Guest

Cisco 12000 Series Routers

Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router Clock and Scheduler, Switch Fabric, and Alarm Card Replacement Instructions

  • Viewing Options

  • PDF (1.4 MB)
  • Feedback
Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router Clock and Scheduler, Switch Fabric, and Alarm Card Replacement Instructions

Table Of Contents

Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router Clock and Scheduler, Switch Fabric, and Alarm Card Replacement Instructions

Contents

Switch Fabric Overview

Switch Fabric Card Types

Switch Fabric Card Redundancy

Alarm Card and Alarm Display Overview

Preparing for Installation

Safety Guidelines

Safety with Equipment

Safety with Electricity

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Required Tools and Equipment

Related Documentation

Removing and Installing a CSC or SFC

Opening the Air Filter Door

Removing a Card from the Switch Fabric and Alarm Card Cage

Installing a Card in the Switch Fabric and Alarm Card Cage

Closing the Air Filter Door

Removing and Installing the Alarm Card

Upgrading the Mbus ROM

Removing an Alarm Card

Installing an Alarm Card

Removing and Installing the External Alarm Display

Removing the External Alarm Display

Installing the External Alarm Display

Upgrading the Switch Fabric

Upgrade Requirements

Upgrading the Switch Fabric

Verifying the Upgrade

Post-Upgrade Considerations

Troubleshooting the Switch Fabric

Analyzing the Data

crc16 Output

Grant Parity and Request Errors

Properly Seating Switch Fabric Cards

Regulatory, Compliance, and Safety Information

Translated Safety Warnings and Agency Approvals

Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulatory Statements

FCC Class B Compliance

CISPR 22

Canada

Europe (EU)

VCCI Class A Notice for Japan

Class A Notice for Hungary

Class A Notice for Taiwan and Other Traditional Chinese Markets

Class A Notice for Korea

Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request


Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router Clock and Scheduler, Switch Fabric, and Alarm Card Replacement Instructions


Document Order Number: DOC-OL-13810-01, May 30, 2008

Product Numbers: 12010E-CSC=, 12410E-CSC=, 12410E-SFC, 12810E-CSC=, 12010-CSC, 12010-SFC, GSR10-CSC=, GSR10-SFC=, 12810-CSC=, 12810-SFC=, GSR-ALRM=, GSR10-DISP=

This publication contains removal and installation procedures for the clock and scheduler card (CSC), switch fabric card (SFC), alarm card, and the alarm card display on Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Routers. The CSC and SFC are a card set referred to as the switch fabric. The alarm card is not a part of the switch fabric card set.

Also provided are procedures for upgrading from a 10-gigabit-per-second (Gbps) switch fabric to a 40-Gbps switch fabric. In addition, instructions for verifying the operation of the system after you replace a card along with switch fabric troubleshooting information are also included.

Contents

Switch Fabric Overview, page 2

Alarm Card and Alarm Display Overview

Preparing for Installation

Removing and Installing a CSC or SFC

Removing and Installing the Alarm Card

Removing and Installing the External Alarm Display

Upgrading the Switch Fabric

Troubleshooting the Switch Fabric

Regulatory, Compliance, and Safety Information

Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request

Switch Fabric Overview

The switch fabric for the Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router consists of two clock and scheduler cards (CSCs) and five switch fabric cards (SFCs) installed in the switch fabric and alarm card cage. One CSC and four SFCs are required for an active switch fabric; the second CSC and the fifth SFC provide redundancy.


Note Two alarm cards are also located in the switch fabric and alarm card cage. These cards are not a part of the switch fabric. However, their removal and installation procedures are located in this publication in the "Removing and Installing the Alarm Card" section.


Figure 1 illustrates the switch fabric and alarm card cage with the air filter door open. The cards in the switch fabric and alarm card cage are labeled CSC-200, SFC-200, and Alarm. The labeling that identifies the type of card for each slot is viewable when the air filter door is open.

Figure 1 Switch Fabric and Alarm Card Cage


Note The CSCs and SFCs support online insertion and removal (OIR), which means you can remove and install a card while the router remains powered on. On the 10-slot chassis, the CSC's are only used for clocking purposes and do not carry any data traffic. There are 5 SFC cards which carry the traffic. 4 of the SFCs carry the actual traffic, while the 5th SFC is for redundancy purposes in case one of the SFC's fail. The recommended procedure for any fabric card removal is to perform a hw module shut command on the card, wait for approximately 1 minute, and then remove the card. Primary CSC OIR results in traffic loss regardless of the line cards installed in chassis. Redundant SFC or CSC OIR should not cause traffic loss regardless of the line cards installed in chassis.


The Cisco 12010 Router supports a 2.5-Gbps switch fabric.The Cisco 12410 Router supports a 10-Gbps switch fabric. The Cisco 12810 Router supports a 40-Gbps switch fabric. Each SFC or CSC provides either a 2.5-, 10-, or 40-Gbps full-duplex connection to each line card in the system.

There are currently six switch fabric options:

Enhanced 2.5-Gbps switch fabric (50-Gbps switching system bandwidth) used in the Cisco 12010 Router—Consists of the 12010E-CSC and the 12010E-SFC fabric sets. Each SFC or CSC card provides a 2.5-Gbps full-duplex connection to each line card in the system. Thus, for a Cisco 12010 Router with 10 line cards with 2 x 2.5 Gbps (full duplex), the system switching bandwidth is 10 x 5 Gbps = 50-Gbps. The enhanced fabric is required when enabling the Single-Router Automatic Protection Switching (APS) or Building Integrated Timing Supply (BITS).

Enhanced 10-Gbps switch fabric (200-Gbps switching system bandwidth) used in the Cisco 12410 Router—Consists of the 12410E-CSC and the 12410E-SFC fabric sets. Each SFC or CSC card provides a 10-Gbps full-duplex connection to each line card in the system. Thus, for a Cisco 12410 Router with 10 line cards with 2 x 10 Gbps (full duplex), the system switching bandwidth is 10 x 20 Gbps = 200 Gbps. The enhanced fabric is required when enabling the Single-Router APS or BITS features.

Enhanced 40-Gbps switch fabric (800-Gbps switching system bandwidth) used in the Cisco 12810 Router—Consists of the 12810E-CSC and the 12810-SFC fabric sets. Each SFC or CSC card provides a 40-Gbps full-duplex connection to each line card in the system. Thus, for a Cisco 12810 Internet Router with 10 line cards with 2 x 40 Gbps (full duplex), the system switching bandwidth is 10 x 80 Gbps = 800-Gbps. The enhanced fabric is required when enabling the Single-Router APS or BITS features.

2.5-Gbps switch fabric (50-Gbps switching system bandwidth) used in the Cisco 12010 Router—Consists of the 12010-CSC and the 12010-SFC fabric sets. Each SFC or CSC card provides a 2.5-Gbps full-duplex connection to each line card in the system. Thus, for a Cisco 12010 Router with 10 line cards with 2 x 2.5 Gbps (full duplex), the system switching bandwidth is 10 x 5 Gbps = 50 Gbps.

10-Gbps switch fabric (200-Gbps switching system bandwidth) used in the Cisco 12410 Router—Consists of the GSR10-CSC= and the GSR10-SFC= fabric sets. Each SFC or CSC card provides a 10-Gbps full-duplex connection to each line card in the system. Thus, for a Cisco 12410 Router with 10 line cards with 2 x 10 Gbps (full duplex), the system switching bandwidth is 10 x 20 Gbps = 200 Gbps.

40-Gbps switch fabric (800-Gbps switching system bandwidth) used in the Cisco 12810 Router—Consists of the 12810-CSC= and the 12810-SFC= fabric sets. Each SFC or CSC card provides a 40 Gbps full-duplex connection to each line card in the system. Thus, for a Cisco 12810 Internet Router with 10 line cards with 2 x 40 Gbps (full duplex), the system switching bandwidth is 10 x 80 Gbps = 800 Gbps.


Note Although they perform similar functions, you cannot intermix SFCs and CSCs. The switch fabric is a card set. You must use either the 2.5-, 10-, or 40-Gbps switch fabric card set. Also, the 10-Gbps switch fabric does not operate in one-quarter bandwidth mode as did some earlier models of the
Cisco 12000 Series routers.


Switch Fabric Card Types

Your router ships from the factory with two CSCs and five SFCs installed in the nine slots in the switch fabric and alarm card cage.

CSCs are installed in slot 0 or slot 1 (labeled CSC 0 or CSC 1); SFCs are installed in slots 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. (labeled SFC 0, SFC 1, SFC 2, SFC 3, and SFC 4).

The CSC provides the following functionality:

Scheduler—Handles requests from the line cards for access to the switch fabric and determines when to allow the line cards access to the switch fabric.

System clock—Sent to all SFCs, line cards, and the route processor (RP). The system clock synchronizes data transfers between line cards or between line cards and the RP through the switch fabric.

Switch fabric—Carries the user traffic between line cards or between the RP and a line card. The switch fabric on the CSC is identical to the switch fabric on the SFC.

The SFC contains only the switch fabric circuitry, which carries user traffic between line cards or between the RP and the line cards. The SFC receives scheduling information and the system clock sent from the CSC.

LEDs on the faceplate of the external alarm display card display the status of the cards in the switch fabric and alarm card cage. The alarm display card faceplate has one pair of LEDs for each of the nine card slots (seven fabric cards and two alarm cards) in the switch fabric and alarm card cage.

Each pair of LEDs consists of a green LED labeled ENABLED and a yellow LED labeled FAIL. When a green LED is on, the CSC or SFC in the corresponding slot is installed and operational. When the LED is off, either the slot is empty or the card installed in the slot is faulty. When a yellow LED is on, the router detects a fault on the card in the corresponding slot.

Switch Fabric Card Redundancy

On the 10-slot chassis, the CSC's are only used for clocking purposes and do not carry any data traffic. There are 5 SFC cards which carry the traffic. 4 of the SFCs carry the actual traffic, while the 5th SFC is for redundancy purposes in case one of the SFC's fail. The interfaces between the line cards and the switch fabric are monitored constantly. If the system detects a loss of synchronization (LOS), it automatically activates the data paths of the redundant SFC, and data flows across the redundant path. The switch to the redundant CSC occurs within sub-seconds (the actual switch time depends on your configuration and its scale).

Alarm Card and Alarm Display Overview

The router alarm and alarm display system consists of two alarm cards that are located in the switch fabric and alarm card cage and an alarm display mounted on the front of the chassis below the blower module (Figure 2).


Note The two alarm cards located in the switch fabric and alarm card cage are not part of the switch fabric.


The switch fabric and alarm card cage is located behind the air filter door. The two alarm cards are located in the two right-most slots, which are labeled Alarm, in the switch fabric and alarm card cage.

Figure 2 Alarm Cards and Alarm Display

The alarm cards and alarm display perform four functions:

Hardware implementation of the alarm system

OK/FAIL status indication for the CSCs and SFCs

Power system monitoring

Redundant generation of the 5 VDC maintenance bus (MBus) supply voltage for the line cards

The display indicator LEDs, alarm relays, and external alarm relay connectors are located on a separate card in order to accommodate the mechanical design requirements of the router enclosure. The external alarm display assembly is mounted on the front of the chassis just above the horizontal cable-management tray (Figure 3). The alarm display assembly is sometimes referred to as the alarm display card or alarm display. The power system monitoring functions are located in the alarm card MBus module.

Figure 3 External Alarm Display Assembly

Preparing for Installation

Installation preparation is presented in the following sections:

Safety Guidelines

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Required Tools and Equipment

Related Documentation

Safety Guidelines

Before you perform any procedure in this publication, review the safety guidelines in this section to avoid injuring yourself or damaging the equipment. In addition, review the safety warnings listed in the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router publication that accompanied your router before installing, configuring, or maintaining the router.

The following guidelines are for your safety and to protect equipment. The guidelines do not include all hazards. Be alert.

Safety with Equipment

Always disconnect all power cords and interface cables before moving the system.

Never assume that power is disconnected from a circuit; always check.

Keep tools and assembly components away from walk areas.

Do not work alone if potentially hazardous conditions exist.

Do not perform any action that creates a potential hazard to people or makes the equipment unsafe.

Carefully examine your work area for possible hazards such as moist floors, ungrounded power extension cables, and missing safety grounds.

Safety with Electricity

Before beginning any procedures requiring access to the interior of the router, locate the emergency power-off switch for the room in which you are working.

Disconnect all power and external cables before installing or removing a router.

Never assume that power has been disconnected from a circuit; always check.

Do not perform any action that creates a potential hazard to people or makes the equipment unsafe.

Never install equipment that appears damaged.

Carefully examine your work area for possible hazards such as moist floors, ungrounded power extension cables, and missing safety grounds.

If an electrical accident does occur, proceed as follows:

Use caution; do not become a victim yourself. Disconnect power to the router.

If possible, send another person to get medical aid; otherwise, assess the condition of the victim and then call for help.

Determine if the person needs rescue breathing or external cardiac compressions; then take appropriate action.

In addition, observe the following guidelines when working with any equipment that is disconnected from a power source but still connected to telephone or network wiring:

Never install telephone wiring during a lightning storm.

Never install telephone jacks in wet locations unless the jack is specifically designed for wet locations.

Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the telephone line has been disconnected at the network interface.

Use caution when installing or modifying telephone lines.

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Many router components can be damaged by static electricity. Some components can be damaged by voltages as low as 30V, while static voltages as high as 35,000V can be generated just by handling plastic or foam packing material, or by sliding assemblies across plastic and carpets. Not exercising the proper electrostatic discharge (ESD) precautions can result in intermittent or complete component failures. To minimize the potential for ESD damage, observe the following guidelines:

Always use an ESD-preventive antistatic wrist strap or ankle strap and ensure that it makes good skin contact.


Caution You should periodically check the resistance value of the ESD-preventive strap. The measurement should be between 1 and 10 megohms.

When removing or installing a component, make sure the equipment end of your antistatic strap leash is connected to one of the ESD connection sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface on the chassis (Figure 4). Avoid contact between the component and your clothing. The ESD-preventive wrist strap only protects the component from ESD voltages on the body; ESD voltages on your clothing can still cause component damage.

Always place a card component-side-up on an antistatic surface, in an antistatic card rack, or in a static shielding bag. If you are returning the item to the factory, immediately place it in a static shielding bag.

When installing a line card or route processor (RP), use the ejector levers to seat the card connectors in the backplane, then tighten both captive screws on the faceplate of the card. These screws prevent accidental removal, provide proper grounding for the router, and help to ensure that the card connector is seated in the backplane.

When removing line cards, CSCs, SFCs, alarm cards, or an RP, use the ejector levers to unseat the card connector from the backplane. Pull the metal card carrier out slowly, placing one hand along the bottom of the carrier to guide it straight out of the slot.

Handle line cards, CSCs, SFCs, alarm cards, or an RP by the metal card carrier edges only; avoid touching the board or any connector pins.

Figure 4 Connecting an ESD-Preventive Wrist Strap to the Chassis

Required Tools and Equipment

The following tools and equipment are required to remove and install CSCs, SFCs, and the alarm card and alarm display:

ESD-preventive wrist strap

Flat-blade screwdriver

Related Documentation

The following publications contain additional information:

Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router Installation and Configuration Guide

Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router

Removing and Installing a CSC or SFC

The switch fabric and alarm card cage is located below the line card and RP card cage, behind the air filter door on the front of the chassis. (See Figure 5.) The switch fabric and alarm card cage has seven keyed, vertical card slots for the clock and scheduler cards (CSCs) and switch fabric cards (SFCs). CSCs are installed in the left two card slots (labeled CSC 0 and CSC 1); SFCs are installed in the next five slots (labeled SFC 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4). Two alarm cards are installed in the right two card slots of the switch fabric and alarm card cage, although they are not a part of the switch fabric.

Procedures for removing and installing a CSC or an SFC are described in the following sections:

Opening the Air Filter Door

Removing a Card from the Switch Fabric and Alarm Card Cage

Installing a Card in the Switch Fabric and Alarm Card Cage

Closing the Air Filter Door

Opening the Air Filter Door

To remove or install either a CSC or SFC, you must open the air filter door to gain access to the fabric card cage. To access the fabric card cage, use Figure 5 as a reference and follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap to your wrist and connect the leash to one of the ESD connection sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface on the chassis (see Figure 4).

Step 2 Loosen the two captive screws on each side of the air filter door.

Step 3 Grasp the sides of the air filter door front cover and swing the door out and down, away from the switch fabric and alarm card cage. The air filter door is attached to the chassis by a hinges on the bottom.


Caution Be especially careful not to damage the honeycomb screen on the back of the air filter door and on the inside of the switch fabric and alarm card cage. Damaging the honeycomb screen can restrict the air flow and cause overheating in the router, and it can diminish EMI protection.


Figure 5 Opening the Air Filter Door

Removing a Card from the Switch Fabric and Alarm Card Cage

To remove cards from the switch fabric and alarm card cage, use Figure 6 as a reference and follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap to your wrist and connect the leash to one of the ESD connection sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface on the chassis (see Figure 4).

Step 2 Select one of the cards in the switch fabric and alarm card cage. Grasp the two card ejector levers and simultaneously pivot both ejector levers 70 degrees away from the front edge of the card carrier to unseat the card from the backplane connector.

Step 3 Touching only the metal card carrier, slide the card out of the slot and place it directly into an antistatic bag or other ESD-preventive container.


Figure 6 Removing a Card from the Switch Fabric and Alarm Card Cage

Installing a Card in the Switch Fabric and Alarm Card Cage

To install a CSC or an SFC, follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap to your wrist and connect the leash to one of the ESD sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface. (See Figure 4.)

Step 2 Remove the replacement card from its antistatic bag or ESD-preventive container.

Step 3 Determine the assigned card slot for the card by checking the label attached to the edge of the card carrier (near the bottom ejector lever). This will be the slot from which you just removed a CSC or an SFC. Clock and scheduler cards are labeled CSC and are installed in the two far left slots; switch fabric cards are labeled SFC and are installed in the next five slots. Alarm cards are installed in the last two slots.


Note Alignment grooves exist on each slot in the switch fabric and alarm card cage. When you reinstall a card in the switch fabric and alarm card cage, make sure you align the top and bottom edges of the card carrier in the slot grooves.


Step 4 Grasp the card carrier handle with one hand and place your other hand under the carrier to support and guide it into the correct slot. Slide the card halfway into the slot. Avoid touching the card circuitry or any connectors.

Step 5 Pivot both card ejector levers so the openings on the card ejector cams at the top and bottom of the card pass over the tabs on each side of the card cage slot.


Caution Verify that the openings on the card ejector cams pass over the tabs; otherwise, one or both ejector levers might bind when you attempt to close the ejector levers, damaging or breaking one or both ejector levers.


Note Continue sliding the card into the card cage slot until the openings on the card ejector cams engage the tabs on each side of the card cage slot.



Note CSCs and SFCs have guide pins that make initial contact with the backplane connector as you slide a card into its slot. After the guide pins make contact, continue pushing on the card carrier until the card ejector levers begin pivoting forward.


Step 6 To seat the card in the backplane connector, grasp both card ejector levers and pivot them inward toward the middle of the card carrier until they are flush against the front edge of the card carrier.


Closing the Air Filter Door

To close the air filter door, follow these steps:


Step 1 Grasp the sides of the air filter door front cover and pivot the air filter door up so that it is aligned with the opening of the switch fabric and alarm card cage, and the two guide pins are inserted in the corresponding holes on each side of the switch fabric and alarm card cage.


Caution All four sides of the air filter door are lined with EMI-preventive gaskets consisting of many raised, conductive contacts. Align and seat the door carefully to avoid damaging the EMI-preventive gasket contacts. A damaged gasket can result in reduced EMI performance.

Step 2 Push firmly on the air filter door until it is seated in the opening of the switch fabric and alarm card cage, then tighten the two captive screws in each.


Caution Be careful not to damage the honeycomb screen on the back of the air filter door and on the inside of the switch fabric and alarm card cage. Damaging the honeycomb screen can restrict the air flow and cause overheating in the router, and it can diminish EMI protection.


Removing and Installing the Alarm Card

Procedures for removing and installing the alarm card are described in the following sections:

Upgrading the Mbus ROM

Removing an Alarm Card

Installing an Alarm Card


Note One alarm card can be replaced while the system is running, but you must do this quickly because the normal cooling process is interrupted when the air filter door is open.



Caution When an alarm card is installed or replaced, you must perform an upgrade to Mbus ROM agent Version 3.46 (minimum). See the "Upgrading the Mbus ROM" section that follows.

Upgrading the Mbus ROM

The MBus agent ROM firmware is bundled with the Cisco IOS software. You must upgrade the MBus agent ROM firmware on the GRP card or line cards if your MBus agent ROM firmware is a random number (for example, FF.DE), or if it is not the currently released version (the current version is 1.33).

To upgrade the MBus firmware on one or more line cards, perform the following tasks in privileged EXEC mode.


Step 1 Check the current MBus agent software version using the show diag [slot-number] command.

Step 2 Upgrade the MBus agent software on a specific line card using the upgrade mbus-agent-rom [slot-number] command.

Step 3 Upgrade the MBus agent software on all line cards using the upgrade mbus-agent-rom all command.

Step 4 Verify that there is a new MBus agent software version using the show diag [slot-number] command for each line card.


Removing an Alarm Card

To remove an alarm card, follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap to your wrist and connect the leash to one of the ESD connection sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface on the chassis (see Figure 4).

Step 2 Loosen the captive screws (one on each side of the air filter door) that fasten the air filter door to the chassis (Figure 7).

Figure 7 Opening the Chassis Air Filter Door

Step 3 Grasp the sides of the air filter door front cover and carefully pivot the door down, away from the switch fabric and alarm card cage (Figure 8).

The alarm cards are the two right-most cards in the switch fabric and alarm card cage. They are labeled Alarm.

Figure 8 Switch Fabric and Alarm Card Cage (Door Open)

Step 4 Select the appropriate alarm cards in the switch fabric and alarm card cage. Grasp the two card ejector levers and simultaneously pivot both ejector levers 70 degrees away from the front edge of the card carrier to unseat the card from the backplane connector.

Step 5 Touching only the metal card carrier, slide the alarm card out of the slot and place it directly into an antistatic sack or other ESD-preventive container.


Installing an Alarm Card

To replace an alarm card in the switch fabric and alarm card cage, follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap to your wrist and connect the leash to one of the ESD sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface (see Figure 4).

Step 2 Remove the replacement alarm card from its antistatic sack or ESD-preventive container.

Step 3 Determine the assigned card slot for the card by checking the label attached to the edge of the card carrier (near the bottom ejector lever).


Note There are alignment grooves on each slot in the switch fabric and alarm card cage. When you reinstall a card in the switch fabric and alarm card cage, make sure you align the top and bottom edges of the card carrier in the slot grooves.


Step 4 Grasp the card carrier handle with one hand and place your other hand under the carrier to support and guide it into the correct slot. Slide the card halfway into the slot. Avoid touching the card circuitry or any connectors.

Step 5 Pivot both card ejector levers so the openings on the card ejector cams at the top and bottom of the card pass over the tabs on each side of the card cage slot.


Caution Verify that the openings on the card ejector cams pass over the tabs; otherwise, one or both ejector levers might bind when you attempt to close the ejector levers, damaging or breaking one or both ejector levers.

Step 6 Continue sliding the card into the card cage slot until the openings on the card ejector cams engage the tabs on each side of the card cage slot.

Step 7 To seat the card in the backplane connector, grasp both card ejector levers and pivot them inward toward the middle of the card carrier until they are flush against the front edge of the card carrier.

Step 8 Pivot the air filter door up so that it is aligned with the opening of the switch fabric and alarm card cage.

Step 9 Secure the air filter door to the chassis with the two panel screws in the upper corners.


Caution Mbus ROM upgrade must be performed when an alarm card is installed or replaced.


Removing and Installing the External Alarm Display

Procedures for removing and installing the external alarm display are described in the following sections:

Removing the External Alarm Display

Installing the External Alarm Display

Removing the External Alarm Display

To replace the external alarm display assembly, follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap to your wrist and connect the leash to one of the ESD sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface. (See Figure 4.)

Step 2 If there are any external alarm cables connected to the ALARM A or ALARM B connectors, remove them.

Step 3 Loosen the two screws that secure the cable that comes out of the chassis and attaches to the alarm display assembly input connector.

Step 4 Disconnect the connector.

Step 5 Loosen the two panel screws, one on each side of the alarm display assembly, and remove the alarm display assembly.


Installing the External Alarm Display

To replace an external alarm display assembly, follow these steps:


Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap to your wrist and connect the leash to one of the ESD sockets on the front of the chassis or to a bare metal surface (see Figure 4).

Step 2 Secure the replacement external alarm display assembly to the chassis with the two panel screws.

Step 3 Connect the cable coming out of the chassis to the alarm display assembly INPUT connector and secure the two screws in the cable.

Step 4 Connect any cables that were attached to the ALARM A or ALARM B connectors.


Upgrading the Switch Fabric

The switch fabric on the Cisco 12410 Router can be upgraded in the field to a Cisco 12810 Router. This allows you to upgrade the 10-Gbps switch fabric to a 40-Gbps switch fabric. Table 1 lists Cisco router model numbers, their corresponding switch fabric speed, and the available upgrade path for each router model.

Table 1 Switch Fabric Upgrade Paths

Router Model
Switch Fabric Speed
Upgrade Path

Cisco 12010 Router

2.5 Gbps

Cisco 12410 Router

or

Cisco 12810 Router

Cisco 12410 Router

10 Gbps

Cisco 12810 Router

Cisco 12810 Router

40 Gbps

N/A


Upgrade Requirements

Before proceeding, review the following upgrade requirements:

1. You must have a complete switch fabric card set. You cannot intermix 2.5-, 10-, and 40-Gbps CSCs and SFCs.

2. When upgrading to a 10-Gbps switch fabric with a GRP installed, the Flash memory card must be loaded with Cisco IOS Release 12.0(16)S or later.

3. When upgrading to a 10-Gbps switch fabric with a PRP installed, the Flash memory card must be loaded with Cisco IOS Release 12.0(22)S or later.

4. When upgrading to a 40-Gbps switch fabric, the Performance Route Processor (PRP) must be installed, and the flash memory card must be loaded with Cisco IOS Release 12.0(31)S or later.

5. When upgrading to an enhanced 10-Gbps switch fabric, the Performance Route Processor (PRP) must be installed, and the flash memory card must be loaded with Cisco IOS 12.0(32)SY2 or later.

6. When upgrading to an enhanced 40-Gbps switch fabric, the Performance Route Processor (PRP) must be installed, and the flash memory card must be loaded with Cisco IOS 12.0(31)S or later.

Upgrading the Switch Fabric

To upgrade the switch fabric, follow these steps:


Step 1 Turn off power to the router.

Step 2 Remove all CSCs and SFCs. See the "Removing a Card from the Switch Fabric and Alarm Card Cage" section.

Step 3 Install the new CSCs and SFCs. See the "Installing a Card in the Switch Fabric and Alarm Card Cage" section.


Note Although they perform similar functions, you cannot intermix SFCs and CSCs. The switch fabric is a card set. You must use either the 10- or 40-Gbps switch fabric card set.


Step 4 Insert a Flash memory card into the PRP, making sure that it is loaded with the appropriate Cisco IOS release, noted in the "Upgrade Requirements" section.

Step 5 Turn on power to the router and wait for all installed line cards to fully boot before proceeding to the next step.


Note Let the router return to full operation before proceeding to the next step. This may take a considerable amount of time depending upon the configuration of the router.


Step 6 At the privileged EXEC prompt, enter the configure terminal command to enter global configuration mode.

Step 7 Enter the service upgrade mbus-agent-rom command.

Step 8 Enter the service upgrade fabric-downloader command.

Step 9 After the commands have finished running, press Ctrl-Z to exit configuration mode.

Step 10 See the next section, Verifying the Upgrade.



Note Additional information is available on the Cisco TAC website. Refer to the Cisco 12000 Series Internet Router Upgrade Procedure document.


Verifying the Upgrade

To verify that the upgraded switch fabric is operating properly, follow these steps:


Step 1 Perform all the steps listed in the "Upgrading the Switch Fabric" section. If there is a mismatch between the older and newer switch fabric cards, an error message appears on the console.

Step 2 Run the show gsr command to see if the new switch fabric cards are detected by the system.


Note The show gsr command output varies slightly between each switch fabric card set.


Step 3 See the "Troubleshooting the Switch Fabric" section if you encounter problems. Also review the next section, Post-Upgrade Considerations.


Post-Upgrade Considerations

After performing an upgrade and verifying its installation, there are some post-upgrade considerations.

Cisco 12000 Series routers include a label on the side of the chassis that indicates the model of the router. The switch fabric upgrade kit does not include a new label to identify the upgraded router model. For example, if you upgrade a Cisco 12410 Router to a Cisco 12810 Router, the label on the side of the chassis still identifies the chassis as a Cisco 12410 Router. Cisco recommends that you take the necessary administrative steps to properly identify an upgraded router.

The alternative methods for identifying an upgraded router are through the label on the switch fabric cards or through Cisco IOS software, using the show gsr command. Table 2 lists the router model and the number on the corresponding switch fabric card identification labels.

Table 2 Identifying Switch Fabric Cards

Router Model
Switch Fabric Card Identification Label

Cisco 12010 Router

SFC-50 and CSC-50

Cisco 12410 Router

SFC-200 & CSC-200

Cisco 12810 Router

SFC-800 & CSC-800


Troubleshooting the Switch Fabric

This section describes the procedures needed to troubleshoot problems with the switch fabric. The RP and the line cards connect through the crossbar switch fabric, which provides a high-speed physical path for most inter-card communication. Among the messages passed between the RP and the line cards over the switch fabric are, actual packets being routed and received, forwarding information, traffic statistics, and most management and control information. This information is useful in diagnosing hardware-related failures.


Note This section is recommended only for advanced Cisco IOS software operators and system administration personnel. Refer to the appropriate Cisco IOS software publications for detailed Cisco IOS information.


To troubleshoot the switch fabric, follow these steps:


Step 1 Collect the needed data from the RPs and line cards.


Note When you connect to the line card, use the attach command. The execute-on command is dependent upon the inter-process communication (IPC) which operates over the switch fabric. If you are having problems with IPC, the commands that run remotely through the switch fabric can time out. The attach <slot #> command travels over the MBus and not the IPC.


Step 2 Use the show controllers fia command on the primary and secondary RPs and save the output.

Step 3 Use the attach <slot #> command to access a line card.

Step 4 Use the show controllers fia command on all installed line cards and save the output from each.

Step 5 Gather the output and proceed to the Analyzing the Data section.


Analyzing the Data

Switch fabric problems can occur due to failures in any of the following components:

RP

Line card hardware

Backplane

CSCs/SFCs

When troubleshooting switch fabric errors, you need to look for patterns with regard to which components are reporting errors. For example, if you combine the show controllers fia output from all the RPs and line cards, you can determine if there is an error pattern. The following subsections discuss the values within the output that can help you determine any error patterns.


Note The sample output in this section comes from a Cisco 12016 Router. The main difference in these examples, is that only three SFCs are shown in the output instead of five SFCs that are in the
Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Routers.


crc16 Output

The crc16 data line from the show controllers fia command is an important indicator of hardware problems. If online card or one CSC/SFC has been on line inserted and removed, you can expect to see some crc16 error data. However, this number should not continue to increase. If the number increases, you may need to replace some faulty hardware. It is important to correlate the data from both the primary RP and the secondary RP and all installed line cards. The sample output below shows the status of the primary RP. The crc16 data line is underlined and shows errors from sfc1.

Router#show controllers fia
Fabric configuration: Full bandwidth, redundant fabric
Master Scheduler: Slot 17  Backup Scheduler: Slot 16
From Fabric FIA Errors
-----------------------
redund fifo parity 0    redund overflow 0      cell drops 0 
crc32 lkup parity  0    cell parity     0      crc32      0 
Switch cards present    0x001F    Slots  16 17 18 19 20
Switch cards monitored  0x001F    Slots  16 17 18 19 20
Slot:     16         17         18         19         20
Name:    csc0       csc1       sfc0       sfc1       sfc2
       --------   --------   --------   --------   --------
los    0          0          0          0          0          
state  Off        Off        Off        Off        Off       
crc16  0          0          0          1345       0
To Fabric FIA Errors
-----------------------
sca not pres 0          req error     0          uni FIFO overflow 0 
grant parity 0          multi req     0          uni FIFO undrflow 0 
cntrl parity 0          uni req       0          crc32 lkup parity 0 
multi FIFO   0          empty dst req 0          handshake error   0 
cell parity  0

In the sample output below, you can see the status of the line card in slot 2. The crc16 data line is underlined and is showing errors from sfc1. Remember to use the attach command (not the execute-on command) to access the line cards.

Router#attach 2
Entering Console for 4 port ATM Over SONET OC-3c/STM-1 in Slot: 2
Type "exit" to end this session
Press RETURN to get started!
LC-Slot2>
LC-Slot2>enable
LC-Slot2#show controllers fia
From Fabric FIA Errors
-----------------------
redund FIFO parity 0          redund overflow 0          cell drops 0 
crc32 lkup parity  0          cell parity     0          crc32      0 
Switch cards present    0x001F    Slots  16 17 18 19 20 
Switch cards monitored  0x001F    Slots  16 17 18 19 20 
Slot:     16         17         18         19         20
Name:    csc0       csc1       sfc0       sfc1       sfc2
       --------   --------   --------   --------   --------
Los    0          0          0          0          0          
state  Off        Off        Off        Off        Off       
crc16  0          0          0          1345       0
To Fabric FIA Errors
-----------------------
sca not pres 0          req error     0          uni fifo overflow 0 
grant parity 0          multi req     0          uni fifo undrflow 0 
cntrl parity 0          uni req       0          crc32 lkup parity 0 
multi fifo   0          empty DST req 0          handshake error   0 
cell parity  0
LC-Slot2#exit
Disconnecting from slot 2.
Connection Duration: 00:00:21
Router#

After you gather the show controllers fia command data from the RPs and line cards, you can create a table similar to Table 3.

Table 3 Error Data Collection Table

Card Slot
CSC 0
CSC 1
SFC 0
SFC 1
SFC 2
SFC 3
SFC 4

0

     

ERROR

     

1

             

2

     

ERROR

     

3

     

ERROR

     

4

             

5

     

ERROR

     

6

             

7

     

ERROR

     

8

             

This table indicates that more than one line card is reporting errors coming from SFC 1. Therefore, the first step is to change this SFC. Each time a replacement is recommended, first verify that the card is correctly seated. You should always reseat the corresponding card to ensure it is correctly seated. If, after reseating the card, the CRCs still increase, then replace the part. See the "Properly Seating Switch Fabric Cards" section.

The common failure patterns and recommended actions for crc16 errors are as follows (one step at a time until the problem is eliminated):

1. Errors indicated on more than one line card from the same switch fabric card:

a. Replace the switch fabric card in the slot corresponding to the errors

b. Replace all switch fabric cards

c. Replace the backplane

2. Errors indicated on one line card from more than one switch fabric card:

a. Replace the line card

b. If errors are incrementing, replace the current master CSC

c. If errors are not incrementing and the current master is CSC0, replace CSC1

Grant Parity and Request Errors

Troubleshooting indicators include the console logs (or the output of the show log command) in the form of grant parity and request errors. Look for the following type of message that indicates a grant parity error:

%FABRIC-3-PARITYERR: To Fabric parity error was detected.
Grant parity error Data = 0x2.
SLOT 1:%FABRIC-3-PARITYERR: To Fabric parity error was detected.
Grant parity error Data = 0x1

You can also use the output from the show controllers fia command. Important information is underlined:

Router#show controllers fia
Fabric configuration: Full bandwidth, redundant fabric
Master Scheduler: Slot 17     Backup Scheduler: Slot 16

From Fabric FIA Errors
-----------------------
redund FIFO parity 0   redund overflow 0   cell drops 76

crc32 lkup parity  0    cell parity 0   crc32 0
Switch cards present    0x001F    Slots  16 17 18 19 20
Switch cards monitored  0x001F    Slots  16 17 18 19 20
Slot:     16         17         18         19         20
Name:    csc0       csc1       sfc0       sfc1       sfc2
       --------   --------   --------   --------   --------
Los    0          0          0          0          0
state  Off        Off        Off        Off        Off
crc16  876        257        876        876        876


To Fabric FIA Errors
-----------------------
sca not pres 0          req error     1          uni fifo overflow 0
grant parity 1          multi req     0          uni fifo undrflow 0


cntrl parity 0          uni req       0          crc32 lkup parity 0
multi fifo   0          empty DST req 0          handshake error   0
cell parity  0

The common failure patterns and recommended actions for grant parity and request errors are as follows (one step at a time until the problem goes away):

1. Grant errors on more than one line card:

a. Replace the CSC (see the note below to know which one should be swapped)

b. Replace the backplane

2. Grant errors on one line card:

a. Replace the line card

a. Replace the CSC (see the note below to know which one should be swapped)

b. Replace the backplane


Note If multiple line cards are reporting grant parity or request errors and the router is still functioning, then a CSC switch-over has occurred. The failed CSC is the one that is currently the backup CSC (not the one listed as Master Scheduler in the show controllers fia output). If Halted appears next to the heading From Fabric FIA Errors or To Fabric FIA Errors, or if the router is no longer forwarding traffic, then a CSC switch-over did not occur and the failing CSC is listed as Master Scheduler. By default, the CSC in slot 17 is the primary and the CSC in slot 16 is the backup.


Properly Seating Switch Fabric Cards

The switch fabric cards in the router can be challenging to insert, and may require a small amount of force to seat correctly. If either of the CSCs are not seated properly, you may see the following error messages:

%MBUS-0-NOCSC: Must have at least 1 CSC card in slot 16 or 17 
%MBUS-0-FABINIT: Failed to initialize switch fabric infrastructure

Note You may also get this error message if there are only enough CSCs and SFCs seated for quarter bandwidth configurations. Quarter bandwidth configurations are no longer supported on Cisco 12000 Series routers.


When managing switch fabric and line card booting problems, it is important to verify that all CSCs and SFCs are correctly seated and powered on. The output from the show version and show controllers fia commands tells you which hardware configuration is currently running on the box. Important data is underlined.

Router#show version 
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software 
IOS (tm) GS Software (GSR-P-M), Experimental Version 12.0(20010505:112551)
Copyright (c) 1986-2001 by cisco Systems, Inc. 
Compiled Mon 14-May-01 19:25 by tmcclure 
Image text-base: 0x60010950, data-base: 0x61BE6000

ROM: System Bootstrap, Version 11.2(17)GS2, [htseng 180] 
EARLY DEPLOYMENT RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1) 
BOOTFLASH: GS Software (GSR-BOOT-M), Version 12.0(15.6)S, 
EARLY DEPLOYMENT MAINTENANCE INTERIM SOFTWARE

Router uptime is 17 hours, 53 minutes 
System returned to ROM by reload at 23:59:40 MET Mon Jul 2 2001 
System restarted at 00:01:30 MET Tue Jul 3 2001 
System image file is "tftp://172.17.247.195/gsr-p-mz.15S2plus-FT-14-May-2001"

cisco 12016/GRP (R5000) processor (revision 0x01) with 262144K bytes of memory. 
R5000 CPU at 200Mhz, Implementation 35, Rev 2.1, 512KB L2 Cache 
Last reset from power-on

2 Route Processor Cards 
1 Clock Scheduler Card 
3 Switch Fabric Cards 
1 8-port OC3 POS controller (8 POs). 
1 OC12 POS controller (1 POs). 
1 OC48 POS E.D. controller (1 POs). 
7 OC48 POS controllers (7 POs). 
1 Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s) 
17 Packet over SONET network interface(s) 
507K bytes of non-volatile configuration memory.

20480K bytes of Flash PCMCIA card at slot 0 (Sector size 128K). 
8192K bytes of Flash internal SIMM (Sector size 256K).

Router#show controller fia 
Fabric configuration: Full bandwidth nonredundant
Master Scheduler: Slot 17

Additional troubleshooting information is available on Cisco.com.

Regulatory, Compliance, and Safety Information

This section includes regulatory, compliance, and safety information in the following sections:

Translated Safety Warnings and Agency Approvals

Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulatory Statements

Translated Safety Warnings and Agency Approvals

The complete list of translated safety warnings and agency approvals is available in the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for Cisco 12000 Series Internet Routers publication. (Document Number 78-4347-xx.)

Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulatory Statements

FCC Class B Compliance

The equipment described in this manual generates and may radiate radio-frequency energy. If it is not installed in accordance with Cisco's installation instructions, it may cause interference with radio and television reception. This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device in accordance with the specifications in part 15 of the FCC rules. These specifications are designed to provide reasonable protection against such interference in a residential installation. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation.

Modifying the equipment without Cisco's written authorization may result in the equipment no longer complying with FCC requirements for Class B digital devices. In that event, your right to use the equipment may be limited by FCC regulations, and you may be required to correct any interference to radio or television communications at your own expense.

You can determine whether your equipment is causing interference by turning it off. If the interference stops, it was probably caused by the Cisco equipment or one of its peripheral devices. If the equipment causes interference to radio or television reception, try to correct the interference by using one or more of the following measures:

· Turn the television or radio antenna until the interference stops.

· Move the equipment to one side or the other of the television or radio.

· Move the equipment farther away from the television or radio.

· Plug the equipment into an outlet that is on a different circuit from the television or radio. (That is, make certain the equipment and the television or radio are on circuits controlled by different circuit breakers or fuses.)

CISPR 22

This apparatus complies with CISPR 22/EN55022 Class B radiated and conducted emissions requirements.

Canada

English Statement of Compliance

This class A digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.

French Statement of Compliance

Cet appareil numérique de la classe A est conforme à la norme NMB-003 du Canada.

Europe (EU)

This apparatus complies with EN55022 Class B and EN55024 standards when used as ITE/TTE equipment, and EN300386 for Telecommunications Network Equipment (TNE) in both installation environments, telecommunication centers and other indoor locations.

VCCI Class A Notice for Japan

Warning


This is a Class A product based on the standard of the Voluntary Control Council for Interference by Information Technology Equipment (VCCI). If this equipment is used in a domestic environment, radio disturbance may arise. When such trouble occurs, the user may be required to take corrective actions. Statement 191


Class A Notice for Hungary

Warning


This equipment is a class A product and should be used and installed properly according to the Hungarian EMC Class A requirements (MSZEN55022). Class A equipment is designed for typical commercial establishments for which special conditions of installation and protection distance are used. Statement 256


Class A Notice for Taiwan and Other Traditional Chinese Markets

Warning


This is a Class A Information Product, when used in residential environment, it may cause radio frequency interference, under such circumstances, the user may be requested to take appropriate countermeasures. Statement 257


Class A Notice for Korea

Warning


This is a Class A Device and is registered for EMC requirements for industrial use. The seller or buyer should be aware of this. If this type was sold or purchased by mistake, it should be replaced with a residential-use type. Statement 294


Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request

For information on obtaining documentation, submitting a service request, and gathering additional information, see the monthly What's New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and revised Cisco technical documentation, at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/general/whatsnew/whatsnew.html

Subscribe to the What's New in Cisco Product Documentation as a Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feed and set content to be delivered directly to your desktop using a reader application. The RSS feeds are a free service and Cisco currently supports RSS version 2.0.