Cisco 7600 Series Router Installation Guide
Troubleshooting
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Troubleshooting

Table Of Contents

Troubleshooting

Getting Started

Problem Solving to the System Component Level

Identifying Startup Problems

Troubleshooting the Power Supply

Troubleshooting the Power Supply Sub-System

Troubleshooting Inadequate Power for all the Modules

Troubleshooting Power Latch Up

Troubleshooting the Cooling Sub-System

Troubleshooting the Fan Assembly

Troubleshooting An Old Fan Module

Troubleshooting Modules

Contacting Customer Service


Troubleshooting


This chapter describes how to troubleshoot the Cisco 7600 series router hardware installation and contains these sections:

Getting Started

Problem Solving to the System Component Level

Identifying Startup Problems

Troubleshooting the Power Supply

Troubleshooting the Cooling Sub-System

Troubleshooting Modules

Contacting Customer Service

If your system has problems starting up, use the information in this chapter to help isolate the cause. Problems with the initial startup are often caused by a module that has become dislodged from the backplane or a power supply that has been disconnected from the power cord connector. Although temperature conditions above the maximum acceptable level rarely occur at initial startup, you may encounter these conditions during extended operation. Long-term monitoring functions also include independent reporting of DC-output voltage problems.


Note This chapter covers only the chassis component hardware aspects of troubleshooting. For module-specific information, refer to the Cisco 7600 Series Internet Router Module Installation Guide.


Getting Started

When the initial system boot is complete, verify the following:

Power supplies are supplying power to the system.

The system fan assembly is operating.

System software boots successfully.

The supervisor engine and all modules are installed properly in their slots, and each was initialized without problems.

If each of these conditions is met and the hardware installation is complete, refer to the Cisco 7600 Series Router Supervisor Engine and Route Switch Processor Guide, the Cisco 7600 Series Internet Router IOS Software Configuration Guide, the Cisco 7600 Series Internet Router IOS Command Reference, or the Cisco 7600 Series Internet Router IOS Command Reference publications to troubleshoot the software. However, if any of these conditions are not met, use the procedures in this chapter to isolate and, if possible, resolve the problem.

Problem Solving to the System Component Level

The key to success when troubleshooting the system is to isolate the problem to a specific system component. The first step is to compare what the system is doing to what it should be doing. Because a startup problem can usually be attributed to a single component, it is more efficient to isolate the problem to a subsystem rather than troubleshoot each separate component in the system.

The router consists of the following subsystems:

Power supply—Includes the power supplies and power supply fans.

Power entry module (PEM)—On the Cisco 7603 Router and Cisco 7606 Router, there is one PEM for each power supply. The PEM connects the site source to the power supply.

Fan assembly—The chassis fan assembly should operate whenever system power is on. You should see the FAN LED turn green and should be able to hear the fan assembly to determine whether or not it is operating. If the FAN LED is red, this indicates that one or more fans in the fan assembly is not operating. You should immediately contact a customer service representative. (See the "Contacting Customer Service" section.) There are no installation adjustments that you can make if the fan assembly does not function properly at initial startup.

Supervisor engine—The supervisor engine contains the system operating software, so check the supervisor engine if you have trouble with the system software. Status LEDs on the supervisor engine indicate whether or not the supervisor engine is able to initialize the module.

If you have a redundant supervisor engine, refer to the Cisco 7600 Series Router Supervisor Engine and Route Switch Processor Guide or the Cisco 7600 Series Internet Router IOS Software Configuration Guide publications for descriptions of how the redundant supervisor engine comes online and how the software images are handled.

Modules—Status LEDs on each module indicate if the module has been initialized by the supervisor engine. A module that is partially installed in the backplane can cause the system to halt.

Identifying Startup Problems

LEDs indicate all system states in the startup sequence. By checking the LEDs, you can determine when and where the system failed in the startup sequence.

Perform these steps to identify startup problems:


Step 1 Turn on the power supplies. You should immediately hear the system fan assembly begin to operate. If you do not, see the "Troubleshooting the Power Supply" section. If you determine that the power supplies are functioning normally and that the fan assembly is faulty, contact a customer service representative. If the system fan assembly does not function properly at initial startup, there are no installation adjustments that you can make. To replace the fan assembly, see the "Removing and Replacing the Fan Assembly" section.

Step 2 Check that the LEDs on the supervisor engine light as follows:

The STATUS LED flashes orange once and stays orange during diagnostic boot tests. It turns green when the module is operational (online). If the system software is unable to start up, this LED stays orange.

The SYSTEM LED turns green, indicating that all chassis environmental monitors are reporting that the system is OK. If one or more environmental monitor reports a problem, the SYSTEM LED is orange or red.

The ACTIVE LED turns green, indicating that the supervisor engine is operational and active. If the supervisor engine is in standby mode, the ACTIVE LED is orange.

Each LINK LED flashes orange once, stays orange during diagnostic boot tests, and turns green when the module is operational (online). If no signal is detected, the LINK LED turns off. The LINK LED blinks orange if the port is bad.

If any LEDs on the supervisor engine front panel are red or orange, see the "Troubleshooting Modules" section.

If you have a redundant supervisor engine, refer to the Cisco 7600 Series Router Supervisor Engine and Route Switch Processor Guide or the Cisco 7600 Series Internet Router IOS Software Configuration Guide for descriptions of how the redundant supervisor engine comes online and how the software images are handled.

For a complete description of the supervisor engine LEDs, refer to the Cisco 7600 Series Internet Router Module Installation Guide.

Step 3 Verify that the STATUS LEDs on the supervisor engine and on each module are green when the supervisor engine completes initialization. This LED indicates that the supervisor engine or modules are receiving power, have been recognized by the supervisor engine, and contain a valid Flash code version. This LED does not indicate the state of the individual interfaces on the modules. If a STATUS LED is red or orange, see the "Troubleshooting Modules" section.

Step 4 If the boot information and system banner are not displayed, refer to the Cisco 7600 Series Internet Router Module Installation Guide to verify that the terminal is set correctly and that it is connected properly to the supervisor engine console port.


Troubleshooting the Power Supply

Perform these steps when troubleshooting the power supply to isolate a power subsystem problem:


Step 1 Verify that the INPUT OK LED on the power supply is green.

If the INPUT OK LED is green, the AC or DC source is good and the power supply is functional.

If the INPUT OK LED is off, first ensure that the power supply is flush with the back of the chassis. Turn the AC power supply or AC PEM power switch or DC circuit breaker to the Off position, tighten the captive installation screw(s), and then turn the power on.

If the INPUT OK LED remains off, there might be a problem with the AC source, the DC source, or the power cable.

Turn off the power to the router, connect the power cord to another power source if one is available, and turn the power On.

If the INPUT OK LED is green, the problem is the first power source.


Note The INPUT OK LED is green and the OUTPUT FAIL LED glows if there is bad power supply or internal problem in the chassis or the cards. Troubleshoot the power suppply on an empty chassis that has no card inserted.


If the INPUT OK LED fails to light after you connect the power supply to a new power source, replace the power cord, and turn the switch On.

If the INPUT OK LED then goes on, return the first power cord for replacement.

If this unit has more than one power cord, repeat Step 1 for each power supply.

If the INPUT OK LED still fails to light when the power supply is connected to a different power source with a new power cord, the power supply is probably faulty.

If a second power supply is available, install it in the second power supply bay and contact a customer service representative for further instructions.

Step 2 If you have a second (redundant) power supply, repeat Step 1 for this power supply.


If you are unable to resolve the problem or if you determine that either a power supply or backplane connector is faulty, see the "Contacting Customer Service" section.

Troubleshooting the Power Supply Sub-System

Table 4-1 lists the solutions for the various issues associated with power supply sub-systems.

Table 4-1

Problem
Solution

Power supply is disabled

1. Ensure that the power supply is disconnected from the chassis.

2. Ensure that all the system cards are removed from the backplane.

3. Connect the safety ground wiring to each power shelf, if not done.

4. Before connecting the power cables to the stud terminals, verify that power inputs are not shorted-circuited with the ground or the chassis.

5. To enable the power supply systems, ensure that the AC power supply knob is switched on.

6. Once the power is enabled, measure the voltage at the input terminal block. Verify that the DC voltage between the negative and positive terminal is between -37 VDC and -56 VDC. The acceptable range for AC power supply is 110V-230V.


Troubleshooting Power Supply

Table 4-2 maps the LED indicator information in a power supply sub-system.

Table 4-2 Power Supply Indicator Information

Color
Indicator
Description

Green

Power input

Power is available; however if the LED is OFF, it indicates lack of power.

Red

Output fail

Power is not available; however, if the LED is OFF, it indicates the presence of the output power.


Troubleshooting Inadequate Power for all the Modules

If there is not enough power to initiate all the modules, follow the solutions listed in Table 4-3.

Table 4-3 Troubleshooting Inadequate Power for all the Modules

Problem
Solution

Not enough power to initiate all the modules

1. Use the power redundancy-mode combined command to combine the two power supplies in the config terminal mode OR

2. If dual RP is not required, apply the value of the POWERNORESERVE=1 on ROMMON mode.


Troubleshooting Power Latch Up

When two power supplies are present in the system, they work in redundant mode where 50% of the power is drawn from each power supply. Table 4-4 lists the solutions for the power latch issues.

Table 4-4

Problem
Solution

Lost redundancy and system operates on a single power supply source.

1. Check if the power drawn by the system is more than five thirds of the power supply output.

2. Reduce the system power.

3. Reload the system or re-insert the power supply module.


Troubleshooting Power Latch Up Issues

Troubleshooting the Cooling Sub-System

The cooling system dissipates heat generated by the chassis and controls the temperature of chassis components. The cooling system has a fully redundant architecture that allows the chassis to continue operating with a single-fault failure (such as a single fan or fan tray failure).

The chassis cooling system includes:

One or Two fan trays (depending upon the chassis).

Temperature sensors on cards and modules throughout the chassis.

Control software

Air filter, inlet and outlet air vents, and bezels.

Impedance carriers for empty chassis slots.

The AC and DC power supplies have their own self-contained cooling fans. So, depending on the required airflow, all the fans in the tray increase or decrease their rotation speed collectively. Thermal sensors (inlet, exhaust, and hot-spot) located throughout the chassis are used to monitor temperature readings and correct system cooling errors and faults. The supervisor software controls the speed of the fan and the related alarms raised.

Table 4-5 lists the solutions for power loss in the sub-system.

Table 4-5 Troubleshooting the Power Loss in the Sub-System

Problem
Solution

Power Loss output in the cooling sub-system

Complete these steps to troubleshoot the power loss in the sub-system:

1. Ensure that the fan-tray is installed and functional

2. Insert fan-tray and the air filters in the designated slot.

Note Except for 7609S, all C7600 routers have fan tray slots located on the left side of the chassis near to the exhaust side.

3. Ensure that the inlet temperature to the chassis does not exceed 40 degree celsius.

4. Install fillers or blanks in the empty slots.

5. Ensure that the air filters are not choked and are clean.


Troubleshooting the Fan Assembly

The chassis fan assembly should operate whenever the system power is on. You should see the FAN LED turn green and should be able to hear the fan assembly to determine whether or not it is operating. If the FAN LED is red, this indicates that one or more fans in the fan assembly is not operating. You should contact TAC immediately. There are no installation adjustments to make if the fan assembly does not function properly at the initial startup.

Troubleshooting An Old Fan Module

Table 4-6 lists the solutions to force an old fan module to work in single RPs only.

Table 4-6 Troubleshooting An Old Fan Module

Problem
Solution

Old fan module does not work

Set the following in ROMMON mode:

ALLOWALLFANS=1

ALLOWALLFAN=1

ALLOWANYFAN=1

ALLOWANYPS=1

sync


Perform these steps when troubleshooting the fan assembly to isolate a fan assembly problem:


Step 1 Verify that the FAN LED on the fan assembly is green.

If it is not, see the "Problem Solving to the System Component Level" section to determine whether the power subsystem is functioning properly.

Step 2 Verify that the FAN LED is red.

If it is red, the fan assembly is not seated in the backplane or has malfunctioned.

To ensure that the fan assembly is seated properly, loosen the captive installation screws, remove the fan assembly, and reinstall it.

Tighten all captive installation screws, and then restart the system.

If the FAN LED is still red, the system detects a fan assembly failure. Contact a customer service representative for instructions.


Troubleshooting Modules

Perform these steps when troubleshooting the modules to isolate a supervisor engine or module problem:


Step 1 Verify that all status LEDs are on.

Step 2 If any status LEDs on the supervisor engine or any modules are red or off, the module might have shifted out of its slot. Reseat the module until both ejector levers are at 90 degrees to the rear of the chassis. Tighten the captive installation screws at the left and right of the module front panel, and restart the system.


If the status LED on a module is orange, the module might be busy or disabled. Refer to the Cisco 7600 Series Router Supervisor Engine and Route Switch Processor Guide, the Cisco 7600 Series Internet Router IOS Software Configuration Guide, the Cisco 7600 Series Internet Router IOS Command Reference or the Cisco 7600 Series Internet Router IOS Command Reference publications to configure or enable the interfaces. After the system reinitializes the interfaces, the status LED on the module should be green.

If you still experience trouble with the startup, see the "Contacting Customer Service" section.

Contacting Customer Service

If you are unable to solve a startup problem after using the troubleshooting suggestions in this chapter, contact a customer service representative for assistance and further instructions. Before you call, have the following information ready to help your service provider assist you as quickly as possible:

Date you received the router

Chassis serial number (located on a label on the right of the rear panel of the chassis)

Type of software and release number

Maintenance agreement or warranty information

Brief description of the problem

Brief explanation of the steps you have already taken to isolate and resolve the problem