BACnet Device Property-Time Synchronization recipients.

Step 21 To perform the Time Synchronization, click the default property 116.

116 = Time synchronization recipient.

The 116 tab displays the default name and description.

Step 22 (Optional) You can change the name and description of the default property. To do so, in the Description text box, enter a description that will help you identify the property.

Step 23 In the default value text box, enter the device instances of the devices that should receive the Time Synchronization message.

The message is received in a comma separated format within square brackets. For example, [1,2,3,4,5,6].

Step 24 Save the configuration.


Note When Time Synchronization is enabled, the Mediator sends Time Synchronization service messages every hour to synchronize the clock between the Mediator and the BACnet Devices.


Step 25 Check the include all check box to ensure that all the devices in the network receive the Time Synchronization.

Step 26 Save configuration to the Mediator and restart.

Step 27 Open the NodeBrowser.

Step 28 Click the Schedules tab to view the added schedules utility in the Mediator.

The BACnet device schedules appear in the left hand pane.

Step 29 Select a schedule and then move the slide bars in the right pane to edit the schedule objects.


Configuring the Dallas Sensor Protocol

This section describes how to connect and configure a Dallas Sensor point, and includes the following topics:

Connecting a Dallas Sensor Point

Configuring the Dallas Sensor Point

Connecting a Dallas Sensor Point

The Dallas temperature sensor includes the following three legs:

Signal leg—wired to the Dallas1 input on the Mediator. Generally, a white wire is connected to this leg.

Power leg—wired together with the ground leg into the ground (GND) input.

Ground leg—wired together with the power leg into the ground input.

The GND input is located below the Dallas1 input. The red and black wires are connected to the power and ground legs on the Dallas Sensor.

Figure 6-5 describes the Dallas Sensor Point connection.

Figure 6-5 Dallas Sensor Point Connection

Configuring the Dallas Sensor Point

To configure the dallas sensor point on the Mediator, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start configTOOL and connect to the Mediator.

For more information, see the following sections:

Starting configTOOL

Accessing Mediators Using configTOOL.

Step 2 In the node tree pane, expand the node tree, click interfaces, and then click dallas1.

The dallas tab displays the default name and description of the dallas node.

Step 3 (Optional) You can change the description of the node. To do so, in the Description text box, enter a description that will help you identify the purpose of the node.

Step 4 In the node tree pane, right-click Dallas1, and choose 28B20 from the drop-down list.


Note The Dallas sensor point includes two models: 18B20 and 18S20. Based on the model you choose, the node will appear as 18B20 or 18S20.


The 18B20 tab displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters of the 18B20 node. You can change the description of the node.

Step 5 In the Address text box, enter the address of the Dallas sensor point. The address is printed on the dallas wire. For example, 289ccae0010000af.

Step 6 From the Model drop-down list, choose the appropriate model number.

Step 7 Save the configuration.

Step 8 In the node tree, expand the 18B20 node, and then click C.

Step 9 Right-click C, and choose Get Value from the drop-down list.

This displays the values in Celsius. Alternatively, you can click either F or K to see the temperature in Fahrenheit or Kelvin.

Step 10 Launch an Internet browser (example, Internet Explorer) and browse to the Mediator web client homepage. To do so, enter the IP address of the Mediator in the Address bar of the browser.

The Mediator web client homepage appears in the Internet browser window.

Step 11 Click NodeBrowser.

The Mediator web client NodeBrowser homepage appears.

Step 12 Choose interfaces > dallas1 > 18B20.

The dallas values appear in Celsius, Fahrenheit, and Kelvin.


Configuring Modbus Protocol

This section explains how to configure Modbus devices that are connected to the Mediator and includes the following topics:

Prerequisites

Configuring a Modbus RTU over an RS-232 Bus Network Node

Configuring a Modbus RTU over an RS-485 Bus Network Node

Prerequisites

The prerequisites for configuring a Modbus device to the Mediator are as follows:

Type of Modbus Protocol

Physical network architecture of Modbus device

Physical addresses of the Modbus RTU Device

Register Map of the Modbus Device

Communication Settings of the Modbus Device

Configuring a Modbus RTU over an RS-232 Bus Network Node

This section describes how to configure a Modbus RS-232 bus network for devices that are connected to the com1 or com2 ports of the Mediator.

To configure a Modbus RTU over an RS-232 Bus network node, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start configTOOL and connect to the Mediator.

Step 2 Open an existing Mediator configuration file or create a new one.

Step 3 Click interfaces to view the list of interfaces nodes.

Step 4 Click the com1 node or com 2 node.

When you click the com1 node, a tab appears in the right pane, and displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters.

To change the default name and description of the node, enter a new name in the Name text box to identify the node, and press Enter. The new node name replaces the default in the node tree.

To change the description of the node, enter the new description in the Description text box.

Step 5 Right-click the node, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears displaying a list of child nodes that you can configure for this parent node.

For information on how to configure the devices, see the "Configuring a Modbus Device Node" section.


Configuring a Modbus RTU over an RS-485 Bus Network Node

This section describes how to configure a Modbus RS-485 bus network for devices that are connected to the com3 through com6 ports of the Mediator. To configure a Modbus RTU over an RS-485 network node, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start configTOOL and connect to the Mediator.

Step 2 Open an existing Mediator configuration file or start a new one.

Step 3 Click the com3 node or com 6 node.

When you click the com1 node, a tab appears in the right pane, and displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters.

To change the default name and description of the node, enter a new name in the Name text box to identify the node, and press Enter. The new node name replaces the default in the node tree.

To change the description of the node, enter the new description in the Description text box.

Step 4 Right-click the node, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 5 From the Available Devices list, choose modbus, and then click OK.

For information on how to configure these devices, see the "Configuring a Modbus Device Node" section.


Configuring Modbus TCP/IP Devices

This section provides an overview of the Modbus TCP/IP client, and describes how to configure a Modbus TCP/IP network for devices that are connected to the Ethernet ports of the Mediator.

This section includes the following topics:

Configuring a Modbus TCP/IP Client

Configuring a Modbus TCP/IP Client

Configuring a Modbus Device Node

Configuring the Modbus Holding Registers

Configuring Modbus Input Registers

Configuring the Modbus Coil Registers

Configuring the Modbus Input Status Registers

Configuring Modbus Groups

Configuring the Modbus Proxy

Configuring a Modbus TCP/IP Client

To configure a Modbus TCP/IP client, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start Mediator configTOOL and connect to the Mediator.

Step 2 Open an existing Mediator configuration file or create a new one.

Step 3 Click to expand or collapse the node tree to list the interface nodes in the node tree pane.

Step 4 Right-click the interfaces/eth0 or interfaces/eth1 node, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 5 Click Modbus TCP/IP client (Modbus Actual Devices) and then click OK.

The Modbus Actual Devices appears under eth0 or eth1.

Step 6 Enter the IP address of the server to which the Mediator client will send commands and receive responses.

Step 7 Enter the number of the port the Mediator uses for Modbus communications in the Port text box.

The default port number is 502.

Step 8 To configure additional client nodes, repeat Step 4 to Step 7. You can configure multiple client nodes on the same Mediator, each with a different IP address

Step 9 Right-click Modbus_device (Modbus Actual Device), and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 10 From the Available Devices list, choose Modbus Device (modbus_devices) and then click OK.

The Modbus Device appears under the Modbus Actual Devices.

Step 11 In the Address text box, enter the address of the Modbus Device.

For information on how to configure these devices, see the "Configuring a Modbus Device Node" section.


Configuring a Modbus Device Node

The Mediator implementation of Modbus supports the generic device configuration, which allows you to configure any type of device compliant with the Modbus protocol. In addition, it supports several pre-defined devices produced by specific OEMs.

This section describes how to configure a Modbus Device Node.

To configure a Modbus Device for any network, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Configure the network connection:

If you are configuring devices for an RS-232 bus network, complete the procedure outlined in the "Configuring a Modbus RTU over an RS-232 Bus Network Node" section.

If you are configuring devices for an RS-485 bus network, complete the procedure outlined in the "Configuring a Modbus RTU over an RS-485 Bus Network Node" section.

If you are configuring devices for a TCP/IP network, complete the procedure outlined in the "Configuring Modbus TCP/IP Devices" section.

Step 2 Click Modbus.


Note To rename the node, type the new name in the Name text box, and then press Enter. The new node name replaces the default in the node tree. It also becomes the name of the node throughout the system. The communication parameter defaults appear in the drop-down list in the lower part of the tab.


Step 3 Right-click the modbus device node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 4 Click Modbus, and then click OK.


Note Text boxes for the required configuration parameters (labeled in red) and optional parameters appear in the lower area of the tab.


Step 5 In the Address text box, enter the device address (Device ID) of the Modbus device.

The device address is mentioned in the spec sheet or in the registry details sheet of the device from the manufacturer. It can also be obtained from the dip switches, which are available in the hardware.

Step 6 Click + in the Cache Exclude area to specify the cache.

Step 7 Click the Register tab to enter the register number of the first register that you want to include in the cache in the Register text box.


Note The upper boundary is determined by the start of the next cache (if any), the maximum message size, or the address of the last register in the group.


Step 8 Click the TTL tab to enter the length of time (in seconds) that the node retains the last value read before the system reads a new value from the device in the Time To Live (TTL) text box.

Step 9 Repeat Step 5 to Step 8 for any other caches that you want to configure.


Note The Cache Exclude capability is not explicitly supported in this release. To exclude a register from a cache, configure the cache that begins with the first register that you want to include, another cache that includes only the register that you want to exclude, and another cache that begins with the next register after the excluded one.


Step 10 Right-click the node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.


Note The list contains register types that you can configure for a Modbus device. These include the four standard register types defined in the Modbus protocol as shown in Table 6-1.

Table 6-1 Standard Registers for Modbus Protocol

Name
Size
Access
Register Number Range

Holding Register

16 bit

Read | Write

40001 - 65535

Input Register

16 bit

Read Only

30001 - 39999

Coil

1 bit

Read | Write

1 - 9999

Input Status

1 bit

Read Only

10001 - 29999



For more information on configuring these registers, see the "Configuring the Modbus Holding Registers" section.


Configuring the Modbus Holding Registers

This section describes how to configure Modbus Holding Registers.

To configure Modbus Holding Registers, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Complete the procedure outlined in the "Configuring a Modbus Device Node" section.

Step 2 Right-click the node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 3 From the Available Devices list, choose modbus_holding_register, and then click OK.

A new modbus_holding_register node appears in the node tree under its modbus_device_1 parent node.

Step 4 Enter a new name that more clearly identifies the node in the Name text box.

Step 5 In the Register Number text box, enter a value from 40001 to 65535.


Note The user documentation of the device that you are configuring should specify the mapping of register numbers to data points. Also, ensure to understand the offset in the device configurations that is set by the manufacturers when numbering the registers.


Step 6 Choose the length, in bits, required for the data type that you specify in Step 8 from the Register Length drop-down list.

Step 7 Choose the data type for the register (see Table 6-2) from the Data Type drop-down list.

Step 8 Check the Read-Only check box to specify the node as Read-Only.


Note The Modbus protocol supports two orders in which words, bytes, and bits can be stored in the register.


Network Order (left to right, most significant to least significant)

Reversed Order (right to left, least significant to most significant)

Step 9 Choose the order of the individual words stored in the register from the Word Order drop-down list.

Step 10 Choose the order of the individual words stored in the register from the Byte Order drop-down list.

Step 11 Choose the order of the individual words stored in the register from the Bit Order drop-down list.

Step 12 Enter the minimum limit to the value that can be written to the node in the Minimum text box.

The default is None.

Step 13 Enter the maximum limit to the value that can be written to the node in the Maximum text box. The default is None.

Table 6-2 Holding Register Data Types 

Type
Length
Description

int

1

16-bit signed integer

IEEE float

2, 4

32-bit and 64-it versions

hi byte

1

8-bit unsigned integer (high byte of register)

lobyte

1

8-bit unsigned integer (low byte of register)

loint

1

8-bit signed integer (low byte of register)

hiint

1

8-bit signed integer (high byte of register)

lochar

1

8-bit python char (low byte of register)

hichar

1

8-bit python char (high byte of register)

word

1,2

16 or 32-bit unsigned integer

dword

2

32-bit unsigned integer (same as word with length of 2)

string

-

Variable length

zstring

-

Same as string but terminated with a zero character

modulo

1,2,3,4

16, 32, 48, 64 bits. each 16 bits represents 0-9999

-

-

16-bit range -9999 to 9999

-

-

32-bit range -99,999,999 to 99,999,999

-

-

48-bit range -999,999,999,999 to 999,999,999,999

-

-

64-bit range -9,999,999,999,999,999 to 9,999,999,999,999,999

time

3,6

48 and 96-bit versions

-

-

48-bit version:

-

-

day = low byte first register

-

-

month = high byte first register

-

-

hour = low byte second register

-

-

year = high byte second register

-

-

second = low byte third register

-

-

minute = high byte third register

-

-

96 bit version

-

-

second = first register as word

-

-

minute = second register as word

-

-

hour = third register as word

-

-

day = forth register as word



Configuring Modbus Input Registers

To configure Modbus Input Registers, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Complete the procedure outlined in the "Configuring a Modbus Device Node" section.

Step 2 Right-click the node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears displaying a list of the child nodes that you can configure for this parent node.

Step 3 From the Available Devices list, choose Modbus_Input_register, and then click OK.

A new modbus_holding_register node appears in the node tree under its modbus_device parent node.

Step 4 Enter a new name and description that more clearly identifies the node in the Name and Description text boxes.

Step 5 Enter a number from 30001 (the default) to 39999 in the Register Number text box.


Note The user documentation of the device that you are configuring should specify the mapping of the register numbers to data points.


Step 6 Choose the register length, in bits, as required for the data type that you specify in Step 7 from the Register Length drop-down list. For example, 1 (The options available are 1,2,3,4,5, and 6.)

Step 7 Choose the data type that the register should contain (see Table 6-2) from the Data Type drop-down list.

Step 8 Check the Read-Only check box to specify the node as Read-Only.


Configuring the Modbus Coil Registers

To configure the Modbus Coil Registers, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Complete the procedure outlined in the "Configuring a Modbus Device Node" section.

Step 2 Right-click the node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 3 From the Available Devices list, choose Modbus coil, and click OK.

A new modbus_coil node appears in the node tree under its modbus_device_1 parent node.

Step 4 Enter a new name and description that more clearly identifies the node in the Name and Description text boxes.

Step 5 Enter a number from 1 (the default) to 9999 in the Register Number text box.


Note The user documentation of the device that you are configuring should specify the mapping of register numbers to data points.


Step 6 Check the Read-Only check box to specify the node as Read-Only.


Configuring the Modbus Input Status Registers

To configure the Modbus Input Status Registers, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Complete the procedure outlined in the "Configuring a Modbus Device Node" section.

Step 2 Right-click the node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 3 From the Available Devices list, choose Modbus_Input_Registers, and then click OK.

A new modbus_input_status_1 node appears in the node tree under its modbus_device_1 parent node.

Step 4 Enter a new name and a description that more clearly identifies the node in the Name and Description text boxes, or retain the default values.

Step 5 Enter a number from 10001 to 29999 in the Register Number text box.

The default is 10001.


Note The user documentation of the device that you are configuring should specify the mapping of register numbers to data points.


Step 6 Check the Read-Only check box to specify the node as Read-Only.


Configuring Modbus Groups

This section describes how to configure Modbus groups.

The Modbus implementation on the Mediator supports grouping and data caching of registers. Groups and caches are related, but they are not identical:

Grouping of registers allows you to associate registers into groups that are read from (and possibly written to) the device together in a single message.

Data caching allows you to specify groups of registers that can be read in a single message without accessing the device each time.

Modbus supports a maximum message size of 256 bytes, which sets a limit to the size of a register grouping that can be included in one message. If a register grouping exceeds that limit, the Mediator automatically breaks it up into smaller units.


Note All of the registers in a group must be contiguous registers of the same type.


To configure a group, specify the first register in the group as the Base Register Number, and then specify all of the child nodes of the group nodes with relative addresses. For example, if you specify 40100 as the Base Register Number, and a child node as 5, the Mediator adds the offset to the base to arrive at register 40105. A caching option allows you to cache the group.

To configure the Modbus groups, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Complete the procedure outlined in the "Configuring a Modbus Device Node" section.

Step 2 Right-click the node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 3 From the Available Devices list, choose modbus_group_1.

A new modbus_group_1 node appears in the node tree under its modbus_group_1 parent node.

Step 4 Enter a new name and a description that more clearly identifies the node in the Name and Description text boxes, or retain the default values.

Step 5 Enter the register number of the first register in the group in the Base Register Number text box.

Step 6 Check or uncheck the Enable separate cache check box to enable or disable caching.


Note If you enable caching, the Base Register Number you specify in Step 6 becomes the cache boundary for the group.


Step 7 Right-click modbus_group_1, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 8 Configure the registers in the group. For information on how to configure registers, see the sections covered in page 37 and page 40.


Note You must configure the child node for each register in the group individually. All of the registers in the group must be contiguous and of the same type.


In the Register Number text box, you can specify the address of each related nodes to the Base Register Number specified in Step 6. For example, if you are configuring a group of holding registers and specify 40100 as the Base Register Number, you specify the register address of the first child node as 1, the second as 2, and so on. The Mediator adds the offset to the base to arrive at register 40101, 40102, and so on.

Modbus supports a maximum message size of 256 bytes, which sets a limit to the size of a register grouping that can be included in one message. If a register grouping exceeds that limit, the Mediator automatically breaks it up into smaller units.

Configuring the Modbus Proxy

This section describes how to configure Modbus proxy. You can configure a Modbus proxy device by taking information from a BACnet thermostat and proxying it to Modbus. In some configurations, you can take the data from one system and proxy it to an another system that could not communicate. In other words, Modbus acts as a gateway.

To configure the Modbus proxy, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Right-click the appropriate com port in the node tree, and choose Add from the right-click menu. For example, com1.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 2 From the Available Devices list, choose Modbus Slave(s) over RS232 (modbus), and then click OK.

A new modbus node appears in the node tree under its com1 parent node.


Note Similarly, you can create Modbus Proxy over RS-485 ports and Modbus proxy over IP ports.


Step 3 Enter a new name and a description that more clearly identifies the node in the Name and Description text boxes, or retain the default values.

Step 4 Right-click modbus and choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 5 From the Available Devices list, choose Modbus_proxy_device(modbus_proxy_device) and click OK.

A new modbus_proxy_device node appears in the node tree under its modbus parent node.

Step 6 Enter a new name and a description that more clearly identifies the node in the Name and Description text boxes, or retain the default values.

Step 7 Enter an address desired for the Modbus Proxy device - 1 to 256. For example, enter 1.

Step 8 Right-click on Modbus Proxy device.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 9 From the Available Devices list, choose modbus holding register (modbus_holding_register), and then click OK.

Step 10 Enter a new name and a description that more clearly identifies the node in the Name and Description text boxes, or retain the default values.


Note Any Entity can be linked in the link text box. For example, BACnet entity discovered and mapped under Entity: aliases/RTU1/......"


Step 11 In the Link text box, enter /aliases/RTU1/Occupancy, and click the Selector icon.

Step 12 Enter modbus register number as 40001.

Step 13 Browse to the node /aliases/RTU1/Occupancy highlight it and click Select.

Save the configuration.


Configuring the SNMP Protocol

This section explains how to configure SNMP devices that are connected to the Mediator and includes the following topics:

Prerequisites

Configuring SNMP devices on the Mediator

Prerequisites

The prerequisites for configuring SNMP devices on the Mediator are as follows:

MIBs for SNMP devices

IP address and UDP port of the SNMP Devices

Compiled MIBs for the SNMP device

Configuring SNMP devices on the Mediator

To configure SNMP devices on the Mediator, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Connect to the Mediator using WinSCP and move the compiled MIB of the SNMP device to the /usr/lib/broadway/mpx/lib/snmp/mibs directory on the Mediator.


Note If this is a newly supported SNMP device, you must perform Step 1. For unsupported SNMP devices, contact Cisco TAC to compile MIBs.


Step 2 Start configTOOL and connect to the Mediator.

Step 3 Click services to view the list of services options.

Step 4 Right-click the /service/network node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 5 Click SNMP.

By default, the Trap Engine and Remote Agents nodes are added.

Step 6 Right-click the services/network/SNMP/Remote agents node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 7 Click SNMP Remote Agent (remote_agent), and then click OK.

The Managed Objects node is added automatically.


Note Text boxes for the required configuration parameters (labeled in red) and optional parameters appear in the lower area of the tab.


Step 8 Enter the IP address of the device in the IP Address text box.

Step 9 Enter the UDP Port number in use in the UDP port text box.

By default, the port number is 161 for SNMP.

Step 10 To add a new row, click + in the Built-In MIBs text box.

Step 11 Enter the name of the compiled MIB in the new row.


Note Do not include the .py extension.


Step 12 Check the Force discovery at start check box.

Step 13 Right-click the /services/network/SNMP/Remote Agents/remote_agent node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears listing the available SNMP versions.

Step 14 Enter version-specific security details for the device, and then click OK.

For example, you can choose SNMPv1, SNMPv2c, or SNMPv3 from the Available Devices dialog box, and then click Add.

Step 15 Save the configuration. After the configuration is saved, launch an Internet browser, and browse to the Mediator web client homepage.

Step 16 From the menu bar, choose Nodes, and go to the following URL:

nodebrowser/services/network/SNMP/Remote Agents/remote_agent

Step 17 Click Invoke Discover() via nodebrowser.

The SNMP nodes will be discovered.


Note The discovery process can take several minutes.


Step 18 Click Invoke cached report () via nodebrowser.

When you click Invoke cached report () via nodebrowser, Mediator generates a report that contains the names and node paths of the objects available from the SNMP device.

Step 19 Save the report as a .txt file.

Step 20 Using configTOOL and the SNMP discovery report, create aliases for the SNMP objects.

For example, the alias path will appear as the following:

/services/network/SNMP/RemoteAgents/UPS_1/Managed Objects/UPS_1/ManagedObjects/iso/org/dod/internet/private/enterprises/apc/products/hardware/ups/upsomm/upsCommStatus/0


Configuring C-Bus Protocol

This section describes the C-Bus protocol, explains how to configure C-Bus devices connected to the Mediator, and includes the following topics:

Prerequisites

Configuring C-Bus Devices

Prerequisites

Ensure the following:

The PC-Interface Card connects the Mediator to the C-Bus Network over RS-232.

The communication settings of the C-Bus device are configured.

The C-Bus group address is mapped with the physical location of end devices.

Configuring C-Bus Devices

To configure C-Bus devices on the Mediator, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start configTOOL and connect to the Mediator.

For more information, see the following sections:

Starting configTOOL

Accessing Mediators Using configTOOL.

Step 2 Open an existing Mediator configuration file or create a new configuration file.

The configTOOL window appears.

Step 3 In the node tree pane, expand the node tree, then click interfaces, and then click com1 or com 2. In this example, click com1.

The tab for the com1 node displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters of the node.

Step 4 (Optional) You can change the description of the node. To do so, in the Description text box, enter a description that will help you identify the purpose of the node.

Step 5 (Optional) You can change the default values of the com1 node parameters located in the lower area. To do so, choose an appropriate value from the relevant drop-down list or enter a value in the text boxes provided.

Step 6 In the node tree pane, right-click com1, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears listing the protocols supported by the Mediator.

Step 7 Choose C-Bus via Clipsal PCI (cbus), and then click OK.

A child node, cbus, appears under the com1 node in the node tree pane.

The data entry pane for the cbus node displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters.


Note Ensure that the Auto Discover check box and the Enable check box are checked.


Step 8 Save the configuration.

Step 9 Launch an Internet browser (for example, Internet Explorer) and browse to the Mediator web client homepage. To do so, enter the IP address of the Mediator in the Address bar of the browser.

The Mediator web client homepage appears in the Internet browser window.

Step 10 Click NodeBrowser.

The Mediator web client NodeBrowser homepage appears.

Step 11 Choose interfaces > com1 > cbus > local to browse to the /interfaces/com1/cbus/local/ folder.

The Mediator web client NodeBrowser page displays a list of all C-Bus nodes discovered in the network.

Step 12 Click a56.

The Mediator web client NodeBrowser page displays the group addresses of all available lighting modules.

Step 13 Map the group addresses with end devices and create aliases for all the required nodes using the configTOOL.


Note You can connect two types of devices to the C-Bus node: Relays and Dimmers.

Based on the device that you select, you must add the overridable property as follows:

When you connect to Relays, add the property under the Binary Output (BO).

When you connect to Dimmers, add the property under the Analog Output (AO).


Configuring the Johnson N2 Protocol

This section provides an overview of the Johnson N2 protocol, explains how to configure Johnson N2 devices that are connected to the Mediator, and includes the following topics:

Prerequisites

Configuration Instructions

Prerequisites

Data Definition Language (DDL) files are required for Johnson N2 devices for configuring Johnson N2 devices on the Mediator.

Configuration Instructions

To configure the Johnson N2 devices on the Mediator, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start configTOOL and connect to the Mediator.

Step 2 From the drop-down list of interfaces, choose com4, and then click OK.


Note This step assumes that com4 is connected to the N2 network. You can also use com3, com5, or com6.


Step 3 From the BPS drop-down list, choose 9600.

Step 4 Set the default values in the other text boxes in the lower area of the tab.

Step 5 Right-click the com4 node under interfaces, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 6 Click n2.

Step 7 Configure the n2 node as follows:

a. Enable Auto Discovery Mode: all

b. Starting Address: 1

c. Ending Address: 255

Step 8 Save the configuration.

Step 9 Perform a search for all N2 devices on a network by making a call to the function force_discovery on the n2 node. This will query all 255 addresses for the presence of a device.

This function is invoked from the Node browser with the following URL:

http://ipaddress/nodebrowser/interfaces/com4/n2?action=invoke&method=force_discovery

When you refresh the N2 page, it displays the devices on the network.

Step 10 Use the discovered device information and the object information contained in the DDLs to create aliases for the N2 devices.

The N2 driver nodes are organized as follows:

/ interfaces / com# / n2 / (device number) / (region number) / (object number) / [attribute number]

[device number] is replaced by a number from 1 to 255. This is the N2 LAN address for a device.

[region number] is replaced by a number from 1 to 7. N2 regions are defined as follows:

Analog Inputs

Binary Inputs

Analog Outputs

Binary Outputs

Float Internal Values (ADF)

Integer Internal Values (ADI)

Byte Internal Values

[object number] is replaced by a number from 1 to 255. The range of numbers varies by device type.

[attribute number] is an optional text box to allow access to various internal attributes of objects.

Each object node directly returns the main value for each object instance; however, some applications may require access to other aspects on the state of the object.

Details regarding Object Attributes can be found in the Open N2 protocol specification.

For example, URLs for N2 objects on a device at address 10:

AI 1 = /interfaces/com4/n2/10/1/1

AI 2 = /interfaces/com4/n2/10/1/2

ADF 123 = /interfaces/com4/n2/10/5/123

ADI 22 = /interfaces/com4/n2/10/6/22


Configuring the Barber-Colman ASD Protocol

This section describes the Barber-Colman ASD protocol supported by the Mediator, explains how to configure Barber-Colman devices connected to the Mediator, and includes the following topics:

Prerequisites

Configuring Barber-Colman ASD Devices

Prerequisites

Determine the communications (com) node that includes the Barber-Colman system.

Configuring Barber-Colman ASD Devices

To configure Barber-Colman ASD devices on the Mediator, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start configTOOL to open the Mediator configuration (see the "Accessing Mediators Using configTOOL" section).

The configTOOL window appears.

Step 2 In the node tree pane, click interfaces to display the list of interface nodes.

Step 3 Click the com node to which the Barber-Colman system is connected. In this example, click com5 to display the Barber-Colman system that is connected to the com5 node.

Step 4 The data entry pane displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters of the com5 node.

You can change the default values of the com5 node parameters located in the lower area of the com5 tab. The default values 9600- 8 -N-1-N.

Step 5 In the node tree pane, right-click com5, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 6 Choose Barber Colman ASD protocol (barber colman protocol), and then click OK.

A new child node, barber colman protocol, appears under the chosen com node in the node tree pane.

The barber colman protocol tab displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters of the barber colman protocol child node.

Step 7 From the Discovery Mode drop-down list, choose always.

Step 8 In the Search Limit text box, enter 254.

Step 9 Save the configuration to the Mediator.


Note When the Mediator restarts, open the configuration that you had saved earlier.


Step 10 In the configTOOL window, choose Mediator > Interrogate.

When the device interrogation completes, a list of devices appear under the barber colman protocol snippet. Check the devices to ensure that they match the devices on your network.

Step 11 Save the barber colman protocol snippet.

Step 12 Re-open configTOOL. When prompted, do not save the interrogated configuration.

Step 13 Import the barber colman protocol snippet to the com5 node.

Step 14 Save the configuration to the Mediator.


Configuring the ALC WebCTRL SOAP Interface

This section describes the ALC WebCTRL SOAP interface supported by the Mediator, explains how to configure the ALC WebCTRL SOAP interface on the Mediator, and includes the following topics:

Prerequisites

Configuring an ALC WebCTRL SOAP Interface

Determining WebCTRL Expressions of WebCTRL Points

Prerequisites

Determine the following:

WSDL for the ALC WebCTRL Server

Username and password of the WebCTRL Server

GQL Path of objects

Configuring an ALC WebCTRL SOAP Interface

To configure an ALC WebCTRL SOAP interface, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Connect to the Mediator using WinSCP, and move the WSDL to the following directory on the Mediator:

/var/mpx/config

Step 2 Start configTOOL and connect to the Mediator (see the "Accessing Mediators Using configTOOL" section).

The configTOOL window appears.

Step 3 In the node tree pane, click interfaces to display the list of available interfaces.

Step 4 Right-click eth0, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.


Note This step assumes that the eth0 interface is on the same network as the WebCTRL Server.


The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 5 Choose ALC WebCtrl SOAP Interface (WebCtrl Server), and then click OK.

The WebCtrl Server_1 interface appears under the eth0 node in the node tree pane.

The WebCtrl Server_1 tab displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters of the WebCtrl Server interface.

Step 6 In the Username text box, enter the username configured for the WebCtrl Server operator.

Step 7 In the Password text box, enter the password configured for the operator on the WebCtrl Server.

Step 8 In the WSDL text box, enter the WSDL name.


Note The WebCtrl Server operator must have Remote Data Access privilege to use the SOAP interface.


Step 9 In the node tree pane, right-click WebCtrl Server_1, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears listing the available WebCTRL interfaces.

Step 10 Choose WebCtrl Point (Point), and then click OK.

The Point child node appears under the WebCtrl Server_1 node in the node tree pane.

The point tab displays the default name, description of the Point node, and the configurable parameters.

Step 11 In the Name text box, enter a new name that will identify the Point node.

Step 12 In the URL text box, enter the unique expression that identifies the WebCtrl Point.

You can determine the WebCTRL expression that uniquely identifies a WebCtrl Point. For more information, see the "Determining WebCTRL Expressions of WebCTRL Points" section.

Step 13 Repeat Step 9 to Step 12 to configure additional WebCtrl Points.

Step 14 Save the configuration.


Determining WebCTRL Expressions of WebCTRL Points

A WebCTRL expression uniquely identifies a WebCtrl point. You can determine the WebCTRL expression in two ways:

Copying the Geographic Location

Obtaining the GQL Path

Copying the Geographic Location

You can copy the geographic location path of the WebCtrl point. This path represents the URL of the WebCtrl Point.

To copy the geographic location, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Connect to the ALC WebCTRL server.

Step 2 Navigate to the Logic page, and click the appropriate WebCtrl Point.

Step 3 Click the Details page.

Step 4 Press Alt, and click value.

Step 5 Choose Show Advanced.

The Geographic Location text box displays the URL of the WebCtrl Point.

Step 6 Copy the value in the Geographic Location text box to the clipboard.


Obtaining the GQL Path

You can copy the GQL path of the WebCtrl Point. This path represents the URL of the WebCtrl Point.

To obtain the GQL path, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Connect to the ALC WebCTRL server.

Step 2 In the WebCtrl navigation tree, choose the appropriate equipment or group of equipment.

Step 3 Choose Reports > Equipment > Points List.

Step 4 Click the Options tab, and then check the GQL Path check box.

Step 5 Click Run.

Step 6 Click Save.

Save the report as a Microsoft Excel (.xls) document.

Open the Microsoft Excel document. In the GQL Path column, the value with a /present_value suffix is the URL of the WebCtrl point.
The following is an example of a URL for the WebCtrl point in a GQL Path column:

#b1_chiller/chws/present_value

For legacy CMNet GQL paths, replace parameters with ospace, and use the /output1.value suffix instead of the /present_value suffix as shown in the following example of a URL for a legacy WebCtrl point in a GQL Path column:

Original path: /#ahu1_1/legacy_fb/parameters/sat

Modified path: /#ahu1_1/legacy_fb/ospace/sat/output1.value


Note You can check or uncheck the check box for read-only documents.



Configuring the Lennox SysBus Protocol

This section describes the Lennox SysBus protocol supported by the Mediator, explains how to configure the Lennox SysBus devices on the Mediator, and includes the following topics:

Prerequisites

Configuring Lennox SysBus Devices


Note The Lennox SysBus driver has been tested with Lennox hardware version 1-7 and version 1-8, and firmware version 5.02 or greater.


Prerequisites

Determine the following:

Addresses of the Lennox SysBus devices

Com node that includes the Lennox Sysbus network

Configuring Lennox SysBus Devices

To configure Lennox SysBus devices that are connected to the Mediator, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start configTOOL and connect to the Mediator (see the "Accessing Mediators Using configTOOL" section).

The configTOOL window appears.

Step 2 In the node tree pane, expand the interfaces node, and then click com4. You can also use the com3, com5 or com6 port.


Note This step assumes that the com4 node is connected to the Lennox Sysbus network.


The com4 tab displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters of the com4 node.

Step 3 From the BPS drop-down list, choose 9600.


Note Do not change the default values of the remaining parameters of the com4 node.


Step 4 In the node tree pane, right-click com4, and then choose Add.

The Available Devices dialog box appears listing the protocols supported by the Mediator.

Step 5 Choose Lennox Sysbus protocol (lennox), and then click OK.

A new child node, lennox, appears under the com4 node in the node tree pane.

Step 6 In the node tree pane, right-click lennox, and then choose Add.

The Available Devices dialog box appears listing the available Lennox SysBus devices.

Step 7 Choose Lennox device (device), and then click OK.

A new child node, device, appears under the lennox node in the node tree pane.

The device tab displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters of the device node.

Step 8 (Optional) To change the name of the device node, in the Name text box, enter a new name for the device node.

The device node is renamed to the new name that you provided, and appears in the node tree pane.

Step 9 (Optional) To change the description of the device node, in the Description text box, enter a description to identify the purpose of this node.


Note In the node tree pane, when you position the cursor over the device node, a tooltip appears. The tooltip displays the description text provided in the Description text box.


Step 10 In the Address text box, enter the device address.

Step 11 Repeat Step 6 to Step 10 to configure additional Lennox SysBus devices.

Step 12 Save the configuration.


Configuring the Trane Com3 Protocol on the Mediator

This section provides an overview of the Trane Com3 protocol, explains how to configure Trane Com3 devices that are connected to the Mediator, and includes the following topics:

Prerequisites

Configuring the Trane Com3 Protocol

Configuring the Trane PCM Controller

Configuring the Trane RTA Controller

Configuring the Trane Scroll Controller

Configuring the Trane TCM Controller

Configuring the Trane VariTrane II \ III Controller


Note The devices currently supported in this release are Trane PCM, Trane RTA, Trane Scroll, and Trane TCM.


Prerequisites

Prerequisites for configuring the Trane Com3 protocol are as follows:

Trane Com3 device addresses

Trane Com3 Protocol Converter

Configuring the Trane Com3 Protocol

To configure the Trane Com3 protocol, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start configTOOL and connect to the Mediator.

Step 2 Choose com2 from the drop-down list of interfaces, and then click OK.


Note This step assumes that com2 is connected to the Trane Com3 network. You can also use com1 if required.


Step 3 From the BPS drop-down list, choose 9600.

Retain the default values in the other text boxes in the pane.

Step 4 Right-click the interface/com2 node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 5 Choose trane_com3_protocol from the com2 drop-down list, and then click OK.


Configuring the Trane PCM Controller

To configure the Trane PCM controller, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 4 as described in the "Configuring the Trane Com3 Protocol" section.

Step 2 Right-click the interfaces/com2/trane_com3_protocol node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 3 Click pcm.

Step 4 Enter a new name for the node in the Name text box.

Step 5 Enter the address of the device in the Address text box.

Step 6 Check the Upload Setpoints check box to set the default setting.

Step 7 Repeat Step 1 to Step 6 for each device.

Step 8 Save the configuration.


Configuring the Trane RTA Controller

To configure the Trane RTA controller, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 5 as described in the "Configuring the Trane Com3 Protocol" section.

Step 2 Right-click the trane_com3_protocol node under interfaces/com2, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 3 Click RTA.

Step 4 Enter a new name for the node in the Name text box.

Step 5 Enter the address of the device in the Address text box.

Step 6 Repeat Step 2 to Step 4 for each device.

Step 7 Save the configuration.


Configuring the Trane Scroll Controller

To configure the Trane Scroll controller, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 5 as described in the "Configuring the Trane Com3 Protocol" section.

Step 2 Right-click the interfaces/com2/trane_com3_protocol node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 3 Click Sroll.

Step 4 Enter a new name for the node in the Name text box.

Step 5 Enter the address of the device in the Address text box.

Step 6 Check the Upload Setpoints check box to set the default setting.

Step 7 Repeat Step 1 to Step 5 for each device.

Step 8 Save the configuration.


Configuring the Trane TCM Controller

To configure the Trane TCM controller, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 5 as described in the "Configuring the Trane Com3 Protocol" section.

Step 2 Right-click the interfaces/com2/trane_com3_protocol node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 3 Click tcm, and then click OK.

Step 4 Enter a new name for the node in the Name text box.

Step 5 Enter the address of the device in the Address text box.

Step 6 Check the Upload Setpoints check box to set the default setting.

Step 7 Repeat Step 2 to Step 5 for each device.

Step 8 Click Save to save the configuration.


Configuring the Trane VariTrane II \ III Controller

To configure the Trane VariTrane II \ III controller, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 5 as described in the "Configuring the Trane Com3 Protocol" section.

Step 2 Right-click the /interfaces/com2/trane_com3_protocol node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 3 Click VariTrane, and then click OK.

Step 4 Enter a new name for the node in the Name text box.

Step 5 Enter the address of the device in the Address text box.

Step 6 Check the Upload Setpoints check box to set the default setting.

Step 7 Repeat Step 2 to Step 5 for each device.

Step 8 Click Save to save the configuration.


Figure 6-6 shows the wiring details of the RZ-Trane protocol convertor.

Figure 6-6 Wiring Detail of RZ-Trane Protocol Convertor

Configuring the Trane Com4 Protocol on the Mediator

This section provides an overview of the Trane Com4 protocol, explains how to configure Trane Com4 devices that are connected to the Mediator, and includes the following topics:

Prerequisites

Configuring the Trane Com4 Protocol

Configuring the Trane Intellipak Controller

Configuring the Trane Voyager Controller

Configuring the Trane 3 Non Isolated Controller

Configuring the Trane VariTrane II \ III Controller


Note The devices that are currently supported are the Trane Intellipak, Trane Varitrane II\III, and Trane Voyager.


Prerequisites

Trane Com4 device addresses are required for configuring the Trane Com4 devices on the Mediator.

Configuring the Trane Com4 Protocol

To configure the Trane Com4 Protocol, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start configTOOL and connect to the Mediator.

Step 2 Choose com4 from the drop-down list of interfaces, and then click OK.


Note This step assumes that com4 is connected to the Trane com4 network. You can also use com3, com5, or com6.


Step 3 From the BPS drop-down list, choose 9600.

The other text boxes in the data entry pane have the default values.

Step 4 Right-click the /interfaces/com4 node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 5 Click trane_com4_protocol.


Note The DIP switch address is set to 50. For more information on DIP switch settings, see table "TCI-3 board DIP switch address settings for Tracer 100 series panels and Tracer Summit" in the Trane Communication Interface Installation Guide.



Note The communication PIN set should be changed between COM4 and COM3 protocols.


Step 6 Save the configuration.

Step 7 To view the configuration, launch an Internet browser (for example, Internet Explorer), and browse to the Mediator web client homepage. To do so, enter the IP address of the Mediator in the Address bar of the browser and log in when prompted.

Step 8 Choose nodes > interfaces > com3 > trane_com4_protocol Voyager > inputs

The Mediator web client NodeBrowser page displays the configured values. (See Figure 6-7.)

Figure 6-7 Trane Com4 Configuration


Configuring the Trane Intellipak Controller

To configure the Trane Intellipak controller, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 5 as described in the "Configuring the Trane Com4 Protocol" section.

Step 2 Right-click the interfaces/com4/trane_com4_protocol node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 3 Click Intellipak.

Step 4 Enter a new name for the node in the Name text box.

Step 5 Enter the address of the device in the Address text box.

Step 6 Repeat Step 2 to Step 4 for each device.

Step 7 Save the configuration.


Configuring the Trane Voyager Controller

To configure the Trane Voyager controller, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 5 as described in the "Configuring the Trane Com4 Protocol" section.

Step 2 Right-click /interfaces/com4/trane_com4_protocol node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 3 Click Voyager.

Step 4 Enter a new name for the node in the Name text box.

Step 5 Enter the address of the device in the Address text box.

Step 6 Check the Upload Setpoints check box to set the default setting.

Step 7 Repeat Step 2 to Step 5 for each device.

Step 8 Save the configuration.


Configuring the Trane 3 Non Isolated Controller

To configure the Trane Com3 Non Isolated Controller, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start configTOOL and connect to the Mediator.

Step 2 Choose com4 from the drop-down list of interfaces, and then click OK.


Note This step assumes that com4 is connected to the Trane com4 network. You can also use com3, com5, or com6.


Step 3 From the BPS drop-down list, choose 9600.

The other text boxes in the data entry pane have the default values.

Step 4 Right-click the /interfaces/com3 node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 5 Click trane_com3_noniso protocol.


Configuring the Trane VariTrane II \ III Controller

To configure the Trane VariTrane II \ III controller, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 5 as described in the "Configuring the Trane Com4 Protocol" section.

Step 2 Right-click the /interfaces/com4/trane_com3noniso_protocol node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

Step 3 Click VariTrane, and then click OK.

Step 4 Enter a new name for the node in the Name text box.

Step 5 Enter the address of the device in the Address text box.

Step 6 Check the Upload Setpoints check box to set the default setting.

Step 7 Repeat Step 2 to Step 5 for each device.

Step 8 Save the configuration.


Configuring the TCS Basys Protocol

This section describes the TCS Basys protocol supported by the Mediator, explains how to configure TCS Basys devices connected to the Mediator, and includes the following topics:

Prerequisites

Configuring TCS Basys Devices

Prerequisites

The Mediator connects to the TCS Basys network over RS-485. Therefore, determine the appropriate communications (com) node that includes the TCS Basys system.

Configuring TCS Basys Devices

To configure TCS Basys devices on the Mediator, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start configTOOL and connect to the Mediator (see the "Accessing Mediators Using configTOOL" section).

The configTOOL window appears.

Step 2 In the node tree pane, click interfaces to display the list of interface nodes.

Step 3 Click the com node to which the TCS Basys communication network is connected. In this example, click the com6 node.

Step 4 From the BPS drop-down list, choose the appropriate baud rate.


Note This baud rate must match the baud rate that is configured on the TCS Basys device.


Step 5 From the Data Bits drop-down list, choose 8.

Step 6 From the Parity drop-down list, choose none.

Step 7 From the Stop Bits drop-down list, choose 1.

Step 8 Retain the default values in the remaining text boxes.

Step 9 In the node tree pane, right-click the com6 node, and choose Add from the menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears listing the protocols supported by the Mediator.

Step 10 In the Available Devices dialog box, choose TCS Protocol Line Handler (tcs) from the list, and then click OK.

A new child node, tcs, appears under the com6 node in the node tree pane.

The tcs tab displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters of the tcs child node.

Step 11 From the Enable Auto Discovery Mode drop-down list, choose all. This enables auto discovery of all devices, both newly and previously configured devices.

Step 12 In the Starting Address text box, enter 0.

Step 13 In the Ending Address text box, enter 255.

Every TCS Basys device on the network has a unique address in the range of 0- 255. The Starting and Ending Address text boxes are used to specify the range of addresses to search within.

Step 14 Ensure that the Debug check box is unselected.

Step 15 Save the configuration to the Mediator.


Note When the Mediator restarts, open the configuration you had saved earlier.


Step 16 In the configTOOL window, choose Mediator > Interrogate.

When the device interrogation completes, a list of devices appear under the tcs node. Check the devices to make sure that they match the devices on your network.

Step 17 Save a snippet of the tcs node with the discovered devices by right-clicking the tcs node under the com6 node, and choosing Output From Here from the menu. The Output Mediator Configuration dialog box appears.

Step 18 In the Output Mediator Configuration dialog box, click Save to File.

Step 19 Save the file to a directory on your local system. The file should be saved as an XML extension file. For example, tcssnippet.xml.

Step 20 On the toolbar, click the Refresh Configuration button to reload the Mediator configuration.

Step 21 In the node tree pane, choose Interfaces > com6 > tcs.

Step 22 Right-click the tcs node, and choose Delete from the menu.

Step 23 Click Yes in the Confirmation request message.

Step 24 Import the snippet of the tcs node that includes the discovered devices by right-clicking the com6 node, and choosing System > Import configuration fragment.

Step 25 Browse and choose the snippet that was saved according to the instruction in Step 19.

Step 26 Click OK.

The tcs node, along with a list of devices under it, appears under the com6 node.

Step 27 From the Enable Auto Discovery Mode drop-down list, choose never.

Step 28 Save the configuration to the Mediator.

Step 29 To view the configured TCS Basys devices, launch an Internet browser (for example, Internet Explorer), and browse to the Mediator web client homepage. To do so, enter the IP address of the Mediator in the Address bar of the browser, and log in when prompted.

The Mediator web client homepage appears in the Internet browser window.

Step 30 Click Nodes.

The Mediator web client NodeBrowser page appears.

Step 31 Choose interfaces > com6 > tcs.

The Mediator web client NodeBrowser page displays a list of all the TCS Basys devices.


Configuring Secure Remote Node Abstraction Protocol

This section explains how to configure Secure Remote Node Abstraction (SRNA) protocol.


Note All the other communication protocols described in this chapter are Building Management Systems (BMS) communication protocols. The SRNA protocol is based on IP for communicating with the Downstream Mediators.


To configure the SRNA protocol on the Mediator, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start configTOOL and connect to the Mediator (see the "Accessing Mediators Using configTOOL" section).

The configTOOL window appears.

Step 2 In the node tree pane, expand the node tree, then choose services > network > rna.

The rna tab displays the default name, description, and the configurable parameters of the rna node.

Step 3 Check the Enabled check box to enable the Mediator to act as an RNA server.

By default, this box is unchecked. In such cases, the Mediator will ignore incoming RNA messages.

Step 4 In the port text box, enter 5150.

Step 5 From the interface drop-down list, choose the ethernet interface over which the Mediator communicates with the Mediator Manager using RNA.

By default, eth0 is selected.

Step 6 In the Client-Side Connection Timeout text box, enter an upper limit (in seconds) for how long the client-side RNA allows the TCP/IP connection to be established.

The default timeout value is three seconds.

Step 7 In the Client-Side Transaction Timeout text box, enter an upper limit (in seconds) for how long the client-side RNA allows a TCP/IP send or receive transaction to be completed.

The default timeout value is 900 seconds.

Step 8 In the Security Level drop-down list, retain the security level to NoSec.


Note There are three security levels—NoSec, Auth-Only, and Full-Enc. These levels are described in detail in the Cisco Network Building Mediator Manager User Guide.


Step 9 Repeat Step 1 to Step 8 on all the Mediators that need to communicate with the Mediator Manager over SRNA.

Step 10 To enable communication between the Mediators using RNA, in the node tree pane, expand the root node, and click Aliases.

Step 11 Right-click the Aliases node, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 12 In the Available Devices dialog box, choose Alias and click OK.

Step 13 In the alias tab, enter a new name and a description that more clearly identifies the node in the respective text boxes (or retain the default values).

Step 14 In the Alias For text box, enter the path of the point mpx://<ip address>:<port>/<point_url> for retrieving values from the remote Mediator. For example, mpx://<ipaddress>/services/time/local to retrieve the time from the remote Mediator.


Note The <ipaddress> is the IP address of the Mediator with which you want to communicate.


Step 15 If you have to change the default port on a remote Mediator, enter mpx://ipaddress:<port>/services/time/local.


Note There are two options mpxao and mpxfe. For more information, see the Cisco Network Building Mediator Manager User Guide.


Step 16 Save configuration.


Note Transport Layer Security protocol (TLS) 1.0 is enabled in SRNA communications that occur between Mediators as well as between a Mediator and a Mediator Manager. However, when a peer device is running an older software version that does not support TLS 1.0, the connection downgrades to SSL 3.0.
For example, in SRNA communications between a Mediator 3.1.3 and Mediator Manager 1.1.3, TLS 1.0 is enabled. However, in SRNA communications between a Mediator 3.1.3 and Mediator Manager 1.1.2, the connection downgrades to SSL 3.0



Configuring the ETC-USAP Protocol

This section describes the prerequisites for configuring the ETC-USAP devices and how to configure the ETC-USAP devices on the Mediator. It includes the following topics:

Prerequisites

Configuring ETC-USAP Devices

Prerequisites

Ensure that the following requirements are met:

The devices support ETC-USAP protocol.

ETC-USAP licensing is enabled on the Mediator.

Configuring ETC-USAP Devices

The ETC-USAP devices are connected to the RS232 ports, com1 or com2, of the Mediator.

To configure ETC-USAP devices that are connected to the Mediator, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start configTOOL and connect to the Mediator (see the "Accessing Mediators Using configTOOL" section).

The configTOOL window appears.

Step 2 In the node tree pane, expand the interfaces node, and right-click com1.

The right-click menu appears.

Step 3 Choose Add.

The Available Devices dialog box appears listing the protocols supported by the Mediator.

Step 4 Choose USAP Device (USAP Device) and click OK.

The USAP Device tab appears and a new child node, USAP Device, appears under the com1 node in the node tree.

Step 5 In the USAP Device tab, do the following:

a. (Optional) In the Description text box, enter the description for the device.

b. Select the enabled check box to enable the USAP protocol.

c. Select the unison_v1_9_0_prior check box if the Unison operating code version on USAP controller is version 1.9.0 or earlier.

d. Select the debug check box to print the protocol related messages on the mslog_viewer.

Step 6 Right-click the USAP Device node and choose Add.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 7 Choose USAP Room (Room) and click OK.

The Room tab appears and a new child node, USAP Room, appears under the USAP Device node in the node tree.

Step 8 On the Room tab, do the following:

(Optional) In the Description text box, enter the description for the room.

Step 9 Right-click the USAP Room node and choose Add.

The Available Devices dialog box appears listing the objects and sections.

Step 10 Choose USAP Object (Object) to add an object or USAP Section (Section) to add a section in the room.

The Object tab or the Section tab appears depending on your selection and a corresponding new child node, USAP Object or USAP Section, appears in the node tree.

Step 11 On the Object or the Section tab, do the following:

(Optional) In the Description text box, enter the description for the room.


Note Ensure that the names of the objects, sections, and rooms correspond to the object, section, and room names that are configured in the device otherwise the configuration fails.


Step 12 Save the configuration.

Step 13 To view the configured USAP devices, launch the Internet browser and log in to the Mediator web client homepage.

The Mediator homepage appears.

Step 14 Click Nodes.

The Mediator web client NodeBrowser homepage appears.

Step 15 Choose nodes > interfaces > com1 > USAP Device > Room > Section > Object

All the rooms, sections and objects that are configured are listed in the page.


Note You can activate or deactivate the configurations by entering the ACTI or DACT commands in the Override text box.



Configuring the Omnimeter Protocol

To configure the Omnimeter protocol on the Mediator, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Start configTOOL to open the Mediator configuration (see the "Accessing Mediators Using configTOOL" section).

The configTOOL window appears.

Step 2 In the node tree pane, expand the interfaces node, and then click com3. You can also use any of the RS-485 ports. (For example, COM3, COM4, COM5, COM6)

Step 3 In the node tree pane, right-click com3, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears listing the protocols supported by the Mediator.

Step 4 Choose Omnimeter Protocol and then click OK.

The Omnimeter tab appears.

Step 5 In the Omnimeter tab, do the following:

a. (Optional) In the Name text box, enter a descriptive name for the device.

b. (Optional) In the Description text box, enter the description for the device.


Note All mandatory text boxes appear in red color.


c. In the Number of Retries text box, enter the number of times the Mediator should try to read data from the device before reporting any error.

d. In the Reply Timeout text box, enter the time (in seconds) that the Mediator should wait for a reply from the device.

e. In the Cache life text box, enter the time (in seconds) that the current read value is cached by the Mediator.

Step 6 Right-click Omnimeter Protocol, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 7 From the list of available devices, choose the appropriate Omnimeter device. For example, RS-1 or RS-5.

Step 8 Click OK.

Step 9 The Omnimeter_device tab displays the default name and description, and the configurable parameters. For each text box on the tab, enter or choose the appropriate parameter value to configure the device.

Step 10 In the Building Number text box, enter building number where the energy meter is deployed.

Step 11 In the Unit Number text box, enter unit number of the meter.


Note Specify the unit number and the building number to identify the Omnimeter device in the network.


Step 12 In the Serial Number text box, enter the 12 digit serial number.

The manufacture serial number can be found at the bottom of the Omnimeter and is hardcoded. All devices have an unique serial number. For example, 096143016078.

Step 13 Save configuration.

Step 14 Repeat Step 9 to Step 11 for each device that you want to add.


Configuring the Delphi Web Service Protocol

This section describes how to configure the Delphi Protocol on the Mediator to enable it to interact with various Delphi devices and includes the following topics:

Prerequisites

Configuring the Delphi Web Service Protocol on the Mediator

Viewing Delphi Nodes

Prerequisites

The prerequisites for the Delphi web service protocol configuration are as follows:

Access to the Interface PC with user credentials

Location of the Event.NSS file on the Interface PC

Configuring the Delphi Web Service Protocol on the Mediator

To configure the Delphi protocol on the Mediator, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Perform Step 1 to Step 3 in the "Before You Begin Configuring the Protocols" section.

Step 2 In the node tree pane, expand the node tree, click services, and then click network.

Step 3 In the node tree pane, right-click network, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears listing the protocols supported by the Mediator.

Step 4 Click Delphi Web Service Client (Delphi Flatfile version), and then click OK.

A new child node, Delphi Flatfile version_1, appears under the network node in the node tree pane. The Delphi Flatfile version_1 tab for the delphi node displays the default name and the description.

Step 5 Select the Enabled check box to enable Delphi Flatfile version_1 protocol.

Step 6 Select the Debug check box to print the debug messages from Delphi Flatfile version_1 protocol.

Step 7 In the node tree pane, right-click the Delphi Flatfile version_1 node, and then choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 8 Click Delphi Property Information (PropertyName), and then click OK.

A new child node, PropertyName_1, appears under the network node in the node tree pane. The PropertyName_1 tab for the Delphi node displays the default name and description.

Step 9 In the Interface PC Address text box, enter the communication address or the IP address of the Interface PC. For example, 198.162.1.1.

Step 10 From the Communications Interface drop-down list, choose the appropriate communication interface over IP.

The available communication interface options are: http, https, ftp and sftp.

Step 11 In the User Name text box, enter the username you use to access the Interface PC.

Step 12 In the Password text box, enter the password you use to access the Interface PC.

Step 13 In Event File Location text box, enter the location of EVENT.NSS file. For example, /Delphi/Property/Harrah/EVENTS.NSS.

Step 14 From the Polling Time drop-down list, choose the desired polling time. The EVENT.NSS file is retrieved from the Interface PC at every configured polling time.

The available polling time options, in minutes, are: 15, 30, 45 and 60.

Step 15 From the Grace Time drop-down list, choose the desired grace time.

The available grace time options, in minutes, are: 0, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55 and 60.


Note All mandatory text boxes appear in red color.


DownloadStatus displays the recent download status of EVENT.NSS file with a time stamp. For example, Download Success at 2011-07-25 06:42:03.410809 or Download Failed at 2011-07-25 06:42:03.410809 on the node browser.


Note DownloadStatus node get included by default under the PropertyName node. You can configure only one download status node under a property.


Step 16 To add a Meeting Room, in the node tree pane, right-click the PropertyName_1 node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 17 Click Room Name should match with the room name in EVENT.NSS, and then click OK.


Note You can add multiple room names. Room Name should match with the room name present in EVENT.NSS. For example, BURGUNDY, VERSAILLES 1/2. Duplicate entries should not be made.


MeetingSpaces are just place holders.You can add multiple meeting spaces under each room.

Step 18 To add a MeetingSpace, in the node tree pane, right-click the VERSAILES 1/2 node, and choose Add from the right-click menu.

The Available Devices dialog box appears.

Step 19 Click Delphi Meeting Space Information (MeetingSpace), and then click OK.


Note We recommended adding three meeting spaces under each room. The MeetingSpace name should not contain `/' character.


Each MeetingSpace contains the following nodes:

AgreedAttendance

EndDate Time

EndEpochTime

EventName

StartDateTime

StartEpochTime

Step 20 Save the configuration, and then click Close.

Property status is displayed against property name in node browser. The following enumerated messages are used to indicate the status of execution of a property:

0:'0: Init' - Property Initialization

1:'1: OK' - No error conditions

2:'2: OK with event file same as yesterday' - Event file is same as previous day

3:'3: Incomplete meeting information' - Incomplete meeting information in EVENTS.NSS (line length is not equal to 252)

4:'4: Communication Error, using backup event file' - Network connection error but uses previously downloaded file in the same day

5:'5: Communication Error' - Network connection error and no backup file

6:'6: File IO Error' - Error in file I/O operation

Viewing Delphi Nodes

To view the configured Delphi nodes, perform the following steps:


Step 1 Launch an Internet browser. For example, Internet Explorer.

Step 2 Enter the IP address of the Mediator in the address bar of the browser and log in when prompted.

The Mediator web client homepage appears in the Internet browser page.

Step 3 Click Nodes.

The Mediator web client NodeBrowser homepage appears.

Step 4 Choose services > network > Delphi Flatfile Version_1.

Step 5 Choose PropertyName > MeetingRoom Name > MeetingSpace.

The following four different status is displayed against each MeetingSpace (under MeetingRoom Name).

Unknown: Indicates the status before parsing the events file.

Available: Indicates the meeting space entry under a room is free and can be used to fill the received meeting information from the Interface PC.

Scheduled: Indicates the meeting space entry under a room is filled with the scheduled meeting information received from the Interface PC.

In Progress: Indicates the meeting space under a room is filled with a meeting which is currently in progress.

Step 6 View Delphi messages using mslog_viewer.

Connect to the mediator through console or ssh and enter the mslog_viewer command, a series of messages are displayed in the message log (msglog viewer). These messages are useful to verify whether the Delphi stack is running and how the downloads and updates from the Delphi network are configured on the stack.