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Cisco 12000 Series Router Memory Replacement Instructions

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Cisco 12000 Series Router Memory Replacement Instructions

Table Of Contents

Cisco 12000 Series Router
Memory Replacement Instructions

Contents

Important Information

GRP, PRP, and Line Card Memory Overview

GRP Memory

PRP Memory

Line Card Memory

Memory Considerations

GRP Route Memory

PRP Route Memory

Line Card Memory

Engine 0 and Engine 1 Line Card Memory Locations

Engine 2 Line Card Memory Locations

ISE Line Card Memory Locations

Engine 4 Line Card Memory Locations

Line Card Route Memory

Line Card Packet Memory

Cisco 12000 Line Card Engine Types

Preparing for Installation

Safety Guidelines

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge

Required Tools and Equipment

Replacing and Upgrading Route Processor Route Memory

Removing Route Memory DIMMs from an RP

Installing Route Memory DIMMs on an RP

Checking the Installation of RP Memory

Removing and Installing Line Card Memory

Removing a Line Card from the Router

Removing a DIMM from a Line Card

Installing a DIMM in a Line Card

Removing a SODIMM

Installing a SODIMM

Checking the Installation of Route Memory

Regulatory, Compliance, and Safety Information

Translated Safety Warnings and Agency Approvals

Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulatory Statements

FCC Class A Compliance

CISPR 22

Canada

Europe (EU)

Hungarian Class A Warning

Taiwan Class A Warning Notice

Japan VCCI Class A

Korean Class A Warning

Obtaining Documentation

Cisco.com

Documentation CD-ROM

Ordering Documentation

Documentation Feedback

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco TAC Website

Opening a TAC Case

TAC Case Priority Definitions

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information


Cisco 12000 Series Router
Memory Replacement Instructions


Product Numbers: MEM-GRP/LC-64=, MEM-DFT-GRP/LC-128, MEM-GRP/LC-128=, MEM-GRP/LC-256=, MEM-GRP-256=, MEM-GRP-512=, MEM-LC-PKT-64=, MEM-LC-PKT-128=, MEM-LC1-PKT-256=, MEM-PKT-512-UPG=, MEM-PRP-512=, MEM-PRP-1G=, MEM-LC-ISE-512=, MEM-LC-ISE-512A=, MEM-LC-ISE-1G=

Document Order Number: DOC-784338=

This publication describes procedures for upgrading or replacing memory on the Cisco 12000 Series Router Gigabit Route Processor (GRP), Performance Route Processor (PRP), and
Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router line cards.

Contents

This publication contains the following sections:

Important Information

GRP, PRP, and Line Card Memory Overview

Preparing for Installation

Replacing and Upgrading Route Processor Route Memory

Removing and Installing Line Card Memory

Regulatory, Compliance, and Safety Information

Obtaining Documentation

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information

Important Information

For Cisco 12000 Series Router route processor (RP) and line card removal and installation information, refer to the installation and configuration publication for the hardware in use.

GRP, PRP, and Line Card Memory Overview

This section provides an overview of the memory systems on the GRP, PRP, and Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router line cards.

GRP Memory

The GRP uses the following types of memory (see Figure 1 for memory locations):

Route memory—Dynamic random access memory (DRAM) enables an onboard processor to run Cisco IOS software and store network routing tables. You can configure route memory from the factory default of 128 MB to the maximum configuration of 512 MB.


Note GRP route memory configurations of 512 MB are only compatible with Product Number GRP-B=. Cisco IOS Release 12.0(19)S or 12.0(19)ST or later, and ROMMON Release 11.2 (181) or later, are also required.


GRP Flash memory—Single in-line memory module (SIMM) stores the boot helper software that enables you to boot the router when a valid Cisco IOS software image is not available on a Flash memory card.

GRP linear Flash memory card—A convenient, offline medium for storing a copy of the default Cisco IOS software image. This card can be inserted into either of the two Flash memory slots on the GRP, so that you can load router software into GRP main memory.

GRP erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM)—Contains a ROM monitor that enables you to boot the default Cisco IOS software image from a Flash memory card if the Flash memory SIMM does not contain a boot helper image.

GRP Random access memory—Nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM) provides a stable medium for storing the router's configuration files, the environmental monitoring logs, and the contents of the router's virtual configuration register.

PRP Memory

The PRP uses the following types of memory. (See Figure 2 for memory locations):

Route memory—Synchronous dynamic random access memory (SDRAM) enables an onboard processor to run Cisco IOS software and store network routing tables. You can configure route memory from the factory default of 512 MB to the maximum configuration of 2 GB.

PRP onboard Flash memory—Single in-line memory module (SIMM) stores the boot helper software to boot the router when a valid Cisco IOS software image is not available on a Flash disk or a linear Flash memory card.

PRP Flash disk—A convenient, offline medium for storing a copy of the default Cisco IOS software image. The Flash disk can be inserted into either of the two Flash disk slots in the PRP, so that you can load router software into PRP main memory.

PRP erasable programmable read-only memory (EPROM)—Contains a ROM monitor that enables you to boot the default Cisco IOS software image from a Flash disk if the Flash memory SIMM does not contain a boot helper image.

PRP Random access memory—Nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM) provides a stable medium for storing the router's configuration files, the environmental monitoring logs, and the contents of the router's virtual configuration register.

Line Card Memory

Cisco 12000 Series Router line cards use the following types of memory:

Route memory—Dynamic random access memory (DRAM) or small outline DIMM (SODIMM) memory enables an onboard processor to run Cisco IOS software and store network routing tables.

Packet memory—Synchronous dynamic random access memory (SDRAM) is arranged in banks of SDRAM (see Figure 3 and Figure 4) and consists of a set of receive (RX) and transmit (TX) buffers that help to manage the flow of packet data into and out of the line card.

Memory Considerations

Consider the following to ensure proper memory configurations:

Packet memory options and functions apply only to line cards. There is no packet memory on the GRP and PRP. Different line cards support different default and maximum packet memory configurations. Line card memory configurations are determined by their engine type. See Table 6 for more information.

Of the various types of memory used on the GRP, PRP, and line cards, only two types of memory are field serviceable (that is, memory that can be replaced in the field): DRAM and SDRAM route memory (GRP, PRP, and line cards) and SDRAM packet memory (certain line cards only).

GRP Route Memory

The processor on the GRP uses onboard DRAM to perform several tasks for Cisco 12000 Series
Internet Routers, including the following:

Running the Cisco IOS software image

Storing and maintaining the network routing tables

Loading the Cisco IOS software image into installed line cards

Formatting and distributing updated routing tables to installed line cards

Monitoring temperature and voltage alarm conditions of installed cards and shutting them down when necessary

Supporting a console port that enables you to configure the router using an attached terminal

Participating in network routing protocols (together with other routers in the networking environment) to update the router's internal routing tables

Figure 1 shows the locations of the processor memory DRAM DIMM sockets and the Flash memory SIMM socket on the GRP.

The two route memory DIMM sockets on the GRP, labeled U39 (route memory bank 1) and U42 (route memory bank 2), respectively, enable you to configure route memory in desired increments ranging from 128 to 512 MB.


Note GRP route memory configurations of 512 MB are only compatible with Product Number GRP-B=. Cisco IOS Release 12.0(19)S or 12.0(19)ST or later and ROMMON Release 11.2 (181) or later are also required.


Table 1 lists the available route memory configurations and associated product numbers for the GRP. The default route memory configuration is 128 MB. If the GRP is currently equipped with one 64-MB DIMM in socket U39, you can upgrade memory by installing a second 64-MB DIMM in socket U42, or by removing the existing 64-MB DIMM and replacing it with one 128-MB DIMM.

Figure 1 Memory Locations on the Cisco 12000 Series Router GRP

Table 1 Route Memory Configurations Available for Cisco 12000 Series Router GRP

Total Route Memory Ordered 1
Cisco Product Number
DIMM Modules
DRAM DIMM Sockets

64 MB

MEM-GRP/LC-64=2

1 64-MB DIMM

U39 or U42

128 MB

MEM-GRP/LC-128=

1 128-MB DIMM

U39

256 MB

MEM-GRP/LC-256=3

2 128-MB DIMMs

U39 and U42

256 MB

MEM-GRP-256=4

1 256-MB DIMM

U39

512 MB

MEM-GRP-512=5

2 256-MB DIMMs

U39 and U42

1 Do not mix memory sizes. If installing 2 DIMMs, both DIMMs must be the same size.

2 For GRPs equipped with 64 MB, this option adds a second 64-MB DIMM for a total of 128 MB.

3 This product is no longer available. Replace it with Cisco Product Number MEM-GRP-256.

4 Only compatible with Product Number GRP-B=.

5 GRP route memory configurations of 512 MB are only compatible with Product Number GRP-B=. Cisco IOS Release 12.0(19)S or 12.0(19)ST or later and ROMMON Release 11.2 (181) or later are also required



Note If your system includes redundant GRPs, both GRPs should have the same memory size. Redundancy is not supported when using a GRP and a Performance Route Processor (PRP) in the same chassis. Refer to the Route Processor Redundancy Plus for the Cisco 12000 Series Router publication for more information.


PRP Route Memory

The processor on the PRP uses onboard SDRAM to perform several tasks for Cisco 12000 Series
Internet Routers, including the following:

Running the Cisco IOS software image

Storing and maintaining the network routing tables

Loading the Cisco IOS software image into installed line cards

Formatting and distributing updated routing tables to installed line cards

Monitoring temperature and voltage alarm conditions of installed cards and shutting them down when necessary

Supporting a console port that enables you to configure the router using an attached terminal

Participating in network routing protocols (together with other routers in the networking environment) to update the router's internal routing tables

Figure 2 shows the locations of the processor memory SDRAM DIMM sockets and the Flash memory SIMM socket on the PRP.

Figure 2 Memory Locations on the Cisco 12000 Series Router PRP

1

Backplane connector

6

Ethernet ports

2

Flash SIMM (Socket number P3)

7

Auxiliary port

3

SDRAM DIMMs
Bank 1 - Socket number U15
Bank 2 - Socket number U18

8

Console port

4

Ejector lever

9

Handle

5

Flash disk slots (covered)

10

Display LEDs


The two route memory DIMM sockets on the PRP, labeled U15 (route memory bank 1) and U18 (route memory bank 2), respectively, enable you to configure route memory in desired increments ranging from 512 MB to 2 GB.

Table 2 lists the available route memory configurations and associated product numbers for the
Cisco 12000 Series Router PRP.

Table 2 Route Memory Configurations Available for Cisco 12000 Series Router PRP

Total Route Memory 1
Cisco Product Number
DIMM Modules
SDRAM DIMM Sockets 2

512 MB3

1 512-MB DIMM

U15

1 GB

MEM-PRP-512=4

2 512-MB DIMMs

U15 and U18

1 GB

MEM-PRP-1G=

1 1-GB DIMM

U15

1.5 GB5

2 GB

2MEM-PRP-1G=

2 1-GB DIMMs

U15 and U18

1 Do not mix memory sizes. If installing 2 DIMMs, both DIMMs must be the same size.

2 Default SDRAM configuration is 512 MB. Bank 1 (U15) must be populated first. You can use one or both banks to configure SDRAM combinations of 512 MB, 1 GB, or 2 GB. 1.5 GB configurations are not supported.

3 One 512-MB DIMM is the default shipping configuration.

4 Upgrades PRP to 1 GB by adding a second 512-MB DIMM.

5 This memory size is not supported.



Note If your system includes redundant PRPs, both PRPs should have the same memory size. Redundancy is not supported when using a GRP and a PRP in the same chassis. Cisco strongly recommends that you avoid configuring your router using mixed route processor cards. Refer to the Route Processor Redundancy Plus for the Cisco 12000 Series Router publication for more redundancy information.


Line Card Memory

There are two types of user-configurable line card memory on most line cards:

Route or processor memory

Packet memory

Line card memory configurations and memory socket locations differ, depending on the type of line card. In general, all line cards share a common set of memory configuration options for route memory, but support packet memory differently. For clarity in describing how to remove and install memory in this publication, line cards fall into the following groups, based on certain physical characteristics:

Engine 0 and Engine 1 line cards (See Figure 3.)

Engine 2 line cards (See Figure 4.)

Internet Service Engine (ISE), formerly known as Engine 3 line cards (See Figure 5.)

Engine 4 and Engine 4+ line cards (See Figure 6.)


Note The procedures for replacing memory on both the Engine 4 and the Engine 4+ line cards is identical.


The general characteristics that determine which engine type a line card belongs to are as follows:

Location of memory module sockets on the line card

Number and function of memory module sockets

Type of memory module sockets

Engine 0 and Engine 1 Line Card Memory Locations

Figure 3 shows the dual in-line memory module (DIMM) socket locations on an Engine 0 or Engine 1 line card. This line card is equipped with six DIMM sockets:

Two route memory DIMM sockets

Two pairs of packet memory DIMM sockets (RX and TX pairs)

Figure 3 Engine 0 and Engine 1 Line Card Memory Locations

1

Route memory DIMM0

4

Packet memory RX DIMM1

2

Route memory DIMM1

5

Packet memory TX DIMM0

3

Packet memory RX DIMM0

6

Packet memory TX DIMM1


Engine 2 Line Card Memory Locations

Figure 4 shows the DIMM socket locations on an Engine 2 line card. This line card is equipped with eight DIMM sockets:

Two route memory DIMM sockets

Two pairs of packet memory DIMM sockets (RX and TX pairs)

One pointer look-up (PLU) memory DIMM socket (not user serviceable)

One table look-up (TLU) memory DIMM socket (not user serviceable)

Figure 4 Engine 2 Line Card Memory Locations

1

Route memory DIMM0

5

Packet memory RX DIMM0

2

Route memory DIMM1

6

Packet memory RX DIMM1

3

Packet memory TX DIMM0

7

PLU DIMM (not user serviceable)

4

Packet memory TX DIMM1

8

TLU DIMM (not user serviceable)


ISE Line Card Memory Locations

Figure 5 shows the small outline DIMM (SODIMM) socket locations on an ISE line card. This line card is equipped with 10 SODIMM sockets:

Two route memory SODIMM sockets

Four packet memory sockets (not user serviceable)

Four TLU/PLU memory sockets (not user serviceable)

Figure 5 ISE Line Card Memory Locations

1

Route memory SODIMM0

3

Four packet memory SODIMM sockets (not field serviceable)

2

Route memory SODIMM1

4

Four TLU/PLU memory SODIMM sockets (not field serviceable)


There are two route memory sockets on ISE (Engine 3) line cards that support the addition of route memory in cards. Table 3 describes the various memory upgrade options.

Table 3 ISE/Engine 3 Line Card Memory Upgrade Options

Line Card
Current Configuration
Memory Upgrade

Quad OC-12c/STM-4c ATM

Quad OC-3c/STM-1c ATM

Two 256 MB memory modules

One 512 MB memory module

No memory upgrade option available.1

Upgrade to 1 GB by installing a second 512 MB memory module.2, 3

Quad OC-12/STM-4 SRP

N/A

Does not support 1 GB memory upgrade.

All other ISE Engine 3 line cards

Two 128 MB memory modules



Two 256 MB memory modules

One 512 MB memory module

Upgrade to 512 MB by installing two 256 MB memory modules.2

Upgrade to 512 MB by installing one 512 MB memory module.3

Upgrade to 1 GB by installing two 512 MB memory modules.2,3

Upgrade to 1 GB by installing a second 512 MB memory module.2, 3

1 Memory in SODIMM0 is not user serviceable on Engine 3 ATM line cards.

2 Do not mix memory sizes. Both DIMMs must be the same size memory.

3 Requires Cisco IOS Release 12.0(31)S or later, and you must upgrade the route processor ROMMON code to Version later than 1.3 before installing the upgraded memory.


Verifying Memory Installation

To determine whether you have two 256-Mbyte memory modules installed or one 512-Mbyte memory module installed, attach to the line card and use the show hardware command. The DRAM DIMM information is indicated in bold in the following example:

Router# attach 3
Entering Console for 4 Port GigabitEthernet in Slot: 3
Type exit to end this session

Press RETURN to get started!

LC-Slot3# show hardware
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software IOS (tm) GS Software (GLC1-LC-M), 
Experimental Version
12.0(20050203:211853) [samson-1g_cli_ci 144] Copyright (c) 1986-2005 by cisco Systems, 
Inc.
Compiled Wed 16-Feb-05 13:17 by samson
Image text-base: 0x40010FC8, data-base: 0x41400000

ROM: System Bootstrap, Version 12.0(20030207:104405) [jkuzma-rommon 1.8] RELEASE SOFTWARE

 LC-Slot3 uptime is 5 minutes
Running default software

cisco GE-4 (R7000) processor (revision 0x02) with 524289K bytes of memory.
R7000 CPU at 400Mhz, Implementation 39, Rev 3.3, 256KB L2 Cache Last reset from power-on
4 GigabitEthernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s)
DRAM DIMM Slot 1: 256M found, Slot 2: 256M found 

Configuration register is 0x0

In this example, two 256-Mbyte memory modules are installed and therefore the memory is not user upgradable.

Engine 4 Line Card Memory Locations

Figure 6 shows the DIMM socket locations on an Engine 4 line card. These line cards are equipped with five DIMM sockets:

One route memory small-outline DIMM (SODIMM) socket

Two pairs of packet memory DIMM sockets (not user serviceable)

The route memory module is installed to a 144-pin SODIMM socket. Route memory runs the Cisco IOS software image and stores the updated network routing tables downloaded from the route processor.

Figure 6 Engine 4 Line Card Memory Locations

1

Route memory SODIMM

2

Packet memory DIMMs (not user serviceable)



Note Engine 4 and Engine 4+ line cards may have a different route memory DIMM socket identifier than the Cisco OC-192c line card shown in Figure 6. For example, the route memory module on the Cisco Quad OC-48c line card is in the J12 socket.


Line Card Route Memory

Route memory is line card DRAM that runs the Cisco IOS software image and stores the updated network routing tables downloaded from the GRP. Line card route memory ranges from 128 to 512 MB.

Table 4 lists the available route memory configurations and associated product numbers of DRAM DIMMs for upgrading route memory on the Cisco 12000 Series Router line cards.

Table 4 Route Memory Configurations for Cisco 12000 Series Line Cards  

Total Route Memory Ordered
Cisco Product Number
DIMM Module
Route Memory DIMM Sockets
Engine

64 MB

MEM-GRP/LC-64=1

1 64-MB DIMM

DIMM0 or DIMM1

E0, E1, E2

128 MB

MEM-DFT-GRP/LC-1282

1 128-MB DIMM

DIMM0 or DIMM1

E0, E1, E2

128 MB

MEM-GRP/LC-128=3

1 128-MB DIMM

DIMM0 or DIMM1

E0, E1, E2

256 MB

MEM-GRP/LC-256=

2 128-MB DIMMs

DIMM0 and DIMM1

E0, E1, E2

256 MB

N/A - Default Config.

1 256-MB SODIMM4

J15-OC-192
J12-Quad OC-48

E4, E4+

256 MB

MEM-LC-ISE-256=

2 128-MB SODIMM

DIMM0 and DIMM1

E3 (ISE only)

512 MB

MEM-LC-ISE-512=5

2 256-MB SODIMM

DIMM0 and DIMM1

E3 (ISE only)

512 MB

MEM-LC-ISE-512A=

1 512-MB SODIMM

DIMM06

E3 (ISE only)

1 GB

MEM-LC-ISE-1G=

2 512-MB SODIMM

DIMM0 and DIMM1

E3 (ISE only)

1 This option adds a second 64-MB DIMM for a total of 128 MB for line cards that are equipped with 64 MB.

2 Standard (default) DRAM DIMM configuration for the processor on E0, E1, or E2 line cards is 128 MB.

3 This option allows the customer to order a spare module or add a second 128-MB DIMM for a total of 256 MB for line cards that are already equipped with one 128 MB DIMM.

4 A 144-pin SODIMM module is used.

5 The default memory on ISE line cards is 512-MB. This is provided as either 2 256-MB SODIMMs or 1 512-MB SODIMM.

6 The spare 512-MB SODIMM in the ATM ISE line cards can only be installed in SODIMM1. The memory in SODIMM0 is not user replaceable.


Line Card Packet Memory

Line card packet memory temporarily stores data packets awaiting switching decisions by the line card processor. Once the line card processor makes the switching decisions, the packets are propagated into the router's switch fabric for transmission to the appropriate line card.

Engine 0 and Engine 1 line cards (see Figure 3) include four SDRAM DIMM sockets for packet memory, paired as follows:

Receive (RX) buffer—Two SDRAM DIMM sockets labeled RX DIMM0 and RX DIMM1

Transmit (TX) buffer—Two SDRAM DIMM sockets labeled TX DIMM0 and TX DIMM1

Engine 2 line cards (see Figure 4) include four SDRAM DIMM sockets for packet memory, paired as follows:

Transmit (TX) buffer—Two SDRAM DIMM sockets labeled TX DIMM0 and TX DIMM1

Receive (RX) buffer—Two SDRAM DIMM sockets labeled RX DIMM0 and RX DIMM1

ISE line cards (see Figure 5) include four SODIMM sockets for packet memory. This memory is not field serviceable.

Engine 4 and Engine 4+ line cards (see Figure 6) include two DDR DIMM sockets for packet memory. This memory is not field serviceable.


Note For a line card to operate, both receive packet memory DIMM sockets and both transmit packet memory DIMM sockets must be populated. The SDRAM DIMMs installed in a given buffer (either receive or transmit) must be the same type and size, but receive and transmit buffers can operate with different memory sizes.


Table 5 lists the available packet memory configuration options for Cisco 12000 Series Router line cards. Cisco packet memory configuration options consist of four DIMMs of the same type and size (two DIMMs for the RX socket pair and two DIMMs for the TX socket pair). The actual default and maximum packet memory configuration options depend on the type of line card. Table 6 lists engine types for each available Cisco 12000 Series Router line card.

Table 5 Packet Memory Configurations for Cisco 12000 Series Router Line Cards 

Engine Number
Total Packet Memory 1
DIMM Modules
Cisco Product Number

Engine 0

(200-pin DIMMs)

128 MB (replacement)

not upgradeable

2 RX 32-MB DIMMs
2 TX 32-MB DIMMs

MEM-LC-PKT-128=

Engine 1

(168-pin DIMMs)

256 MB (replacement)

not upgradeable

2 RX 64-MB DIMMs
2 TX 64-MB DIMMs

MEM-LC1-PKT-256=

Engine 2

(168-pin DIMMS)

256 MB (replacement)

512 MB (upgrade)

2 RX 64-MB DIMMs
2 TX 64-MB DIMMs

or

2 RX 128-MB DIMMs
2 TX 128-MB DIMMs

MEM-LC1-PKT-256=





MEM-PKT-512-UPG=

ISE2

(144-pin SODIMMs)

512 MB

2 RX 128-MB SODIMMs
2 TX 128-MB SODIMMs

Engine 4 and Engine 4+2

(278-pin DDR DIMMs)

512 MB

2 RX 128-MB DDR DIMMs
2 TX 128-MB DDR DIMMs

1 The SDRAM DIMMs installed in a given buffer (either receive or transmit) must be the same type and size, but receive and transmit buffers can operate with different memory capacities.

2 The packet memory on this line card engine type is not field serviceable.


Cisco 12000 Line Card Engine Types

Table 6 lists Cisco 12000 Series Router line cards and their engine types.


Note Additional line cards continue to be released for Cisco 12000 Series Routers. This list might not include the latest released line cards. Check the installation and configuration note that came with your line card to verify the engine type.


Table 6 Line Card Packet Memory Configuration Options 

Line Card Type and Name
Cisco Product Number
Engine Type
Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM)
   

8-Port OC-3 STM-1 ATM

8OC03/ATM/TS-IR-B=
8OC03/ATM/TS-MM-B=

Engine 2

OC-12c/STM-4c ATM

LC-1OC12/ATM-SM=
LC-1OC12/ATM-MM=

Engine 0

Quad OC-3c/STM-1c ATM

4OC3/ATM-IR-SC=
4OC3/ATM-MM-SC=

Engine 0

Quad OC-12c/STM-4c ATM

4OC12X/ATM-IR-SC=
4OC12X/ATM-MM-SC=

Engine 3

Quad OC-12c/STM-4c ATM/IP

4OC12/ATM-IR-IP=
4OC12/ATM-MM-IP=

Engine 3

CHANNELIZED and Digital Signal (DS)
   

2-port STM-1/OC-3 Channelized E1/T1

2CHOC3/STM1-IR-SC=

Engine 0

4-Port Channelized OC-12/STM-4 POS/SDH ISE

4CHOC12/DS3-I-SCB=

ISE

6CT3-SMB

6CT3-SMB=

Engine 0

6-Port DS3
12-Port DS3

6DS3-SMB=
6DS3-SMB-B=
12DS3-SMB=
12DS3-SMB-B=

Engine 0

6E3-SMB
12E3-SMB

6E3-SMB=
12E3-SMB=

Engine 0

Channelized OC-12 to DS3

LC-OC12-DS3=

Engine 0

Channelized OC-12/STM-4 IR-SC STS3/STM1

CHOC12/STS3-IR-SC=

Engine 0

Channelized OC-48/STM-1 POS/SDH ISE

CHOC48/DS3-SR-SC=

ISE

Ethernet
   

1-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet

1X10GE-LR-SC=

Engine 4+

3-Port Gigabit Ethernet

3GE-GBIC-SC=

Engine 2

4-Port Gigabit Ethernet ISE

4GE-SFP-LC=

ISE

8-Port Fast Ethernet

8FE-FX-SC=
8FE-TX-RJ45=
8FE-FX-SC-B=
8FE-TX-RJ45-B=

Engine 1

10-Port 1-Gigabit Ethernet

10X1GE-SFP-LC =
10X1GE-SFP-LC-B=

Engine 4

10-Port 1-Gigabit Ethernet LR

-LR=

Engine 4+

Gigabit Ethernet

GE-SX/LH-SC=
GE-GBIC-SC-B=

Engine 1

Modular Gigabit Ethernet

 

Engine 4+

Packet-over-SONET (POS)
   

4-Port OC-12c/STM-4c POS/SDH ISE

4OC12X/POS-I-SC-B=
4OC12X/POS-M-SC-B=

ISE

8xOC3 POS or 16xOC3 POS

8OC3/POS-MM=
8OC3/POS-SM==
16OC3/POS-MM=
16OC3/POS-SM=

Engine 2

OC-3c/STM-1c POS/SDH ISE

4OC3X/POS-IR-LC-B=
4OC3X/POS-MM-MJ-B=
4OC3X/POS-LR-LC-B=
8OC3X/POS-IR-LC-B=
8OC3X/POS-MM-MJ-B=
16OC3X/POS-I-LC-B=
16OC3X/POS-M-MJ-B=

ISE

OC-12c/STM-4c POS

LC-1OC12/POS-SM=
LC-1OC12/POS-MM=

Engine 0

Enhanced OC-48c/STM-16c POS

OC48E/POS-1550-SC=
OC48E/POS-1550-FC=
OC48E/POS-SR-SC=
OC48E/POS-SR-FC=
OC48E/POS-LR-SC-B=
OC48E/POS-LR-FC-B=
OC48E/POS-SR-SC-B=
OC48E/POS-SR-FC-B=

Engine 2

OC-48c/STM-16 POS

Note Most users deploy the enhanced OC-48c/STM-16c line card. This is the non-enhanced version.

OC48/POS-SR-SC=
OC48/POS-SR-FC=

Engine 1

OC-48/STM-16 POS/SDH ISE

OC48X/POS-LR-SC=
OC48X/POS-SR-SC=

ISE

OC-192c/STM-64c POS Enabler

OC192/POS-SR=

Engine 2

OC-192c/STM-64c POS

OC192/POS-VSR=
OC192/POS-SR-SC=
OC192/POS-IR-SC=
OC192E/POS-VSR=
OC192E/POS-SR-SC=
OC192E/POS-IR-SC=
OC192/POS-LR=

Engine 4


Engine 4+

Quad OC-3c/STM-1c POS

LC-4OC3/POS-SM=
LC-4OC3/POS-MM=
4OC3/POS-LR-SC=

Engine 0

Enhanced QOC-12c/STM-4c Layer 3 POS

4OC12E/POS-IR-SC=
4OC12E/POS-MM-SC=

Engine 2

QOC-12c/STM-4c Layer 3 POS

Note Most users currently deploy the enhanced QOC-12c/STM4c line card. This line card is the non-enhanced version.

4OC12/POS-IR-SC=
4OC12/POS-MM-SC=

Engine 2

Quad OC-48c/STM-16c POS

4OC48/POS-SR-SC=
4OC48/POS-SR-FC=
4OC48/POS-LR-SC=
4OC48/POS-LR-FC=
4OC48E/POS-SR-SC=
4OC48E/POS-LR-SC=

Engine 4



Engine 4+

Dynamic Packet Transport (DPT)/
Spatial Reuse Protocol (SRP)
   

2OC-12/STM-4 SRP

OC12/SRP-MM-SC-B=
OC12/SRP-IR-SC-B=
OC12/SRP-LR-SC-B=
OC12/SRP-XR-SC=

Engine 1

1OC-48/STM-16 SRP

OC48/SRP-SR-SC-B=
OC48/SRP-LR-SC-B=

Engine 2

Quad OC-12/STM-4 SRP

4OC12X/SRP-IR-LC=
4OC12X/SRP-XR-LC=

Engine 3

Quad OC-48/STM-16 SRP

4OC48/SRP-SFP

Engine 4+

1OC-192/STM-64

OC192/STM-IR
OC192/STM-SR
OC192/STM-VSR

Engine 4+


.

Preparing for Installation

Installation preparation is presented in the following sections:

Safety Guidelines

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge

Required Tools and Equipment

Safety Guidelines

Before you perform any procedure in this publication, review the safety guidelines in this section to avoid injuring yourself or damaging the equipment.

The following guidelines are for your safety and to protect equipment. The guidelines do not include all hazards. Be alert.


Note Review the safety warnings listed in the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for
Cisco 12000 Series Internet Routers
publication (Document Number 78-4347-xx) that accompanied your router before installing, configuring, or maintaining a line card or its components.


Keep the work area clear and dust free during and after installation. Do not allow dirt or debris to enter into any components.

Do not wear loose clothing, jewelry, or other items that could get caught in the router while working with line cards or components.

Cisco equipment operates safely when it is used in accordance with its specifications and product usage instructions.

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge

Electrostatic discharge (ESD) damage, which can occur when electronic cards or components are improperly handled, results in complete or intermittent failures. Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding is an integral component of the line card. Cisco recommends using an ESD-preventive strap whenever you are handling network equipment or one of its components.

The following are guidelines for preventing ESD damage:

Always use an ESD-preventive wrist or ankle strap and ensure that it makes good skin contact. Connect the equipment end of the connection cord to an ESD connection socket on the router or to bare metal on the chassis.

Handle line cards by the captive installation screws, the provided handle, ejector levers, or the line card metal carrier only; avoid touching the board or connector pins.

Place a removed line card board-side-up on an antistatic surface or in a static shielding bag. If you plan to return the component to the factory, immediately place it in a static shielding bag.

Avoid contact between the line card and clothing. The wrist strap only protects the board from ESD voltages on the body; ESD voltages on clothing can still cause damage.

Required Tools and Equipment

You will need the following tools and parts to install or replace memory on the Cisco 12000 Series Router GRP, PRP, or line cards:

Flat-blade or Number 2 Phillips screwdriver.

Some early models of the GRP and line cards are equipped with slotted-head captive screws that fasten the card in the card cage. Later models of the GRP, PRP, and line cards are equipped with combination-head captive screws, which can take either a flat-bladed screwdriver or a Phillips screwdriver.

Your own ESD-prevention equipment or the disposable grounding wrist strap included with all upgrade kits, field-replaceable units (FRUs), and spares for the Cisco 12000 Series Routers.

Antistatic mat or surface.

The DIMM modules for configuring the GRP, PRP, or line card memory (for the GRP, see Table 1; for the PRP see Table 2; for line cards, see Table 4 and Table 6).

Replacing and Upgrading Route Processor Route Memory

This section describes how to replace or upgrade the route memory DRAM DIMMs on the GRP and the SDRAM DIMMs on the PRP. Unless otherwise stated, throughout the remainder of this publication the GRP and the PRP are called an RP.


Note If the router is equipped with a single RP, you must power down the router before removing the RP to replace or upgrade processor memory DIMMs on the RP. If the router is equipped with an optional, redundant RP, you can remove one of the RPs while the router is running without affecting router operation. Redundant RPs should both have the same memory size.


This section contains the following procedures:

Removing Route Memory DIMMs from an RP

Installing Route Memory DIMMs on an RP

Checking the Installation of RP Memory

If you are upgrading memory by adding a matching DIMM to an existing single-DIMM configuration, use the procedure in the "Installing Route Memory DIMMs on an RP" section.

If you are replacing a defective DIMM or performing a memory upgrade that requires the existing DIMMs to be removed, you must first remove the existing DIMMs. In that case, use the procedure in the "Removing Route Memory DIMMs from an RP" section. After you have removed the DIMM from the RP, proceed to the "Installing Route Memory DIMMs on an RP" section.

Removing Route Memory DIMMs from an RP

Review the following route memory removal scenarios:

If you are upgrading the memory by adding a matching DIMM to an existing single-DIMM configuration (only socket U39 occupied), use the procedure in the "Installing Route Memory DIMMs on an RP" section. For example, if you want to upgrade memory from 64 MB to 128 MB (two 64-MB DIMMs) or from 128 MB to 256 MB (two 128-MB DIMMs), you can install the appropriate DIMM in socket U42.

If you are replacing a defective DIMM or performing a memory upgrade that requires the existing DIMMs to be removed, use the following procedure. For example, if you want to upgrade memory from 64 MB to 128 MB (one 128-MB DIMM) or 256 MB (two 128-MB DIMMs), you must remove the existing DIMM before installing the new DIMMs.


Note After removing processor memory DIMMs from the RP, place them in an antistatic bag for ESD protection. Removed route memory DIMMs can be used in other compatible equipment.


To remove a DIMM from an RP, follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap to your wrist and connect the leash to one of the ESD connection sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface on the chassis.

Step 2 Position the RP on the antistatic mat so that the faceplate is toward you and the backplane connector is away from you.

Step 3 Locate the route memory DIMMs on the RP. (See Figure 1.) The DIMMs occupy U39 (bank 1) and U42 (bank 2).

Step 4 For the DIMM you want to remove, pull down the lever on the DIMM socket to release the DIMM from the socket. (See Figure 7.)

Figure 7 Using the DIMM Socket's Release Lever to Remove DIMMs


Caution Handle the edges of the DIMM only. (See  Figure 8.) Do not touch the integrated circuit devices on the DIMM, the metal traces, or fingers, along the edge of the DIMM, or the pins in the DIMM socket.

Step 5 When one end of the DIMM is released from the socket, grasp each end of the DIMM with your thumb and forefinger and pull the DIMM completely out of the socket.

Figure 8 Handling a DIMM

Step 6 Place the DIMM in an antistatic bag to protect it from ESD damage.

Repeat Step 4 through Step 6 for the remaining DIMM, if required for your upgrade.


Installing Route Memory DIMMs on an RP

This section describes how to install a new DIMM on the RP.


Caution To prevent router and memory problems when installing memory, the card's DIMMs must be 3.3-volt, 60-ns, extended data output (EDO) devices. Do not attempt to install other devices in the RP's DIMM sockets.


Caution DIMMs are sensitive electronic components that can be damaged by ESD and contaminated by mishandling. Do not touch the integrated circuit devices on the DIMM, the metal traces, or fingers, along the edge of the DIMM, or the pins in the DIMM socket.

To install the new DIMMs, follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap to your wrist and connect the leash to one of the ESD connection sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface on the chassis.

Step 2 Place the RP on an antistatic mat or pad and position the RP so that the faceplate is toward you and the backplane connector is away from you.

Step 3 Locate the two DIMM sockets on the RP, labeled as follows (see Figure 1 and Figure 2):

U39 (bank 1) GRP

U42 (bank 2) GRP

U15 (bank1) PRP

U18 (bank2) PRP

Step 4 Remove a new DIMM from the antistatic bag.

Step 5 Hold the DIMM component-side-up, with the connector edge (the metal fingers) closest to you. Hold the ends of the DIMM between your thumb and forefinger. (See Figure 8.)

Step 6 Tilt the DIMM to the same angle as the socket and insert the entire connector edge into the socket. The two notches (keys) on the bottom edge of the module ensure that the DIMM edge connector is registered properly in the socket.


Caution When inserting DIMMs, use firm but not excessive pressure. If you damage a socket, you will have to return the RP to the factory for repair.

Step 7 Gently push the DIMM into the socket until the lever is flush against the side of the DIMM socket and the DIMM's edge connector is fully inserted. (See Figure 9.) If necessary, rock the DIMM gently back and forth to seat it properly.

Figure 9 Installing a DIMM in a DIMM Socket

Step 8 Check that the release lever is flush against the side of the DIMM socket. If it is not, the DIMM might not be seated properly. If the DIMM appears to be misaligned, carefully remove it and reseat it in the socket. Push the DIMM firmly back into the socket until the release lever is flush against the side of the DIMM socket.

Step 9 Repeat Step 4 through Step 8 to install the remaining DIMM, as required.


Proceed to the next section and follow the procedure to replace the RP in the card cage slot from which you removed it. If the router is equipped with a single RP, you will need to restart the router before you can perform an installation check. If the router is equipped with an optional, redundant RP, the RP you return to the card cage will power up and reinitialize when it is seated in the backplane connector.

Checking the Installation of RP Memory

Turn on power and allow the router to reboot. The time required for the router to initialize varies with different router and memory configurations. Routers with 256 MB or more of memory might take longer to boot than those with less. If the router fails to boot properly or if the console terminal displays a checksum or memory error after you have installed new DIMMs, check the following:

Ensure that all DIMMs are installed correctly. If necessary, shut down the router and remove the RP. To check the DIMMs, look straight down on the DIMMs to inspect them at eye level. They should all be aligned at the same angle and the same height when properly installed. If a DIMM appears to stick out or rest in the socket at a different angle from the others, remove the DIMM and reinsert it. Then replace the RP in the card cage and reboot the router for another installation check.

DIMMs must be EDO, 3.3-volt, 60-ns DRAM (GRP) or PC-133-compliant SDRAM (PRP) devices. The speed is printed along one edge of the DIMM.

If the router fails to restart properly after several attempts, access Cisco.com or contact a Cisco customer service representative for assistance. Before you call, make note of any error messages, unusual LED states, or any other indications that might help solve the problem.

Removing and Installing Line Card Memory

Cisco 12000 Series Router line cards use the following types of field serviceable memory:

Route memory (DRAM)—Each Cisco 12000 Series Router line card includes DRAM DIMM or SODIMM sockets. (See Figure 3, Figure 4, Figure 5, and Figure 6.) The DRAM is used by the line card's processor. (See Table 4 for all route memory options.)

Packet memory (SDRAM)—Each Cisco 12000 Series Router line card includes SDRAM DIMM or SODIMM sockets. (See Figure 3, Figure 4, Figure 5, and Figure 6.) The SDRAM is used by the line card's transmit (TX) and receive (RX) buffers. See Table 5 for the default packet memory configuration of each line card.

Maximum configurations also depend on the line card type. Some line cards support a maximum configuration of 128 MB, while other line cards support a maximum configuration of 512 MB.


Caution Packet memory on ISE, Engine 4, and Engine 4+ line cards is not field serviceable. On ISE line cards, the packet memory SODIMM modules look identical to the route memory SODIMMs; however, they will not work in the packet memory sockets. Do not attempt to install route memory SODIMM modules in packet memory sockets; this will cause the board to fail when you reboot the card.

Both route memory and packet memory can be replaced or upgraded in the field. See Table 4 for the available DRAM DIMM options or Table 5 for the available SDRAM DIMM options that you can use for configuring memory. Observe the following guidelines:

Line card route memory DRAM (Engine 0, 1, and 2)

Route memory DIMM0 socket must always be populated.

For certain memory configurations, the route memory DIMM1 socket can remain empty.

DRAM DIMMs must be 3.3V devices.

Line card route memory DRAM (ISE, Engine 4, and Engine 4+)

ISE line cards—Use two 256-MB, 144-pin SODIMM memory modules. Route memory DIMM0 socket must always be populated.

ATM ISE line cards—Can also use one or two 512-MB, 144-pin SODIMM memory modules

Engine 4 and Engine 4+ line cards—Use one 256-MB, 144-pin SODIMM memory module

Line card transmit and receive packet memory SDRAM (Engine 0, 1, and 2)

All four DIMM sockets for SDRAM buffer memory must be populated.

Both DIMM sockets for a given buffer pair (either those for the transmit buffer or those for the receive buffer) must be populated with SDRAM DIMMs of the same type and size.

Size of the SDRAM DIMMs in the transmit buffer need not match the size of the SDRAM DIMMs in the receive buffer.

SDRAM DIMMs must be 3.3V devices.


Caution ISE, Engine 4, and Engine 4+ line card packet memory is not field serviceable. Only qualified Cisco personnel should service these memory modules.


Caution On ATM ISE line cards, only the route memory in DIMM1 is user replaceable. You must use the same size memory in DIMM1 as installed in DIMM0. The memory module in DIMM0 can only be replaced by the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC).

This section contains the following procedures:

Removing a Line Card from the Router

Removing a DIMM from a Line Card

Installing a DIMM in a Line Card

Removing a SODIMM

Installing a SODIMM

Checking the Installation of Route Memory

Removing a Line Card from the Router

For information on removing and installing a line card, refer to the installation and configuration note for the line card in use, in addition to the installation and configuration guide for the router in use.

Removing a DIMM from a Line Card

Engine 0, 1, and 2 line cards use DRAM DIMMs for route memory and SDRAM DIMMs for the transmit and receive buffer packet memory. The locations of the DIMM sockets for these two types of line card memory are shown in Figure 3 and Figure 4.


Caution ISE, Engine 4, and Engine 4+ line card packet memory is not field serviceable. Only qualified Cisco personnel should service these memory modules. See the "Removing a SODIMM" section

To remove a DIMM from a line card, follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap to your wrist and connect the leash to one of the ESD connection sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface on the chassis.

Step 2 Place the line card on an antistatic mat so that the faceplate is nearest to you.

Step 3 Locate the DIMM sockets on the line card. (See Figure 3 and Figure 4.)


Note Some line cards use DIMM sockets equipped with a single release lever, as shown in Figure 7; other line cards use DIMM sockets equipped with dual release levers, as shown in Figure 10. Both DIMM sockets operate in the same general way.


Figure 10 DIMM Socket with Dual Release Levers

Step 4 For the DIMM you want to remove, use the socket release levers to eject the DIMM.

For a socket with a single release lever (see Figure 7), pull down that release lever to eject the DIMM.

For a socket with dual release levers (see Figure 10), pull down on both levers at the same time to eject the DIMM.


Caution Handle the edges of the DIMM only. (See  Figure 8.) Do not touch the integrated circuit devices on the DIMM, the metal traces, or fingers, along the edge of the DIMM, or the pins in the DIMM socket.

Step 5 As one end of the DIMM is released, grasp the top corners of the DIMM with the thumb and forefinger of each hand and pull the DIMM completely out of its socket.

Step 6 Immediately place the DIMM in an antistatic bag to protect it from ESD damage.

Step 7 Repeat Step 4 through Step 6 for any remaining DIMMs that you want to remove.


Installing a DIMM in a Line Card


Note If you are upgrading packet memory, both DIMM sockets of a given pair (either the transmit buffer or the receive buffer) must be populated with an SDRAM DIMM of the same type and size.



Caution ISE, Engine 4, and Engine 4+ line card packet memory is not field serviceable. Only qualified Cisco personnel should service these memory modules. See the "Installing a SODIMM" section

To install new DRAM or SDRAM DIMMs in a Cisco 12000 Series Router line card, follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap to your wrist and connect the leash to one of the ESD connection sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface on the chassis.

Step 2 Place the line card on an antistatic mat so that the faceplate is nearest to you.


Caution To prevent router and memory problems, all DIMMs installed in the line card must be 3.3-volt devices.

Step 3 Remove the new DIMM from its protective antistatic bag.

Step 4 Grasp the edges of the DIMM only. (See Figure 8.) Do not touch the integrated circuit devices on the DIMM, the metal traces, or fingers, along the edge of the DIMM, or the pins in the DIMM socket.

Step 5 To position the DIMM for insertion, orient it at the same angle as the DIMM socket. The two notches (keys) on the bottom edge of the module ensure that the DIMM edge connector is registered properly in the socket.

If necessary, rock the DIMM back and forth gently to align it in the socket.


Caution When inserting DIMMs into a socket, apply firm, but not excessive, pressure. If you damage a DIMM socket, you must return the line card for repair.

Step 6 Gently insert the DIMM into the socket and push until the DIMM snaps into place and the release lever is flush against the side of the socket. (See Figure 9.)

Step 7 Verify that the release lever is flush against the side of the socket. If it is not, the DIMM might not be seated properly. On a socket with dual release levers, both levers should be flush against the sides of the DIMM.

If the module appears misaligned, carefully remove it and reseat it, ensuring that the release lever is flush against the side of the DIMM socket.

Step 8 Repeat Step 3 through Step 7 to install any remaining DIMMs for your memory configuration.


Removing a SODIMM

ISE, Engine 4, and Engine 4+ line cards use a different type of route memory than Engine 0, 1, and 2 line cards. A 144-pin small outline DIMM (SODIMM) is used for route memory. To remove a SODIMM from a line card, follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap and follow its instructions for use.

Step 2 Place the line card on an antistatic mat so that the faceplate is nearest to you.

Step 3 Locate the route memory socket on the line card. (See Figure 5 for ISE line cards or Figure 6 for Engine 4 and Engine 4+ line cards.)

Step 4 Remove the SODIMM memory-retaining clip from the memory module socket. Grasp the latch arm intersection located on each side of the clip and gently slide the clip out. (See Figure 11.) Save the retaining clip.


Caution If the retaining clip is bent or damaged, do not attempt to fix or reuse it. This can cause serious damage to the line card. Each SODIMM replacement ships with a spare retaining clip, in case there is any damage to the existing clip.

Figure 11 Remove Retaining Clip from Memory Module Socket


Note The retaining clip is not used with all ISE, Engine 4, and Engine 4+ line cards. If your SODIMM socket does not include the retaining clip; there is no problem. Simply ignore any instructions that refer to the clip.


Step 5 Remove the SODIMM by gently moving the latches in an outward direction, parallel to and away from the memory module until it releases and rotates to a 45-degree angle. (See Figure 12, Figure 13, and Figure 14a.)


Caution The latch on the SODIMM socket is enclosed by the metal strain relief latch. The latch should never be moved past the metal strain relief latch.

Figure 12 Moving the Latch Away from the SODIMM

Figure 13 Moving the Latch Away from the SODIMM (Alternate Latch Type)


Caution Handle the edges of the SODIMM only. Do not touch the integrated circuit devices on the SODIMM, the metal traces, or fingers, along the edge of the SODIMM, or the pins in the SODIMM socket.

Step 6 As the SODIMM is released, it positions itself at a 45-degree angle. Gently pull the SODIMM out of the socket. Continue to keep the module in a 45-degree angle until it is completely removed from the socket guides. (See Figure 14b.)


Caution On ATM ISE line cards, take care that the SODIMM being removed from DIMM1 does not touch the SODIMM module in DIMM0 as it is released.

Figure 14 Removing a SODIMM

Step 7 Immediately place the SODIMM in an antistatic bag to protect it from ESD damage.


Installing a SODIMM

To install a SODIMM, follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap and follow its instructions for use.

Step 2 Place the line card on an antistatic mat so that the faceplate is nearest to you.

Step 3 Check the retaining clip to make sure it has not been damaged or bent.

Figure 15 SODIMM Socket Retaining Clip


Caution If the retaining clip is damaged, do not use it. This can damage the SODIMM socket.


Note The retaining clip is not used with all ISE, Engine 4, and Engine 4+ line cards. If your SODIMM socket does not include the retaining clip; there is no problem. Simply ignore any instructions that refer to the clip.


Step 4 Locate the route memory socket on the line card. (See Figure 5 for ISE line cards or Figure 6 for Engine 4 and Engine 4+ line cards.)

Step 5 Remove the new SODIMM from its protective antistatic bag.


Caution Grasp the edges of the SODIMM only. Do not touch the integrated circuit devices on the SODIMM, the metal traces, or fingers, along the edge of the SODIMM, or the pins in the SODIMM socket.

Step 6 Line up the SODIMM key with the key in the board socket. (See Figure 16.)

Figure 16 SODIMM with Key in Face-Up Position

Step 7 The SODIMM must be lined up at a 45-degree angle. (See Figure 17a.)


Note When the key is in the face-up position, the metal traces on the left side of the key measure 0.9 inches (23.20 mm). The metal traces on the right side of the key measure 1.29 inches (32.80 mm). The SODIMM can not be inserted until the keys are lined up properly.


Step 8 Place both thumbs at the end of the socket and use your index fingers to guide the module in to the socket until it is fully seated.

Be sure your index fingers are located on the outer corners of the SODIMM to maintain even pressure when the module is seating in the socket.


Caution On ATM ISE line cards, take care that the module being installed in DIMM1 does not touch the SODIMM module installed in DIMM0.

Figure 17 Installing a SODIMM

Step 9 Gently press the SODIMM down using your index fingers, distributing even pressure across the module until it locks into the tabs. (See Figure 17b.)


Caution Excessive pressure can damage a SODIMM socket.

Step 10 Verify that the release levers are flush against the side of the socket. If they are not, the SODIMM might not be seated properly.

Step 11 If the module appears misaligned, carefully remove it and reseat it, ensuring that the release lever is flush against the side of the SODIMM socket.

Step 12 Insert the retainer clip by sliding the clip between the metal strain relief and the latch.
(See Figure 18.)

Figure 18 Inserting the Retaining Clip


Note The retaining clip is not used with all ISE, Engine 4, and Engine 4+ line cards. If your SODIMM socket does not include the retaining clip; there is no problem. Simply ignore any instructions that refer to the clip.


The clip is properly installed when the clip detente protrudes below the strain relief and latch. (See Figure 19.)

Figure 19 Retaining Clip Completely Installed into Module Latch


Note The retaining clip is not used with all ISE, Engine 4, and Engine 4+ line cards. If your SODIMM socket does not include the retaining clip; there is no problem. Simply ignore any instructions that refer to the clip.


Checking the Installation of Route Memory

After you install line card memory and reinstall the line card in the router, the router reinitializes the line card and detects the memory change as part of the reinitialization cycle. The time required for the router to initialize can vary with different router configurations and memory configurations.

If the line card does not reinitialize properly after you replace the SODIMM, or if the console terminal displays a checksum or memory error, verify that you installed the correct SODIMM and that it is installed correctly on the line card.

To check the installation of line card memory, follow these steps:


Step 1 Remove the line card from the router.

Step 2 Check the alignment of the SODIMM, looking at it across the horizontal plane of the card. The SODIMM should be aligned at the same angle as shown in Figure 17 and be fully inserted into its socket.

If a SODIMM is not correctly aligned, remove it and reinsert it.

Step 3 Reinstall the line card in the card cage as described earlier in this publication and perform another installation check.


If the router fails to restart properly after several attempts and you are unable to resolve the problem, access Cisco.com or contact your Cisco service representative for assistance. Before calling, however, make note of any console error messages, unusual LED states, or other router indications or behaviors that might help to resolve the problem.

Regulatory, Compliance, and Safety Information

This section includes regulatory, compliance, and safety information in the following sections:

Translated Safety Warnings and Agency Approvals

Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulatory Statements

Translated Safety Warnings and Agency Approvals

The complete list of translated safety warnings and agency approvals is available in the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for Cisco 12000 Series Internet Routers publication.
(Document Number 78-4347-xx.)

Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulatory Statements

FCC Class A Compliance

This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case users will be required to correct the interference at their own expense.

Modifying the equipment without Cisco's authorization may result in the equipment no longer complying with FCC requirements for Class A digital devices. In that event, your right to use the equipment may be limited by FCC regulation and you may be required to correct any interference to radio or television communication at your own expense.

You can determine whether your equipment is causing interference by turning it off. If the interference stops, it was probably caused by the Cisco equipment or one of its peripheral devices. If the equipment causes interference to radio or television reception, try to correct the interference by using one or more of the following measures:

Turn the television or radio antenna until the interference stops.

Move the equipment to one side or the other of the television or radio.

Move the equipment farther away from the television or radio.

Plug the equipment into an outlet that is on a different circuit from the television or radio. (That is, make certain the equipment and the television or radio are on circuits controlled by different circuit breakers or fuses.)

CISPR 22

This apparatus complies with CISPR 22/EN55022 Class B radiated and conducted emissions requirements.

Canada

English Statement of Compliance

This class A digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.

French Statement of Compliance

Cet appareil numérique de la classe A est conforme à la norme NMB-003 du Canada.

Europe (EU)

This apparatus complies with EN55022 Class B and EN55024 standards when used as ITE/TTE equipment, and EN300386 for Telecommunications Network Equipment (TNE) in both installation environments, telecommunication centers and other indoor locations.

Hungarian Class A Warning

Figyelmeztetés a felhasználói kézikönyv számára:

Ez a berendezés "A" osztályú termék, felhasználására és üzembe helyezésére a magyar EMC "A" osztályú követelményeknek (MSZ EN 55022) megfelelõen kerülhet sor, illetve ezen "A" osztályú berendezések csak megfelelõ kereskedelmi forrásból származhatnak, amelyek biztosítják a megfelelõ speciális üzembe helyezési körülményeket és biztonságos üzemelési távolságok alkalmazását.

This equipment is a class A product and should be used and installed properly according to the Hungarian EMC Class A requirements (MSZEN55022). The Class A equipment are derived for typical commercial establishments for which special conditions of installation and protection distance are used.

Taiwan Class A Warning Notice

This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment this product may cause radio interference in which case you may be required to take adequate measures.


Note This card has EMC approval based on the relevant host system, please see approval information for the system.


Japan VCCI Class A

This is a Class A product based on the standard of the Voluntary Control Council for Interference from Information Technology Equipment (VCCI). If this equipment is used near a domestic environment, radio disturbance may arise. When such trouble occurs, the user may be required to take corrective actions.

Korean Class A Warning

Class A device. This device is registered for EMC requirements for industrial use. The seller or buyer should be aware of this. If this type was sold or purchased by mistake, it should be replaced with a residential-use type.

Obtaining Documentation

Cisco provides several ways to obtain documentation, technical assistance, and other technical resources. These sections explain how to obtain technical information from Cisco Systems.

Cisco.com

You can access the most current Cisco documentation on the World Wide Web at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/home/home.htm

You can access the Cisco website at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com

International Cisco websites can be accessed from this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/public/countries_languages.shtml

Documentation CD-ROM

Cisco documentation and additional literature are available in a Cisco Documentation CD-ROM package, which may have shipped with your product. The Documentation CD-ROM is updated regularly and may be more current than printed documentation. The CD-ROM package is available as a single unit or through an annual or quarterly subscription.

Registered Cisco.com users can order a single Documentation CD-ROM (product number DOC-CONDOCCD=) through the Cisco Ordering tool:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/ordering/ordering_place_order_ordering_tool_launch.html

All users can order annual or quarterly subscriptions through the online Subscription Store:

http://www.cisco.com/go/subscription

Ordering Documentation

You can find instructions for ordering documentation at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/es_inpck/pdi.htm

You can order Cisco documentation in these ways:

Registered Cisco.com users (Cisco direct customers) can order Cisco product documentation from the Networking Products MarketPlace:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/ordering/index.shtml

Nonregistered Cisco.com users can order documentation through a local account representative by calling Cisco Systems Corporate Headquarters (California, USA) at 408 526-7208 or, elsewhere in North America, by calling 800 553-NETS (6387).

Documentation Feedback

You can submit comments electronically on Cisco.com. On the Cisco Documentation home page, click Feedback at the top of the page.

You can send your comments in e-mail to bug-doc@cisco.com.

You can submit comments by using the response card (if present) behind the front cover of your document or by writing to the following address:

Cisco Systems
Attn: Customer Document Ordering
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, CA 95134-9883

We appreciate your comments.

Obtaining Technical Assistance

For all customers, partners, resellers, and distributors who hold valid Cisco service contracts, the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) provides 24-hour, award-winning technical support services, online and over the phone. Cisco.com features the Cisco TAC website as an online starting point for technical assistance.

Cisco TAC Website

The Cisco TAC website (http://www.cisco.com/tac) provides online documents and tools for troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. The Cisco TAC website is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Accessing all the tools on the Cisco TAC website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password. If you have a valid service contract but do not have a login ID or password, register at this URL:

http://tools.cisco.com/RPF/register/register.do

Opening a TAC Case

The online TAC Case Open Tool (http://www.cisco.com/tac/caseopen) is the fastest way to open P3 and P4 cases. (Your network is minimally impaired or you require product information). After you describe your situation, the TAC Case Open Tool automatically recommends resources for an immediate solution. If your issue is not resolved using these recommendations, your case will be assigned to a Cisco TAC engineer.

For P1 or P2 cases (your production network is down or severely degraded) or if you do not have Internet access, contact Cisco TAC by telephone. Cisco TAC engineers are assigned immediately to P1 and P2 cases to help keep your business operations running smoothly.

To open a case by telephone, use one of the following numbers:

Asia-Pacific: +61 2 8446 7411 (Australia: 1 800 805 227)
EMEA: +32 2 704 55 55
USA: 1 800 553-2447

For a complete listing of Cisco TAC contacts, go to this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/687/Directory/DirTAC.shtml

TAC Case Priority Definitions

To ensure that all cases are reported in a standard format, Cisco has established case priority definitions.

Priority 1 (P1)—Your network is "down" or there is a critical impact to your business operations. You and Cisco will commit all necessary resources around the clock to resolve the situation.

Priority 2 (P2)—Operation of an existing network is severely degraded, or significant aspects of your business operation are negatively affected by inadequate performance of Cisco products. You and Cisco will commit full-time resources during normal business hours to resolve the situation.

Priority 3 (P3)—Operational performance of your network is impaired, but most business operations remain functional. You and Cisco will commit resources during normal business hours to restore service to satisfactory levels.

Priority 4 (P4)—You require information or assistance with Cisco product capabilities, installation, or configuration. There is little or no effect on your business operations.

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information

Information about Cisco products, technologies, and network solutions is available from various online and printed sources.

The Cisco Product Catalog describes the networking products offered by Cisco Systems, as well as ordering and customer support services. Access the Cisco Product Catalog at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/products_catalog_links_launch.html

Cisco Press publishes a wide range of networking publications. Cisco suggests these titles for new and experienced users: Internetworking Terms and Acronyms Dictionary, Internetworking Technology Handbook, Internetworking Troubleshooting Guide, and the Internetworking Design Guide. For current Cisco Press titles and other information, go to Cisco Press online at this URL:

http://www.ciscopress.com

Packet magazine is the Cisco quarterly publication that provides the latest networking trends, technology breakthroughs, and Cisco products and solutions to help industry professionals get the most from their networking investment. Included are networking deployment and troubleshooting tips, configuration examples, customer case studies, tutorials and training, certification information, and links to numerous in-depth online resources. You can access Packet magazine at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/packet

iQ Magazine is the Cisco bimonthly publication that delivers the latest information about Internet business strategies for executives. You can access iQ Magazine at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/iqmagazine

Internet Protocol Journal is a quarterly journal published by Cisco Systems for engineering professionals involved in designing, developing, and operating public and private internets and intranets. You can access the Internet Protocol Journal at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/about/ac123/ac147/about_cisco_the_internet_protocol_journal.html

Training—Cisco offers world-class networking training. Current offerings in network training are listed at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/learning/index.html