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AT Command Set and Register Summary for NextPort Universal Digital Signal Processor Platforms

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AT Command Set and Register Summary for NextPort Universal Digital Signal Processor Platforms

Table Of Contents

AT Command Set and Register Summary for NextPort Universal Digital Signal Processor Platforms

Entering AT Commands

Alphabetic Command Set

A/ (Repeat Last Command)

A (Answer)

AT (Attention)

D {dial string} (Dial)

D {t} {m} {dial string}

En (Command Echo)

H or H0 (Hang Up)

In (Inquiry)

Ln (Monitor Speaker Loudness)

Mn (Monitor Speaker Mode)

O (Online from Escape Mode)

P (Pulse Dial)

Qn (Quiet)

Sn (Point to a New Configuration Register)

Sn? (Read Configuration Register)

Sn=y (Set Configuration Register to a Decimal Value)
Sn=>y (Set Configuration Register to a Hexadecimal Value)

T (Tone Dial)

Vn (Result Code Format)

Xn (Extended Result Codes)

Z (Reset)

Percent Command Set

%R (Verbose Display of the Modem Configuration)

Ampersand Command Set

&Cn (Serial Port DCD Control)

&Dn (DTR Control)

&Fn (Restore Factory Defaults)

&Tn (Diagnostic Test Mode)

&Vn (Display Modem Information)

+F Command Set

+FCLASS (Service Class)

FAX Class 2 Action Commands

FAX Class 2 Parameter Commands

Backslash Command Set

\B (Transmit a Break)

\Qn (Flow Control)

\S (Verbose Display of Current Modem Statistics)

Modem S Register Summary

S Register Commands

Read All Registers

Read a Configuration Register

Point to a New Reference Register

Change the Value of a Register

Display the Value of the Reference Register

Change the Value of the Reference Register

Bit-Mapped Registers

S Register Descriptions

S0 (Automatic Answer in Seconds)

S1 (Unused)

S2 (Escape Code Character)

S3 (Carriage Return Character)

S4 (Line Feed Character)

S5 (Backspace Character)

S6 (Wait Before Dialing)

S7 (Wait for Carrier After Dial)

S8 (Comma Dial Modifier)

S9 (Modem Settings)

S10 (Delay for Hang-up After Carrier Loss)

S11 (Link Initiate Action)

S12 (Number of Async Data Bits)

S13 (Parity Configuration)

S14 (Stop Bit Configuration)

S15 (V.42 Detect Phase Operation)

S16 (Error Correction Autodetect Timeout)

S17 (Error Correction Negotiation Timeout)

S18 (Error Correction Fallback Character)

S19 (Error Correction Retransmission Limit)

S20 (Error Correction Max Frame Length)

S21 (Data Compression)

S22 (ARA Error Correction Options)

S23 (V.42 LAP-Modem Error Correction)

S24 (Microcom Network Protocol Error Correction)

S25 (Link Protocol Fallback)

S27 (Calling Tone)

S28 (Guard Tone)

S29 (Modulation Standard)

Digital and Analog Modulations

Effect of FSK on Framing

S30 (Maximum Connect Rate)

S31 (Minimum Connect Rate)

S32 (Signal Quality Threshold)

S33 (Speed Change Squelch Timer)

S34 (Fall-forward Timer)

S35 (Fallback Timer)

S36 (Terminate Timeout)

S37 (Wait for Carrier After Dial)

S38 (Delay for Hang-up After Carrier Loss)

S39 (Transmit Level Setting)

S40 (Consecutive Retrain Disconnect Threshold)

S41 (V.34 Maximum Symbol Rate)

S42 (V.34 Minimum Symbol Rate)

S43 (V.34 Carrier Frequency)

S44 (V.34 Preemphasis Filter Selection)

S47 (Hayes +++ Escape Detection)

S48 (AT Command Processor)

S50 (Maximum PCM Connect Rate)

S51 (Minimum PCM Connect Rate)

S52 (Digital Pad Compensation)

S53 (V.8bis Capability)

S54 (General Options)

S56 (Set Maximum V.34+ Transmit Rate)

S57 (User Rate for ISDN, V.110, V.120, and Clear Channel)

S59 (V.90 Transmit Level Setting)

S61 (Microcom Network Protocol 10-EC)

S62 (V.92 Modem on Hold Exchange)

S63 (Quick Connect Exchange)

S64 (Link Standard)

S65 (V.44 Maximum TX Codewords)

S66 (V.44 Maximum RX Codewords)

S67 (V.44 Maximum TX String Length)

S68 (V.44 Maximum RX String Length)

S69 (V.44 Maximum TX History Size)

S70 (V.44 Maximum RX History Size)

S75 (Answer Tone Length)

S76 (Rx Aggression Control)

S77 (Tx Aggression Control)

S78 (56K Plus)

S79 (Client Uplink Rate)

Transmit Level Setting Based on Country Code

Related Links

Obtaining Documentation

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Cisco.com

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AT Command Set and Register Summary for NextPort Universal Digital Signal Processor Platforms


May 29, 2007

This document describes modem AT commands and S-registers for Cisco NextPort universal digital signal processor (DSP) modules. NextPort is the next generation DSP used by Cisco to implement either voice, data, or fax on a given port.

To use this document, you should be familiar with digital modem theory and the use of modemcaps to change the configuration of a digital modem. For more information on digital modems and modemcaps, please refer to the Modem Management Commands document and the
Modem-Router Connection Guide.

For information about managing modems on Cisco access gateways using Cisco IOS software commands, refer to the software configuration guide for the access server in which the modems are installed.


Note The defaults and limits on parameters described in this document are valid for the United States. They may not be appropriate for use in other countries.


This document contains the following sections:

Entering AT Commands

Alphabetic Command Set

Percent Command Set

Ampersand Command Set

+F Command Set

Backslash Command Set

Modem S Register Summary

S Register Descriptions

Related Links

Obtaining Documentation

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Entering AT Commands

To send AT commands to the modem, you must first put the modem in AT command mode. Entering AT command mode involves a reverse Telnet procedure. The table below shows how to enter AT command mode from Cisco IOS EXEC mode using reverse Telnet.

.

Step
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

telnet ip-address line#






Trying 172.0.0.1, 2001 ... Open

Open a reverse Telnet connection to the modem. In this example, ip-address is the IP address of the access server and line# is the two-digit line number of the modem, prefixed by 20. (For example, enter
telnet 172.0.0.1 2001 if the IP address is 172.0.0.1 and the modem line number is 1.) If you do not know which line number to use, enter the show line command and check the resulting display for tty numbers that have inout in the Modem column. Use one of those numbers.

The Telnet connection is open when the word Open appears.

Step 2 

at

OK

There is no command prompt in AT command mode. To confirm that you can enter AT commands, enter at and press Return. If you are in AT command mode, the modem returns OK.

Step 3 

Ctrl-Shift-6 X



# disconnect

When you have finished entering AT commands, exit AT command mode and return to privileged EXEC mode. To do so, enter Ctrl-Sh-6 X (that is, hold down the Control and Shift keys and press 6, and then release everything and press X).

Enter disconnect to end the Telnet connection.


Use these guidelines when you send AT commands to a modem:

Enter the AT prefix before all commands except A/ (Repeat Last Command) and +++ (Escape code). Commands are carried out when you press Return or Enter.

Command lines are limited to 128 characters, not including the AT prefix and Return characters. Dial strings, however, are limited to 49 characters.

You can enter several commands on the same command line, as long as you do not exceed the 128-character limit (see preceding item). Enter commands with no spaces or separators between them. The commands are carried out in the order in which they appear on the command line. If an individual command fails (returns ERROR), any subsequent commands on that line are not carried out.

Certain commands work only if they are the last command on the line. Such commands include
A (answer), D (dial), H (hang up), Z (reset), and any command that takes time to execute or that does not return a result immediately.

Spaces within AT commands are permitted anywhere except between the A and the T. For example, enter ATS0?, AT S0?, ATS 0?, but not A TS0?.

Enter commands as either uppercase or lowercase, not mixed case.

Enter Ctrl-C (^C) to abort a partially entered command. The modem echoes ^C.

Use the Backspace key (or another key specified in register S5) to erase characters on the command line, except for the leading characters AT. To clear the characters AT, press Return for a fresh command line. For information on changing the command-line erase key, see the "S5 (Backspace Character)" section.

A missing numeric argument is assumed to be zero. For example, the Quiet command Q is equivalent to Q0.

The modem operates in the following modes:

Command state: The modem is idle and waiting for commands.

Set-up state: Establishing a connection.

Online state: Connected to another modem. To return to the online state from any other state, enter ATO and press Return. A fresh connect message is sent.

Escape state: Allows you to enter commands while the modem is on line. To go to escape state, enter +++ (+++ is the default escape code; see "S2 (Escape Code Character)," on page 19 for details on changing the escape code). When you enter the +++ command, pause for at least a second before and after typing it, but do not pause between characters. Do not press Return. Wait for the OK prompt before entering commands.

The escape code can be enabled and disabled; for instructions, see "S2 (Escape Code Character)," on page 19, and "S47 (Hayes +++ Escape Detection)" on page 39 .

Alphabetic Command Set

This section describes modem commands that begin with an alphabetic character (A to Z).

A/ (Repeat Last Command)

Enters the last command again. If there is no previous command, the modem displays OK. Do not enter the AT prefix before A/. You do not usually need to press Return after entering the A/ command.


Note Because of the data forwarding method used in some Telnet connections, it may be necessary to press Return after A/ in some cases.


A (Answer)

Forces the modem off-hook in answer mode, regardless of the value of register S11. The modem must be in the command state when you use the Answer command. If the modem is not in the command state, it responds to this command with the ERROR result code.

AT (Attention)

Informs the modem that commands are being sent to it. The modem displays OK. AT must precede all other commands except A/ and +++.

D {dial string} (Dial)

Dials a telephone number, establishing a connection. Always make the Dial command the last (or the only) command on the command line. The dial string can contain up to 49 characters; valid characters are the digits 0 to 9, and for tone dialing, the letters A, B, C, and D, and the characters # and *.

The modem ignores invalid characters. If you enter dial strings longer than 49 characters, the ERROR result code appears. The following example shows the command used to dial the telephone number
1 (617) 555-1234:

D 1 (617) 555-1234

The modem ignores the spaces, parentheses, and hyphen in the examples dial string: They are not dialed and they do not count against the 49-character limit.

To cancel the Dial command, press any key, or clear the call from the router or access server.

The modem must be in the command state when you use the Dial command. If the modem is in the escape state, it responds to this command with the ERROR result code.

For compatibility, the modem accepts these dial modifiers but does not act on them:

P

T

@ (at sign)

! (exclamation point)

; (semicolon)

D {t} {m} {dial string}

Initiates a call or resumes a session. In order to use the DI command, you must set register S29 to a compatible call type. The call type for ISDN is V.110 (S29 = 8). See the "S29 (Modulation Standard)" section. The Dial command must be the last command on the command line.

Valid dial types {t}. The dial string can contain up to 49 characters; valid characters are the digits 0 to 9, and for tone dialing, the letters A, B, C, and D and the characters, # and *.

The modem (or the modem and the host) ignores invalid characters. If you enter a dial string longer than 49 characters, the modem returns the ERROR result code. The following example shows the command used to dial the telephone number 1 (617) 555-1234

DI 1 (617) 555-1234

The modem ignores the spaces, parentheses, and hyphen in the examples dial string: They are not dialed and they do not count against the 49-character limit.

To cancel the ISDN Dial command, press any key, or clear the call from the router or access server.

The modem must be in the command state when you use the ISDN Dial command. If the modem is in the escape state, it responds to this command with the ERROR result code.

For compatibility, the modem accepts these dial modifiers but does not act on them:

P

T

@ (at sign)

! (exclamation point)

; (semicolon)

En (Command Echo)

Configures the modem to echo commands to the workstation. The table below lists command echo options.

Default

E1

s

Command Option
Meaning

E0

Disables echoing of commands to the workstation.

E1

Enables echoing of commands to the workstation.


H or H0 (Hang Up)

Disconnects this modem from the remote system and hangs up the telephone line.

In (Inquiry)

Displays modem information and results of checksum tests on firmware. Lists inquiry command options.

Command Option
Meaning

I0

Displays the modem product ID code in the following format:

NextPort Product ID = product code

I1

Runs a checksum on firmware and displays the result, as in the following example:

NextPort code CHECKSUM is xxxxxxxx (where xxxxxxxx is a 32-bit checksum of the code)

I2

Runs a checksum on firmware and displays the checksum status:

0 (OK in verbose mode) if the checksum is correct

1 (ERROR in verbose mode) if the checksum is not correct

I3

Displays the country code, modulation standards, and revision levels, as shown in the following example:

Cisco NextPort Module Product Information

          NextPort Product ID = product_code

Country Code: country code

Signaling: signaling supported revision date

Modems: modems supported revision date

Fax: fax modems revision date

Voice Codec: voice codecs supported revision date

ISDN: ISDN services supported revision date

I4

Displays one of the following lines describing the features available in the version of firmware running on the modem:

Cisco NextPort Module Product Information

NextPort Product ID = product_code

Country Code: country code

Signaling: signaling supported

Modems: modems supported

Fax: fax modems

Voice Codec: voice codecs supported

ISDN: ISDN services supported


Ln (Monitor Speaker Loudness)

This command is provided for compatibility: It has no effect (the modem responds OK but takes no action). However, the value of n must be in the range 0 to 3. If another value is used, the modem returns the ERROR result code.

Mn (Monitor Speaker Mode)

This command is provided for compatibility: It has no effect (the modem responds OK but takes no action). However, the value of n must be in the range 0 to 2. If another value is used, the modem returns the ERROR result code.

O (Online from Escape Mode)

Changes the modem to the online state (connected, or steady state) from escape mode. The modem displays a connect message. You can use the following values:

o: 0 Go on-line from escape mode

o: 1 Retrain without returning to online state

o: 2 Fallback without returning to online state

o: 3 Fall-forward without returning to online state

P (Pulse Dial)

This command is provided for compatibility: It has no effect (the modem responds OK but takes no action).

Qn (Quiet)

Configures the modem to send (or not send) result and status codes, such as OK, ERROR, and BUSY, to your workstation. Lists quiet mode command options in the Vn command mode.


Note The Q command does not affect output from AT commands such as I, Sn?, \S, and %R.


Default

Q0

Command Option 
Meaning 

Q0

Enables output of result codes.

Q1

Disables output of result codes.

Q2

CONNECT and NO CARRIER result codes are disabled for answer mode only. All other result codes are generated normally (default)


Sn (Point to a New Configuration Register)

Sets the modem register pointer to S register n (where n is a decimal number). Register n becomes the current register and is addressed by subsequent register commands. If you enter a value for n that is outside the range of S register numbers, the command fails (returns ERROR). For descriptions of the S registers and a summary of commands you can use to manipulate S registers, see the "Modem S Register Summary" section. See also the "%R (Verbose Display of the Modem Configuration)" section.

Range

0 to 75. (The range is determined by the numbers of the S registers, which can change from one Cisco NextPort firmware release to the next as new S registers are added.)

Default

S0

Sn? (Read Configuration Register)

Displays the contents of S register n (where n is a decimal number). For descriptions of the S registers, see the "Modem S Register Summary" section. See also the "%R (Verbose Display of the Modem Configuration)" section.

Range

0 to 75

Default

S0

Sn=y (Set Configuration Register to a Decimal Value)
Sn=>y (Set Configuration Register to a Hexadecimal Value)

Sets the contents of S register n (where n is a decimal number) to the value y. Some invalid values for y cause the command to fail (returning ERROR), even though other invalid values are accepted. For descriptions of the S registers, see the "Modem S Register Summary" section.

Range

n: 0 to 75
y: depends on n, the register selected

T (Tone Dial)

This command is provided for compatibility: It has no effect (the modem responds OK but takes no action).

Vn (Result Code Format)

Selects the format (short or long) of the result codes sent to your workstation. describes the result codes. lists options for the result code format command.


Note The V command does not affect output from AT commands such as I, Sn?, \S, and %R.


Numeric Result Code
Long Result Code
Description

0

OK

Command accepted, ready for next command.

1

CONNECT [text]

A connection has been established. The long result code may be followed on the same line by speed and protocol information, depending on the setting of the X command. See the ""Xn (Extended Result Codes)" section.

2

RING

Ring signal indicated.

3

NO CARRIER

Indicates one of the following:

Carrier signal was not detected.

Carrier signal was lost for the period specified in register S10.

The other modem indicated disconnection (with error correction only).

An unrecoverable error occurred (with error correction only).

4

ERROR

Indicates one of the following:

Invalid command or checksum.

Command line exceeds 128 characters.

Dial string exceeds 49 characters.

5

NO DIALTONE

Dial tone was not detected, or in channelized T1 there was no trunk to seize.

6

BUSY

Busy (line engaged) signal or number unobtainable signal detected.)

7

NO ANSWER

There was no answer-back tone. (Either the call was not answered, or a human being answered.)

8

(ABORTED)

An operator pressed any key to abort a D (Dial) or A (Answer) command.


Default

V1

Command Option
Meaning

V0

Sends short result codes (numeric codes defined).

V1

Sends long result codes (text codes defined).


Xn (Extended Result Codes)

Selects the extended result code format sent to the workstation. The table lists options for the
extended result codes command.

Before dialling, the modem waits for the time delay specified in register S6. (See "S6 (Wait Before Dialing)" on page 20 for information on register S6.)

See also the previous section, "Vn (Result Code Format)." You can use the Vn command to select short or long form result codes.

Default

X4

Command Option
Meaning

X0

CONNECT result code is given upon entering online data state. Dial tone and busy detection are disabled.

X1

CONNECT result code is given upon entering online data state. Dial tone and busy detection are disabled.

Sends a verbose connect message1 when a connection is established.

X2

CONNECT result code is given upon entering online data state. Dial tone detection is enabled and busy detection is disabled.

X3

CONNECT result code is given upon entering online data state. Dial tone detection is disabled and busy detection is enabled.

X4

CONNECT result code is given upon entering online data state. Dial tone and busy detection are enabled (default).

1 The connect message for X1 through X4 includes the rate in bits per second of the connection, the protocol used, and the compression type. For example, a connect message might read "CONNECT 33600 /V.42/V.42bis". (X0 sends only the result code, CONNECT.)


Z (Reset)

This command terminates the current call (if any) and resets the configuration to the saved value (this is currently the same as setting factory defaults, AT&F).

Percent Command Set

This section describes the modem commands that begin with the percent (%) character.

%R (Verbose Display of the Modem Configuration)

Reads and displays the modem configuration, showing the contents of modem S registers first as a list of values in hexadecimal and decimal format (the Configuration Summary), and then as a more detailed table with register settings in decimal (in the Value column) and descriptions of the registers. Press Q to stop the display. Refer to the "S Register Commands" section to interrupt the output of this command.

Ampersand Command Set

This section describes modem commands that begin with an ampersand (&) character.

&Cn (Serial Port DCD Control)

This command controls the data carrier detect (DCD) signal level presented to the host. This command is provided for compatibility; it has no effect. (The modem responds OK but takes no action.) Note, however, that n must be 0 or 1. The modem range-checks the value of n, so if you enter something other than 0 or 1, the modem returns an error.


Note DCD processing is virtualized for digital modems, since there is no physical EIA-232 interface.


&Dn (DTR Control)

Specifies the modem action when the host (DTE) data terminal ready (DTR) transitions off (as when the user session ends). DTR control command options are listed below.


Note DTR processing is virtualized for digital modems, since there is no physical EIA-232 interface.


Default

&D3

Command Option
Meaning

&D0
&D1
&D2

The end of a call does not reset the modem configuration. These options are provided for compatibility.

These options maintain settings within a session. Thus, if you change settings, dial, hear a busy signal, and dial again, your new settings are still in effect. However, your settings may remain in effect for the next user of the modem.

&D3

The modem disconnects at the end of a call, then enters command state. The modem configuration is reset to factory defaults. To restore local settings, you must re-apply the modemcap from the Cisco IOS interface of the modem's host device.

Note The modem treats the end of a connection (hang-up, call drop) as a DTR loss and resets its configuration if &D3 is set.



Note Because the modem has no visibility of DTR virtualization, commands &D0, &D1, and &D2 operate identically (configuration not reset on return to IDLE). The &D3 command causes a configuration reset whenever the modem returns to IDLE. Because the modem does not have per-modem nonvolatile memory or a &W command, the &D3 command reset loads factory defaults (&F).


&Fn (Restore Factory Defaults)

Hangs up the telephone line, clears the modem, and restores the factory default configuration, with several exceptions—the following values are preserved:

Country code

Central office signaling type (S45)

Sticky flags (S60)

This command can also be entered as &F0. Entering 0 sets the configuration to factory defaults.

&Tn (Diagnostic Test Mode)

Tests the modem hardware. Lists modem test options.

Default

&T5

Command Option
Meaning

&T0

Ends the test in progress.

&T1

Enters local analog loopback (LAL) mode, in which the modem establishes a connection to itself and loops all user data back to the user. This helps to verify that the modem hardware is functioning properly.

Note The modem must be IDLE or an ERROR result code is returned. Error correction must be turned off by setting S registers 22, 23, and 24 to zero; otherwise an ERROR result code is returned.


&Vn (Display Modem Information)

This command supports an implementation-specific method to display modem information, which can be used to present items such as modem configuration, connection statistics, and status. The output format is determined by the particular implementation and is not defined in this document. Any values for n that are not supported by the implementation should return the ERROR result.

+F Command Set

Fax Class 2 and Class 2.0 modem commands begin with the characters +F. Fax commands are accessed by software only. For more information on Class 2 commands, see the Electronic Industries Association publication Standards Proposal No. 2388, August 20, 1990, Asynchronous Facsimile DCE Control Standard. For more information on Class 2.0 commands, see the Electronic Industries Association publication EIA/TIA-592, Asynchronous Facsimile DCE Control Standard.

+FCLASS (Service Class)

The +FCLASS=n command sets the service class capabilities. When +FCLASS=0, the fax AT command set is not available and any fax AT command sent to the modem will return an ERROR message.

FAX Class 2 Action Commands

Action Command
Short Description

ATD<number>

Originate call.

AT+FDT

Transmit fax data.

AT+FET=<code>

Send post-page message.

AT+FKS

Terminate session.


FAX Class 2 Parameter Commands

Command
Capabilities
Short Description

AT+FAXERR?

0-103

Last hang-up status code

AT+FBADLIN

0

Number of consecutive bad lines for a bad page

AT+FBADMUL

0

Acceptable ratio of good/bad lines

AT+FBOR

0-3

Phase C data bit order

AT+FBUF?

-

Read only buffer status

AT+FBUG

0-1

HDLC frame contents reporting

AT+FCLASS

0, 2

Service class

Note NextPort does not support Class 2.0.

AT+FCQ

0-1

Received quality checking

AT+FCR

0-1

Ability to receive

AT+FCTCRTY

0-255

Number of CTCs allowed in ECM

AT+FDCC

(0-1), (0-5), (0-4), (0-2),(0-3), (0-1), (0-1), (0-7)

Modem capabilities

AT+FDCS?

-

Read only current session parameters

AT+FDIS

(0-1), (0-5), (0-4),
(0-2), (0-3),(0-1),
(0-1), (0-7)

Session capabilities

AT+FDFFC

0

Check and convert compression formats

AT+FECM

0

Ability to do error correction

AT+FLID

(20), (32-127)

Local ID

AT+FLNFC

0

Check and convert length mismatches

AT+FLPL

0

Document available for polling

AT+FMDL?

-

Read only modem ID

AT+FMFR?

-

Read only manufacturer ID

AT+FMINSP

(0-5)

Minimum phase C data transfer speed

AT+FPHCTO

(0-255)

Phase C timeout

AT+FREV?

-

Read only revision ID

AT+FRBC

0

Receive block size

AT+FREL

0

EOL alignment

AT+FSPL

0

Request to poll

AT+FTBC

0

Transmit block size

AT+FVRFC

0

Check and convert resolution mismatches

AT+FWDFC

0

Check and convert width mismatches


In addition to the commands listed above, these Class 2 commands are defined in TIA/EIA SP-2388 and are supported in Cisco NextPort firmware: ATA, ATE0, ATS0=n, and ATV1.

Backslash Command Set

This section describes modem commands that begin with a backslash (\) character.

\B (Transmit a Break)

Sends a break (in async mode, a 300-millisecond break) that is nondestructive (does not cause data to be lost) and expedited (does not wait behind data that was entered before it). The break can be transmitted in LAP-M mode, MNP mode, and async mode.

For compatibility, Cisco NextPort modems accept a numeric argument immediately following the \B command, but the argument is ignored.

Default

\B

\Qn (Flow Control)

In fax mode, enables and disables flow control for the modem. Flow control command options are listed below.


Note When the modem is not operating in fax mode, this command has no effect.


Default

\Q0

Command Option
Meaning

\Q0

Disables flow control.

Note The host can always exert buffering back-pressure, so it's not possible to completely disable flow control.

\Q1

Enables bidirectional Xon/Xoff flow control. Data transmission is stopped by an Xoff character and restarted by an Xon character. The modem generates Xon and Xoff characters at the same parity used on the serial port. The serial port responds to Xon and Xoff characters sent by the local workstation in the same way.

\Q2

Enables unidirectional CTS/RTS hardware flow control.

Note Because the modem has no control of the router's virtualization of RTS and CTS, the \Q2 and \Q3 commands have no effect.

\Q3

Enables bi-directional CTS/RTS hardware flow control.

\Q4

Enables unidirectional XON/XOFF flow control. The modem serial port generates, but does not respond to, XON/XOFF flow control characters.


\S (Verbose Display of Current Modem Statistics)

Displays a detailed list of the modem current link statistics, including the elapsed connect time, counts of bytes in and out, and IP and EC packets sent and received. Press any key to display the next screen. Press Q to cancel the display. If a number is too large to be displayed, its left-most digit appears as a hash mark (#).

The following is an example of the \S verbose listing of the current statistics:

      Cisco NextPort Module Modem Link Statistics
      Host interface protocol (IP)  RAW
      Data compression protocol      V.44 both OR V.44 TX OR V.44 Rx
      Line interface protocol (EC)   V.42 (LAP-M)
      Line modulation standard       V.34+
      Line transfer rates    33600 bps TX and 33600 BPS RX
      The modem has been connected   0 days, 0:00:29
      Line quality   7
      Bytes sent to host     441     Bytes received from host                17
      Bytes received from line       0       Bytes sent to line      0
      IP packets received from line  0       IP packets sent to line 0
      IP packets received errored    0       IP packets aborted      0
      EC frames received from line   9       EC frames sent to line  9
      EC NAKs received from line     0       EC NAKs sent to line    0
      EC frames retransmitted        0       EC ACK timeouts 0
      DC negotiated RX Codewords     2048    DC negotiated TX Codewords      2048 
      DC negotiated RX String Length 255     DC negotiated TX String Length  255 
      DC negotiated RX History Size  10240   DC negotiated TX History Size   10240 
      DC negotiated RX History Size          10240   DC negotiated TX History Size  10240 
      DC Decoder State       Transparent     DC Encoder State        Transparent 
      DC RX Compression Ratio        3.21:1  DC TX Compression Ratio 9.22:1 
      Last disconnect reason        0x0000
      Strike a key when ready (Q to QUIT)
      TX / .Rx.
      Carrier Frequency (Hz)   1959 / 1959
      Symbol rate (baud/sec)   3429 / 3429
      Trellis code               16 /   16
      Non-linear encoding        On /   On
      Precoding                 Off /  Off
      Constellation shaping      On /   On
      Preemphasis index           0 /    0
      RX level (dBm)            -13 /   -9
      TX level reduction (dBm)    0 /    0
      SNR (dB) 33
      Far-end echo (dBm)       -97
      Round-trip delay (ms)    3
      Frequency offset (Hz)    -0.5
      Phase roll freq (Hz)     0.0
      Phase jitter freq (Hz)   0.0
      Phase jitter level (deg) 0
      RBS Pattern              0x#F  [PCM builds only]
      Digital Pad (dB)         0     [PCM builds only]
      Digital Pad Compensation On    [PCM builds only]

Modem S Register Summary

S registers can be set or read using in-band AT commands like reverse Telnet or modemcaps. They can also be read or set using out-of-band services such as direct interprocess communication (IPC) calls from Cisco IOS subsystems. Examples of this are call switch module (CSM) and resource pool management (RPM) commands.

Reserved S registers have no affect on the operation of any services.

All S registers can be modified with the ATSn=v command. For information on how to use bit-mapped registers, see the "Bit-Mapped Registers" section.

S Register Commands

This section describes AT commands that display or change register values.

Read All Registers

The %R command displays the contents of all S registers. The register contents are displayed as a table in decimal and hexadecimal format.

Read a Configuration Register

The Sn? command displays the contents of register n in decimal format. Register n becomes the reference register.

Point to a New Reference Register

The Sn command sets the modem register pointer to register n. Register n then becomes the reference register for subsequent register commands.

Change the Value of a Register

The Sn=x command changes the value of register n to x, where x is a decimal value. The Sn=>y command changes the value of register n to y, where y is a hexadecimal value. In either case, register n becomes the reference register.

Display the Value of the Reference Register

The ? command displays the value of the last S register referenced in a read, change, or point command.

Change the Value of the Reference Register

The =x command changes the value of the last S register referenced to x, where x is a decimal number. The =>y command changes the value of the last S register referenced to y, where y is a hexadecimal number.

Bit-Mapped Registers

Some S registers are bit-mapped so that they control several functions. (For example, see the sections on S9 and S46.) For each bit-mapped register, the "S Register Descriptions" section includes a table like the one below that lists register values and describes the feature associated with each value. To turn on a single feature, set the register to the appropriate value. To turn on two or more features, add their values and set the register to the total.

For example, suppose you want to set the register described in to disable quick retrains (value = 0), no result codes in answer mode (value = 4), and disable 8S-2D trellis encoding (value = 8). Total the values: 0 + 4 + 8 = 12, and set the register to 12.

Sample Bit-Mapped Register
Meaning
Values

0

Quick retrains

0—Enable quick retrains (default)
1—Disable quick retrains

1, 2

Result codes

0—Result codes (default)
2No result codes
4No result codes in answer mode

3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Trellis encoding

0—Enable trellis encoding (default)
8Disable 8S-2D trellis encoding
16Disable 16S-4D trellis encoding
32Disable 32S-4D trellis encoding
64Disable 64S-4D trellis encoding
128Disable nonlinear coding


S Register Descriptions

This section describes the purpose and format of each S register.

S0 (Automatic Answer in Seconds)

Specifies the interval in seconds between the time the modem receives notification of an incoming call and the time the modem answers the call.

Range

0 (Answer immediately)
1 to 255 (Wait 1 to 255 seconds before answering)

Default

2 (Answer in two seconds)

S1 (Unused)

Register S1 is not used.

S2 (Escape Code Character)

Specifies the ASCII value of the character used in the escape code. (The escape code is the escape character entered three times in succession.) When the modem is in connect state and it receives the escape code, the modem enters command state. Setting register S2 to 128 or above disables the escape code character.


Note Two registers, S2 and S47, control the escape code. To enable the escape code, you must set S2 to a value in the range 0 to 127, and you must set S47 to enabled (1 or 2). (See "S47 (Hayes +++ Escape Detection)" on page 39 .) To disable the escape code, you can either set S2 to 128 or higher, or you can set S47 to disabled (0).


Range

0 to 255 (ASCII decimal)
128 or higher disables the escape feature

Default

43 (+)

S3 (Carriage Return Character)

Specifies the ASCII value of the carriage return (CR) character. The carriage return terminates command lines and result codes.

Range

0 to 127 (ASCII decimal)

Default

13 (carriage return, CR)

S4 (Line Feed Character)

Specifies the ASCII value for the line feed (LF) character. The line feed character follows a carriage return at the end of long-form result codes. Short-form result codes are sent without line feeds. (See "Vn (Result Code Format)" on page 9 for descriptions of long-form and short-form result codes.)

Range

0 to 127 (ASCII decimal)

Default

10 (Line feed, LF)

S5 (Backspace Character)

Specifies the ASCII value for the backspace (BS) character that you can use to edit the command line.

Range

0 to 127 (ASCII decimal)

Default

8 (Backspace, BS)

S6 (Wait Before Dialing)

Specifies the time the modem waits after going off-hook before it dials. This is a minimum of 2 seconds, even if register S6 is set to a value less than 2. Register S6 is used only when the X0, X1, or X3 command (Extended Result Codes) is set.

Range

2 to 225 seconds

Default

2 seconds

S7 (Wait for Carrier After Dial)

Specifies the time that the modem waits for one of the following before hanging up:

Carrier from the remote modem when this modem is in originate or answer mode

Ringback, only when this modem is in originate mode, and only if X3 or X4 (Extended Result Codes) is set

Register S7 is linked to register S37 so that the two registers share a single value. Changing the value of S7 changes the value of S37, and changing S37 changes S7.

Range

0 to 255 seconds

Default

60 seconds

S8 (Pause Time for Comma Dial Modifier)

Specifies the time the modem waits when the pause dial modifier (,) is used in a dial string.


Note Register S8 and the comma dial modifier are provided for command compatibility with modems that use these features.


S8 (Comma Dial Modifier)

Command compatibility only.

Range

0 to 255 seconds

Default

2

S9 (Modem Settings)

Used to manipulate the bit mask settings of the E, V, &D and X AT commands. Use the %R command (Verbose display of the modem configuration) to see these values.

S9 is a bit-mapped register. See the "Bit-Mapped Registers" section for information on how to set bit-mapped registers. Table 1 Table 1 defines the bits in S9, with the default values shown in bold.

Table 1 S9 Values

Bit
Meaning
Values 1

0

Command echo

0—No echo (E0)
1Echo (E1)

1, 2

Result codes

0—Result codes (Q0)
2—No result codes (Q1)
4No result codes in answer mode (Q2)

3

Result type

0—Short form (V0)
8Long form (V1)

4, 5

Action on loss of data terminal ready (DTR) signal

0—Ignore DTR (&D0)
16—Modem enters command state (&D1)
32—Sets modem on hook (&D2)
48Resets modem (&D3)

6, 7, 8

Connect result code format and call progress

0—Sends connect result code, ignores dial tones and busy signals (X0)
64—Sends verbose connect result code, ignores dial tones and busy signals (X1)
128—Sends verbose connect and no dial tone result codes, ignores busy signals (X2)
192—Sends verbose connect and busy result codes, ignores dial tone (X3)
256Sends verbose connect, no dial tone, and busy result codes (X4)

1 Default values are in bold.


Range

0 to 301

Default

301 (0x12D)

S10 (Delay for Hang-up After Carrier Loss)

Specifies the time the modem waits before hanging up after loss of carrier. This waiting period allows the modem to recover from a temporary loss of carrier without breaking the connection. Modems at both ends of the connection should have the same values set. If the S10 values of the two modems are unequal, disconnection occurs when the lower value is reached. When register S10 is set to 255, the modem functions as if carrier were always present; it never hangs up due to loss of carrier. After disconnecting in originate mode, the modem waits a minimum of 5 seconds before going off-hook.

Register S10 is linked to register S38 so that the two registers share a single value. Changing the value of S10 changes the value of S38, and changing S38 changes S10.

Range

0 (Do not disconnect after carrier loss)
1 to 255 (Time to disconnect in 0.1-second increments)

Default

14 (1.4 seconds)

S11 (Link Initiate Action)

If the modem is idle (in escape or command state) and receives the ATO (on line) command, it originates or answers a call, based on the contents of this register.

Range

0 (Answer)
1 (Originate)

Default

0 (Answer)

S12 (Number of Async Data Bits)

Specifies the number of asynchronous (start-stop mode) data bits for the call. Outgoing characters have this many significant bits. This number of bits is assembled for each incoming character.

Set this register to 7 if you wish to use the error correction (EC) parity feature. The EC parity feature is active only when all of the following are true:

Error correction is successfully negotiated (see registers S15, S22, S23, and S24)

Bit 4 in Register S54 is set to 64 (see "S54 (General Options)," on page 42)

This register is set to 7

If EC has not been negotiated, or if bit 4 in register S54 is set to 0, the modem always uses 8-bit data, regardless of how this register is set.

Range

7 (7 data bits)

8 (8 data bits)

9 (9 data bits)

Default

8

S13 (Parity Configuration)

Specifies the character parity for the call in start-stop (asynchronous) mode. The modem sets this value on outgoing (to line) characters and checks it on incoming characters.


Note See "S12 (Number of Async Data Bits)" on page 23 for information on the factors that control the availability of the EC parity feature.


Range

0 (No parity)
1 (Even parity)
2 (Odd parity)

Default

0 (No parity)

S14 (Stop Bit Configuration)

Specifies the number of stop bits for the call in start-stop (asynchronous) mode. The modem sets this value on outgoing (to line) characters.


Note If error correction is successfully negotiated (see registers S15, S22, S23, and S24), stop bits are meaningless, and the setting of this register has no effect.


Range

1 or 2 stop bits

Default

1

S15 (V.42 Detect Phase Operation)

Enables or disables V.42 detect phase, during which two modems prepare to negotiate a common error correction protocol. This register controls the originating modem's behavior only; in answering mode, detect phase is automatic. The length of the negotiation period is controlled by S16.


Note V.42 detect phase is also disabled under either of the following conditions, regardless of the setting of this register:
-If LAP-M error correction is disabled by setting S23 to 0. See "S23 (V.42 LAP-Modem Error Correction)" on page 28 .
-If the modulation standard in effect uses FSK (frequency shift keying). FSK modulations include V.21, V.23, and Bell103. For information on setting the modulation standard, see the "S29 (Modulation Standard)" section.


Range

0 (Disable V.42 detect phase)
1 (Enable V.42 detect phase)

Default

1 (Enable V.42 detect phase)

S16 (Error Correction Autodetect Timeout)

Specifies, in 100-millisecond steps, the period for which the modem can remain in V.42 detect phase. This timeout period is used only if V.42 detect phase is enabled; see the preceding section,"S15 (V.42 Detect Phase Operation)." See "S25 (Link Protocol Fallback)" on page 28 for a description of the fallback action invoked by the modem if the detect phase times out.

Range

0 (Run detect mechanism until manual intervention occurs or a pattern match is found)
1 to 255 (Run detect mechanism for 0.1 to 858.9 seconds.)

Values larger than 255 are accepted but yield unpredictable results.

The value of S16 must be smaller than the value of S17. See "S17 (Error Correction Negotiation Timeout)."

Default

50 (5 seconds)

S17 (Error Correction Negotiation Timeout)

Specifies, in 100-millisecond steps, the period during which the modem tries to detect and negotiate an error correction protocol. The clock for this timeout starts at the same time as the clock for the error correction autodetect timeout controlled by register S16. The time allowed for error correction negotiation is the difference between the values of S16 and S17. For example, suppose that S16 is set to 50 (5 seconds) and S17 is set to 100 (10 seconds). If the modems spend the full 5 seconds in autodetect phase, only 5 seconds remain for error correction negotiation.

Unsuccessful negotiation results in fallback at the end of the specified time period. The fallback action is set using S25; see "S25 (Link Protocol Fallback)" on page 28 .

Range

0 (Wait indefinitely for protocol negotiation or manual intervention)
1 to 255 (Wait 0.1 to 25.5 seconds before unsuccessful negotiation causes fallback)

Values larger than 255 are accepted but yield unpredictable results.

The value of S17 must be larger than the value of S16. See "S16 (Error Correction Autodetect Timeout)."

Default

100 (10 seconds)

S18 (Error Correction Fallback Character)

Specifies the ASCII value of the error correction (EC) fallback character. The partner modem can send this character three times during EC protocol detect phase (during call establishment) to force this modem to stop negotiating and use the fallback option specified in S25. See "S15 (V.42 Detect Phase Operation)" on page 24 and "S25 (Link Protocol Fallback)" on page 28 .

If you set bit 7 to 128, the fallback character needs to be entered only one time. (That is, you can enter the fallback character once during protocol detect phase, instead of three times, to force the modem to stop negotiating and use the fallback option specified in S25.)

S18 is a bit-mapped register. See "Bit-Mapped Registers" on page 18 for information on how to set bit-mapped registers. Table 2Table 2 defines the bits in S18, with the defaults shown in bold.

Table 2 Error Correction Fall-back Character

Bit
Meaning
Values 1

7

Number of times fallback character must be entered

0—Three times
128—Once

6 to 0

ASCII decimal code for fallback character

0No fallback character
:
:
13Carriage return
:
:
127

1 Default values are in bold.


Range

0 to 127

Default

13 (three carriage returns)

S19 (Error Correction Retransmission Limit)

Specifies the number of successive data frame transmissions that take place before the modem performs a special recovery action and repeats the specified number of retransmissions. If the retransmissions fail, the modem disconnects.

The special recovery action might include shifting the bit rate or retraining.


Note The error correction retransmission limit is used only during a call; it is not in effect during link establishment.


Range

0 (Do not disconnect on excessive retransmission; do not perform special recovery action before retries)
1 to 255 (This number of successive frame retransmissions causes recovery, then disconnect)

Default

12 retransmissions

S20 (Error Correction Max Frame Length)

Specifies the maximum length for error correction frames (that is, for MNP, LAP-M, and ARA frames). Higher values are more efficient; lower values work better on a line with poor transmission quality.

Range

64 to 1024 octets of data

Default

256 octets

S21 (Data Compression)

Specifies permitted methods of data compression. Unless both modems permit a particular data compression method, it is not be used.

S21 is a bit-mapped register.


Note MNP5 can operate only when MNP error correction is active. (See S24 (Microcom Network Protocol Error Correction).) Thus, if S21 is set to 2 (MNP5), LAP-M connections have no data compression.


Range

0 (Data compression disabled)
Bit 0 (V.42bis enable)
Bit 1 (MNP5 enable)
Bit 2 (V.44 Tx
Bit 3 (V.44 Rx


Note When multiple compression types are enabled, the order of precedence is v.44, v.42bis, MNP5, none


Default

15 for NextPort version 7.xx and above
3 for NextPort version 6.xx and below

S22 (ARA Error Correction Options)

Specifies the AppleTalk Remote Access error correction method.

If more than one method of error correction is enabled at each end of the connection, the modem chooses a method based on the following order of precedence:

1. ARA originate only [highest precedence]

2. LAP-M

3. MNP/ARA answer only

4. Fall back (refer to "S25 (Link Protocol Fallback)" on page 28 ) [lowest precedence]

Range

0 (ARA1.0 and ARA2.0 disabled)
1 (ARA1.0 and ARA2.0 enabled for answer only)
2 (ARA1.0 and ARA2.0 enabled for answer, ARA1.0 enabled for call origination)
3 (ARA1.0 and ARA2.0 enabled for answer, ARA2.0 enabled for call origination)

Default

1 (ARA1.0 and ARA2.0 enabled for answer only)

S23 (V.42 LAP-Modem Error Correction)

Enables or disables V.42 (LAP-M) error correction.

If more than one method of error correction is enabled at each end of the connection, the modem chooses a method based on the following order of precedence:

1. ARA originate only [highest precedence]

2. LAP-M

3. MNP/ARA answer only

4. Fall back (refer to "S25 (Link Protocol Fallback)" on page 28 ) [lowest precedence]

5. See also S15 (V.42 Detect Phase Operation).

Range

0 (V.42 (LAP-M) disabled)
1 (V.42 (LAP-M) originate and answer enabled)

Default

1 (V.42 (LAP-M) originate and answer enabled)

S24 (Microcom Network Protocol Error Correction)

Enables or disables MNP error correction.

If more than one method of error correction is enabled at each end of the connection, the modem chooses a method based on the following order of precedence:

1. LAP-M [highest precedence]

2. ARA

3. MNP

4. Fall back (refer to "S25 (Link Protocol Fallback)" on page 28 ) [lowest precedence]

Range

0 (MNP disabled)
1 (MNP originate and answer enabled)

Default

1 (MNP originate and answer enabled)

S25 (Link Protocol Fallback)

If either V.42 detect phase or error correction negotiation phase (see S15, S16, and S17) ends in failure to agree on an error correction protocol, the modem takes the fallback action specified in this register. The partner modem can also force this modem to fall back using the character specified in S18. In asynchronous framing mode (S25 = 0), the modem uses the settings of S12, S13, and S14. For more information on V.42 detect phase, see "S15 (V.42 Detect Phase Operation)" on page 24 , "S16 (Error Correction Autodetect Timeout)" on page 25 , "S17 (Error Correction Negotiation Timeout)" on page 25 , and "S18 (Error Correction Fallback Character)" on page 25 .

Range

0 (Enter asynchronous framing mode (start/stop/parity bits))
1 (Enter synchronous framing mode (raw 8 bits to line))
2 (Disconnect)

Default

0 (Enter asynchronous framing mode (start/stop/parity bits))

S27 (Calling Tone)

Enables or disables the V.25 optional calling tone, a 1300-Hz signal that allows the called party to determine whether the calling device is a modem. Some phone systems outside the United States and Canada require a modem to send a calling tone when it originates a connection.

Range

0 (Calling tone disabled)
1 (Send calling tone)

Default

0 (Calling tone disabled)

S28 (Guard Tone)

Enables or disables the 1800-Hz guard tone in V.22 and V.22bis modes. Some phone systems outside the United States and Canada require a modem to send a guard tone.

Range

0 (Guard tone disabled)
1 (Use guard tone (V.22 and V.22bis only))

Default

0 (Guard tone disabled)

S29 (Modulation Standard)

Specifies the modulation standards to be used. When negotiating a connection with another modem, the modem attempts to set up a connection based on a standard acceptable to both, based on the sequence and timing of generated and detected tones. For example, when S29 is set to 0, the modem opens negotiations by generating ANSAM, a single tone that is a valid starting point for many standards, including K56FLEX, V.90, V.34+, V.34, V.32bis, V.32, V.22bis, V.22, and V.21. If there is no response, the modem generates a sequence specific to V.32bis. Then the modem tries V.22/V.22bis, then V.32 again, then V.21, and so on.

If both modems are Cisco NextPort compatible, they are able to agree on one of the standards in setting 4. If one modem is not Cisco NextPort compatible, the modems might fail to negotiate a standard and can disconnect.

Digital and Analog Modulations

K56Flex and V.90 (used in settings 5 and 6 of this register) use digital pulse code modulation (PCM); the other types of modulation (V.34, V.22, etc.) are analog.

Effect of FSK on Framing

Certain modulations, including V.21, V.23, and Bell103, use frequency shift keying (FSK). FSK causes MNP connections to use MNP2 (character mode framing), rather than the standard MNP3 (sync framing). FSK also causes LAP-M/V.42 and V.42 detect phase to be disabled.

Range

Value
Modulation Standards

0

V.34+, V.34
V.32bis, V.32
V.23
V.22bis, V.22
V.21
BELL212
BELL103

1

V.34+, V.34
V.32bis, V.32
V.23
V.22bis, V.22
V.21
BELL212
BELL103

2

V.32ter Automode

3

V.32bis, V.32
V.23
V.22bis, V.22
V.21
BELL212
BELL103

4

V.23
V.22bis, V.22
V.21
BELL212
BELL103

5

K56Flex 1.1
V.34+, V.34
V.32bis, V.32
V.23
V.22bis, V.22
V.21
BELL212
BELL103

6

V.90
K56Flex 1.1
V.34+, V.34
V.32bis, V.32
V.23
V.22bis, V.22
V.21
BELL212
BELL103

7

Reserved

8

V.110

9

PIAFS

10

V.120

11

Clear channel

12

V.92 Auto-mode (V.92 builds only: NextPort version 7.xx or higher)


Default

12 for NextPort version 7.xx and above
6 for NextPort version 6.xx and below

S30 (Maximum Connect Rate)

Maximum rate at which the modem receives data, in bits per second. If this modem's range of connect rates does not overlap with the other modem's range (that is, if one modem's maximum connect rate is lower than the other modem's minimum connect rate (see S31)), a connection cannot be established and the modems disconnect.


Note If the modem is using K56Flex or V.90 modulation, S30 and S31 control the data rate in the receive direction only; S50 and S51 control transmit speeds. See "S50 (Maximum PCM Connect Rate)," on page 40, and "S51 (Minimum PCM Connect Rate)," on page 40. If the modem is not using K56Flex or V.90, S30 and S31 control the rates of both received and transmitted data. Table 3 shows which S registers control data rates under the various modulation standards.


Table 3 S Registers Controlling Data Rates Under Different Modulation Standards

Modulation Standard
S Registers Controlling Transmit Rate
S Registers Controlling Receive Rate

V.32terbo and lower

S30 and S31

S30 and S31

V.34

S56

S30 and S31

V.90 and K56Flex

S50 and S51

S30 and S31

V.92, V.90 and K56Flex

S50 and S51

S30 and S31


Range

75 to 33600 bps
This value must be equal to or greater than the value of S31 and must be equal to or greater than its corresponding minimum connect rate.

Default

33600 bps

S31 (Minimum Connect Rate)

Minimum rate at which the modem receives data, in bits per second. If this modem's range of connect rates does not overlap with the other modem's range (that is, if one modem's maximum connect rate (see S30) is lower than the other modem's minimum connect rate), a connection cannot be established and the modems disconnect.


Note If the modem is using K56Flex or V.90 modulation, S30 and S31 control the data rate in the receive direction only; S50 and S51 control transmit speeds. See "S50 (Maximum PCM Connect Rate)," on page 40, and "S51 (Minimum PCM Connect Rate)," on page 40. If the modem is not using K56Flex or V.90, S30 and S31 control the rates of both received and transmitted data. Table 3, above, shows which S registers control data rates under the various modulation standards.


Range

75 to 33600 bps
This value must be equal to or less than the value of S30 and must be equal to or less than its corresponding maximum connect rate.

Default

300 bps

S32 (Signal Quality Threshold)

Specifies the minimum bit error rate at which the modem initiates recovery, and below which the modem considers the line to be good. Recovery consists of a retrain or of falling back to a lower data rate, depending on the modulation standard currently in use. If the line quality consistently exceeds the threshold, the modem falls forward to a higher data rate (see the "S34 (Fall-forward Timer)" section).

This register works in conjunction with bit 7 of S54 to control the signal quality threshold and receive speed. Table 4 shows the relationship between the S register settings, the effective signal quality threshold, the trigger bit error rate (BER), and, for a given bandwidth/signal-to-noise ratio, the receive speed. Table 4 shows S32 values.

Table 4 S Registers, Signal Quality Thresholds, BER and Receive Speed

S Register Settings
Effective SQ Threshold
BER Threshold
Receive Speed at Bandwidth/SNR
3200 Hz/33 dB
3429 Hz/37 dB

S32 = 2
S54 bit 7 = 0

2

1:1000

26400 bps

31200 bps

S32 = 2
S54 bit 7 = 1281

2.5

1:3000

24000 bps

28800 bps

S32 = 3
S54 bit 7 = 0

3

1:10000

21600 bps

26400 bps

1 These are the default values.


Range

S32 Value
Meaning if S54 bit 7 = 0
Meaning if S54 bit 7 = 128

0

No action on bit errors

No action on bit errors

1

Bit error rates of at least 1 in 100 cause recovery

Bit error rates of at least 1 in 300 cause recovery

2

Bit error rates of at least 1 in 1000 cause recovery

Bit error rates of at least 1 in 3000 cause recovery

3

Bit error rates of at least 1 in 10,000 cause recovery

Bit error rates of at least 1 in 30,000 cause recovery

4

Bit error rates of at least 1 in 100,000 cause recovery

Bit error rates of at least 1 in 300,000 cause recovery

5

Bit error rates of at least 1 in 1,000,000 cause recovery

Bit error rates of at least 1 in 3,000,000 cause recovery


Default

2

S33 (Speed Change Squelch Timer)

Specifies, in milliseconds, the time to delay after a speed shift before another speed shift is allowed.

Range

0 (Timer disabled)
1 to 65535 (Delay time; maximum value is about 1 minute)

Default

500 (0.5 second)

S34 (Fall-forward Timer)

The elapsed time, in 10-millisecond increments, during which signal quality is consistently good, that the modem waits before increasing transmission speed. To set signal quality, see "S32 (Signal Quality Threshold)" on page 33 .

Range

0 (Fall-forward disabled)
1 to 65535 (0.01 to 655.35 seconds before speed increase; maximum is almost 11 minutes)

Default

1000 (10 seconds)

S35 (Fallback Timer)

The elapsed time, in 10-millisecond increments, during which signal quality is consistently poor, that the modem waits before decreasing transmission speed. To set signal quality, see "S32 (Signal Quality Threshold)" on page 33 .


Note With NextPort, CSMv6 delays retrain requests by the value of S35. When a retrain occurs, the CSMv6 starts a 45-second timer. If it recognizes that the retrain is not responding before 45 seconds, it might time out sooner. (CSMv6 also hangs up after the S40 retrain limit is reached.)


Range

0 (Fallback disabled)
1 to 65535 (0.01 to 655.35 seconds before fallback)

Default

50 (0.5 second)

S36 (Terminate Timeout)

Specifies, in seconds, the maximum time to delay after a host disconnect request before forcing the link to disconnect. (The disconnect request can be an ATH (hang up) command or a Cisco IOS request from the router or access server.) During this period, the modem sends buffered data and then clears the link. Low values cause the modem to disconnect faster, but may result in some final data being lost and in the remote modem hanging on to a dead line for a while.

Range

0 to 858 seconds

Default

20 seconds

S37 (Wait for Carrier After Dial)

Register S37 is linked to register S7 so that the two registers share a single value. Changing the value of S37 changes S7, and changing S7 changes S37. For a description of the function of the two registers, see "S7 (Wait for Carrier After Dial)" on page 20 .

Range

0: wait forever for data mode
1 to 255: Maximum time the link takes to establish before disconnection (in 1 second steps)

Default

60

S38 (Delay for Hang-up After Carrier Loss)

Register S38 is linked to register S10 so that the two registers share a single value. Changing the value of S38 changes S10, and changing S10 changes S38. For a description of the function of the two registers, see "S10 (Delay for Hang-up After Carrier Loss)" on page 22 .

Range

0: Do not disconnect on carrier loss
1 to 255: Maximum time without carrier to cause link disconnect (in 100 ms steps)

Default

14

S39 (Transmit Level Setting)

Specifies the decibel level the modem uses for transmissions.


Note The actual range of transmit levels you can use is specified by the country in which the modem is operating. Transmit levels are also controlled by the country code setting that is made at installation. For example, if you set S39 to 3, -9 dBm, but your country imposes a ceiling of -10 dBm on transmit levels, your modem transmits at -10 dBm, despite the setting of -9 dBm.


Transmit level settings for V.90 are controlled by "S59 (V.90 Transmit Level Setting)," on page 43.

Range

Value
Decibel level

0

-6 dBm

1

-7 dBm

2

-8 dBm

3

-9 dBm

4

-10 dBm

5

-11 dBm

6

-12 dBm

7

-13 dBm

8

-14 dBm

9

-15 dBm

10

-16 dBm

11

-17 dBm

12

-18 dBm

13

-19 dBm

14

-20 dBm

15

-21 dBm



Note The transmit level settings are capped at -10 dBm for all countries, except the USA(-12 dBm) and Japan(-15 dBm). Refer to the "Transmit Level Setting Based on Country Code" section.


Default

7 (-13 dBm)

S40 (Consecutive Retrain Disconnect Threshold)

After this number of consecutive failed retrains, the modem disconnects. (If the modem loses synchronization with its partner, it can try to regain synchronization with a retrain.)

Range

0 (Never disconnect because of failed retrains)
1 to 255 (Disconnect after this number of failed retrains)

Default

4 retrains

S41 (V.34 Maximum Symbol Rate)

Specifies the maximum symbol (baud) rate that pertains when the modem is using V.34 modulation. (To select the modulation standard, see "S29 (Modulation Standard)" on page 29 .) This register is read-only to AT commands.

Range

0 (2400 baud)
1 (2743 baud)
2 (2800 baud)
3 (3000 baud)
4 (3200 baud)
5 (3429 baud)

Default

5 (3429 baud)

S42 (V.34 Minimum Symbol Rate)

Specifies the minimum symbol (baud) rate that pertains when the modem is using V.34 modulation. (To select the modulation standard, see "S29 (Modulation Standard)" on page 29 .)

Range

0 (2400 baud)
1 (2743 baud)
2 (2800 baud)
3 (3000 baud)
4 (3200 baud)
5 (3429 baud)

Default

0 (2400 baud)

S43 (V.34 Carrier Frequency)

Specifies the carrier frequency that pertains when the modem is using V.34 modulation. (To change the modulation standard, see "S29 (Modulation Standard)" on page 29 .)

Range

0 (Low carrier)
1 (High carrier)
2 (Automatic carrier selection)

Default

2 (Automatic carrier selection)

S44 (V.34 Preemphasis Filter Selection)

Specifies the filter to use on the transmit signal when the modem is using V.34 modulation. (To select the modulation standard, see "S29 (Modulation Standard)" on page 29 .) The default setting, 11, selects a filter automatically based on line impairments and conditions. Settings 0 to 10 select fixed preemphasis filters without regard for line impairments and conditions. We recommend that you leave this register set to the default value, 11 (automatic selection), unless you are advised otherwise by a Cisco representative. For more information on preemphasis filter selection, see CCITT Recommendation V.34.

Range

0 to 10 (Select fixed filters)
11 (Automatic preemphasis filter selection)

Default

11 (Automatic preemphasis filter selection)

S47 (Hayes +++ Escape Detection)

Enables or disables detection of the escape code (+++ by default) that you enter to put the modem into escape mode. Escape mode enables you to enter commands while this modem is connected to another modem.


Note Two registers, S2 and S47, control the escape code. To enable the escape code, you must set S2 to a value in the range 0 to 127, and you must set S47 to enabled (1 or 2). (See "S2 (Escape Code Character)" on page 19 .) To disable the escape code, you can either set S2 to 128 or higher, or set S47 to disabled (0).

In addition, if you use register S48 to turn off the AT command processor, executing the escape code has no effect.


If escape code detection is enabled on the modem for a host that echoes the user's input, the host modem may inadvertently be placed in online command mode when a user enters the escape code on his or her own modem. For this reason, we recommend disabling escape code detection (setting S47 to 0) on host/server modems. However, if the host/server echoes only when answering calls, then S47 = 2 is a good setting.

Range

0 (Disabled)
1 (Enabled)
2 (Enabled in originate mode only)

Default

2 (Enabled in originate mode only)

S48 (AT Command Processor)

Enables or disables the AT command processor.

Range

0 (Disabled)
1 (Enabled)

Default

1 (Enabled)

S50 (Maximum PCM Connect Rate)

Maximum rate, in bits per second, at which the modem transmits data when it is using the K56Flex or V.90 modulation standards (use S29 to set the modulation standard). This parameter is unidirectional; it does not affect the speed of data received. If this modem's range of connect rates does not overlap with the other modem's range (that is, if one modem's maximum connect rate is lower than the other modem's minimum connect rate (see S51)), a connection cannot be established and the modems disconnect.

Pulse code modulation (PCM) is digital; the other types of modulation available (V.34, V.22, etc.) are analog.


Note If the modem is using K56Flex or V.90 modulation, S50 and S51 control the data rate in the transmit direction only; S30 and S31 control receive speeds. See "S30 (Maximum Connect Rate)," on page 32, and "S31 (Minimum Connect Rate)," on page 33. If the modem is not using K56Flex or V.90, S30 and S31 control the rates of both received and transmitted data. Table 5 Table 5 shows which S registers control data rates under the various modulation standards.


Table 5 S Registers Controlling Data Rates Under Different Modulation Standards

Modulation Standard
S Registers Controlling Transmit Rate
S Registers Controlling Receive Rate

V.34 and lower

S30 and S31

S30 and S31

K56Flex

S50 and S51

S30 and S31

V.90

S50 and S51

S30 and S31


Range

28000 bps to 60000 bps
This value must be equal to or greater than the value of S51.

Default

60000 bps

S51 (Minimum PCM Connect Rate)

Minimum rate, in bits per second, at which the modem transmits data when it is using the K56Flex or V.90 modulation standards. (Use S29 to set the modulation standard.) This parameter is unidirectional; it does not affect the speed of data received. If this modem's range of connect rates does not overlap with the other modem's range (that is, if one modem's maximum connect rate (see S50) is lower than the other modem's minimum connect rate), a connection cannot be established and the modems disconnect.


Note If the modem is using K56Flex or V.90 modulation, S50 and S51 control the data rate in the transmit direction only; S30 and S31 control receive speeds. See "S30 (Maximum Connect Rate)," on page 32, and "S31 (Minimum Connect Rate)," on page 33. If the modem is not using K56Flex or V.90, S30 and S31 control the rates of both received and transmitted data. Table 5, above, shows which S registers control data rates under the various modulation standards.


Range

28000 bps to 60000 bps
This value must be equal to or less than the value of S50.

Default

28000 bps

S52 (Digital Pad Compensation)

For V.90 transmissions, Cisco NextPort firmware can boost the signal it transmits when the partner analog modem detects a digital pad (attenuator) in the circuit. Boosting the signal to compensate for digital pad attenuation can improve throughput. This register controls whether Cisco NextPort allows the partner analog modem to compensate on circuits where a digital pad is detected.

This register has no effect on transmissions in modes other than V.90.

Range

0 (No compensation)
1 (This modem supports digital pad compensation for V.90 transmissions)

Default

1

S53 (V.8bis Capability)

V.8bis is a protocol used for exchanging K56Flex information. It is used during modem train-up prior to all other exchanges/tones. If you are not expecting to connect to K56Flex clients, disable V.8bis (set this register to 0) to shorten modem train-up times for other protocols by about 3 seconds.


Note Enabling V.8bis has no effect unless you are using a modulation standard that includes K56Flex. To set the modulation standard, use register S29 (Modulation Standard).



Note Setting S53 to 0 effectively disables K56Flex, because K56Flex cannot operate without V.8bis.


S53 is a bit-mapped register. See "Bit-Mapped Registers" on page 18 for information on how to set bit-mapped registers. The bits are defined in Table 6.

Table 6 V.8bis Capability

Bit
Meaning
Values 1

0

V.8bis negotiation

0Disable V.8bis negotiation
1Enable V.8bis negotiation

1

V.90 negotiation in V.8bis

0Disable V.90 negotiation in V.8bis
2Enable V.90 negotiation in V.8bis

1 Default values are in bold.


Range

0: DISABLED
1: ENABLED

Default

1 (Enable V.8bis options)

S54 (General Options)

S54 is a bit-mapped register that controls several options. See "Bit-Mapped Registers" on page 18 8for information on how to set bit-mapped registers. The bits are defined in Table 7.


Note Available in SPE firmware version 6.108 and above.


Table 7 General Options

Bit
2 Bit
Meaning

0

1

Reserved for debug images

1

2

Disable Speed-Shift state change reporting

2

4

Disable V.25 tones for V.22bis, V.23, V.22, and V.21

3

8

Disable 6dB boost at ADC input

4

16

Not used

5

32

Not used

64

   


Note Used for NextPort PoS applications. (See also, S75 (Answer Tone Length)=1.)
Use S54=4 for PoS applications that do not require V.25 tones. S54 pertains to SPE firmware version 6.108 and above (an ERROR is sent from the modem when trying to set S54 on SPE versions below v6.108. For example, SPE v.6.103, 6.93, 6.89, etc. all return ERROR).
Use the following recommended PoS modemcap:
&f&d2s15=0s16=0s17=0s21=0s22=0s23=0s24=0s53=0s54=4s75=1


Range

0 to 2047

Default

0

S56 (Set Maximum V.34+ Transmit Rate)

Set the maximum allowable V.34+ transmit rate in bits per second (bps).

Range

4800, 7200, 9600, 12000, 14400, 16800, 19200, 21600, 24000, 26400, 28800, 31200, 33600

Default

33600

S57 (User Rate for ISDN, V.110, V.120, and Clear Channel)

S57 specifies the user rate (send and receive speed) for originating ISDN, V.110, V.120, and clear channel calls. The user rate is communicated to the remote modem.

Range

600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 7200, 9600, 14400, 19200, 38400-64000 Bps

Default

64000

S59 (V.90 Transmit Level Setting)

Specifies the level in decibels for V.90 transmissions. (Transmit level settings for other operating modes are controlled by "S39 (Transmit Level Setting)," on page 36.)

These are the maximum transmit level settings in Cisco NextPort firmware:

United States: -12 dBm

Japan: -15 dBm

All other countries: -10 dBm


Note The range of transmit levels you can use is specified by the country in which the modem is operating. Transmit levels are also controlled by the country code setting that is made at installation. For example, if you set S59 to 3, -9 dBm, but your country imposes a ceiling of -10 dBm on transmit levels, your modem transmits at -10 dBm, despite the setting of -9 dBm.


Range

Value
Decibel level

0

-6 dBm

1

-7 dBm

2

-8 dBm

3

-9 dBm

4

-10 dBm

5

-11 dBm

6

-12 dBm

7

-13 dBm

8

-14 dBm

9

-15 dBm

10

-16 dBm


Defaults

For Japan: 9 (-15 dBm)
All other countries: 6 (-12 dBm)

S61 (Microcom Network Protocol 10-EC)

Not used.

S62 (V.92 Modem on Hold Exchange)

Sets the maximum time a user is allowed to stay on-hold every time a Modem on Hold event is requested. A timeout of 0 seconds disables Modem on Hold. A message is issued indicating that a Modem on Hold event is not allowed.


Note Available with SPE firmware version 6.103.11 and above.


.

Value
Timeout

0

MoH disabled

1

10 seconds

2

20 seconds

3

30 seconds

4

40 seconds

5

1 minute

6

2 minutes

7

3 minutes

8

4 minutes

9

6 minutes

10

8 minutes

11

12 minutes

12

16 minutes

13

No Limit


Range

0 to 13

Default

0

S63 (Quick Connect Exchange)

Enables or disables V.92 Quick Connect and also sets the ANSpcm tone level to be used during Quick Connect negotiation.


Note Available in SPE firmware version 6.103.11 and above.


Value
Meaning

Bit 0

QC Enabled

0

QC Disabled

1

QC Enabled,

Bits 1-2 (ANSpcm level)

:00: -9 dBm

01: -12 dBm

10: -15 dBm

11: -18 dBm


Range

0, 2 to 7

Default

3

S64 (Link Standard)

Enable or disable automoding by setting to connect at a fixed modulation.


Note By using the S64 register, Cisco NextPort is forced to try ONLY the standard specified in S64. The only exception is if S64 is set to 1 (V.90) where, due to the V.8 specification, a fallback to V.34 is allowed.


For example, if a client modem is set to V.90 automode, and Cisco NextPort is set to S64=5 (V.32), both modems conect at V.32. However, if the client modem is set to V.21 and Cisco NextPort is set to S64=7 (V.22), the connection is dropped, since Cisco NextPort does not try any modulation other than V.22 in this case.

Value
Meaning

0

Automode enabled(proceed according to S29)

1

V.90

2

K.56Flex

3

V.34

4

V.32bis

5

V.32

6

V.22bis

7

V.22

8

V.21

9

V.23

10

Bell212

11

Bell103


Range

0 to 11

Default

0

S65 (V.44 Maximum TX Codewords)

Sets the maximum number of codewords that can be negotiated and used in the transmitter's V.44 compression dictionary.


Note Available in SPE firmware version 6.103.11 and above.


Range

256 to 2048

Default

2048

S66 (V.44 Maximum RX Codewords)

Sets the maximum number of codewords that can be negotiated and used in the receiver's V.44 compression dictionary.


Note Available in SPE firmware version 6.103.11 and above.


Range

256 to 2048

Default

2048

S67 (V.44 Maximum TX String Length)

Sets the maximum string length that can be negotiated and used in the transmitter's V.44 compression dictionary.


Note Available in SPE firmware version 6.103.11 and above.


Range

32 to 255

Default

142

S68 (V.44 Maximum RX String Length)

Sets the maximum string length that can be negotiated and used in the receiver's V.44 compression dictionary.


Note Available in SPE firmware version 6.103.11 and above.


Range

32 to 255

Default

142

S69 (V.44 Maximum TX History Size)

Sets the maximum history size that can be negotiated and used in the transmitter's V.44 compression dictionary.


Note Available in SPE firmware version 6.103.11 and above.


Range

256 to 10240

Default

10240

S70 (V.44 Maximum RX History Size)

Sets the maximum history size that can be negotiated and used in the receiver's V.44 compression dictionary.


Note Available in SPE firmware version 6.103.11 and above.


Range

256 to 10240

Default

10240

S75 (Answer Tone Length)

Number of phase reversals of the answer tone.


Note Used for NextPort PoS applications. See also, S54 (General Options)=4 and S64 (Link Standard). Use S75 (Answer Tone Length)=1 to reduce the number of phase reversals to a minimum.
S75 is available in SPE firmware version 6.108 and above. (You will get ERROR from the modem when trying to set S75 on SPE versions below version 6.108 (for example, SPE version 6.103, 6.93, 6.89, etc. all return ERROR). Use the following recommended PoS modemcap:
&f&d2s15=0s16=0s17=0s21=0s22=0s23=0s24=0s53=0s54=4s75=1


Range

0 to 255, number of phase reversals of the answer tone. One unit lower decreases answertone duration by 450ms. One unit higher increases answertone duration by 450ms. For V.90, K56flex, and V.34, the default duration is 4950ms. For all other modulations, the default duration is 3600ms.

Default

11

S76 (Rx Aggression Control)


Note Available in SPE firmware version 6.106 and above.


Range

0: default speed
1: one speed lower
2: two speeds lower
3: three speeds lower ...

9: one speed higher
10: two speeds higher
11: three speeds higher

Default

0

S77 (Tx Aggression Control)


Note Available in SPE firmware version 6.106 and above.


Range

0: default speed
1: one speed lower
2: two speeds lower
3: three speeds lower

Default

0

S78 (56K Plus)


Note Available in SPE firmware version 6.106 and above.


Range

0: disabled
1: enabled

Default

0

S79 (Client Uplink Rate)


Note Available in SPE firmware version 6.106 and above.


Range

0: Disable
1: Conexant Client
2: 26.4k
4: 24k
8: 21.6k
16: PCTel
32: 26.4k
64: 24k
128: 21.6k
256: Lucent Client
512: 26.4k
1024:24k
2048: 21.6k
4096: USR
8192: 26.4k
16384: 24k
32768: 21.6k

Default

0

Transmit Level Setting Based on Country Code

The default setting and maximum transmit level setting for S39 are dependent on the country code setting. If the user tries to set S39 to a value greater than the maximum Setting then an ERROR is returned and S39 will retain the last valid value entered. Refer to the table below for the values:

Table 8

Country
Default Setting
Default Level (dBm)
Maximum Setting
Maximum Level (dBm)

USA

7

-13

6

-12

TAIWAN

7

-13

4

-10

HONGKONG

7

-13

4

-10

INTERNATIONAL_MULAW

7

-13

4

-10

JAPAN

9

-15

9

-15

All Others

7

-13

6

-12


Related Links

Access-Dial Technical Tips

Access Product Support Page

Access Technology Support Page

Cisco IOS Release 12.2 Master Indexes

Cisco IOS Dial Services Command Reference for Cisco IOS Software Release 12.2

Cisco IOS Dial Technologies Configuration Guide, Release 12.2

Comparing NextPort SPE Commands to MICA Modem Commands

Configuration documents for Cisco AS5400

Modem Management Commands

Modem-Router Connection Guide

Overview of General Modem and NAS Line Quality

SPE and Firmware Download Enhancements

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Cisco provides Cisco.com as a starting point for all technical assistance. Customers and partners can obtain documentation, troubleshooting tips, and sample configurations from online tools by using the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) Web Site. Cisco.com registered users have complete access to the technical support resources on the Cisco TAC Web Site.

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