User Guide for Cisco Unified Service Monitor 8.5
Using Reports
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Using Reports

Table Of Contents

Using Reports

Overview: Service Monitor Reports

Configuring Service Monitor Initially Before Running Reports

Understanding Report Tool Buttons

Using Diagnostic Reports

Generating a Sensor Diagnostic Report

Selecting Columns to Display and to Hide on a Report

Specifying IP Addresses or Directory Numbers for Endpoints

Accessing Data for Reports that Contain More than 2,000 Records

Understanding Sensor Diagnostic Reports

Viewing Sensor Stream Correlation Data

Enabling the Sensor Stream Correlation Window to Display

Generating a CVTQ Diagnostic Report

Understanding CVTQ Diagnostic Reports

Understanding Call Termination Cause Codes and Call Release Codes

Using Most-Impacted Endpoints Reports

Generating and Understanding the Sensor Most-Impacted Endpoints Report

Generating and Understanding the CVTQ Most-Impacted Endpoints Report

Using CDR Call Reports

Generating a CDR Call Report

Understanding the Call Termination Type: Success or Failure

Understanding a CDR Call Report


Using Reports


The following topics are included:

Overview: Service Monitor Reports

Using Diagnostic Reports

Using Most-Impacted Endpoints Reports

Using CDR Call Reports

Overview: Service Monitor Reports

Service Monitor reports enable you to examine voice transmission quality in the parts of your network that Service Monitor has monitored. Service Monitor reports show the times when MOS has been below configured thresholds, the codec in use, and the endpoints on which the violations have occurred. Data for the reports is obtained from sensors (Cisco 1040s and NAMs) and Unified Communications Manager clusters in your network.

Service Monitor stores the data that it collects from sensors and Unified Communications Managers in the Service Monitor database. For the number of days that data is being retained in your Service Monitor system, see Configuring and Viewing Other Settings, page 3-34.

Service Monitor supplies separate reports for data obtained from:

Sensors—Service Monitor obtains data from sensors every 60 seconds, providing minute-by-minute assessments of MOS.

Unified Communications Manager clusters—Service Monitor obtains CVTQ data from clusters every 60 seconds. However, data for a given call becomes available only after the call completes. Service Monitor therefore can provide information in reports after the call has occurred.

Service Monitor supplies the following types of reports:

Diagnostic reports—These reports enable you to specify what you want to report on. On the report window itself, you can change the columns that are displayed, including restoring reports to display a default set of columns; see Selecting Columns to Display and to Hide on a Report. For more information, see Using Diagnostic Reports.

Most-Impacted Endpoint reports—These reports list the endpoints that have had the most violations reported in the last 24 hours. You can also schedule this report to run automatically; exported reports are then created for the last 24 hours and for the last 7 days. For more information, see Generating and Understanding the Sensor Most-Impacted Endpoints Report and Generating and Understanding the CVTQ Most-Impacted Endpoints Report.

CDR Call reports—These reports are based on Unified Communications Manager CDRs and enable you to filter CDRs by call category (in addition to other filters such as cluster and endpoint). For more information, see Using CDR Call Reports.


Note CDRs do not include call quality information such as MOS and latency. For a report that includes call quality information, see Generating a CVTQ Diagnostic Report.


Configuring Service Monitor Initially Before Running Reports

Before you can run Service Monitor reports for the first time, you need to perform some configuration tasks. For Service Monitor to begin monitoring data that is gathered by:

Unified Communications Manager clusters—You need to add credentials to Service Monitor and perform some configuration in Unified Communications Manager or on the system where Unified Communications Manager resides. For more information, see the following topics:

Understanding and Setting Data Source Credentials, page 3-2

Unified Communications Manager Configuration, page B-1

NAM sensors—You need to add credentials to Service Monitor and perform some configuration. For more information, see the following topics:

Understanding and Setting Data Source Credentials, page 3-2

NAM Configuration, page C-1

Cisco 1040 Sensors—You need to complete the tasks listed in Performing Initial Configuration in Service Monitor for Cisco 1040s, page 4-1.

You need to configure call categories if you use Service Statistics Manager and you want to see the CDR Call Reports by call category. For more information, see Configuring Call Classification, page 3-18.

To be able to launch the Detailed Device View and Phone Details pages in Operations Manager—so that you can obtain more info about the endpoints you see in Service Monitor CVTQ and sensor reports—enter the Operations Manager server IP address. For more information, see Configuring and Viewing Other Settings, page 3-34.

Service Monitor reports include data for up to the licensed number of phones:

To generate reports, see:

Generating a Sensor Diagnostic Report

Generating a CVTQ Diagnostic Report

Using CDR Call Reports

To view the license limit and the total number of phones that Service Monitor is monitoring—after having learned of them from clusters and sensors—see Managing the Phone Count, page 3-14.

While using Service Monitor reports, the following information is useful:

Understanding Report Tool Buttons

Selecting Columns to Display and to Hide on a Report

Understanding Report Tool Buttons

The following report tool buttons might appear in the upper-right corner of Service Monitor reports.

Table 2-1 Report Tool Buttons

Button
Description

Exports the current report to CSV file to save on your local system. Enables you to export data for a range of record numbers or for all records up to the maximum.

The maximum number of records is configurable; the upper limit is 30,000 records. For more information, see Configuring Diagnostic Report Search and CSV Export Limit Settings, page 3-35.

If your client system seems unresponsive when you try to export files, see Troubleshooting File Download Issues, page 4-7.

Opens a new window with the report formatted for printing from your browser.

Opens a column selector dialog box from which you can select those columns of a report to hide and those to display. See Selecting Columns to Display and to Hide on a Report.

Opens context-sensitive help.


Using Diagnostic Reports

See the following topics:

Generating a Sensor Diagnostic Report

Understanding Sensor Diagnostic Reports

Viewing Sensor Stream Correlation Data

Generating a CVTQ Diagnostic Report

Understanding CVTQ Diagnostic Reports

Generating a Sensor Diagnostic Report

Using sensor report filters, you can generate reports that include data for all calls that have been monitored by the sensors or reports that include a subset of data, such as:

Where MOS was less than a specific value

When reported from specific sensors

Where particular codecs were used

A set of endpoints

All sensors or a subset of sensors

A given time period


Step 1 Select Reports > Sensor Report > Diagnostic. The Sensor Filter page appears.

Step 2 Do one of the following:

Click Generate Report to generate the report using the default criteria. A report opens in a new window. See Understanding Sensor Diagnostic Reports.

Change any of the report inputs listed in the following table. To be included in the report, data must meet each of the criteria that you specify.

Fields
Description/Action

MOS Less than or Equal to

Enter a value from 0.0 to 5.0.

Jitter Greater than or Equal to

Enter the number of milliseconds.

Packet Loss Greater than or Equal to

Enter the number of lost packets.

Codec

Select a codec from the list.

Grades

Based on the global threshold settings.

You can select any or all of the following:

Good

Poor

Acceptable

No MOS

To select grades:

1. Click . The Select Grade dialog box appears.

2. Select check boxes.

3. Click OK.

Streams Between Endpoint 1 and Endpoint 2

Streams that flow between the endpoints that you specify are included in the report. Endpoints that match the criteria that you enter can be speakers or listeners in the stream.

Endpoint 1—Do one of the following:

Select the DN radio button and enter:

A complete directory number, such as 50123.

A partial directory number that includes wildcards:

X—Uppercase X matches a single ASCII character.

*—Asterisk (*) matches multiple ASCII characters.

Select the IP Address radio button. In each of the 4 octets, enter one of the following:

Numbers.

Asterisk (*); a wildcard that replaces the whole octet.

Note For more information, see Specifying IP Addresses or Directory Numbers for Endpoints.

Endpoint 2—Follow the instructions for Endpoint 1.

Note The relationship between Endpoint 1 and Endpoint 2 can be:

One-to-one

One-to-many

Many-to-one

Many-to-many

Sensor ID(s)

To select sensors:

1. Click . The Select Sensors dialog box appears.

2. Select check boxes.

3. Click OK.

Date and Time

Select a radio button and select the period that you want to report on:

Data for—Select one of these:

Last Hour—The previous 60 minutes.

Today—From 00:00:00 today until now.

This Week—From 00:00 Monday until now.

Custom—Enter the From date and time and To date and time.


Step 3 Click Generate Report. Service Monitor searches for data for no longer than a few minutes before a report opens in a new window. See Understanding Sensor Diagnostic Reports.


Note If more than 2,000 records match the filters that you entered, Service Monitor displays an informational message before displaying the report. For more information, see Accessing Data for Reports that Contain More than 2,000 Records.




Note The number of minutes that Service Monitor searches for diagnostic report data is configurable. For more information, see Configuring Diagnostic Report Search and CSV Export Limit Settings, page 3-35.


Selecting Columns to Display and to Hide on a Report

By default, sensor reports, CVTQ reports, and CDR call reports do not display every possible column of data. You can select the data that you would like to display.


Step 1 In the upper-right corner of a report, click the Tools button . A column selector dialog box appears.

Step 2 To restore the report to use columns that are displayed by default, click the Restore Default Columns button. The column selector dialog box closes and the report window refreshes, displaying the default columns.

Step 3 To update report columns, do the following:

To hide a column, place it in the Available Column(s) list:

Select the column by name from the Displayed Column(s) list.

Click the << Remove < button. The column appears in the Available Column(s) list.


Note To select adjacent columns, hold down the Shift key. To select columns that are not adjacent, hold down the Ctrl key.


To display a column, place it in the Displayed Column(s) list:

Select it by name from the Available Column(s) list.

Click the > Add >> button. It appears in the Displayed Column(s) list.

Click Update. The report window refreshes, displaying only those columns from the Displayed Column(s) list.



Note Your selections are saved and will affect other users.


Specifying IP Addresses or Directory Numbers for Endpoints

When you generate a diagnostic report, you can specify the endpoints to include. To do so, you can enter the complete directory number or IP address—whichever is applicable—and you can use wildcards, enabling you to match multiple directory numbers or IP addresses. Table 2-2 provides some examples.

Table 2-2 Valid Endpoint Definitions for Generating Diagnostic Reports

Type of Endpoint
Valid Entries
Examples

Directory number

To specify directory numbers to include in a CVTQ or Sensor Diagnostic report, you can enter up to 25 characters in any order from among the following characters:

0-9

*—Asterisk matches multiple ASCII characters.

+—The plus sign (+) substitutes for an international access code. (Not all Unified Communications Manager software versions support plus dialing. For more information, see Cisco Unified Service Monitor 8.5 Compatibility Matrix.)

a-z

A-Z

Note Uppercase X is a wildcard that matches a single ASCII character.

34224 matches 34224 only.

5XXX matches 4-digit numbers that start with 5; for example, 5876.

+1408946* matches numbers in the US 408 area code with a 946 prefix.

IP address

An IP address consists of 4 octets (1-byte numbers). To specify an IP address number, in each octet, enter one of the following:

A number.

An asterisk (*) to replace the whole octet.

172.20.119.21 matches 172.20.119.21 only.

172.*.*.*.* matches all IP addresses 172.0.0.1 through 172.255.255.255.


Accessing Data for Reports that Contain More than 2,000 Records

Service Monitor reports display up to 2,000 records. If more than 2,000 records are returned when you generate a report, Service Monitor displays an informational message before displaying the report.

In this case, you can:

Enter more specific filters to generate a report with fewer records.

Export the report data to a CSV file to access the additional records. To open the export window, click the Export icon in the top right of the report window. You can export up to 30,000 records to a CSV file. For more information, see Configuring Diagnostic Report Search and CSV Export Limit Settings, page 3-35.


Note If your client system seems unresponsive when you try to export files, see Troubleshooting File Download Issues, page 4-7.


Understanding Sensor Diagnostic Reports

Two RTP streams—incoming and outgoing—make up a single voice call. Sensors capture voice traffic in various ways:

Cisco 1040s listen to RTP voice traffic on Switch Port Analyzer (SPAN) ports that have been configured to mirror voice traffic. Depending on the phone ports and the voice VLANs that a SPAN port mirrors, a Cisco 1040 might listen to only one or both RTP streams, calculating MOS and sending data to Service Monitor at 60-second intervals.

NAMs can also capture data from SPAN ports. Alternatively, you can configure NAMs to use other means of data capture. For a NAM to provide the data that Service Monitor needs, RTP stream monitoring must be enabled on the NAM. (For more information, see NAM Configuration, page C-1.) Service Monitor obtains data from NAMs at 60-second intervals.

Sensor reports display the MOS that a sensor calculated for RTP streams on a minute-by-minute basis. For each interval, a sensor report displays one or two rows of data, depending on whether data from only one or both RTP streams was captured. Each row identifies the sensor that collected the data, the endpoints involved, MOS, milliseconds of jitter, and the time stamp.

Table 2-3 lists all possible columns of data that can be displayed in a Sensor report; by default, certain columns are displayed (as noted). For more information, see Selecting Columns to Display and to Hide on a Report.

Table 2-3 Sensor Report Contents 

Column
Description
Displayed by Default

Sensor

Name—Descriptive name for the sensor that collected the data and analyzed the MOS.

Note The name Cisco 1040 + <last 6 digits from MAC address> identifies a Cisco 1040 that automatically registered with Service Monitor. To enter another name, see Editing the Configuration for a Cisco 1040, page 4-9.

ID—1040 MAC address or NAM IP address.

X

Speaker

Directory Number—Displayed when the device is managed by a Unified Communications Manager that:

Is added to Service Monitor with the proper credentials.

Has not been suspended from monitoring.

X

Device Type—Can provide the device type or one of these:

N/A—Some error prevents Service Monitor from obtaining the device type.

Unavailable—This is the first time Service Monitor has seen this phone and the device type is not yet known; or the corresponding Unified Communications Manager:

Has not been added to Service Monitor.

Did not provide a valid device type to Service Monitor.

X

IP Address—If an IP address is clickable, click it to launch the Detailed Device View page or Phone Detail window on Operations Manager.

Note To enable the launch of Operations Manager, ensure that the IP address for Operations Manager is configured in Service Monitor. See Configuring and Viewing Other Settings, page 3-34.

UDP Port—Transport layer port that is the source of the media stream.

Device Name.

Listener

Directory Number—Displayed when the device is managed by a Unified Communications Manager that:

Is added to Service Monitor with the proper credentials.

Has not been suspended from monitoring.

X

Device Type—Can provide the device type or one of these:

N/A—Some error prevents Service Monitor from obtaining the device type.

Unavailable—This is the first time Service Monitor has seen this phone and the device type is not yet known; or the corresponding Unified Communications Manager:

Has not been added to Service Monitor.

Did not provide a valid device type to Service Monitor.

IP Address—If an IP address is clickable, click it to launch the Detailed Device View page or Phone Detail window on Operations Manager.

Note To enable the launch of Operations Manager, ensure that the IP address for Operations Manager is configured in Service Monitor. See Configuring and Viewing Other Settings, page 3-34.

UDP Port—Transport layer port that is the destination for the media stream.

Device Name.

Time

Time at which the sensor calculated MOS.

X

TOS

Type of Service (TOS).

MOS

Average MOS value during the sample duration. The value might be N/A or not available if the sample duration is very short.

MOS reflects the experience of the listener. Click the value to open a Sensor Stream Correlation window. See Viewing Sensor Stream Correlation Data.

Note If a Cannot find server window appears instead of a Sensor Stream Correlation window, see Enabling the Sensor Stream Correlation Window to Display.

X

Minimum MOS

The minimum MOS score within the sample duration.

The value might be N/A or not available if the sample duration is very short.

Primary Degradation Cause

One of these:

Jitter

Packet loss

None—Jitter and packet loss values are both 0 (zero).

The value might be N/A or not available if the sample duration is very short.

X

Codec

Codec used.

X

Grade

Based on the global threshold settings.

One of these:

Good—The MOS value exceeds the acceptable MOS threshold.

Acceptable—The MOS value falls between the acceptable MOS threshold and the poor MOS threshold.

Poor—The MOS value falls below the poor MOS threshold.

No MOS—The sample interval is less than three seconds, therefore the MOS value could not be calculated.

X

Jitter (ms)

Milliseconds of jitter during the sample duration.

Packet Loss

Number of packets lost due to network transmission during the sample duration. Computed based on observed RTP sequence number analysis.

Sample Duration(s)

Number of seconds, between the first and last packet that is analyzed. The value is usually 60, but can be less for an initial or final stream.

X

Max Jitter (ms)

Maximum milliseconds of jitter during the sample duration.

Adjusted Packet Loss(%)

Percentage packet loss due to high jitter. Computed based on a reference jitter buffer with a fixed length delay. This value is not affected by network loss.

Packet Loss (%)

Percent of packet loss. (Packets lost divided by total packets expected expressed as a percent.)

SSRC

Synchronization source ID—Identifies the source of a stream of RTP packets.


Viewing Sensor Stream Correlation Data

To launch a Sensor Stream Correlation window, generate a sensor diagnostic report and click the MOS value for the stream that interests you. The MOS value that you click is a measure of the listener's experience in the RTP stream.


Note If a Cannot find server window appears instead of a Sensor Stream Correlation window, see Enabling the Sensor Stream Correlation Window to Display.


Service Monitor correlates data from sensors against one another and against Unified Communications Manager call records and displays tables with the following information:

Stream summary—A subset of the data that was displayed on the sensor diagnostic report. Additionally, the source synchronization ID (SSRC) for the stream is listed. An SSRC identifies the source of a stream of RTP packets and remains unique during an RTP session.


Note Another SSRC is assigned to RTP streams sent when the listener endpoint and UDP port are the source of a stream of RTP packets. The Sensor Stream Correlation window correlates data for one SSRC only.


Call record—Information from the Unified Communications Manager call detail record (CDR) that correlates to the stream.


Note If the call is not complete yet, No Call Detail Record found for these streams appears in the table heading.


Stream details—Details from one or more sensors where the SSRC matches the one in the stream summary.

Table 2-4 lists the data that is displayed in the Stream Summary table. Table 2-5 lists information from the related CDR. Table 2-6 lists details for streams with the same SSRC as the one in Table 2-4.

Table 2-4 Stream Summary 

Column
Description

Speaker
(Calling Party)

Directory Number—Displayed when the device is managed by a Unified Communications Manager that:

Is added to Service Monitor with the proper credentials.

Has not been suspended from monitoring.

IP Address—If clickable, click to obtain more information from Operations Manager. Depending on the device type, an IP Phone Details page or a Detailed Device View opens.

UDP Port—Transport layer port that is the source of the media stream.

Device Type—Can provide the device type or one of these:

N/A—Some error prevents Service Monitor from obtaining the device type.

Unavailable—This is the first time that Service Monitor has seen this phone and the device type is not yet known; or the corresponding Unified Communications Manager:

Has not been added to Service Monitor.

Did not provide a valid device type to Service Monitor.

Device Name.

Listener
(Called Party)

Directory Number—Displayed when the device is managed by a Unified Communications Manager that:

Is added to Service Monitor with the proper credentials.

Has not been suspended from monitoring.

IP Address—If clickable, click to obtain more information from Operations Manager. Depending on the device type, an IP Phone Details page or a Detailed Device View opens.

UDP Port—Transport layer port that is the destination for the media stream.

Device Type—Can provide the device type or one of these:

N/A—Some error prevents Service Monitor from obtaining the device type.

Unavailable—This is the first time that Service Monitor has seen this phone and the device type is not yet known; or the corresponding Unified Communications Manager:

Has not been added to Service Monitor.

Did not provide a valid device type to Service Monitor.

Device Name.

TOS

Type of service.

Codec

Codec name.

SSRC

Synchronization Source ID—Identifies the source of a stream of RTP packets.


Table 2-5 lists data from the CDR, if available. If the call has not completed yet, No Call Detail Record found for these streams appears in the table heading and the row is blank.

Table 2-5 Call Record 

Column
Description

Call Disconnect

The time that the call disconnected. Zero (0) is displayed if the call never connected.

Cluster ID

Unified Communications Manager cluster ID.

Caller Signaling IP

IP address of the device that originated the call signaling. For Cisco Unified IP Phones, this field specifies the address of the phone. For PSTN calls, this field specifies the address of the H.323 gateway.

Caller B-Channel

B-channel number of the MGCP gateway, or NA, if not applicable.

Called Signaling IP

IP address of the device that terminates the call signaling.

Called B-Channel

B-channel number of the MGCP gateway, or NA, if not applicable.

Call Duration (s)

Length of the call, in seconds.

Caller Termination Cause

Populated when the originating party releases the call.

Note Termination causes might not be populated.

For more information on call termination causes, see Call Release Code in Table 2-7.

Called Termination Cause

Populated when the terminating party releases the call or the call is rejected.

Note Termination causes might not be populated.


Table 2-6 lists data from streams with an SSRC that matches the one in Table 2-4.

Table 2-6 Stream Details 

Column
Description

Sensor Name

Display name of the Cisco 1040 or NAM.

Time

Time at which the sensor calculated the MOS.

MOS

Average MOS in the sample duration.

Minimum MOS

Minimum MOS in the sample duration.

Primary Degradation Cause

Jitter, Packet Loss, or None when jitter and packet loss values are zero (0).

Jitter (ms)

Milliseconds of jitter.

Packet Loss

Number of packets lost. (Actual packet loss for the sample duration.)

Sample Duration (s)

Number of seconds elapsed between the first and last packets that are analyzed.

Max Jitter (ms)

Maximum jitter, in milliseconds.

Adjusted Packet Loss (%)

Percentage packet loss due to high jitter. Computed based on a reference jitter buffer with a fixed length delay. This value is not affected by network loss.

Packet Loss (%)

Percentage packet loss. (Actual packets lost divided by total packets expected expressed as a percent.)


Enabling the Sensor Stream Correlation Window to Display

When you try to open a Sensor Stream Correlation window, if a window opens displaying a message such as "The page cannot be found", you can resolve the problem by disabling the proxy server setting in your browser. The setting is found in internet options on the Connection tab.

Generating a CVTQ Diagnostic Report

Using CVTQ report filters, you can generate reports that include all call data from the clusters or reports that include a subset of call data, such as:

Where MOS was less than a specific value

When reported from specific clusters

Where particular codecs were used

A set of endpoints

All clusters or a subset of clusters

A given time period


Step 1 Select Reports > CVTQ Report > Diagnostic.

The CVTQ Filter page appears.

Step 2 Do one of the following:

Click Generate Report to generate the report using the default values as displayed on the page. A report opens in a new window. See Understanding CVTQ Diagnostic Reports.

Change any of the report inputs listed in the following table. (To be included in the report, data must meet each of the criteria that you specify.)

Fields
Description/Action

MOS Less than or Equal to

Enter a number from 0.0 to 5.0.

(Optional) Select the Include records for which MOS is unavailable check box.

Note MOS is unavailable for endpoints that do not support CVTQ. For more information, see Cisco Unified Service Monitor 8.5 Compatibility Matrix.

Jitter Greater than or Equal to

Enter the number of milliseconds.

Packet Loss Greater than or Equal to

Enter the number of lost packets.

Codec

Select a codec from the list.

Concealment Seconds Greater than or Equal to

Number of seconds that have concealment events (lost frames) from the start of the voice stream (includes severely concealed seconds, that is total number of seconds that have more than 5 percent concealment frames).

Concealment Ratio Greater than or Equal to

Cumulative ratio of concealment frames to total frames observed after starting a call.

Cluster ID(s)

To select clusters:

1. Click . The Select Clusters dialog box appears.

2. Select check boxes.

3. Click OK.

Calls Between

Endpoint—Calls between the endpoints that you specify are included in the report. Endpoints that match the criteria that you enter can be caller or called endpoints.

To configure endpoints, do the following:

Endpoint 1—Do one of the following:

Select the DN radio button—Enter a complete directory number (such as 50123). Or enter a partial directory number that includes wildcards; an uppercase X matches a single ASCII character, and an asterisk (*) matches multiple ASCII characters.

Select the IP Address radio button—In each of the 4 octets, enter either a number or an asterisk (replaces an entire octet).

Note For more information, see Specifying IP Addresses or Directory Numbers for Endpoints.

Endpoint 2—Follow the instructions for Endpoint 1.

Note The relationship between Endpoint 1 and Endpoint 2 can be:

One-to-one

One-to-many

Many-to-one

Many-to-many

Location—Calls between locations that you specify are included in the report.

To configure locations, do the following:

Origination—Select Any, or a specific location.

Destination—Select AnyOther, or a specific location.

Device Pool—Calls between device pools that you specify are included in the report.

To configure device pools, do the following:

Origination—Select Any, or a specific device pool.

Destination—Select AnyOther, or a specific device pool.

Grades

Based on the global threshold settings.

You can select any or all of the following:

Good

Poor

Acceptable

No MOS

To select grades:

1. Click . The Select Grade dialog box appears.

2. Select check boxes.

3. Click OK.

Call Signaling Start Date and Time

Select a radio button and select the period that you want to report on:

Data for—Select one of these:

Last Hour—The previous 60 minutes.

Today—From 00:00:00 today until now.

This Week—From 00:00 Monday until now.

Custom—Enter the From date and time and To date and time.


Step 3 Click Generate Report. Service Monitor searches for data for—at most—a few minutes before a report opens in a new window. See Understanding CVTQ Diagnostic Reports.


Note If more than 2,000 records match the filters that you entered, Service Monitor displays an informational message before displaying the report. For more information, see Accessing Data for Reports that Contain More than 2,000 Records.




Note The number of minutes that Service Monitor searches for diagnostic report data is configurable. For more information, see Configuring Diagnostic Report Search and CSV Export Limit Settings, page 3-35.


Understanding CVTQ Diagnostic Reports

Table 2-7 lists all possible columns of data that can be displayed in a CVTQ report; by default, certain columns are displayed (as noted). For more information, see Selecting Columns to Display and to Hide on a Report.


Note The CVTQ diagnostic report displays two lines for each call: one line with data for the listening experience at the called endpoint and another line for the caller endpoint.


Table 2-7 CVTQ Report Contents 

Column
Description
Displayed by Default

Listener DN/IP

Identifies the endpoint—called or caller—for which MOS and impairment details are reported; one of these:

IP address of the listener.

Directory number of the listener.

X

Cluster ID

Unified Communications Manager cluster ID.

X

Caller

Directory Number—Directory number where the call was made.

Device Type—Type of device making the call.

X

Device Name—Device Name.

Signaling IP—IP address of the device that originated the call signaling. For Cisco Unified IP Phones, this field specifies the address of the phone. For PSTN calls, this field specifies the address of the H.323 gateway.

B-Channel—B-channel number of the MGCP gateway, or NA, if not applicable.

Media IP—IP address where the call originated.

Media Port—Port through which the call originated.

Codec—Codec name.

Device Pool—Device pool where the call originated.

Location—Location where the call originated.

Note If an IP address is clickable, click it to launch the Detailed Device View page or Phone Detail window on Operations Manager. To enable the launch of Operations Manager, ensure that the IP address for Operations Manager is configured in Service Monitor. See Configuring and Viewing Other Settings, page 3-34.

Called

Directory Number—Directory number where the call was received.

Device Type—Type of device receiving the call.

X

Device Name—Device Name.

Signaling IP—IP address of the device that terminates the call signaling.

B-Channel—B-channel number of the MGCP gateway, or NA, if not applicable.

Media IP—IP address where the call was received.

Media Port—Port on which the call was received.

Codec—Codec name.

Device Pool—Device pool where the call was received.

Location—Location where the call was received.

Note If an IP address is clickable, click it to launch the Detailed Device View page or Phone Detail window on Operations Manager. To enable the launch of Operations Manager, ensure that the IP address for Operations Manager is configured in Service Monitor. See Configuring and Viewing Other Settings, page 3-34.

Signaling Start Time

Date and time that the call started with respect to the Service Monitor server local time zone (not the time zone in which the Unified Communications Manager resides).

X

Call Duration(s)

Total seconds in the call.

X

MOS

One of these:

Average MOS value during the call.

Short Call—A short duration call (less than 9 seconds) for which Unified Communications Manager set MOS to zero.

Unavailable—Data was not available from the cluster; not all endpoints support CVTQ. For more information, see Cisco Unified Service Monitor 8.5 Compatibility Matrix.

Note When VAD is enabled on a voice gateway, lower MOS values might be seen on calls between the gateway and Cisco Unified IP Phones. For more information, see Configuring Voice Gateways When VAD Is Enabled, page B-12.

X

Grade

Based on the global threshold settings.

One of these:

Good—The MOS value exceeds the acceptable MOS threshold.

Acceptable—The MOS value falls between the acceptable MOS threshold and the poor MOS threshold.

Poor—The MOS value falls below the poor MOS threshold.

No MOS—The sample interval is less than three seconds, therefore the MOS value could not be calculated.

Short Call—A short duration call (less than 9 seconds) for which Unified Communications Manager set MOS to zero.

X

Impairment Details

Jitter (ms)—Milliseconds of jitter during the call.

Packet Loss—Number of packets lost during the call.

Concealment Seconds—Number of seconds that have concealment events (lost frames) from the start of the voice stream (includes severely concealed seconds).

Severely Concealed Seconds—Number of seconds during which a significant amount of concealment (greater than fifty milliseconds) was observed.

Latency—Delay.

Concealment Ratio—Ratio of concealment frames to total frames.

Call Release Code

Caller Termination Cause—String that describes why the call was terminated on the caller endpoint.

Called Termination Cause—String that describes why the call was terminated on the called endpoint.

Service Monitor displays cause codes that are provided by Unified Communications Manager. For more information, see Understanding Call Termination Cause Codes and Call Release Codes.


Understanding Call Termination Cause Codes and Call Release Codes

Unified Communications Manager provides the cause codes that are included in Service Monitor reports. Because of their length, the following cause codes are truncated (as shown) when displayed in Service Monitor windows:

Only restricted digital information bearer capability is available (national use...

Destination number missing and DC not subscribed or non-existent CUG (Closed Use...

Message is not compatible with the call state, or the message type is non-existe...

The call was terminated when a timer expired and a recovery routine was executed...

Call split (this is a Cisco specific code). It is used when a call is terminate...

For more information, see one of the following:

Call Termination Cause Codes in Cisco Unified Communications Manager CDR Analysis and Reporting Administration Guide for the appropriate Unified Communications Manager release version later than 5.0.

Cause Codes and Call Release Codes, respectively, in:

Call Detail Record Definitions for Cisco Unified CallManager 5.0(2)

Cisco CallManager 4.2(1) Call Detail Record Definition

You can find these documents at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps556/
products_programming_reference_guides_list.html

Using Most-Impacted Endpoints Reports

Throughout the day—from 00:00:00 until 23:59:59:999—Service Monitor analyzes and summarizes call data as it comes in to determine the endpoints where the greatest number of violations occurred. When you view a Most-Impacted Endpoints report, you see the results of the previous day's analysis. Optionally at 1 AM, Service Monitor exports daily and weekly (on Monday) Most-Impacted Endpoints reports, storing them on the server.

By default, Service Monitor determines the 10 most-impacted endpoints and does not export the Most-Impacted Endpoints reports. To change the number of most-impacted endpoints that Service Monitor reports on and to configure automatic export, see Configuring Settings for Most-Impacted Endpoints Reports, page 3-16.

This section includes the following topics:

Generating and Understanding the Sensor Most-Impacted Endpoints Report

Generating and Understanding the CVTQ Most-Impacted Endpoints Report

Generating and Understanding the Sensor Most-Impacted Endpoints Report


Note By default, 10 endpoints are included on the Most-Impacted Endpoints reports. For more information, see Configuring Settings for Most-Impacted Endpoints Reports, page 3-16.


To generate the Sensor Most-Impacted Endpoints report, select Reports > Sensor Report > Most-Impacted Endpoints. The report opens in a new window.

The Sensor Most-Impacted Endpoints report displays the data listed in Table 2-8.

Table 2-8 Sensor Most-Impacted Endpoint Report Contents 

Column
Description

Endpoint

One of these:

Directory number.

IP address for the endpoint.

IP Address

IP address

Note Clicking the IP address launches a CVTQ report for the endpoint.

Device Type

The device type that Unified Communications manager provides.

Note Service Monitor displays Unavailable if the corresponding Unified Communications Manager has not been added to Service Monitor or has returned an invalid device type.

Cumulative Talk Time (min)

Cumulative duration of speech through this endpoint during the report time period.

Note When launched from the Reports tab, the report includes data from the previous day—from 00:00:00 until 23:59:59:999. If configured, you can examine a weekly report that has been exported to the server. For the location of exported reports, see Configuring Settings for Most-Impacted Endpoints Reports, page 3-16.

Impaired Minutes

Number of minutes during which MOS was below a threshold through this endpoint.

% of Impaired Minutes

Impaired minutes as a percentage of all minutes.

Average MOS

Average MOS value during cumulative talk time.


Generating and Understanding the CVTQ Most-Impacted Endpoints Report


Note For information about configuring the number of endpoints to include in Most-Impacted Endpoints reports, see Configuring Settings for Most-Impacted Endpoints Reports, page 3-16.


To generate the CVTQ Most-Impacted Endpoints report, select Reports > CVTQ Report > Most-Impacted Endpoints. The report opens in a new window.

The CVTQ Most-Impacted Endpoints report displays the data listed in Table 2-9.

Table 2-9 CVTQ Most-Impacted Endpoints Report Contents 

Column
Description

Endpoint

One of these:

Directory number—One directory number or, for a multiline phone, a comma-separated list of directory numbers.

IP address for the endpoint.

Device Name

Endpoint name.

Note Clicking the device name launches a CVTQ report for the endpoint.

Device Type

The device type provided by Unified Communications Manager.

Cumulative Talk Time (min)

Cumulative duration of all calls through this endpoint during the report time period.

Note When launched from the Reports tab, the report includes data from the previous day—from 00:00:00 until 23:59:59:999. If configured, you can examine a weekly report that has been exported to the server. For the location of exported reports, see Configuring Settings for Most-Impacted Endpoints Reports, page 3-16

# of Calls

Number of calls through this endpoint during the report time period.

Impaired Calls

Number of impaired calls through this endpoint during the report time period.

% of Impaired Calls

Impaired calls as a percentage of calls during the report time period.

Average MOS

Average MOS value during the call or Unavailable—Not all endpoints support CVTQ. For more information, see Cisco Unified Service Monitor 8.5 Compatibility Matrix.

Note When VAD is enabled on a voice gateway, lower MOS values might be seen on calls between the gateway and Cisco Unified IP Phones. For more information, see Configuring Voice Gateways When VAD Is Enabled, page B-12.


Using CDR Call Reports

See the following topics:

Generating a CDR Call Report

Understanding a CDR Call Report

Generating a CDR Call Report


Note A CDR Call Report takes information from Unified Communications Manager Call Detail Records (CDRs). CDRs do not include call quality information such as MOS, latency, or jitter. For a report that includes call quality information, see Generating a CVTQ Diagnostic Report.


Call categories are among the filters that you can use to generate a CDR Call report. You can filter a CDR Call report by system-defined call categories and, when configured, user-defined call categories. For more information, see Configuring Call Classification, page 3-18.


Step 1 Select Reports > CDR Call Reports > Diagnostic.

The CDR Call Report Filter page appears.

Step 2 Do one of the following:

Click Generate Report to generate the report using the default values as displayed on the page. A report opens in a new window. See Understanding a CDR Call Report.

Change any of the report inputs listed in the following table. (To be included in the report, data must meet each of the criteria that you specify.)

Fields
Description/Action

Cluster ID(s)

To select clusters:

1. Click . The Select Clusters list appears.

2. Select check boxes.

3. Click OK.

Grades

Based on the global threshold settings.

You can select any or all of the following:

Good

Poor

Acceptable

No MOS

Short Call

To select grades:

1. Click . The Select Grade dialog box appears.

2. Select check boxes.

3. Click OK.

Calls Between

Endpoint—Calls between the endpoints that you specify are included in the report. Endpoints that match the criteria that you enter can be caller or called endpoints.

To configure endpoints, do the following:

Endpoint 1—Do one of the following:

Select the DN radio button—Enter a complete directory number (such as 50123). Or enter a partial directory number that includes wildcards; an uppercase X matches a single ASCII character, and an asterisk (*) matches multiple ASCII characters.

Select the IP Address radio button—In each of the 4 octets, enter either a number or an asterisk (replaces an entire octet).

Note For more information, see Specifying IP Addresses or Directory Numbers for Endpoints.

Endpoint 2—Follow the instructions for Endpoint 1.

Note The relationship between Endpoint 1 and Endpoint 2 can be:

One-to-one

One-to-many

Many-to-one

Many-to-many

Location—Calls between locations that you specify are included in the report.

To configure locations, do the following:

Origination—Select Any, or a specific location.

Destination—Select AnyOther, or a specific location.

Device Pool—Calls between device pools that you specify are included in the report.

To configure device pools, do the following:

Origination—Select Any, or a specific device pool.

Destination—Select AnyOther, or a specific device pool.

Call Category Names

By default, all call category names are selected. To select call category names:

1. Select a radio button:

Category Name—Enables you to select from a list that contains call category names and types.

Category Type—Enables you to select from a list of call category types only. (By selecting category types, all category names that belong to the category types are selected.)

2. Click to display the list.

3. Select check boxes.

4. Click OK.

Source Device Type

To select source device types categories:

1. Click . The Select Source Device Type list appears.

2. Select check boxes.

3. Click OK.

Destination Device Type

To select destination device types categories:

1. Click . The Select Destination Device Type list appears.

2. Select check boxes.

Click OK.

Call Termination Type

Select a radio button: Both, Success, or Failure

Note For more information, see Understanding the Call Termination Type: Success or Failure.

Device Name

Enter a device name and select a radio button (To, From, or Either). The default radio button is To.

Termination Cause Code

Select one.

To see calls that terminated with any cause code, select All. To see calls that terminated with a particular cause code, select it.

Note Some cause codes are too long to display fully. For more information, see Understanding Call Termination Cause Codes and Call Release Codes.

Call Class

Select a radio button: Both, On-Net, or Off-Net

Note For more information, see Understanding OffNet and OnNet Calls, page 3-22.

Call Duration Between number and number seconds

Enter the number of seconds. By default, call duration is set to retrieve calls between 0 (zero) and 3600 seconds.

Call Signaling Start Date and Time

Select a radio button and select the period that you want to report on:

Data for—Select one of these:

Last Hour—The previous 60 minutes.

Today—From 00:00:00 today until now.

This Week—From 00:00 Monday until now.

Custom—Enter the From date and time and To date and time.


Step 3 Click Generate Report. Service Monitor searches for data for—at most—a few minutes before a report opens in a new window. See Understanding a CDR Call Report.


Note If more than 2,000 records match the filters that you entered, Service Monitor displays an informational message before displaying the report. For more information, see Accessing Data for Reports that Contain More than 2,000 Records.



Understanding the Call Termination Type: Success or Failure

Unified Communications Manager provides a cause code that describes how the call terminated for each endpoint in a call. Service Monitor determines the call termination type based on the list that follows. Cause codes in the following list are considered Success; all others are considered Failure:

0—No error

1—Unallocated (unassigned) number

The number requested by the calling user cannot be reached because it is not currently assigned to any user by the network.

2—No route to specified transit network (national use)

The equipment issuing this cause code received a request to route the call through a transit network that it does not recognize for one of the following reasons:

The network does not exist

The network exists but does not serve the equipment that is sending this cause.

This message is network-dependent.

3—No route to destination

The called user cannot be reached because the network that serves the called user is inaccessible.

16—Normal call clearing

The call is being cleared because one of the users involved in the call has requested that the call be cleared.

17—User busy

31—Normal, unspecified

127—Interworking, unspecified

393216 (0x60000)—Call split

This code is used when a call is terminated during a transfer operation because it was split off and terminated; (it was not part of the final transferred call).

458752 (0x70000)— Drop any party/drop last party

262144 (0x40000)—Conference Full

For more information, see Understanding Call Termination Cause Codes and Call Release Codes.

Understanding a CDR Call Report


Note A CDR Call report takes information from Unified Communications Manager Call Detail Records (CDRs). CDRs do not include call quality information such as MOS, latency, or jitter; for a report that includes call quality information, see Generating a CVTQ Diagnostic Report.


Table 2-10 lists all possible columns of data that can be displayed in a CDR Call report; by default, certain columns are displayed (as noted). For more information, see Selecting Columns to Display and to Hide on a Report.

Table 2-10 CDR Call Report Contents 

Column
Description
Displayed by Default

Cluster ID

Unified Communications Manager cluster ID.

X

Caller

Directory Number—Directory number where the call was made.

Device Type—Type of device making the call.

X

Device Name—Device Name.

Codec—Codec name.

Signaling IP—IP address of the device that originated the call signaling. For Cisco Unified IP Phones, this field specifies the address of the phone. For PSTN calls, this field specifies the address of the H.323 gateway.

B-Channel—B-channel number of the MGCP gateway, or NA, if not applicable.

Media IP—IP address where the call originated.

Media Port—Port through which the call originated.

Device Pool—Device pool where the call originated.

Location—Location where the call originated.

Called

Directory Number—Directory number where the call was received.

Device Type—Type of device receiving the call.

X

Device Name—Device Name.

Signaling IP—IP address of the device that terminates the call signaling.

B-Channel—B-channel number of the MGCP gateway, or NA, if not applicable.

Media IP—IP address where the call was received.

Media Port—Port on which the call was received.

Codec—Codec name. For information on how to determine bandwidth per codec, see Determining WAN Bandwidth per Codec.

Device Pool—Device pool where the call was received.

Location—Location where the call was received.

Call Category Names

A comma-separated list of the categories to which the call belongs.

Note Service Monitor classifies a call into all the categories to which it belongs. For more information, see Understanding Call Classification, page 3-18.

X

Call Category Types

A comma-separated list of the category types to which the call categories belong.

Call Class

One of these:

Offnet

Onnet

Note For more information, see Understanding OffNet and OnNet Calls, page 3-22.

X

Call Duration (s)

Total seconds in the call.

X

Grade

Based on the global threshold settings.

One of the following appear:

Good—The MOS value exceeds the acceptable MOS threshold.

Acceptable—The MOS value falls between the acceptable MOS threshold and the poor MOS threshold.

Poor—The MOS value falls below the poor MOS threshold.

No MOS—The sample interval is less than three seconds, therefore the MOS value could not be calculated.

Short Call—A short duration call (less than 9 seconds) for which Unified Communications Manager set MOS to zero.

Unknown—Occurs when the corresponding CMR records are not available.

Note Clicking a grade launches the CVTQ report for the CDR

X

Termination Type

Success or Failure. For more information, Understanding the Call Termination Type: Success or Failure.

X

Call Release Code

Caller Termination Cause—String that describes why the call was terminated on the caller endpoint.

Called Termination Cause—String that describes why the call was terminated on the called endpoint.

Service Monitor displays cause codes that are provided by Unified Communications Manager. For more information, see Understanding Call Termination Cause Codes and Call Release Codes.

Signaling Start Time

Date and time that the call started with respect to the Service Monitor server local time zone (not the time zone in which the Unified Communications Manager resides).


Determining WAN Bandwidth per Codec

WAN bandwidth used per codec is defined in Unified Communications Manager documents, such as the following:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/cucmbe/admin/7_1_2/ccmcfg/b02locat.html#wp1065267


Note The definition of WAN bandwidth per codec does not not change across software releases.


WAN bandwidth per codec is applicable only when a different call admission control location is configured in Unified Communications Manager for each endpoint in a call. Service Monitor does not support endpoint location. To calculate bandwidth usage for a call, you must find out which call admission control location is configured for each endpoint; if different locations are defined, the WAN bandwidth defined for the codec is applicable.