Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router Installation and Configuration Guide
Chapter 2 - Preparing for Installation
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Preparing for Installation

Table Of Contents

Preparing for Installation

Safety Guidelines

General Safety Guidelines

Compliance and Safety Information

Laser Safety

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Lifting Guidelines

Laser Safety

Site Requirement Guidelines

Rack-Mounting Guidelines

Enclosed Rack

Open Rack

Telco Rack

Site Layout and Equipment Dimensions

Air Flow Guidelines

Temperature and Humidity Guidelines

Power Connection Guidelines

AC-Powered Routers

DC-Powered Routers

NEBS Supplemental Unit Bonding and Grounding Guidelines

Site Wiring Guidelines

GRP Port Connection Guidelines

GRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connections

GRP Auxiliary Port Signals

GRP Console Port Signals

GRP Ethernet Port Connections

GRP RJ-45 Ethernet Connections

GRP MII Ethernet Connections

PRP Port Connection Guidelines

PRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connections

PRP Auxiliary Port Signals

PRP Console Port Signals

PRP Ethernet Connections

PRP RJ-45 Ethernet Connections

Alarm Display Connection Guidelines


Preparing for Installation


Before installing your router, you must consider power and cabling requirements that must be in place at your installation site, special equipment for installing the router, and the environmental conditions your installation site must meet to maintain normal operation. This chapter guides you through the process of preparing for router installation.

The shipping package for the router is engineered to reduce the chances of product damage associated with routine material handling experienced during shipment.

The router should always be transported or stored in its shipping package in the upright position.

Keep the router in the shipping container until you have determined the installation site.

Use the Cisco 12010, Cisco 12410, and Cisco 12810 Router Unpacking Instructions included with the router to unpack it and inspect all items for shipping damage. If an item appears damaged, contact a Cisco customer service representative immediately.

This chapter contains the following installation topics:

Safety Guidelines

Site Requirement Guidelines

GRP Port Connection Guidelines

PRP Port Connection Guidelines

Alarm Display Connection Guidelines

Safety Guidelines

Before you perform any procedure in this publication, you must review the safety guidelines in this section to avoid injuring yourself or damaging the equipment.

Note that the information in this section are guidelines and do not include every potentially hazardous situation. When you install a router, always use common sense and caution.

General Safety Guidelines

Never attempt to lift an object that might be too heavy for you to lift by yourself.

Always disconnect the power source and unplug all power cables before lifting, moving, or working on the router.

Keep the work area clear and dust free during and after installation.

Keep tools and router components away from walkways and equipment rack aisles.

Do not wear loose clothing, jewelry (including rings and chains), or other items that could get caught in the router.

Fasten your tie or scarf and sleeves.

Cisco equipment operates safely when it is used in accordance with its electrical ratings and product usage instructions.

Do not work alone if potentially hazardous conditions exist.

Always unplug the power cables when performing maintenance or working on the router, unless the replacement part is hot swappable and designed for online insertion and removal (OIR).

The installation of the router should be in compliance with national and local electrical codes: in the United States, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70, United States National Electrical Code; in Canada, Canadian Electrical Code, part I, CSA C22.1; in other countries, International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 364, part 1 through part 7.

Compliance and Safety Information

The Cisco 12010, Cisco 2410 and Cisco 12810 routers are designed to meet the regulatory compliance and safety approval requirements. Refer to the Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco 12000 Series Router (Document Number 78-4347-xx) if you require additional compliance information (see Obtaining Documentation for site information).

Laser Safety

Single-mode Cisco 12000 Series Router line cards are equipped with lasers. The lasers emit invisible radiation. Do not stare into open line card ports. Observe the following warning to prevent eye injury:


Warning Avoid exposure to laser radiation. Do not stare into an open aperture, because invisible laser radiation may be emitted from the aperture when a cable is not inserted in the port.


Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Many router components can be damaged by static electricity. Not exercising the proper electrostatic discharge (ESD) precautions can result in intermittent or complete component failures. To minimize the potential for ESD damage, always use an ESD-preventive antistatic wrist strap (or ankle strap) and ensure that it makes good skin contact.


Note Check the resistance value of the ESD-preventive strap periodically. The measurement should be between 1 and 10 megohms.


Before you perform any of the procedures in this guide, attach an ESD-preventive strap to your wrist and connect the leash to the chassis as shown in Figure 2-1. Note that some versions of the 10-slot chassis do not provide an ESD connection socket in the line card cage area. For those chassis, use an alligator clip to connect the leash to an open metal part of the chassis.

Figure 2-1 Connecting an ESD-Preventive Wrist Strap to the Chassis

Lifting Guidelines

A fully configured router can weigh as much as 275 pounds (lb) (124.74 kilograms (kg)), while an empty chassis weighs 125 lb (56.7 kg). These systems are not intended to be moved frequently. Before you install the router, ensure that your site is properly prepared so you can avoid having to move the router later to accommodate power sources and network connections.

Use the following lifting guidelines to avoid injury to yourself or damage to the equipment:

Do not lift equipment alone; have another person help you to lift heavy equipment.

Ensure that your footing is solid; balance the weight of the object between your feet.

Lift the equipment slowly; never move suddenly or twist your body as you lift.

Keep your back straight and lift with your legs, not your back. When bending down to lift equipment, bend at the knees (not at the waist), to reduce the strain on your lower back muscles.


Caution To prevent equipment damage, never attempt to lift or tilt the router chassis using the handles on the blower module or on line cards. These handles do not support the weight of the chassis.

Laser Safety

Some line cards are equipped with ports that can emit hazardous laser radiation from the aperture when there is no cable connected to the port. This invisible radiation can cause eye injury if you stare into the port.


Warning To avoid eye injury, never stare into open line card ports.


Site Requirement Guidelines

The following sections contain the site requirement guidelines that you should be familiar with before installing the router:

Rack-Mounting Guidelines

Air Flow Guidelines

Temperature and Humidity Guidelines

Power Connection Guidelines

NEBS Supplemental Unit Bonding and Grounding Guidelines

Site Wiring Guidelines

Rack-Mounting Guidelines

The router can be mounted in most 2-post, 4-post, or telco-type 19-inch equipment racks that comply with the Electronics Industries Association (EIA) standard for equipment racks (EIA-310-D). The rack must have at least two posts with mounting flanges to mount the router chassis. The distance between the center lines of the mounting holes on the two mounting posts must be 18.31 inches ± 0.06 inch (46.50 cm ± 0.15 cm). The rack-mounting hardware included with the router is suitable for most 19-inch equipment racks or telco-style frames.

Figure 2-2 shows examples of typical 2-post, 4-post, and telco-type equipment racks.

Figure 2-2 Equipment Rack Types

Enclosed Rack

Figure 2-2a shows a free-standing, enclosed rack with two mounting posts in the front. The router should not be installed in this type of enclosed rack, because the router requires an unobstructed flow of cooling air to maintain acceptable operating temperatures for its internal components. Installing the router in any type of enclosed rack—even with the front and back doors removed—could disrupt the air flow, trap heat next to the chassis, and cause an overtemperature condition inside the router.

Open Rack

Figure 2-2b shows a free-standing, 4-post open rack with two mounting posts in the front and two mounting posts in the back. The mounting posts in this type of rack are often adjustable so that you can position the rack-mounted unit within the depth of the rack rather than flush-mount it with the front of the rack.

Telco Rack

Figure 2-2c shows a telco-type rack. The telco-type rack is an open frame consisting of two posts tied together by a cross-bar at the top and a floor stand at the bottom.

This type of rack is usually secured to the floor and sometimes to an overhead structure or wall for additional stability. The router chassis can be installed in the telco-type rack either in a front-mounted position or a center-mounted position.

In the front-mounted position, you secure the chassis rack-mounting brackets directly to the rack posts (Figure 2-3).

Figure 2-3 Front-Mounted Router—Telco Rack

In the center-mounted position, you secure a set of optional center-mount brackets to the rack posts. The chassis rack-mounting flanges are then secured to the center-mount brackets (Figure 2-4). The center-mounted position moves the center of gravity of the chassis closer to the vertical axis of the rack posts, which adds to the stability of the rack installation.

Figure 2-4 Center-Mounted Router—Telco Rack

Site Layout and Equipment Dimensions

To help maintain trouble-free operation, adhere to the following precautions when planning your rack installation:

Ensure the site of the rack includes provisions for source AC or DC power, grounding, and network interface cables.

Allow sufficient space to work around the rack during the installation. You need:

At least 3 feet adjacent to the rack to move, align, and insert the chassis.

At least 2 feet in front of the power shelf to insert power entry modules.

Maintain at least 24 inches (61 cm) of clearance in front of and behind the chassis for maintenance after installation.

To mount the router between two posts or rails, the usable aperture (the width between the inner edges of the two mounting flanges) must be at least 17.7 inches (45.0 cm).

For the enhanced model of the Cisco 12404 Internet router, the mounting rails on a 4-post rack must be recessed no more than 1.5 inches for the front door to fully open and close and to provide adequate room for cable routing.

The height of the router is 37.0 inches (93.98 cm). Most racks accommodate two routers.

When fully populated with cards, the router can weigh as much as 275 lb (124.74 kg). To maintain equipment rack stability and to ensure your safety, the rack is provided with stabilizing devices. Make sure you install the stabilizers before installing the router.

If you use a telco-style rack, the weight of the chassis is cantilevered off of the two rack posts. Make sure that:

The weight of the router does not make the frame unstable.

The frame is bolted to the floor and is secured to the building structure using either wall brackets or overhead brackets.

When mounting the router in a telco-type rack or 4-post rack, be sure to use all of the screws provided to secure the chassis to the rack posts.

Install the cable-management brackets included with the router to keep cables organized. Be sure to:

Use appropriate strain-relief methods to protect cables and equipment connections.

Make sure that cables from other equipment installed in the rack do not restrict access to the card cages.

To avoid noise interference in network interface cables, do not route them directly across or along power cables.

Figure 2-5 shows the footprint and outer dimensions of the original router chassis.

Figure 2-5 Original Router Chassis Footprint and Dimensions—Top View

Figure 2-5 shows the footprint and outer dimensions of the enhanced version of router chassis.

Figure 2-6 Enhanced Router Chassis Footprint and Dimensions—Top View

Air Flow Guidelines

Cool air is circulated through the router by the blower module located at the top of the chassis. The blower module maintains acceptable operating temperatures for the internal components by drawing in cool air through the air filter in front of the switch fabric and alarm card cage, and circulating the air through both card cages (Figure 2-7). Each power supply is also equipped with a fan that draws cooler air into the front of the power supply and forces warmer air out of the back of the chassis.

Figure 2-7 Air Flow Path through the Router—Side View

When selecting a site to install the router, observe the following guidelines:

Dust free area—The site should be as dust free as possible. Dusty environments can clog the air filter or power supply intake vents, reducing the cooling air flow through the router. Clogged filters and vents can cause an overtemperature condition in the router.

Unrestricted air flow—Allow sufficient air flow by maintaining a minimum of 6 inches (15.24 cm) of clearance at both the inlet and exhaust openings on the chassis and the power modules. If the air flow is blocked or restricted, or if the inlet air is too warm, an overtemperature condition can occur within the router. Under extreme conditions, the environmental monitoring system powers off the router to protect the components.

Temperature and Humidity Guidelines

The operating and nonoperating environmental site requirements are listed in Table A-4 on page A-5. The router normally operates within the ranges listed in Table A-4, however, if a temperature measurement is approaching a minimum or maximum parameter it indicates a potential problem. Maintain normal operation by anticipating and correcting environmental anomalies before they approach critical values by properly planning and preparing your site before you install the router.

Power Connection Guidelines

You can configure the router with either an AC-input or DC-input power subsystem, so the site power source requirements differ depending on the power subsystem in your router. Ensure all power connection wiring conforms to the rules and regulations in the National Electrical Code (NEC), as well as local codes.


Caution Proper grounding is necessary to avoid damage from lightning and power surges. See the "NEBS Supplemental Unit Bonding and Grounding Guidelines" section for grounding requirements.

AC-Powered Routers

AC PEMs operate in the nominal range of 200 VAC to 240 VAC and require a minimum service of:

20 A for operation in North America

16 A for international operation

13 A for operation in the UK

Each of the AC power inputs requires separate dedicated branch circuit. For a list of the nominal and acceptable value ranges for source AC power, refer to Table A-2 on page A-3.

Figure 2-8 shows the different styles of AC power cords used to connect to the local AC power source that are available for North America and various locales.

Figure 2-8 AC Power Cord Plugs and Appliance Coupler

Table 2-1 lists power cord options. All AC-input power supply power cords measure 14 feet (4.3 m).

Table 2-1 AC Power Cord International Options

Label
Description
Part Number

North America

20 A, 250 VAC

CAB-GSR16-US=

Australia, New Zealand

15 A, 250 VAC

CAB-GSR16-AU=

Europe, Argentina, Brazil

16 A, 250 VAC

CAB-GSR16-EU=

Italy

16 A, 250 VAC

CAB-GSR16-IT=

United Kingdom

13 A, 250 VAC
(13 A replaceable fuse)

CAB-GSR16-UK=


DC-Powered Routers

Connections to DC PEMs are rated at 60 A maximum. A dedicated, commensurately rated DC power source is required for each PEM connection.

For DC power cables, we recommend that you use a commensurately rated, high-strand-count copper wire cable. Connection to the DC power distribution unit (PDU) requires one earth ground cable and two cable leads; a source DC (-) and source DC return (+) for each PDU (2 PDUs x 3 = 6 cables).

The length of the cables depends on your router location from the source power.


Note DC power cables are not available from Cisco, but are available from any commercial cable vendor.


You must terminate DC power cables using cable lugs at the power shelf end.Ensure the lugs are dual-hole and that they fit over M6 terminal studs at 0.625-inch (15.88-mm) centers (for example, Panduit Part Number LCD8-14A-L or equivalent).

Figure 2-9 shows the type of lug required for DC-input cable connections.

Figure 2-9 DC Power Cable Lug

Figure 2-10 shows a typical source DC power distribution scheme for a 2400 W DC PDU.

Figure 2-10 Typical Source DC Power Cabling Scheme—2400W PDU

The color coding of source DC power cable leads depends on the color coding of the site DC power source. Because there is no color code standard for source DC wiring, be sure that power source cables are connected to the PDU using the proper positive (+) and negative (-) polarity:

In some cases, the source DC cable leads might have a positive (+) or a negative (-) label. This is a relatively safe indication of the polarity, but you must verify the polarity by measuring the voltage between the DC cable leads. Be sure that the positive (+) and negative (-) cable leads match the positive (+) and negative (-) labels on the PDU when making the measurement.

A green (or green and yellow) cable typically indicate that it is a ground cable.


Caution DC PEMs contains circuitry to trip the breaker on the PEM if the PEM detects a reverse polarity condition. No damage should occur from reverse polarity, but you should correct a reverse polarity condition immediately.

For a list of the nominal and acceptable value ranges for source DC power, refer to Table A-3 on page A-4.

NEBS Supplemental Unit Bonding and Grounding Guidelines

Although the router chassis requires a safety earth ground connection as part of the power cabling to PDUs, we also recommend that you connect the central office ground system or interior equipment grounding system to the supplemental bonding and grounding connections on the back of the router chassis (Figure 2-11). This grounding point is also referred to as the network equipment building system (NEBS) bonding and grounding studs.


Note These bonding and grounding connections satisfy the Telcordia NEBS requirements for supplemental bonding and grounding connections. If you are not installing the router in a NEBS environment, you can choose to bypass these guidelines and rely on the safety earth ground connections to the AC and DC PDUs.


Figure 2-11 NEBS Bonding and Grounding Studs

To ensure a satisfactory supplemental ground connection to the router, use the following parts:


Note These parts are not available from Cisco, but are available from commercial vendors.


One grounding lug, which have two M6 bolt holes with 0.625 to 0.75-inch (15.86 to 19.05-mm) spacing between them, and a wire receptacle large enough to accept a 6-AWG or larger, multistrand copper wire. This lug is similar to those used for the DC-input power supply leads (see Figure 2-9).

Two M6 hex-head nuts and locking washers (nickel-plated brass is ideal).

One grounding wires. Although we recommends at least 6-AWG multistrand copper wire, the wire diameter and length depend on your router location and site environment.

Site Wiring Guidelines

When planning the location of the router, consider distance limitations for signaling, electromagnetic interference (EMI), and connector compatibility. If the wiring is run for any significant distance in an electromagnetic field, interference can occur between the field and the signals on the wires. Poor wiring can cause:

Radio interference emanating from the wires.

Strong EMI, especially when caused by lightning or radio transmitters. EMI can destroy the signal drivers and receivers in the router, and can even create an electrical hazard by conducting power surges through lines and into equipment.


Note To predict and remedy strong EMI, you may need to consult with experts in radio frequency interference (RFI).


Site wiring is unlikely to emit radio interference if you use twisted-pair cable with a good distribution of grounding conductors. Use a high-quality twisted-pair cable with one ground conductor for each data signal, when applicable.

Give special consideration to the effect of a lightning strike in your vicinity, especially if the wiring exceeds the recommended distances, or if it passes between buildings. The electromagnetic pulse (EMP) caused by lightning or other high-energy phenomena can easily induce enough energy into unshielded conductors to destroy electronic devices. If you have experienced EMP problems in the past, you may want to consult experts in electrical surge suppression and shielding.

Most data centers cannot resolve infrequent but potentially catastrophic problems without pulse meters and other special equipment. In addition, these problems can take a great deal of time to identify and resolve. We recommend that you take the necessary precautions to avoid these problems by providing a properly grounded and shielded environment, with special attention to issues of electrical surge suppression.

GRP Port Connection Guidelines

The following sections contain detailed cabling and signal information for all interface and port connections to the GRP. It also provides information for Ethernet routing and equipment.


Caution Ports labeled Ethernet, 10BASE-T, Token Ring, Console, and AUX are safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits. Only connect SELV circuits to other SELV circuits.

GRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connections

GRP Ethernet Port Connections

PRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connections

PRP Ethernet Connections

GRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connections

The GRP has two EIA/TIA-232 ports (Figure 2-12):

Auxiliary port— DB-25 plug, DTE-mode port for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a CSU/DSU or another router) to the GRP.

Console port—DB-25 receptacle, DCE-mode port for connecting a data terminal to perform the initial configuration of the router.


Note The auxiliary and console ports are asynchronous serial ports. Devices connected to these ports must be capable of asynchronous transmission.


Figure 2-12 GRP Console and Auxiliary Port Connections

Because the connectors on some standard cables are large enough to interfere with the front covers installed on the card cages, a lower-profile cable adapter is included that permits you to connect a flat cable with modular RJ-45 plugs to the GRP console port.


Note EIA/TIA-232 cables are not available from Cisco, but are available from any commercial cable vendor.



Caution To maintain Class B EMI compliance, you must use shielded cables when connecting to the auxiliary and console ports of original GRPs (part numbers GRP= and GRP-B=). An updated version of the GRP-B= board (Rev. F0) does not require shielded cables for Class B compliance.

GRP Auxiliary Port Signals

The GRP auxiliary port is a DB-25 DTE port for connecting a modem or other DCE device to the router. The auxiliary port supports hardware flow control and modem control.

Table 2-2 lists the signals used on the auxiliary port.

Table 2-2 GRP Auxiliary Port Signals 

Pin
Signal
Direction
Description

1

GND

Shield ground

2

TxD

Output

Transmit data (to DCE)

3

RxD

Input

Receive data (from DCE)

4

RTS

Output

Request to send
(used for hardware flow control)

5

CTS

Input

Clear to send (used for hardware flow control)

6

DSR

Input

Data set ready

7

GND

Signal ground

8

DCD

Input

Carrier detect (used for modem control)

20

DTR

Output

Data terminal ready (used for modem control only)

22

RING

Input

Ring


GRP Console Port Signals

The GRP console port is a DB-25 DCE interface for connecting a DTE terminal device to the router. Both Data Set Ready (DSR) and Data Carrier Detect (DCD) signals are active when the router is powered on. The console port does not support modem control or hardware flow control and requires a straight-through EIA/TIA-232 cable.

Before you connect a terminal to the console port, check the terminal setting for the data transmission rate, in bits per second (bps). The terminal transmission rate setting must match the default rate of the GRP console port, which is 9600 bps. Set the terminal to these operational values: 9600 bps, 8 data bits, no parity, 2 stop bits (9600 8N2).

Table 2-3 lists the signals used on the console port.

Table 2-3 GRP Console Port Signals

Pin
Signal
Direction
Description

1

GND

Shield ground

2

TxD

Output

Transmit data (from DTE)

3

RxD

Input

Receive data (to DTE)

6

DSR

Input

Data set ready (always on)

7

GND

Signal ground

8

DCD

Input

Data carrier detect (always on)

20

DTR

Output

Data terminal ready


GRP Ethernet Port Connections

The GRP has the following two types of Ethernet connections (Figure 2-13):

RJ-45 media-dependent interface (MDI)

40-pin, D-shell type media-independent interface (MII)

Figure 2-13 GRP RJ-45 and MII Ethernet Connections

You can use either Ethernet connection, but not both at the same time. Two LEDs on the GRP front panel indicate which Ethernet port is active. Each connection supports IEEE 802.3 and IEEE 802.3u interfaces compliant with the 10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX standards.


Note The Ethernet port can use either unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) or shielded twisted-pair (STP) cables. Shielded twisted-pair cables are recommended for sites at which extremely high immunity to noise is required.


The GRP Ethernet port does not provide external routing functions. Its primary roles are to act as a Telnet port into the router, and to boot or access Cisco IOS software images over a network to which the GRP Ethernet port is directly connected.


Caution Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) functions on these ports are switched off by default for security reasons. We strongly caution you to consider the security implications of switching on CEF routing functions on these ports.

Figure 2-14 shows:

You cannot access Network 2.0.0.0 from Ethernet port (E0) on the GRP in Router A. You can only access Host A, Host B, and Router C, which are in Network 1.0.0.0 (see dotted-line arrows).

To access Network 2.0.0.0 from Router A, you must use an interface port on one of the line cards (a POS line card in this example) in Router A. Data from Router A is routed through Router B and Router C, to reach Network 2.0.0.0 (see solid-line arrows).

Figure 2-14 Using the Ethernet Port on the GRP

GRP RJ-45 Ethernet Connections

The RJ-45 Ethernet connection does not require an external transceiver. Figure 2-15 shows the pin orientation of the RJ-45 Ethernet port and the modular cable plug it accepts.

Figure 2-15 GRP RJ-45 Ethernet Receptacle and Modular Plug

Table 2-4 lists the RJ-45 pin signals used on the connector.

Table 2-4 GRP RJ-45 Ethernet Receptacle Pinout 

Ethernet Port Pin
Signal
Description

1

TxD+

Transmit data +

2

TxD-

Transmit data -

3

RxD+

Receive data +

4

Termination network

No connection

5

Termination network

No connection

6

RxD-

Receive data -

7

Termination network

No connection

8

Termination network

No connection


When connecting the RJ-45 port to a hub or repeater, use the straight-through cable pinout shown in Figure 2-16.

Figure 2-16 Straight-Through Ethernet Cable Pinout

When connecting two GRPs back-to-back, use the crossover cable pinout shown in Figure 2-17.

Figure 2-17 Crossover Ethernet Cable Pinout

GRP MII Ethernet Connections

The GRP MII Ethernet connection requires an external physical sublayer (PHY) and an external transceiver that permits connection to multimode fiber for 100BASE-FX or 100BASE-T4 physical media. Depending on the type of media between the MII receptacle and the switch or hub, the network side of your 100-Mbps transceiver should be appropriately equipped with fiber-optic SC-type or ST-type connectors, coaxial cable BNC connectors, or other appropriate hardware.

Figure 2-18 shows the pin orientation of the female MII connector on the GRP. The MII connector uses 2-56 screw-type locks, called jackscrews, to secure the cable or transceiver to the MII port. MII cables and transceivers have knurled thumbscrews that you fasten to the jackscrews on the MII connector to provide strain relief for your MII cable.

Figure 2-18 GRP MII Ethernet Connector

Table 2-5 lists the signals used on the MII connector.

Table 2-5 GRP MII Ethernet Pinout 

Pin 1
In
Out
Input/
Output
Description

14-17

-

Yes

-

Transmit data (TxD)

12

Yes

-

-

Transmit clock (Tx_CLK)2

11

-

Yes

-

Transmit error (Tx_ER)

13

-

Yes

-

Transmit enable (Tx_EN)

3

-

Yes

-

MII Data clock (MDC)

4-7

Yes

-

-

Receive data (RxD)

9

Yes

-

-

Receive clock (Rx_CLK)

10

Yes

-

-

Receive error (Rx_ER)

8

Yes

-

-

Receive data valid (Rx_DV)

18

Yes

-

-

Collision (COL)

19

Yes

-

-

Carrier sense (CRS)

2

-

-

Yes

MII data input/output (MDIO)

22-39

-

-

-

Common (ground)

1, 20, 21, 40

-

-

-

+5 V

1 Pins not listed in the table are not used.

2 Tx_CLK and Rx_CLK are provided by the external transceiver.


Table 2-6 lists the cabling specifications for 100-Mbps transmission over unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cables.

Table 2-6 Specifications and Connection Limits for 100-Mbps Transmission 

Parameter
RJ-45
MII

Cable specification

Category 51 UTP, 22 - 24 AWG2

Category 3, 4, or 5, 150-ohm UTP or STP, or multimode optical fiber

Cable length (max)

1.64 ft (0.5 m) (MII-to-MII cable3 )

Segment length (max)

328 ft (100 m) for 100BASE-TX

3.28 ft (1 m)4 or 1,312 ft (400 m) for 100BASE-FX

Network length (max)

656 ft (200 m)4 with 1 repeater

1 EIA/TIA-568 or EIA-TIA-568 TSB-36 compliant. Not supplied by Cisco.

2 AWG = American Wire Gauge. This gauge is specified by the EIA/TIA-568 standard.

3 The cable between the MII port on the GRP and the appropriate transceiver.

4 Specifically the length between any two stations on a repeated segment.


Table 2-7 lists IEEE 802.3u physical characteristics for 100BASE-TX cabling.

Table 2-7 IEEE 802.3u Physical Characteristics 

Parameter
100BASE-TX

Data rate (Mbps)

100

Signaling method

Baseband

Segment length (max meters)

100 m between DTE and repeaters

Media

Category 5 UTP (for RJ-45) or MII

Topology

Star/hub


PRP Port Connection Guidelines

This section contains detailed cabling and signal information for all interface and port connections to the PRP. It also provides information for Ethernet routing and equipment.


Caution Ports labeled Ethernet, 10BASE-T, Token Ring, Console, and AUX are safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits. SELV circuits should only be connected to other SELV circuits.

PRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connections

The PRP has two RJ-45 connection ports:

Auxiliary port— DTE RJ-45 interface for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a CSU/DSU or another router) to the PRP.

Console port—DCE RJ-45 interface for connecting a data terminal device to the router, which you need to perform the initial configuration of the router.


Note The auxiliary and console ports are asynchronous serial ports. Ensure that devices connected to these ports are capable of asynchronous transmission.


Figure 2-19 shows the auxiliary and console port connections from the PRP to the associated devices.

Figure 2-19 PRP Auxiliary and Console Port Connections

1

Modem

4

Auxiliary port

2

Console terminal

5

Console port

3

RJ-45 cables


PRP Auxiliary Port Signals

The PRP auxiliary port is a DTE, RJ-45 interface for connecting a modem or other DCE device (such as a CSU/DSU or another router) to the PRP. The auxiliary port supports hardware flow control and modem control.

Table 2-8 lists the signals used on the auxiliary port.

Table 2-8 PRP Auxiliary Port Signals 

Auxiliary Port Pin
Signal
Input/Output
Description

1

RTS

Output

Request to send

2

DTR

Output

Data terminal ready

3

TxD

Output

Transmit data

4

GND

Signal ground

5

GND

Signal ground

6

RxD

Input

Receive data

7

DSR

Input

Data set ready

8

CTS

Input

Clear to send


PRP Console Port Signals

The PRP console port is a DCE RJ-45 interface for connecting a terminal to the router. The console port does not support modem control or hardware flow control and requires a straight-through RJ-45 cable.

Before connecting a terminal to the console port, check the terminal setting for the data transmission rate, in bits per second (bps). The terminal transmission rate setting must match the default rate of the PRP console port, which is 9600 bps. Set the terminal to these operational values: 9600 bps, 8 data bits, no parity, 2 stop bits (9600 8N2).

Table 2-9 lists the signals used on the console port.

Table 2-9 PRP Console Port Signals

Console Port Pin
Signal
Input/Output
Description

11

2

DTR

Output

Data terminal ready

3

TxD

Output

Transmit data

4

GND

Signal ground

5

GND

Signal ground

6

RxD

Input

Receive data

7

DSR

Input

Data set ready

81

1 These pins are not connected.


PRP Ethernet Connections

The PRP has two RJ-45 MDI Ethernet ports; ETH0 and ETH1 (Figure 2-20).

Figure 2-20 PRP Ethernet Connections

These connections support IEEE 802.3 and IEEE 802.3u interfaces compliant with 10BASE-T and 100BASE-TX standards. The transmission speed of the Ethernet ports is "autosensing" by default and is user configurable.

The PRP Ethernet port does not provide external routing functions. Its primary roles are to act as a Telnet port into the router, and to boot or access Cisco IOS software images over a network to which the PRP Ethernet port is directly connected.


Caution Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) functions on these ports are switched off by default for security reasons. We strongly caution you to consider the security implications of switching on CEF routing functions on these ports.

Figure 2-21 shows:

You cannot access Network 2.0.0.0 from Ethernet port (E0) on the GRP in Router A. You can only access Host A, Host B, and Router C, which are in Network 1.0.0.0 (see dotted-line arrows).

To access Network 2.0.0.0 from Router A, you must use an interface port on one of the line cards (a POS line card in this example) in Router A. Data from Router A is routed through Router B and Router C, to reach Network 2.0.0.0 (see solid-line arrows).

Figure 2-21 Using the Ethernet Port on the PRP

PRP RJ-45 Ethernet Connections

The RJ-45 Ethernet connection does not require an external transceiver. Figure 2-22 shows the pin orientation of the RJ-45 Ethernet port and the modular cable plug it accepts.

Figure 2-22 RJ-45 Receptacle and Plug

Table 2-10 lists the RJ-45 pin signals used on the connector.

Table 2-10 PRP RJ-45 Ethernet Receptacle Pinout

Ethernet Port Pin
Signal
Description

1

TxD+

Transmit data +

2

TxD-

Transmit data -

3

RxD+

Receive data +

4

Termination network

No connection

5

Termination network

No connection

6

RxD-

Receive data -

7

Termination network

No connection

8

Termination network

No connection


When connecting the RJ-45 port to a hub or repeater, use the straight-through cable pinout shown in Figure 2-23.

Figure 2-23 Straight-Through Cable Pinout to Hub or Repeater

When connecting two PRPs back-to-back, use the crossover cable pinout shown in Figure 2-24.

Figure 2-24 Crossover Cable Pinout Between PRPs

Table 2-11 lists the cabling specifications for 100-Mbps transmission over unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cables.


Note The transmission speed of the Ethernet ports is autosensing by default and is user-configurable.


Table 2-11 Specifications and Connection Limits for 100-Mbps Transmission 

Parameter
RJ-45

Cable specification

Category 51 UTP, 22 to 24 AWG2

Cable length (max)

Segment length (max)

328 feet (100 m) for 100BASE-TX

Network length (max)

656 feet (200 m)3 with 1 repeater

1 EIA/TIA-568 or EIA-TIA-568 TSB-36 compliant. Not supplied by Cisco.

2 AWG = American Wire Gauge. This gauge is specified by the EIA/TIA-568 standard.

3 Specifically the length between any two stations on a repeated segment.


Table 2-12 lists IEEE 802.3u physical characteristics for 100BASE-TX.

Table 2-12 IEEE 802.3u Physical Characteristics 

Parameter
100BASE-TX

Data rate (Mbps)

100

Signaling method

Baseband

Maximum segment length

100 m between DTE and repeaters

Media

Category 5 UTP

Topology

Star/Hub


Alarm Display Connection Guidelines

The router alarm system consists of the following cards:

Two alarm cards—Installed in the switch fabric and alarm card cage. They do not have any indicators, connectors, or switches.

One alarm display card—Mounted on the front of the router chassis, just above the horizontal cable management tray.

The alarm display card has two 25-pin D-subconnectors (ALARM A and ALARM B) on the front panel that connect the router to an external site alarm maintenance system (Figure 2-25). When a critical, major, or minor alarm is generated, it energizes the alarm relays on the alarm card to activate the external site alarm.

Figure 2-25 Alarm Display Card Front Panel

The alarm relay contacts on the alarm card consist of standard common, normally open, and normally closed relay contacts that are wired to the pins on the connectors.


Caution Only safety extra-low voltage (SELV) circuits can be connected to the alarm connector. Maximum rating for the alarm circuit is 2 A, 50 VA.


Note To comply with the intrabuilding lightning surge requirements of GR-1089-CORE, Issue II, Revision 01, February 1999, you must use a shielded cable when connecting to the external alarm ports on the alarm card. The shielded cable is terminated by shielded connectors on both ends, with the cable shield material tied to both connectors.


Table 2-13 lists the pin-to-signal correspondence between the cable connector pins and the alarm card relay contacts.

Table 2-13 Alarm Connector Pinout

Pin Group
Common
Normally Open
Normally Closed

Critical audible alarm

2

1

14

Major audible alarm

16

3

15

Minor audible alarm

5

4

17

Critical visual alarm

19

6

18

Major visual alarm

8

7

20

Minor visual alarm

22

9

21

Alarm input

13

25