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Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router Chassis Replacement Instructions

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Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router Chassis Replacement Instructions

Table Of Contents

Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router
Chassis Replacement Instructions

Contents

Replacement Chassis Overview

Preparing for Installation

Safety Guidelines

Safety with Equipment

Safety with Electricity

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Required Tools and Equipment

Related Documentation

Before You Begin

Grounding the Replacement Chassis

Removing and Installing the Chassis

Removing the Defective Chassis from the Equipment Rack

Preparing the Defective Chassis

Disconnecting Cables

Removing and Installing System Components

Detaching the Supplemental Bonding and Grounding Connection

Removing the Defective Chassis

Installing the Replacement Chassis in the Equipment Rack

Inserting the Chassis into the Rack

Reattaching the Supplemental Bonding and Grounding Connection

Reinstalling System Components

Connecting Power to the System

Reconnecting Line Card Network Interface Cables

Reconnecting Cables to the RP

Reconnecting Cables to the Alarm Display Cards

Reinstalling the Snap-On Front Covers

Checking the Operation of the Router

Packaging the Replaced Chassis for Shipment

Regulatory, Compliance, and Safety Information

Translated Safety Warnings and Agency Approvals

Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulatory Statements

FCC Class A Compliance

CISPR 22

Canada

Europe (EU)

VCCI Class A Notice for Japan

Class A Notice for Hungary

Class A Notice for Taiwan and Other Traditional Chinese Markets

Class A Notice for Korea

Obtaining Documentation

Cisco.com

Documentation CD-ROM

Ordering Documentation

Documentation Feedback

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco TAC Website

Opening a TAC Case

TAC Case Priority Definitions

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information


Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router
Chassis Replacement Instructions


Product Number: CHAS-GSR10=
Document Order Number: DOC-7816076=

This publication explains how to remove and install the Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router chassis. It includes referrals to other Cisco publications that include the information required to complete these procedures.

Contents

Replacement Chassis Overview

Preparing for Installation

Removing and Installing the Chassis

Regulatory, Compliance, and Safety Information

Obtaining Documentation

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information

Replacement Chassis Overview

The Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router replacement chassis is the sheet-metal enclosure of the router, without components such as the power supplies, line cards, route processors (RPs), switch fabric card set, alarm cards, power distribution units, and front snap-on covers. The same chassis is used for both DC-powered and AC-powered routers.

Figure 1 shows a front view of the replacement chassis on a shipping pallet. As shown, the chassis is shipped with the following components:

Blower module

Alarm display panel

Horizontal cable management bracket

Air filter assembly

Figure 1 Replacement Chassis (Front View)

Figure 2 is the rear view of the replacement chassis. As shown, the chassis is shipped without AC or DC power distribution units (PDUs).

Figure 2 Replacement Chassis (Rear View)

Preparing for Installation

Installation preparation is presented in the following sections:

Safety Guidelines

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Required Tools and Equipment

Related Documentation

Before You Begin

Safety Guidelines

Before you perform any procedure in this publication, review the safety guidelines in this section to avoid injuring yourself or damaging the equipment. In addition, review the safety warnings listed in the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router publication that accompanied your router before installing, configuring, or maintaining the router.

The following guidelines are for your safety and to protect equipment. The guidelines do not include all hazards. Be alert.

Safety with Equipment

Always disconnect all power cords and interface cables before moving the system.

Never assume that power is disconnected from a circuit; always check.

Keep tools and assembly components away from walk areas.

Do not work alone if potentially hazardous conditions exist.

Do not perform any action that creates a potential hazard to people or makes the equipment unsafe.

Carefully examine your work area for possible hazards such as moist floors, ungrounded power extension cables, and missing safety grounds.

Safety with Electricity

Before beginning any procedures requiring access to the interior of the router, locate the emergency power-off switch for the room in which you are working.

Disconnect all power and external cables before installing or removing a router.

Never assume that power has been disconnected from a circuit; always check.

Do not perform any action that creates a potential hazard to people or makes the equipment unsafe.

Never install equipment that appears damaged.

Carefully examine your work area for possible hazards such as moist floors, ungrounded power extension cables, and missing safety grounds.

If an electrical accident does occur, proceed as follows:

Use caution; do not become a victim yourself. Disconnect power to the router.

If possible, send another person to get medical aid; otherwise, assess the condition of the victim and then call for help.

Determine if the person needs rescue breathing or external cardiac compressions; then take appropriate action.

In addition, observe the following guidelines when working with any equipment that is disconnected from a power source but still connected to telephone or network wiring:

Never install telephone wiring during a lightning storm.

Never install telephone jacks in wet locations unless the jack is specifically designed for wet locations.

Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the telephone line has been disconnected at the network interface.

Use caution when installing or modifying telephone lines.

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Many router components can be damaged by static electricity. Some components can be damaged by voltages as low as 30V, while static voltages as high as 35,000V can be generated just by handling plastic or foam packing material, or by sliding assemblies across plastic and carpets. Not exercising the proper electrostatic discharge (ESD) precautions can result in intermittent or complete component failures. To minimize the potential for ESD damage, observe the following guidelines:

Always use an ESD-preventive antistatic wrist strap or ankle strap and ensure that it makes good skin contact.


Caution You should periodically check the resistance value of the ESD-preventive strap. The measurement should be between 1 and 10 megohms.

When removing or installing a component, make sure the equipment end of your antistatic strap leash is connected to one of the ESD connection sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface on the chassis. (See Figure 3.) Avoid contact between the component and your clothing. The ESD-preventive wrist strap only protects the component from ESD voltages on the body; ESD voltages on your clothing can still cause component damage.

Always place a card component-side-up on an antistatic surface, in an antistatic card rack, or in a static shielding bag. If you are returning the item to the factory, immediately place it in a static shielding bag.

When installing a line card or route processor (RP), use the ejector levers to seat the card connectors in the backplane, then tighten both captive screws on the faceplate of the card. These screws prevent accidental removal, provide proper grounding for the router, and help to ensure that the card connector is seated in the backplane.

When removing line cards, clock and scheduler cards, switch fabric cards, or an RP, use the ejector levers to unseat the card connector from the backplane. Pull the metal card carrier out slowly, placing one hand along the bottom of the carrier to guide it straight out of the slot.

Handle line cards, clock and scheduler cards, switch fabric cards, or an RP by the metal card carrier edges only; avoid touching the board or any connector pins.

Figure 3 Connecting an ESD-Preventive Wrist Strap to the Chassis

Required Tools and Equipment

The following tools and equipment are required to remove and install the chassis:

ESD-preventive wrist or ankle strap

1/4-inch (6.5-mm) and 3/16-inch (4.5-mm) flat-blade screwdrivers

Number 1 and number 2 Phillips screwdrivers

9/16-inch (14-mm) wrench (for chassis and pallet hold-down bracket bolts)

3/4-inch (19-mm) socket and ratchet wrench

Related Documentation

The following publications contain additional information:

Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router Installation and Configuration Guide

Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco 12000 Series Internet Routers

Cisco 12000 Series line card installation and configuration note(s)

Before You Begin

Because you are removing all the components (except the air filter) from the defective chassis and then reinstalling them into the replacement chassis, the procedures that follow are based on the following assumptions:

The replacement chassis is removed from its shipping packaging, is placed temporarily within reach of the rack in which the defective chassis is installed, and has been temporarily connected to the same grounding system as the defective chassis.

You noted how the replacement chassis was packaged and saved the packing materials to repack the defective chassis.

You have a place to set the defective chassis when it is removed from the equipment rack.

Components are transferred from the defective chassis to the replacement chassis.

The replacement chassis and all the components now installed in it are inserted into the equipment rack in place of the defective chassis.

This approach has the advantage of protecting the system components, such as line cards and switch fabric cards, against damage by eliminating the need to store them even temporarily outside their card cages. It also helps ensure that the physical configuration of the router is maintained, because each transferred component is installed in the same location in the replacement chassis that it occupied in the defective chassis.

Before you begin, you should study the router chassis being replaced. Note where all the external cables are attached and how they are routed to the chassis. If necessary, label the cables so that they can be reinstalled correctly on the system after the chassis is replaced.

Grounding the Replacement Chassis

When the replacement chassis is near the rack site, temporarily connect the central office grounding system or interior equipment grounding system to the network equipment building systems (NEBS) supplemental bonding and grounding receptacles on the router. There are two threaded studs on the top of the chassis rear panel. (See Figure 4.)

For more information on the bonding and grounding cable and connector requirements, refer to
Chapter 2 of the Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router Installation and Configuration Guide.

Figure 4 Router NEBS Bonding and Grounding Studs

Removing and Installing the Chassis

Procedures for removing and installing the chassis are described in the following sections:

Removing the Defective Chassis from the Equipment Rack

Installing the Replacement Chassis in the Equipment Rack

Checking the Operation of the Router

Packaging the Replaced Chassis for Shipment

Removing the Defective Chassis from the Equipment Rack

The router chassis is an integrated, sheet-metal assembly that includes the blower module bay, the line card and RP card cage, the air filter door, the switch fabric and alarm card cage, and the power supplies. The chassis is mounted in a rack by 6 screws (3 on each side) that fasten the chassis rack-mounting flanges to the mounting flanges on the rack.

Procedures for removing the defective chassis from the equipment rack are described in the following subsections:

Preparing the Defective Chassis

Disconnecting Cables

Removing and Installing System Components

Detaching the Supplemental Bonding and Grounding Connection

Removing the Defective Chassis

Preparing the Defective Chassis

To prepare the defective chassis, follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap to your wrist and connect the leash to one of the ESD connection sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface on the chassis. (See Figure 3.)

Step 2 Turn off all circuit breakers for the source power lines connected to the power shelf.

Step 3 Verify that the LED labeled PWR OK on each of the power modules is off, and that the power fan in each module is off.

Step 4 Verify that the green LED labeled OK on each blower module is off.

Step 5 Disconnect the power cords from the power distribution units on the rear of the chassis.

Step 6 Remove the front covers.


Note The router has front covers over the blower module, the line card and RP card cage, and the switch fabric and alarm card cage. The blower module and line card and RP card cage covers are fastened to the chassis by ball studs that insert into sockets on the front of the chassis. These front covers are referred to as snap-on front covers. (See Figure 5.)

The switch fabric and alarm card cage partial front cover is fastened to the air filter door by four screws inserted from the back side of the air filter door. This partial front cover is referred to as the air filter door front cover. You do not need to remove the air filter door front cover, because the air filter door can be opened and moved out of the way to gain access to the switch fabric and alarm card cage.


a. Observe the appearance and position of each of the snap-on front covers on the front of the router.

b. Select a front cover, grasp its outside edges, and pull it straight out to detach it from the front of the chassis.

c. Set the front cover safely aside.

d. Repeat these steps for the remaining snap-on front covers on the router.


Figure 5 Router Front Covers

Disconnecting Cables

To properly disconnect the cables, follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap to your wrist and connect the leash to one of the ESD connection sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface on the chassis. (See Figure 3.)

Step 2 Disconnect the RP cables. You must disconnect any cables that are connected to the RP console port, auxiliary port, or either of the Ethernet ports, RJ-45 or MII. Identify each of the RP cable connections and write them down on a piece of paper before you disconnect the cables. After disconnecting the cables, remove them from the chassis and place them safely aside.

Step 3 Disconnect the alarm display card cables. You must disconnect any cable that is connected to the external alarm port on the alarm display cards. Identify the alarm cable connections and write this information down on a piece of paper before you disconnect the cables. After disconnecting the cables, remove them from the chassis and place them safely aside.

Step 4 Disconnect the line card interface cables:

a. Identify the line card to be replaced and write down the slot number and the type of line card. When you install the replacement line card, install it in the same slot. Also note the network interface cable connections to the line card ports. You must reconnect the network interface cables to the same line card ports.

b. Starting with the bottom port of the line card (on line cards with multiple ports), disconnect the interface cable connectors from each of the line card ports.

c. Loosen the captive screw at each end of the line card cable-management bracket and pull the cable-management bracket away from the line card faceplate.

d. After you disconnect the cables and the line card cable-management bracket from each line card, carefully pull the cables out of the fingers of the horizontal cable tray and vertical cable-management trough, then place the cable bundle carefully out of the way until the cables are reinstalled on the replacement chassis and reconnected.


Removing and Installing System Components

The procedures for removing and installing various system components are described in separate
Cisco publications. This section contains referrals to the publication that includes the information you need to complete the required procedures for either an AC- or DC-powered system. To remove and install system components, follow these steps:


Step 1 Refer to the Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router Installation and Configuration Guide and review and perform the following steps:

a. Remove and install the PDUs and rear cover

b. Remove and install the horizontal trough

c. Remove and install the power supplies or PEMs

Step 2 Refer to the installation and configuration note for your router processor (RP) and review and perform the removal and installation procedures for the RP.

Step 3 Refer to the installation and configuration note for your line cards, and review and perform the removal and installation procedures for the line cards.

Step 4 Refer to the Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router Installation and Configuration Guide and review and perform the removal and installation procedures for these cards.


Detaching the Supplemental Bonding and Grounding Connection

If the defective chassis has supplemental bonding and grounding cables attached to any of its bonding and grounding cable receptacles, you must detach these cable lugs from the chassis before you can remove the chassis from the equipment rack. Two receptacles are located on top of the power interface panel on the back of the chassis. (See Figure 4.)

To detach a bonding and grounding cable lug from the chassis, follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap to your wrist and connect the leash to one of the ESD connection sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface on the chassis. (See Figure 3.)

Step 2 Remove the two washers, and the nuts that secure the bonding and grounding cable lug to the chassis. Save the mounting hardware, because you will use it in a later procedure.

Step 3 Remove the bonding and grounding cable and set it aside.


Removing the Defective Chassis

To remove the defective chassis from the equipment rack, follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap to your wrist and connect the leash to one of the ESD connection sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface on the chassis. (See Figure 3.)

Step 2 Loosen the screws that attach the chassis rack mount flanges to the rack posts.

Step 3 Carefully lift the chassis out of the rack and set it aside.


Installing the Replacement Chassis in the Equipment Rack

This section contains the following procedures:

Inserting the Chassis into the Rack

Reattaching the Supplemental Bonding and Grounding Connection

Reinstalling System Components

Connecting Power to the System

Reconnecting Line Card Network Interface Cables

Reconnecting Cables to the RP

Reconnecting Cables to the Alarm Display Cards

Reinstalling the Snap-On Front Covers

Inserting the Chassis into the Rack

An empty chassis weighs approximately 125 pounds (56.7 kg). You need two people to slide the chassis into the equipment rack safely. To prevent injury, keep your back straight and lift with your legs, not your back. Avoid sudden twists or lateral moves. Figure 6 shows the orientation of a router to the rack posts.

To reduce the weight of the replacement chassis, now that it has all the components from the defective chassis installed in it, you can temporarily move the components back into the defective chassis which has been removed from the rack.

Temporarily ground the replacement chassis to the supplemental grounding system, and see the "Removing and Installing System Components" section, to move the components back into the defective chassis.

Figure 6 Router and Rack Posts

To rack-mount the replacement chassis, follow these steps:


Step 1 With one person on each side, lift the chassis by the side handles into the rack. Do not grasp the card cage or the air filter door when lifting the router. (See Figure 7.) Lift by the handles and grasp underneath the power supplies. (See Figure 8.)

Step 2 Lift the chassis into the rack. If the defective chassis was mounted in the rack with the optional rack-mount brackets, raise the chassis to the level of the rack-mount brackets and let the bottom of the chassis rest on the brackets, but continue to support the chassis.

Step 3 Position the chassis until the rack-mounting flanges are flush against the mounting flanges on the rack (or the optional center-mount brackets, if installed).

Step 4 Hold the chassis in position against the mounting flanges and have another person insert and loosely tighten one of the mounting screws provided.

Step 5 Go to the other side of the chassis, make sure it is level, and loosely tighten one of the mounting screws provided.

Figure 7 Incorrect Lifting Handholds

Figure 8 Correct Lifting Positions

Step 6 Repeat Step 4 and Step 5 and secure the chassis to the rack using the other groups of mounting holes.

Step 7 Level the chassis as required, and then secure the chassis to the equipment rack by tightening all the screws.


Reattaching the Supplemental Bonding and Grounding Connection

If you disconnected any bonding and grounding cables while removing the defective chassis from the equipment rack, reattach the bonding and grounding cable lugs to the bonding and grounding receptacles on the replacement chassis.

To attach a bonding and grounding cable lug to a bonding and grounding stud on the router, use Figure 9 as a reference and follow these steps:


Step 1 Locate the router bonding and grounding studs you plan to use.

Step 2 Position the bonding and grounding cable lug over the bonding and grounding studs on the chassis.

Step 3 Install the locking washers and nuts over the bonding and grounding cable.

Step 4 Ensure that the bonding and grounding cable does not interfere with other router hardware, and then tighten the nuts to secure the bonding and grounding cable to the chassis.

Step 5 Prepare the other end of the grounding wire and connect it to the appropriate grounding point at your site to ensure an adequate earth ground.


Figure 9 Router Rear NEBS Bonding and Grounding Studs

Reinstalling System Components

Refer to the "Removing and Installing System Components" section and reinstall the system components that were previously removed.

Connecting Power to the System

Procedures for connecting power to the system are described in the following sections:

For AC-powered systems, go to the "Connecting AC Power" section.

For DC-powered systems, go to the "Connecting DC Power" section.

Connecting AC Power

To connect AC-source power to the AC-powered router, use Figure 10 as a reference and follow these steps:


Step 1 Obtain the two AC power cords from the defective chassis.

Step 2 Beginning with the far right AC receptacle on the back of the power shelf, pull back on the power cord retention clip and insert the AC power cord appliance coupler into the AC receptacle. (See Figure 10.)

Step 3 Lower the power cord retention clip onto the power cord appliance coupler to secure the power cord in the AC receptacle.

Step 4 Connect the other end of the AC power cord to the source AC receptacle.


Note Each AC-input power supply is intended to be connected to a dedicated power source (branch circuit). Each AC-input power supply operates between 200 and 240 VAC and requires at least a 20A service for North American use or a 13A service for international use.


Step 5 Route the power cord across the top of the chassis and down the side to keep it safely out of the way, in case you need to remove the back cover of the chassis.

Step 6 Repeat Step 2 through Step 5 for the second AC power cord.


Note Do not switch on the source AC circuit breakers until it is safe to do so.



Figure 10 Connecting Source AC to the AC-Input Power Connector

Connecting DC Power

This section describes how to connect DC power cables to the terminal connections on the power distribution unit (PDU) of a DC-powered router. These steps are accomplished using the same DC power cables from the defective chassis.

A router equipped for DC power requires the following cables:

One earth ground cable

One source DC (negative) cable

One source DC return (positive) cable


Caution For your safety and the welfare of the equipment, always attach the ground and source DC power cable lugs to the power shelf terminals in the following order: (1) ground to ground, (2) positive (+) to positive (+), (3) negative (-) to negative (-).

To connect DC power to the DC-input power entry modules (PEMs), follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an antistatic wrist strap to your wrist and connect the leash to one of the ESD connection sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface on the chassis. (See Figure 3.)

Step 2 Remove the clear plastic safety cover that fits over the DC power connection terminal studs.


Caution Before proceeding to the next step, verify that the source DC circuit breaker servicing the source DC power cable you are installing is in the OFF position. As an important additional check, measure the voltages across the cable leads. All readings should be zero volts.


Warning When installing the source DC power cable leads, always make the ground connection first and disconnect the ground connection last.


Step 3 Remove only the outer nut and locking washer from each of the threaded terminal studs on the back of the power shelf. (See Figure 11 and Figure 12.)

Figure 11 DC-Input Terminal Connections on the DC-Input PDU

Figure 12 Connecting Source DC Cable Leads to the DC-Input Power Connectors


Note The color coding of the source DC power cable leads depends on the color coding of the site DC power source. Typically, green or green and yellow indicate that the cable is a ground cable. Because there is no color code standard for the source DC wiring, you must ensure that the power cables are connected to the DC-input power distribution unit studs in the proper positive (+) and negative (-) polarity. In some cases, the source DC cable leads might have a positive (+) or a negative (-) label. This is a relatively safe indication of the polarity, but you must verify the polarity by making a voltage measurement. When making the measurement, the positive (+) lead and the negative (-) lead must always match the (+) and (-) labels on the power shelf.



Caution To prevent strain on the power shelf terminal studs, allow sufficient slack in the source DC power cable leads and secure the power cable leads to the chassis.

Step 4 Route the source DC ground cables carefully to the side of the chassis to which you are connecting DC power.

The DC PDUs are located on either side of the chassis so that the A and the B feeds from the central office can be routed separately on either side of the router chassis. (See Figure 11 and Figure 12.)

Step 5 Fit the holes in the ground cable lug over the ground cable terminal studs on the power shelf, replace the locking washers and nuts, and then tighten them to secure the ground cable lug.


Note When securing the ground, positive (+), and negative (-) power cable lugs to the power shelf terminals, leave a small service loop in the ground cable. This loop ensures that the ground cable lug will be the last lead to disconnect from the power shelf if a great deal of strain separates the source DC power cable leads from the power shelf.


Step 6 Route the source DC return (positive) and the source DC (negative) cable leads appropriately.

The DC PDUs are located on either side of the chassis so that the central office A and B feeds can be routed separately.

Step 7 To install the power module source DC cable leads, use Figure 12 as a reference and follow these steps:

a. For each PEM cable lead pair, identify the source DC return (positive) and source DC (negative) cable leads.

The DC terminal studs are labeled on the DC PDU and on the flexible plastic insulator around the terminal studs.

b. Select the source DC return (positive) cable lead and fit the holes in the cable lug over the source DC return (positive) terminal studs on the power shelf.

c. Replace the washers and nuts and tighten them to secure the cable lug. Use a ratchet to secure the nut.

d. Select the source DC (negative) cable lead and fit the holes in the cable lug over the source DC (negative) terminal studs on the power shelf.

e. Replace the washers and nuts and tighten them to secure the cable lug.

Step 8 Verify that the polarity of the source DC wiring from the source DC breaker to the power shelf is correct and that the terminal connections on the power shelf are correct and tight.


Note Verify the source DC cable connections to the DC-input power shelf with a calibrated DC voltmeter. Always connect positive (+) leads to positive (+) terminals and negative (-) leads to negative (-) terminals on the power shelf. (For more information on source DC site cabling, see the Power Connection Guidelines section in Chapter 2 of the Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router Installation and Configuration Guide.


Step 9 Repeat Step 6 through Step 8 for the other source DC power cables.

Step 10 Replace the clear plastic safety cover.


Caution Do not switch on the source DC circuit breakers until it is safe to do so.


Reconnecting Line Card Network Interface Cables

To reconnect line card interface cables, refer to the line card installation and configuration note and perform the following steps:


Step 1 Reattach the line card cable-management bracket to the line card faceplates.

Step 2 Reconnect the network interface cables to the replacement line cards.


Reconnecting Cables to the RP


Warning The ports labeled "Ethernet," "10BaseT," "Token Ring," "Console," and "AUX" are safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV circuits.


To reconnect the cables to the RP, refer to the RP installation and configuration note and perform the following steps:


Step 1 Reconnect the console port.

Step 2 Reconnect the auxiliary port.

Step 3 Reconnect the Ethernet port.


Reconnecting Cables to the Alarm Display Cards

If necessary, replace the cables that you removed from the alarm display. Because alarm contact cables are entirely dependent on installation site circumstances, alarm connector cables are not available from Cisco.

For information about alarm connector wiring requirements and the pinouts for the alarm connector interface, refer to Chapter 2 of the Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router Installation and Configuration Guide.

Reinstalling the Snap-On Front Covers

To reinstall the snap-on chassis front covers that you removed from the defective system, refer to Figure 5 and follow these steps:


Step 1 Select a front cover, grasp its outside edges, and align the ball studs with the ball stud clips on the front of the chassis.

Step 2 Press the cover into place.

Step 3 Repeat these steps for the remaining snap-on front cover.


Checking the Operation of the Router

To restart the router and verify that it restarts successfully after replacing the chassis, follow these steps:


Step 1 Verify that the following conditions are true:

All cards are fully inserted in their slots, and all captive screws are tightened.

Line card cable-management brackets are attached to their respective line cards, and all captive screws are tightened.

Interface cables are completely seated in their line card connectors.

Interface cables are routed neatly through the cable-management system.

Any empty card slots are filled with card blanks.

When the faceplate of a card does not completely fill the card slot opening, a narrow card filler panel must be installed to ensure proper air flow through the chassis and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC).

Power modules are fully inserted in their bays and their ejector levers are all completely closed and secured.

Power cables are fully connected to the router and the power source, and are secured with appropriate strain relief.

On a router equipped with DC power, the clear plastic covers are installed over the cable connectors on the back panel of the DC power distribution units.

The Flash memory card that shipped with your system is installed in PC card slot 0 of the RP.


Note By default, a Flash memory card containing a valid Cisco IOS software image is inserted in PC card slot 0 before the router is shipped. Also by default, the software configuration register is set to 0x0102, which causes the router to boot automatically from the Cisco IOS software image stored on the Flash memory card.


Step 2 Ensure that a console terminal is connected to the RP console port and turned on, or that you have a remote login to the router from another device through a Telnet session. (You need to check the startup banner and displays to ensure that the system restarts properly and that all the interfaces reinitialize in the proper state.)

Step 3 Switch on all source voltage circuit breakers that control power to your system.

Step 4 Observe the power module LEDs:

When an AC-input power supply is seated in its power shelf bay and connected to an AC power source supplying power within the required range, the green LED labeled PWR OK on the power supply faceplate should be on and the power supply fan should also be on. This is normal behavior.

When a DC-input PEM is seated in its power shelf bay and connected to a DC power source supplying power within the required range, the green LED labeled PWR OK on the PEM faceplate should be on and the PEM fan should also be on. This is normal behavior.

Step 5 Visually check the two LEDs on the front of each blower module. When the blower module is operating correctly, the green LED labeled OK should be on and the red LED labeled FAIL should be off. Listen for the blowers in the blower modules; you should immediately hear them operating. In a noisy environment, the blowers might be difficult to hear; therefore, place your hand in front of the exhaust vents near the top and bottom rear of the chassis to verify that the blowers are operating.

Step 6 Visually check the LEDs on the two alarm cards. When the system is operating correctly, the following LED conditions should be true:

All three system alarm LEDs should be off.

The alarm card status LED labeled ENABLED should be on; the LED labeled FAIL should be off.

The LED labeled ENABLED for each CSC and SFC in the switch fabric and alarm card cage should be on; the LED labeled FAIL should be off.

Step 7 On the console terminal, verify that the console displays the system banner and that the system and all interfaces initialize successfully.

If the power supplies do not power up, or if the system or any interfaces do not initialize properly, refer to the Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router Installation and Configuration Guide, for additional information and installation troubleshooting procedures. If you are still unable to resolve the problem, contact your Cisco service representative for assistance.


Packaging the Replaced Chassis for Shipment

Reuse the packaging that came with the replacement chassis to package the defective chassis for shipment.

Regulatory, Compliance, and Safety Information

This section includes regulatory, compliance, and safety information in the following sections:

Translated Safety Warnings and Agency Approvals

Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulatory Statements

Translated Safety Warnings and Agency Approvals

The complete list of translated safety warnings and agency approvals is available in the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for Cisco 12000 Series Internet Routers publication.
(Document Number 78-4347-xx.)

Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulatory Statements

FCC Class A Compliance

This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case users will be required to correct the interference at their own expense.

Modifying the equipment without Cisco's authorization may result in the equipment no longer complying with FCC requirements for Class A digital devices. In that event, your right to use the equipment may be limited by FCC regulation and you may be required to correct any interference to radio or television communication at your own expense.

You can determine whether your equipment is causing interference by turning it off. If the interference stops, it was probably caused by the Cisco equipment or one of its peripheral devices. If the equipment causes interference to radio or television reception, try to correct the interference by using one or more of the following measures:

Turn the television or radio antenna until the interference stops.

Move the equipment to one side or the other of the television or radio.

Move the equipment farther away from the television or radio.

Plug the equipment into an outlet that is on a different circuit from the television or radio. (That is, make certain the equipment and the television or radio are on circuits controlled by different circuit breakers or fuses.)

CISPR 22

This apparatus complies with CISPR 22/EN55022 Class B radiated and conducted emissions requirements.

Canada

English Statement of Compliance

This class A digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.

French Statement of Compliance

Cet appareil numérique de la classe A est conforme à la norme NMB-003 du Canada.

Europe (EU)

This apparatus complies with EN55022 Class B and EN55024 standards when used as ITE/TTE equipment, and EN300386 for Telecommunications Network Equipment (TNE) in both installation environments, telecommunication centers and other indoor locations.

VCCI Class A Notice for Japan

Warning


This is a Class A product based on the standard of the Voluntary Control Council for Interference by Information Technology Equipment (VCCI). If this equipment is used in a domestic environment, radio disturbance may arise. When such trouble occurs, the user may be required to take corrective actions. Statement 191


Class A Notice for Hungary

Warning


This equipment is a class A product and should be used and installed properly according to the Hungarian EMC Class A requirements (MSZEN55022). Class A equipment is designed for typical commercial establishments for which special conditions of installation and protection distance are used. Statement 256


Class A Notice for Taiwan and Other Traditional Chinese Markets

Warning


This is a Class A Information Product, when used in residential environment, it may cause radio frequency interference, under such circumstances, the user may be requested to take appropriate countermeasures. Statement 257


Class A Notice for Korea

Warning


This is a Class A Device and is registered for EMC requirements for industrial use. The seller or buyer should be aware of this. If this type was sold or purchased by mistake, it should be replaced with a residential-use type. Statement 294


Obtaining Documentation

Cisco provides several ways to obtain documentation, technical assistance, and other technical resources. These sections explain how to obtain technical information from Cisco Systems.

Cisco.com

You can access the most current Cisco documentation on the World Wide Web at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/home/home.htm

You can access the Cisco website at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com

International Cisco websites can be accessed from this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/public/countries_languages.shtml

Documentation CD-ROM

Cisco documentation and additional literature are available in a Cisco Documentation CD-ROM package, which may have shipped with your product. The Documentation CD-ROM is updated regularly and may be more current than printed documentation. The CD-ROM package is available as a single unit or through an annual or quarterly subscription.

Registered Cisco.com users can order a single Documentation CD-ROM (product number DOC-CONDOCCD=) through the Cisco Ordering tool:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/ordering/ordering_place_order_ordering_tool_launch.html

All users can order annual or quarterly subscriptions through the online Subscription Store:

http://www.cisco.com/go/subscription

Click Subscriptions & Promotional Materials in the left navigation bar.

Ordering Documentation

You can find instructions for ordering documentation at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/es_inpck/pdi.htm

You can order Cisco documentation in these ways:

Registered Cisco.com users (Cisco direct customers) can order Cisco product documentation from the Networking Products MarketPlace:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/ordering/index.shtml

Nonregistered Cisco.com users can order documentation through a local account representative by calling Cisco Systems Corporate Headquarters (California, USA) at 408 526-7208 or, elsewhere in North America, by calling 800 553-NETS (6387).

Documentation Feedback

You can submit e-mail comments about technical documentation to bug-doc@cisco.com.

You can submit comments by using the response card (if present) behind the front cover of your document or by writing to the following address:

Cisco Systems
Attn: Customer Document Ordering
170 West Tasman Drive
San Jose, CA 95134-9883

We appreciate your comments.

Obtaining Technical Assistance

For all customers, partners, resellers, and distributors who hold valid Cisco service contracts, the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) provides 24-hour-a-day, award-winning technical support services, online and over the phone. Cisco.com features the Cisco TAC website as an online starting point for technical assistance. If you do not hold a valid Cisco service contract, please contact your reseller.

Cisco TAC Website

The Cisco TAC website provides online documents and tools for troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with Cisco products and technologies. The Cisco TAC website is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. The Cisco TAC website is located at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/tac

Accessing all the tools on the Cisco TAC website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password. If you have a valid service contract but do not have a login ID or password, register at this URL:

http://tools.cisco.com/RPF/register/register.do

Opening a TAC Case

Using the online TAC Case Open Tool is the fastest way to open P3 and P4 cases. (P3 and P4 cases are those in which your network is minimally impaired or for which you require product information.) After you describe your situation, the TAC Case Open Tool automatically recommends resources for an immediate solution. If your issue is not resolved using the recommended resources, your case will be assigned to a Cisco TAC engineer. The online TAC Case Open Tool is located at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/tac/caseopen

For P1 or P2 cases (P1 and P2 cases are those in which your production network is down or severely degraded) or if you do not have Internet access, contact Cisco TAC by telephone. Cisco TAC engineers are assigned immediately to P1 and P2 cases to help keep your business operations running smoothly.

To open a case by telephone, use one of the following numbers:

Asia-Pacific: +61 2 8446 7411 (Australia: 1 800 805 227)
EMEA: +32 2 704 55 55
USA: 1 800 553-2447

For a complete listing of Cisco TAC contacts, go to this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/687/Directory/DirTAC.shtml

TAC Case Priority Definitions

To ensure that all cases are reported in a standard format, Cisco has established case priority definitions.

Priority 1 (P1)—Your network is "down" or there is a critical impact to your business operations. You and Cisco will commit all necessary resources around the clock to resolve the situation.

Priority 2 (P2)—Operation of an existing network is severely degraded, or significant aspects of your business operation are negatively affected by inadequate performance of Cisco products. You and Cisco will commit full-time resources during normal business hours to resolve the situation.

Priority 3 (P3)—Operational performance of your network is impaired, but most business operations remain functional. You and Cisco will commit resources during normal business hours to restore service to satisfactory levels.

Priority 4 (P4)—You require information or assistance with Cisco product capabilities, installation, or configuration. There is little or no effect on your business operations.

Obtaining Additional Publications and Information

Information about Cisco products, technologies, and network solutions is available from various online and printed sources.

The Cisco Product Catalog describes the networking products offered by Cisco Systems, as well as ordering and customer support services. Access the Cisco Product Catalog at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/products_catalog_links_launch.html

Cisco Press publishes a wide range of general networking, training and certification titles. Both new and experienced users will benefit from these publications. For current Cisco Press titles and other information, go to Cisco Press online at this URL:

http://www.ciscopress.com

Packet magazine is the Cisco quarterly publication that provides the latest networking trends, technology breakthroughs, and Cisco products and solutions to help industry professionals get the most from their networking investment. Included are networking deployment and troubleshooting tips, configuration examples, customer case studies, tutorials and training, certification information, and links to numerous in-depth online resources. You can access Packet magazine at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/packet

iQ Magazine is the Cisco bimonthly publication that delivers the latest information about Internet business strategies for executives. You can access iQ Magazine at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/go/iqmagazine

Internet Protocol Journal is a quarterly journal published by Cisco Systems for engineering professionals involved in designing, developing, and operating public and private internets and intranets. You can access the Internet Protocol Journal at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/about/ac123/ac147/about_cisco_the_internet_protocol_journal.html

Training—Cisco offers world-class networking training. Current offerings in network training are listed at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/learning/index.html