Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Command Reference
ip rsvp precedence through load protocol
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ip rsvp precedence

Table Of Contents

ip rsvp precedence

ip rsvp qos

ip rsvp reservation

ip rsvp reservation-host

ip rsvp resource-provider

ip rsvp sender

ip rsvp sender-host

ip rsvp signalling dscp

ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair notifications

ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair rate

ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair wait-time

ip rsvp signalling hello (configuration)

ip rsvp signalling hello (interface)

ip rsvp signalling hello dscp

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart send

ip rsvp signalling hello refresh interval

ip rsvp signalling hello refresh misses

ip rsvp signalling hello reroute dscp

ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh interval

ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh misses

ip rsvp signalling hello statistics

ip rsvp signalling initial-retransmit-delay

ip rsvp signalling patherr state-removal

ip rsvp signalling rate-limit

ip rsvp signalling refresh interval

ip rsvp signalling refresh misses

ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction

ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction ack-delay

ip rsvp source

ip rsvp svc-required

ip rsvp tos

ip rsvp transport

ip rsvp transport sender-host

ip rsvp tunnel overhead-percent

ip rsvp udp-multicasts

ip rtp compression-connections

ip rtp header-compression

ip rtp priority

ip tcp compression-connections

ip tcp header-compression

iphc-profile

lane client qos

lane qos database

load protocol


ip rsvp precedence

To enable the router to mark the IP Precedence value of the type of service (ToS) byte for packets in a Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) reserved path using the specified values for packets that either conform to or exceed the RSVP flowspec, use the ip rsvp precedence command in interface configuration mode. To remove existing IP Precedence settings, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp precedence {conform precedence-value | exceed precedence-value}

no ip rsvp precedence [conform | exceed]

Syntax Description

conform precedence-value

Specifies an IP Precedence value in the range from 0 to 7 for traffic that conforms to the RSVP flowspec. The IP Precedence value is written to the three high-order bits (bits 5 to 7) of the ToS byte in the IP header of a packet. Either the conform or exceed keyword is required; both keywords may be specified.

When used with the no form of the command, the conform keyword is optional.

exceed precedence-value

Specifies an IP Precedence value in the range from 0 to 7 for traffic that exceeds the RSVP flowspec. The IP Precedence value is written to the three high-order bits (bits 5 to 7) of the ToS byte in the IP header of a packet. Either the conform or exceed keyword is required; both keywords may be specified.

When used with the no form of the command, the exceed keyword is optional.


Command Default

The IP Precedence bits of the ToS byte are left unmodified when this command is not used. The default state is equivalent to execution of the no ip rsvp precedence command.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(3)T

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

Packets in an RSVP reserved path are divided into two classes: those that conform to the reservation flowspec and those that correspond to a reservation but that exceed, or are outside, the reservation flowspec.

The ip rsvp precedence command allows you to set the IP Precedence values to be applied to packets belonging to these two classes. You must specify the IP Precedence value for at least one class of traffic when you use this command. You can use a single instance of the command to specify values for both classes, in which case you can specify the conform and exceed keywords in either order.

As part of its input processing, RSVP uses the ip rsvp precedence command to set the IP Precedence bits on conforming and nonconforming packets. If per-VC DWRED is configured, the system uses the IP Precedence and ToS bit settings on the output interface in its packet drop process. The IP Precedence setting of a packet can also be used by interfaces on downstream routers.

Execution of the ip rsvp precedence command causes IP Precedence values for all preexisting reservations on the interface to be modified.


Note RSVP must be enabled on an interface before you can use this command; that is, use of the ip rsvp bandwidth command must precede use of the ip rsvp precedence command. RSVP cannot be configured with VIP-distributed Cisco Express Forwarding (dCEF).


RSVP receives packets from the underlying forwarding mechanism. Therefore, before you use the ip rsvp precedence command to set IP Precedence, one of the following features is required:

Weighted fair queueing (WFQ) must be enabled on the interface.

RSVP switched virtual circuits (SVCs) must be used.

NetFlow must be configured to assist RSVP.


Note Use of the no form of this command is not equivalent to giving the ip rsvp precedence 0 command, which sets all precedence on the packets to 0, regardless of previous precedence setting.


Examples

The following example shows how to set the IP Precedence value to 3 for all traffic on the ATM interface 0 that conforms to the RSVP flowspec and to 2 for all traffic that exceeds the flowspec:

interface atm0
 ip rsvp precedence conform 3 exceed 2

The following example shows how to set the IP Precedence value to 2 for all traffic on ATM interface 1 that conforms to the RSVP flowspec. The IP Precedence values of those packets that exceed the flowspec are not altered in any way:

interface ATM1
 ip rsvp precedence conform 2

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp bandwidth

Enables RSVP for IP on an interface.

ip rsvp policy cops minimal

Lowers the COPS server's load and improves latency times for messages on the governed router.

ip rsvp tos

Allows you to set the ToS values to be applied to packets that either conform to or exceed the RSVP flowspec.

show ip rsvp

Displays the IP Precedence and ToS bit values to be applied to packets that either conform to or exceed the RSVP flowspec for a given interface.


ip rsvp qos

To enable Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) quality of service (QoS) flows on a router running Multiprotocol Label Switching traffic engineering (MPLS TE), use the ip rsvp qos command in global configuration mode. To disable RSVP QoS flows, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp qos

no ip rsvp qos

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

RSVP QoS flows are not enabled.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRC

This command was introduced.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6.


Usage Guidelines

If RSVP QoS flows and MPLS TE are enabled, the router processes and installs RSVP label switched path (LSP) and IPv4 messages such as PATH and RESV. If RSVP QoS flows and MPLS TE are then disabled with IPv4 and LSP states installed, all installed IPv4 states are immediately cleared. LSP states remain unmodified. Further refreshes or new IPv4 RSVP messages are forwarded unmodified.

Use the show ip rsvp command to display the status of the ip rsvp qos command.

Examples

The following example configures RSVP QoS flows on a router running MPLS TE:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# ip rsvp qos

Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip rsvp

Displays specific information for RSVP categories.


ip rsvp reservation

To enable a router to simulate receiving Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) RESV messages from a downstream host, use the ip rsvp reservation command in global configuration mode. To disable this function, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp reservation session-ip-address sender-ip-address {ip-protocol | tcp | udp} session-dest-port sender-source-port next-hop-address next-hop-interface {ff | se | wf} {load | rate} bandwidth burst-size [identity alias]

no ip rsvp reservation session-ip-address sender-ip-address {ip-protocol | tcp | udp} session-dest-port sender-source-port next-hop-address next-hop-interface {ff | se | wf} {load | rate} bandwidth burst-size [identity alias]

Syntax Description

session-ip-address

For unicast sessions, the address of the intended receiver; for multicast sessions, the IP multicast address of the session.

sender-ip-address

IP address of the sender.

ip-protocol | tcp | udp

Specifies the IP protocol in the range of 0 to 255, TCP, or UDP.

session-dest-port sender-source-port

The session-dest-port argument is the destination port. The sender-source-port argument is the source port. Port numbers are specified in all cases, because the use of 16-bit ports following the IP header is not limited to UDP or TCP. If the destination is zero, the source must be zero, and the implication is that ports are not checked. If the destination is nonzero, the source must be nonzero (except for Wildcard Filter reservations, for which the source port is always ignored and can therefore be zero).

next-hop-address

Hostname or IP address of the receiver or the router closest to the receiver.

next-hop-interface

Next-hop interface or subinterface type and number. Interface type can be ethernet, loopback, null, or serial.

ff | se | wf

Specifies the reservation style:

ff—Fixed Filter with single reservation.

se—Shared Explicit with shared reservation and limited scope.

wf—Wildcard Filter with shared reservation and unlimited scope.

load

Specifies the controlled load service.

rate

Specifies the Quality of Service (QoS) guaranteed bit rate service.

bandwidth

Average bit rate, in kbps, to reserve up to 75 percent of the total on the interface. The range is from 1 to 10000000.

burst-size

Maximum burst size (kbps of data in queue). The range is from 1 to 65535.

identity alias

(Optional) Specifies an application ID alias. An alias is a string that can have as many as 64 printable characters (in the range 0x20 to 0x7E).

Note If you use the " " or ? character as part of the alias or locator string itself, you must type the CTRL-V key sequence before entering the embedded " " or ? character. The alias is never transmitted to other routers.


Command Default

The router does not simulate receiving RSVP RESV messages.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

11.2

This command was introduced.

12.4(6)T

This command was modified. The optional identity alias keyword and argument combination was added.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp reservation command to make the router simulate receiving RSVP RESV messages from a downstream host and to proxy RSVP RESV messages for that host. By giving a local (loopback) next-hop address and next-hop interface, you can also use this command to proxy RSVP for the router that you are configuring or you can use the ip rsvp reservation-host command.

An alias must reference an RSVP identity that you created by using the ip rsvp identity command. The policy-locator string associated with this identity is signaled in the RESV message. This identity overrides any application ID that is contained in the matching PATH message.

If the matching PATH message has an application ID, but you have not specified an application ID using the ip rsvp reservation command, the RESV message will not contain an application ID. However, the RESV message proxied by the ip rsvp listener command does put the matching PATH message application ID into the proxied RESV message.

Examples

The following example shows how to specify the use of a Shared Explicit style of reservation and the controlled load service, with token buckets of 100 or 150 kbps and a maximum queue depth of 60 or 65 kbps:

Router(config)# ip rsvp reservation 192.168.0.2 172.16.1.1 udp 20 30 172.16.4.1 Ethernet1 
se load 100 60

Router(config)# ip rsvp reservation 192.168.0.2 172.16.2.1 tcp 20 30 172.16.4.1 Ethernet1 
se load 150 65 

The following example shows how to specify the use of a Wildcard Filter style of reservation and the guaranteed bit rate service, with token buckets of 300 or 350 kbps, a maximum queue depth of 60 or 65 kbps, and an application ID:

Router(config)# ip rsvp reservation 192.168.0.3 0.0.0.0 udp 20 0 172.16.4.1 Ethernet1 wf 
rate 300 60 identity xyz

Router(config)# ip rsvp reservation 192.168.1.1 0.0.0.0 udp 20 0 172.16.4.1 Ethernet1 wf 
rate 350 65 identity xyz

Note that the wildcard filter does not admit the specification of the sender; it accepts all senders. This action is denoted by setting the source address and port to zero. If, in any filter style, the destination port is specified to be zero, RSVP does not permit the source port to be anything else; it understands that such protocols do not use ports or that the specification applies to all ports.

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp bandwidth

Enables RSVP for IP on an interface.

ip rsvp identity

Defines RSVP application IDs.

ip rsvp neighbor

Enables a router to control who its authorized neighbors are.

ip rsvp reservation-host

Enables a router to simulate a host generating RSVP RESV messages.

ip rsvp sender

Enables a router to simulate receiving RSVP PATH messages.

ip rsvp sender-host

Enables a router to simulate a host generating RSVP PATH messages.

show ip rsvp installed

Displays RSVP-related bandwidth information.

show ip rsvp interface

Displays RSVP-related interface information.

show ip rsvp neighbor

Displays current RSVP neighbors.

show ip rsvp policy identity

Displays selected RSVP identities in a router configuration.

show ip rsvp reservation

Displays RSVP RESV-related receiver information currently in the database.

show ip rsvp sender

Displays RSVP PATH-related sender information currently in the database.


ip rsvp reservation-host

To enable a router to simulate a host generating Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) RESV messages, use the ip rsvp reservation-host command in global configuration mode. To disable this function, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp reservation-host session-ip-address sender-ip-address {ip-protocol | tcp | udp} session-dest-port sender-source-port {ff | se | wf} {load | rate} bandwidth burst-size [identity alias] [vrf vrf-name]

no ip rsvp reservation-host session-ip-address sender-ip-address {ip-protocol | tcp | udp} session-dest-port sender-source-port {ff | se | wf} {load | rate} bandwidth burst-size [identity alias] [vrf vrf-name]

Syntax Description

session-ip-address

For unicast sessions, this is the address of the intended receiver. IP multicast addresses cannot be used with this argument. It must be a logical address configured on an interface on the router that you are configuring.

sender-ip-address

IP address of the sender.

ip-protocol | tcp | udp

Specifies the IP protocol in the range of 0 to 255, TCP or UDP.

session-dest-port sender-source-port

The session-dest-port argument is the destination port. The sender-source-port argument is the source port. Port numbers are specified in all cases, because the use of 16-bit ports following the IP header is not limited to UDP or TCP. If the destination is zero, the source must be zero, and the implication is that ports are not checked. If the destination is nonzero, the source must be nonzero (except for Wildcard Filter reservations, for which the source port is always ignored and can therefore be zero).

ff | se | wf

Specifies the reservation style:

ff—Fixed Filter with single reservation.

se—Shared Explicit with shared reservation and limited scope.

wf—Wildcard Filter with shared reservation and unlimited scope.

load

Specifies the controlled load service.

rate

Specifies the Quality of Service (QoS) guaranteed bit rate service.

bandwidth

Average bit rate, in kbps, to reserve up to 75 percent of the total on the interface. The range is from 1 to 10000000.

burst-size

Maximum burst size (kbps of data in queue). The range is from 1 to 65535.

identity alias

(Optional) Specifies an application ID alias. An alias is a string that can have as many as 64 printable characters (in the range 0x20 to 0x7E).

Note If you use the " " or ? character as part of the alias or locator string itself, you must type the CTRL-V key sequence before entering the embedded " " or ? character. The alias is never transmitted to other routers.

vrf vrf-name

(Optional) Specifies a virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instance.


Command Default

The router does not simulate a host generating RSVP RESV messages.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0

This command was introduced.

12.4(6)T

This command was modified. The optional identity alias keyword and argument combination was added.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.

15.0(1)M

This command was modified. The optional vrf vrf-name keyword and argument combination was added.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6.


Usage Guidelines


Note The syntax of the command depends on your platform and release. The vrf vrf-name keyword and argument combination is not supported on ASR 1000 Series Aggregation Services Routers.


Use the ip rsvp reservation-host command to make a router simulate a host generating its own RSVP RESV messages. This command is similar to the ip rsvp reservation command, which can cause a router to generate RESV messages on behalf of another host. The main differences between the ip rsvp reservation-host and ip rsvp reservation commands follow:

When you enter the ip rsvp reservation-host command, the session-ip-address argument must be a local address configured on an interface on the router. Therefore, you cannot proxy a reservation on behalf of a flow that is destined for another host. Also, you cannot use this command to generate reservation messages for multicast sessions.

Because the message is assumed to originate from the router that you are configuring, you do not specify a next-hop or incoming interface for the RSVP RESV message when entering the ip rsvp reservation-host command.

Use the ip rsvp reservation-host command for debugging and testing purposes because you cannot use it to proxy RSVP for non-RSVP-capable hosts or for multicast sessions.

An alias must reference an RSVP identity that you created by using the ip rsvp identity command. The policy-locator string associated with this identity is signaled in the RESV message. This identity overrides any application ID that is contained in the matching PATH message.

If the matching PATH message has an application ID, but you have not specified an application ID using the ip rsvp reservation-host command, the RESV message does not contain an application ID. However, the RESV message proxied by the ip rsvp listener command does put the matching PATH message application ID into the proxied RESV message.

Examples

The following example specifies the use of a Shared Explicit style of reservation and the controlled load service, with token buckets of 100 or 150 kbps, 60 or 65 kbps maximum queue depth, and an application ID:

Router(config)# ip rsvp reservation-host 10.1.1.1 10.30.1.4 udp 20 30 se load 100 60 
identity xyz

Router(config)# ip rsvp reservation-host 10.40.2.2 10.22.1.1 tcp 20 30 se load 150 65 
identity xyz

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp bandwidth

Enables RSVP for IP on an interface.

ip rsvp identity

Defines RSVP application IDs.

ip rsvp neighbor

Enables a router to control who its authorized RSVP neighbors are.

ip rsvp reservation

Enables a router to simulate receiving RSVP RESV messages.

ip rsvp sender

Enables a router to simulate receiving RSVP PATH messages.

ip rsvp sender-host

Enables a router to simulate a host generating RSVP PATH messages.

show ip rsvp installed

Displays RSVP-related bandwidth information.

show ip rsvp interface

Displays RSVP-related interface information.

show ip rsvp neighbor

Displays current RSVP neighbors.

show ip rsvp policy identity

Displays selected RSVP identities in a router configuration.

show ip rsvp reservation

Displays RSVP RESV-related receiver information currently in the database.

show ip rsvp sender

Displays RSVP PATH-related sender information currently in the database.


ip rsvp resource-provider

To configure a resource provider for an aggregate flow, use the ip rsvp resource-provider command in interface configuration mode. To disable a resource provider for an aggregate flow, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp resource-provider {none | wfq interface | wfq pvc}

no ip rsvp resource-provider

Syntax Description

none

Specifies no resource provider regardless of whether one is configured on the interface.

wfq interface

Specifies Weighted fair queueing (WFQ) as the resource provider on the interface.

wfq pvc

Specifies WFQ as the resource provider on the permanent virtual circuit (PVC) or connection.


Command Default

WFQ (the wfq interface keyword) is the default resource provider that Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) configures on the interface.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(2)T

This command was introduced.

12.0(24)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(24)S.

12.2(14)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(14)S.

12.2(18)SXF2

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXF2.

12.2(33)SRB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRB.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6.


Usage Guidelines


Note The syntax of the command depends on your platform and image. The wfq interface and wfq pvc keywords are not supported on Cisco ASR 1000 series routers.


Use the ip rsvp resource-provider command to configure the resource provider with which you want RSVP to interact when it installs a reservation.

To ensure that a flow receives quality of service (QoS) guarantees when using WFQ on a per-flow basis, configure wfq interface or wfq pvc as the resource provider. To ensure that a flow receives QoS guarantees when using class-based weighted fair queueing (CBWFQ) for data packet processing, configure none as the resource provider.


Note Resource provider was formerly called QoS provider.


Examples

In the following example, the ip rsvp resource-provider command is configured with wfq pvc as the resource provider, ensuring that a flow receives QoS guarantees when using WFQ on a per-flow basis:

Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface atm 6/0
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp resource-provider wfq pvc

In the following example, the ip rsvp resource-provider command is configured with none as the resource provider, ensuring that a flow receives QoS guarantees when using CBWFQ for data-packet processing:

Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface atm 6/0
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp resource-provider none

Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip rsvp interface

Displays RSVP-related interface information.


ip rsvp sender

To enable a router to simulate receiving Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) PATH messages, use the ip rsvp sender command in global configuration mode. To disable this function, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp sender session-ip-address sender-ip-address {ip-protocol | tcp | udp} session-dest-port sender-source-port previous-hop-ip-address previous-hop-interface bandwidth burst-size [identity alias]

no ip rsvp sender session-ip-address sender-ip-address {ip-protocol | tcp | udp} session-dest-port sender-source-port previous-hop-ip-address previous-hop-interface bandwidth burst-size [identity alias]

Syntax Description

session-ip-address

For unicast sessions, the address of the intended receiver; for multicast sessions, the IP multicast address of the session.

sender-ip-address

IP address of the sender.

ip-protocol | tcp | udp

Specifies the IP protocol in the range of 0 to 255, TCP or UDP.

session-dest-port sender-source-port

The session-dest-port argument is the destination port. The sender-source-port argument is the source port. Port numbers are specified in all cases, because the use of 16-bit ports following the IP header is not limited to UDP or TCP. If the destination is zero, the source must be zero, and the implication is that ports are not checked. If the destination is nonzero, the source must be nonzero.

previous-hop-ip-address

Address of the sender or the router closest to the sender.

previous-hop-interface

Previous-hop interface or subinterface. Interface type can be ethernet, gigabitethernet, loopback, null, or serial.

bandwidth

Average bit rate, in kbps, to reserve up to 75 percent of the total on the interface. The range is from 1 to 10000000.

burst-size

Maximum burst size (kbps of data in queue). The range is from 1 to 65535.

identity alias

(Optional) Specifies an application ID alias. An alias is a string that can have as many as 64 printable character (in the range 0x20 to 0x7E).

Note If you use the " " or ? character as part of the alias or locator string itself, you must type the CTRL-V key sequence before entering the embedded " " or ? character. The alias is never transmitted to other routers.


Command Default

The router does not simulate receiving RSVP PATH messages.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

11.2

This command was introduced.

12.4(6)T

This command was modified. The optional identity alias keyword and argument combination was added.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp sender command to make the router simulate the receiving of RSVP PATH messages from an upstream host and to proxy RSVP PATH messages from that host. By including a local (loopback) previous-hop address and previous-hop interface, you can also use this command to proxy RSVP for the router that you are configuring.

An alias must reference an RSVP identity that you created by using the ip rsvp identity command. The policy-locator string associated with this identity is supplied in the PATH message.

Examples

The following example sets up the router to act as though it is receiving RSVP PATH messages using UDP over loopback interface 1:

Router(config)# ip rsvp sender 192.168.0.1 172.16.2.1 udp 20 30 172.16.2.1 loopback1 50 5 
identity xyz

Router(config)# ip rsvp sender 192.168.0.2 172.16.2.1 udp 20 30 172.16.2.1 loopback1 50 5 
identity xyz

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp bandwidth

Enables RSVP for IP on an interface.

ip rsvp identity

Defines RSVP application IDs.

ip rsvp neighbor

Enables a router to control who its authorized RSVP neighbors are.

ip rsvp reservation

Enables a router to simulate receiving RSVP RESV messages.

ip rsvp reservation-host

Enables a router to simulate a host generating RSVP RESV messages.

ip rsvp sender-host

Enables a router to simulate a host generating RSVP PATH messages.

show ip rsvp installed

Displays RSVP-related bandwidth information.

show ip rsvp interface

Displays RSVP-related interface information.

show ip rsvp neighbor

Displays current RSVP neighbors.

show ip rsvp policy identity

Displays selected RSVP identities in a router configuration.

show ip rsvp reservation

Displays RSVP RESV-related receiver information currently in the database.

show ip rsvp sender

Displays RSVP PATH-related sender information currently in the database.


ip rsvp sender-host

To enable a router to simulate a host generating a Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) PATH message, use the ip rsvp sender-host command in global configuration mode. To disable this function, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp sender-host session-ip-address sender-ip-address {ip-protocol | tcp | udp} session-dest-port sender-source-port bandwidth burst-size [identity alias] [vrf vrf-name]

no ip rsvp sender-host ssession-ip-address sender-ip-address {ip-protocol | tcp | udp} session-dest-port sender-source-port bandwidth burst-size [identity alias] [vrf vrf-name]

Syntax Description

session-ip-address

For unicast sessions, the address of the intended receiver; for multicast sessions, the IP multicast address of the session.

sender-ip-address

IP address of the sender. It must be a logical address configured on an interface on the router that you are configuring.

ip-protocol | tcp | udp

Specifies the IP protocol in the range of 0 to 255, TCP or UDP.

session-dest-port sender-source-port

The session-dest-port argument is the destination port. The sender-source-port argument is the source port. Port numbers are specified in all cases, because the use of 16-bit ports following the IP header is not limited to UDP or TCP. If the destination is zero, the source must be zero, and the implication is that ports are not checked. If the destination is nonzero, the source must be nonzero.

bandwidth

Average bit rate, in kbps, to reserve up to 75 percent of the total on the interface. The range is from 1 to 10000000.

burst-size

Maximum burst size (kbps of data in queue). The range is from 1 to 65535.

identity alias

(Optional) Specifies an application ID alias. An alias is a string that can have as many as 64 printable characters (in the range 0x20 to 0x7E).

Note If you use the " " or ? character as part of the string itself, you must type the CTRL-V key sequence before entering the embedded " " or ? character. The alias is never transmitted to other routers.

vrf vrf-name

(Optional) Specifies a virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instance.


Command Default

The router does not simulate RSVP PATH message generation.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0

This command was introduced.

12.4(6)T

This command was modified. The optional identity alias keyword and argument combination was added.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.

15.0(1)M

This command was modified. The optional vrf vrf-name keyword and argument combination was added.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6.


Usage Guidelines


Note The syntax of the command depends on your platform and release. The vrf vrf-name keyword and argument combination is not supported on ASR 1000 Series Aggregation Services Routers.


Use the ip rsvp sender-host command to make a router simulate a host generating its own RSVP PATH messages. This command is similar to the ip rsvp sender command, which can cause a router to generate RSVP PATH messages on behalf of another host. The main differences between the ip rsvp sender-host and ip rsvp sender commands follow:

When you enter the ip rsvp sender-host command, the sender-ip-address argument must be a local address configured on an interface of the router.

Because the message is assumed to originate from the router that you are configuring, you do not specify a previous-hop or incoming interface for the RSVP PATH message when entering the ip rsvp sender-host command.

Use the ip rsvp sender-host command for debugging and testing purposes because you cannot use it to proxy RSVP for non-RSVP-capable hosts.

An alias must reference an RSVP identity that you created by using the ip rsvp identity command. The policy-locator string associated with this identity is signaled in the RESV message. This identity overrides any application ID that is contained in the matching PATH message.

Examples

The following example sets up the router to act like a host that sends traffic to the given address:

Router(config)# ip rsvp sender-host 10.0.0.7 10.0.0.1 udp 1 1 10 10 identity xyz

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp bandwidth

Enables RSVP for IP on an interface.

ip rsvp identity

Defines RSVP application IDs.

ip rsvp neighbor

Enables a router to control who its authorized neighbors are.

ip rsvp reservation

Enables a router to simulate receiving RSVP RESV messages.

ip rsvp reservation-host

Enables a router to simulate a host generating RSVP RESV messages.

ip rsvp sender

Enables a router to simulate receiving RSVP PATH messages.

show ip rsvp installed

Displays RSVP-related bandwidth information.

show ip rsvp interface

Displays RSVP-related interface information.

show ip rsvp neighbor

Displays current RSVP neighbors.

show ip rsvp policy identity

Displays selected RSVP identities in a router configuration.

show ip rsvp reservation

Displays RSVP RESV-related receiver information currently in the database.

show ip rsvp sender

Displays RSVP PATH-related sender information currently in the database.


ip rsvp signalling dscp

To specify the differentiated services code point (DSCP) value to be used on all Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) messages that are transmitted on an interface, use the ip rsvp signalling dscp command in interface configuration mode. To restore the default DSCP value on all RSVP messages transmitted on an interface, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling dscp value

no ip rsvp signalling dscp

Syntax Description

value

Number for the DSCP. Range is from 0 to 63. Default is 0.


Command Default

The default DSCP value is 0.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.1

This command was introduced.

12.2(18)SXF2

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXF2.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6


Usage Guidelines

You must configure the DSCP per interface, not per flow. The DSCP determines the priority that a packet receives from various hops as it travels to its destination.

The DSCP applies to all RSVP flows that are installed on a specific interface. You can configure each interface independently for DSCP.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure the ip rsvp signalling dscp command with a DSCP value of 6:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface gigabitEthernet 0/0/0
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp signalling dscp 6
Router(config-if)# end

Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip rsvp interface

Displays information related to RSVP.


ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair notifications

To configure the number of per flow notifications that Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) processes during a fast local repair (FLR) procedure before suspending, use the ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair notifications command in global configuration mode. To set the number of notifications to its default, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair notifications number

no ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair notifications

Syntax Description

number

Total number of notifications to be sent. The range is from 10 to 10000. The default value is 1000.


Command Default

Notifications are sent by the Routing Information Base (RIB) and processed by RSVP. If the ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair notifications command is not configured, RSVP processes 1000 notifications, suspends the notifications, and then resumes processing of another 1000 notifications.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRB

This command was introduced.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6.

15.0(1)M

This command was integrated into a release earlier than Cisco IOS Release 15.0(1)M.


Usage Guidelines

Upon a route change, RIB builds a list of notifications, one per affected flow, and notifies RSVP by sending an event including these notifications. Therefore, these events can contain thousands of elements, depending on the number of path state blocks (PSBs) affected.

RSVP processes, by default, 1000 notifications at a time and then suspends if required, to prevent the CPU from being overwhelmed. However, you can configure this number using the ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair notifications command.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure the number of flows that are repaired before RSVP suspends to 100:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair notifications 100

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair rate

Configures the repair rate that RSVP uses for an FLR procedure.

ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair wait-time

Configures the delay that RSVP uses to start an FLR procedure.

show ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair

Displays FLR-specific information maintained by RSVP.


ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair rate

To configure the repair rate that Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) uses for a fast local repair (FLR) procedure, use the ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair rate command in global configuration mode. To set the repair rate to its default, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair rate messages-per-second

no ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair rate

Syntax Description

messages-per-second

FLR rate for PATH state refresh and repair, in messages per second. The range is 1 to 2500. The default is 400.


Command Default

If this command is not configured, the RSVP message pacing rate is used.


Note The RSVP message pacing rate is enabled by default in Cisco IOS Release 12.2 and later releases.


Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRB

This command was introduced.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6.

15.0(1)M

This command was integrated into a release earlier than Cisco IOS Release 15.0(1)M.


Usage Guidelines

The default repair rate is based on the RSVP message pacing rate.

If you configure the FLR rate by using the ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair rate command, and RSVP message pacing is enabled, the lower FLR rate and the RSVP message pacing rate takes effect. If you disable the RSVP rate limit by using the no ip rsvp signalling rate-limit command, then the FLR rate is used. However, if you disable the RSVP rate limit and do not configure an FLR rate, then RSVP performs no message pacing and messages are sent back-to-back. This action is not recommended because the point of local repair (PLR) may flood the downstream node with PATH messages causing some of them to be dropped.

The repair rate is determined at notification time, and this same rate is used during the time of the repair even if you change either the RSVP message pacing rate or the FLR rate during this time.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure a repair rate of 100 messages per second:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair rate 100

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair notifications

Configures the number of notifications that are processed before RSVP suspends.

ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair wait-time

Configures the delay used to start an FLR procedure.

ip rsvp signalling rate-limit

Controls the transmission rate for RSVP messages sent to a neighboring router during a specified amount of time.


ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair wait-time

To configure the delay that Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) uses before starting a fast local repair (FLR) procedure, use the ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair wait-time command in interface configuration mode. To set the delay to its default, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair wait-time interval

no ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair wait-time

Syntax Description

interval

Amount of time before an FLR procedure begins, in milliseconds (ms). The range is 0 to 5000 ms. The default is 0.


Command Default

This command is disabled by default; therefore, no delay is configured.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRB

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair wait-time command to configure the delay desired in starting an FLR procedure. If you do not configure a delay, then path refreshes are triggered immediately after RSVP receives a route change notification from the routing information base (RIB).

Examples

The following example configures a delay of 100 ms:

Router(config-if)# ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair wait-time 100

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair notifications

Configures the number of notifications that are processed before RSVP suspends.

ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair rate

Configures the repair rate that RSVP uses for an FLR procedure.


ip rsvp signalling hello (configuration)

To enable hello globally on a router, use the ip rsvp signalling hello command in global configuration mode. To disable hello globally on a router, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello

no ip rsvp signalling hello

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

No hellos are enabled.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(22)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(18)SXD1

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXD1.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB2.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T.


Usage Guidelines

To enable hello globally on a router, you must enter this command. You also must enable hello on the interface.

Examples

In the following example, hello is enabled globally on a router:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello 

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello (interface)

Enables Hello on an interface where you need Fast Reroute protection.

ip rsvp signalling hello statistics

Enables Hello statistics on the router.


ip rsvp signalling hello (interface)

To enable hello on an interface where you need Fast Reroute protection, use the ip rsvp signalling hello command in interface configuration mode. To disable hello on an interface where you need Fast Reroute protection, use the no form of this command

ip rsvp signalling hello

no ip rsvp signalling hello

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

No hellos are enabled.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(22)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(18)SXD1

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXD1.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB2.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T.


Usage Guidelines

You must configure hello globally on a router and on the specific interface.

Examples

In the following example, hello is enabled on an interface:

Router(config-if)# ip rsvp signalling hello 

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello (configuration)

Enables Hello globally on the router.

ip rsvp signalling hello dscp

Sets the DSCP value that is in the IP header of the Hello messages sent out from the interface.

ip rsvp signalling hello refresh misses

Specifies how many Hello acknowledgments a node can miss in a row before the node considers that communication with its neighbor is down.

ip rsvp signalling hello refresh interval

Configures the Hello request interval.


ip rsvp signalling hello dscp

To set the differentiated services code point (DSCP) value that is in the IP header of a Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) hello message sent from an interface, use the ip rsvp signalling hello dscp command in interface configuration mode. To set the DSCP value to its default, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello [fast-reroute] dscp num

no ip rsvp signalling hello [fast-reroute] dscp

Syntax Description

fast-reroute

(Optional) Initiates Fast Reroute capability.

num

DSCP value. Valid values are from 0 to 63.


Command Default

The default DSCP value is 48.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(22)S

This command was introduced.

12.0(29)S

The optional fast-reroute keyword was added.

12.2(18)SXD1

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXD1.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB2.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T.


Usage Guidelines

If a link is congested, it is recommended that you set the DSCP to a value higher than 0 to reduce the likelihood that hello messages will be dropped.

You configure the DSCP per interface, not per flow.

The DSCP applies to the RSVP hellos created on a specific interface. You can configure each interface independently for DSCP.

If you issue the ip rsvp signalling hello dscp command without the optional fast-reroute keyword, the command applies to Fast Reroute hellos. This command is provided for backward compatibility; however, we recommend that you use the ip rsvp signalling hello fast-reroute dscp command.

Examples

In the following example, hello messages sent from this interface have a DSCP value of 30 and Fast Reroute capability is enabled by specifying the fast-reroute keyword:

Router(config-if)# ip rsvp signalling hello fast-reroute dscp 30

In the following example, hello messages sent from this interface have a DSCP value of 30 and Fast Reroute capability is enabled by default:

Router(config-if)# ip rsvp signalling hello dscp 30

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello (interface)

Enables hellos on an interface where you need Fast Reroute protection.

ip rsvp signalling hello refresh interval

Sets the hello refresh interval in hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh misses

Sets the missed refresh limit in hello messages.


ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart

To enable the Resource Reservation protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) graceful restart capability on a neighboring router, use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart command in interface configuration mode. To disable the graceful restart capability, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart

no ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

Neighboring routers have only node hello enabled.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRE

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart command to enable support for graceful restart on routers helping their neighbors recover TE tunnels following stateful switchover (SSO).


Note This command is optional. Use it when node hello is not supported.


Examples

The following example configures graceful restart on POS interface 1/0/0 of a neighboring router with the IP address 10.0.0.1:

Router# configure terminal  
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CTTL/Z. 
Router(config)# interface POS1/0/0 
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode

Enables RSVP TE graceful restart support capability on an RP, and enables node hello.

show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart

Displays information about RSVP TE graceful restart hello messages.


ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp

To set the differentiated services code point (DSCP) value that is in the IP header of a Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) graceful restart hello message, use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp command in global configuration mode. To set the DSCP valueto its default, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp num

no ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp

Syntax Description

num

DSCP value. Valid values are from 0 to 63.


Command Default

The default DSCP value is 48.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T.


Usage Guidelines

If a link is congested, set the DSCP to a value higher than 0 to reduce the likelihood that hello messages get dropped.

The DSCP applies to the RSVP hellos created on a specific router. You can configure each router independently for the DSCP.

Examples

In the following example, hello messages have a DSCP value of 30:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp 30

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

Sets the hello request interval in graceful restart hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

Sets the missed refresh limit in graceful restart hello messages.


ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode

To enable Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) graceful restart capability on a Route Processor (RP), use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode command in global configuration mode. To disable graceful restart capability, use the no form of this command.

Cisco IOS 12.0(29)S, 12.2(33)SRA, 12.2(33)SXH, and Later Releases

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode {help-neighbor | full}

no ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode

Cisco IOS T and XE Trains

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor

no ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor

Syntax Description

help-neighbor

Enables support for a neighboring router to restart after a failure.

full

Enables support for a router to perform self-recovery or to help a neighbor restart after a failure.


Command Default

Graceful restart is disabled.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced as ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was modified. The full keyword was added.This command replaces the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor command.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.

15.0(1)M

This command was integrated into a release earlier than Cisco IOS Release 15.0(1)M.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.1

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS XE Release 2.1 and implemented on Cisco ASR 1000 Series Aggregation Services Routers.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor command to enable support capability for a neighboring router to restart after a failure.

Use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode full command to enable support capability for a router to begin self-recovery or help its neighbor to restart on platforms that support stateful switchover (SSO), such as Cisco 7600 series routers, provided that you have installed and configured a standby RP.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure an RP with support capability to perform self-recovery after a failure:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode full

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp

Sets the DSCP value in the IP header of a RSVP TE graceful restart hello message.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor

Enables RSVP-TE graceful restart support capability on a neighboring router.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

Sets the value to control the request interval in graceful restart hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

Sets the value to control the missed refresh limit in graceful restart hello messages.

show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart

Displays information about RSVP-TE graceful restart hello messages.


ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor


Note Effective with Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA, the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor command is replaced by the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode command. See the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode command for more information.


To enable Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) graceful restart capability on a neighboring router, use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor command in global configuration mode. To disable graceful restart capability, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor

no ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

Graceful restart is disabled.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was replaced by the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode command.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor command to restart a neighboring router.

Examples

In the following example, graceful restart is enabled:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode help-neighbor

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp

Sets the DSCP value in the IP header of a RSVP TE graceful restart hello message.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

Sets the value to control the request interval in graceful restart hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

Sets the value to control the missed refresh limit in graceful restart hello messages.


ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor

To enable Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) graceful restart capability on a neighboring router, use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor command in interface configuration mode. To disable graceful restart capability, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor ip-address

no ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor ip-address

Syntax Description

ip-address

IP address of a neighbor on a given interface.


Command Default

No neighboring routers have graceful restart capability enabled until you issue this command.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRA

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor command to enable support for graceful restart on routers helping their neighbors recover TE tunnels following stateful switchover (SSO).


Note You must issue this command on every interface of the neighboring router that you want to help restart.


Examples

The following example configures graceful restart on POS interface 1/0/0 of a neighboring router with the IP address 10.0.0.1:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# interface POS1/0/0
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor 10.0.0.1

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode

Enables RSVP-TE graceful restart support capability on an RP.

show ip rsvp hello graceful-restart

Displays information about RSVP-TE graceful restart hello messages.


ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

To configure the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) refresh interval in graceful restart hello messages, use the ip rsvp signalling hello grateful-restart refresh interval command in global configuration mode. To set the interval to its default value, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval interval-value

no ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

Syntax Description

interval-value

Frequency, in milliseconds (ms), at which a node sends hello messages to a neighbor. Valid values are from 1000 to 30000.


Command Default

1000 milliseconds (10 seconds)

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T.


Usage Guidelines

A node periodically generates a hello message that contains a Hello Request object for all its neighbors. The frequency of those hello messages is determined by the hello interval.


Note If you change the default value for this command and you are also using the ip rsvp signalling refresh interval command, ensure that the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval command is less than the value for the ip rsvp signalling refresh interval command. Otherwise, some or all of the label-switched paths (LSPs) may not be recovered after a stateful switchover (SSO) has occurred. We recommend that the value for the ip rsvp signalling refresh interval command be twice the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval command.


Examples

The following example shows how to configure hello requests to be sent to a neighbor every 5000 ms:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval 5000

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp

Sets the DSCP value in the IP header of a RSVP TE graceful restart hello message.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

Sets the missed refresh limit in graceful restart hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling refresh interval

Specifies the interval between sending refresh messages for each RSVP state.


ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

To specify how many sequential Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) graceful restart hello acknowledgments (ACKs) a node can miss before the node considers communication with its neighbor lost, use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses command in global configuration mode. To return the missed refresh limit to its default value, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses msg-count

no ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

Syntax Description

msg-count

The number of sequential hello acknowledgments (ACKs) that a node can miss before RSVP considers the state expired and tears it down. Valid values are from 4 to 10.


Command Default

The default number of sequential hello acknowledgments is 4.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T


Usage Guidelines

A hello message comprises a hello message, a Hello Request object, and a Hello ACK object. Each request is answered by an acknowledgment. If a link is congested or a router has a heavy load, set this number to a value higher than the default value to ensure that hello does not falsely declare that a neighbor is down.


Note If you change the default value for this command and you are also using the ip rsvp signalling hello refresh misses command, ensure that the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses command is less than the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello refresh misses command. Otherwise, some or all of the label-switched paths (LSPs) may not be recovered after a stateful switchover (SSO) has occurred. We recommend that the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello refresh misses command be twice the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses command.


Examples

The following example shows how to set the router so that, if the node does not receive five sequential hello acknowledgments, the node declares that its neighbor is down:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses 5

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp

Sets the DSCP value in graceful restart hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

Sets the refresh interval in graceful restart hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling refresh misses

Specifies the number of successive refresh messages that can be missed before RSVP removes a state from the database.

ip rsvp signalling hello refresh misses

Specifies how many Hello acknowledgments a node can miss in a row before the node considers that communication with its neighbor is down.


ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart send

To configure the time for Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) label switched paths (LSPs) in a Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) traffic engineering (TE) network to recover or restart after a stateful switchover (SSO) occurs, use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart send command in global configuration mode. To keep the default recovery and restart times, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart send {recovery-time ms | restart-time ms}

no ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart send {recovery-time ms | restart-time ms}

Syntax Description

recovery-time ms

Configures the time in milliseconds (ms) in outgoing hello messages to allow LSPs to recover after an SSO occurs. Values are 0 to 3600000.

restart-time ms

Configures the time in ms in outgoing hello messages to allow LSPs to restart after an SSO occurs. Values are 0 to 3600000.


Command Default

The default recovery and restart times of 120,000 and 30,000 ms, respecively, are in effect until you change them.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart send command to give LSPs a longer time to recover or restart after an SSO occurs. Otherwise, the LSPs may not all come back up and your network performance is negatively affected.

Examples

In the following example, a recovery time of 300,000 ms is configured:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart send recovery-time 300000

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart dscp

Sets the DSCP value in the IP header of an RSVP TE graceful restart hello message.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart mode

Enables RSVP TE graceful restart capability on an RP.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart neighbor

Enables RSVP TE graceful restart capability on a neighboring router.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval

Configures the RSVP TE refresh interval in graceful restart hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses

Specifies how many sequential RSVP TE graceful restart hello acknowledgments a node can miss before the node considers communication with its neighbor lost.


ip rsvp signalling hello refresh interval

To configure the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) hello refresh interval, use the ip rsvp signalling hello refresh interval command in interface configuration mode. To set the refresh interval to its default value, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello [fast-reroute] refresh interval interval-value

no ip rsvp signalling hello [fast-reroute] refresh interval

Syntax Description

fast-reroute

(Optional) Initiates Fast Reroute capability.

interval-value

Frequency, in milliseconds (msec), at which a node sends hello messages to a neighbor. Valid values are from 10 to 30000 msec.

Note Values below the default of 200 msec are not recommended, because they can cause RSVP Hellos to falsely detect a neighbor down event and unecessarily trigger Fast ReRoute.


Command Default

The default frequency at which a node sends hello messages to a neighbor is 200 msec.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(22)S

This command was introduced.

12.0(29)S

The optional fast-reroute keyword was added.

12.2(18)SXD1

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXD1.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB2.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T.


Usage Guidelines

You can configure the hello request interval on a per-interface basis. A node periodically generates a hello message containing a Hello Request object for each neighbor whose status is being tracked. The frequency of those hello messages is determined by the hello interval.

If you issue the ip rsvp signalling hello refresh interval command without the optional fast-reroute keyword, the command applies to Fast Reroute hellos. This command is provided for backward compatibility; however, we recommend that you use the ip rsvp signalling hello fast-reroute refresh interval command.

Examples

In the following example, hello requests are sent to a neighbor every 5000 milliseconds and Fast Reroute capability is enabled by specifying the fast-reroute keyword:

Router(config-if)# ip rsvp signalling hello fast-reroute refresh interval 5000 

In the following example, hello requests are sent to a neighbor every 5000 milliseconds and Fast Reroute capability is enabled by default:

Router(config-if)# ip rsvp signalling hello refresh interval 5000

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello dscp

Sets the DSCP value in hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart fresh interval

Sets the refresh interval in graceful restart hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh misses

Sets the missed refresh limit in hello messages.


ip rsvp signalling hello refresh misses

To specify how many Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) hello acknowledgments a node can miss in a row before the node considers that communication with its neighbor is down, use the ip rsvp signalling hello refresh misses command in interface configuration mode. To return the missed refresh limit to its default value, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello [fast-reroute] refresh misses msg-count

no ip rsvp signalling hello [fast-reroute] refresh misses

Syntax Description

fast-reroute

(Optional) Initiates Fast Reroute capability.

msg-count

Number of sequential hello acknowledgments that a node can miss before RSVP considers the state expired and tears it down. Valid values are from 4 to 10.


Command Default

The default number of sequential hello acknowledgments is 4.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(22)S

This command was introduced.

12.0(29)S

The optional fast-reroute keyword was added.

12.2(18)SXD1

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXD1.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB2.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T


Usage Guidelines

A hello comprises a hello message, a Hello Request object, and a Hello ACK object. Each request is answered by an acknowledgment. If a link is very congested or a router has a very heavy load, set this number to a value higher than the default value to ensure that hello does not falsely declare that a neighbor is down.

If you issue the ip rsvp signalling hello refresh misses command without the optional fast-reroute keyword, the command applies to Fast Reroute hellos and Fast Reroute capability is enabled by default. This command is provided for backward compatibility; however, we recommend that you use the ip rsvp signalling hello fast-reroute refresh misses command.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure the router so that, if the node does not receive five hello acknowledgments in a row, the node declares that its neighbor is down and Fast Reroute is enabled by specifying the fast-reroute keyword:

Router(config-if)# ip rsvp signalling hello fast-reroute refresh misses 5

The following example shows how to configure the router so that, if the node does not receive five hello acknowledgments in a row, the node declares that its neighbor is down and Fast Reroute is enabled by default:

Router(config-if)# ip rsvp signalling hello refresh misses 5

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello dscp

Sets the DSCP value in hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling hello refresh interval

Sets the refresh interval in hello messages.


ip rsvp signalling hello reroute dscp

To set the differentiated services code point (DSCP) value that is in the IP header of a Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) reroute hello (for state timeout) message sent from an interface, use the ip rsvp signalling hello reroute dscp command in interface configuration mode. To set the DSCP value to its default, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello reroute dscp num

no ip rsvp signalling hello reroute dscp

Syntax Description

num

DSCP value. Valid values are from 0 to 63.


Command Default

The default DSCP value is 48.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T.


Usage Guidelines

If a link is congested, you should set the DSCP to a value higher than 0 to reduce the likelihood that hello messages get dropped.

You configure the DSCP per interface, not per flow.

The DSCP applies to the RSVP hellos created on a specific interface. You can configure each interface independently for DSCP.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure the interface so that hello messages sent from this interface have a DSCP value of 30:

Router(config-if)# ip rsvp signalling hello reroute dscp 30

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh interval

Sets the hello request interval in reroute hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh misses

Sets the missed refresh limit in reroute hello messages.


ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh interval

To configure the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) reroute hello (for state timeout) refresh interval, use the ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh interval command in interface configuration mode. To set the refresh interval to its default value, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh interval interval-value

no ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh interval

Syntax Description

interval-value

Frequency, in milliseconds, at which a node sends hello messages to a neighbor. Valid values are from 1000 to 30000 (1 to 30 seconds).


Command Default

The default frequency at which a node sends hello messages to a neighbor is 1000 milliseconds (10 seconds).

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T.


Usage Guidelines

You can configure the hello request interval on a per-interface basis. A node periodically generates a hello message containing a Hello Request object for each neighbor whose status is being tracked. The frequency of those hello messages is determined by the hello interval. For some routers, if you set the interval to a value less than the default value, CPU usage may be high.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure the router so that hello requests are sent to a neighbor every 5000 milliseconds and Fast Reroute capability is enabled by default:

Router(config-if)# ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh interval 5000

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh misses

Sets the missed refresh limit in reroute hello messages.


ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh misses

To specify how many Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) reroute hello (for state timeout) acknowledgments (ACKs) a node can miss in a row before the node considers communication with its neighbor is down, use the ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh misses command in interface configuration mode. To return the missed refresh limit to its default value, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh misses msg-count

no ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh misses

Syntax Description

msg-count

The number of sequential hello acknowledgments (ACKs) that a node can miss before RSVP considers the state expired and tears it down. Valid values are from 4 to 10.


Command Default

The default is 4.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(29)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

A hello comprises a hello message, a Hello Request object, and a Hello ACK object. Each request is answered by an acknowledgment. If a link is very congested or a router has a very heavy load, set this number to a value higher than the default value to ensure that hello does not falsely declare that a neighbor is down.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure the router so that, if the node does not receive five hello acknowledgments in a row, the node declares that its neighbor is down:

Router(config-if)# ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh misses 5

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello reroute dscp

Sets the DSCP value in reroute hello messages.

ip rsvp signalling hello reroute refresh interval

Sets the refresh interval in reroute hello messages.


ip rsvp signalling hello statistics

To enable hello statistics on a router, use the ip rsvp signalling hello statistics command in global configuration mode. To disable hello statistics on a router, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling hello statistics

no ip rsvp signalling hello statistics

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

No hello statistics are enabled.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(22)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(18)SXD1

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXD1.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB2.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T.


Examples

In the following example, hello statistics are enabled on a router:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling hello statistics 

Related Commands

Command
Description

clear ip rsvp hello instance statistics

Clears Hello statistics for an instance.

ip rsvp signalling hello (configuration)

Enables Hello globally on the router.

show ip rsvp hello statistics

Displays how long Hello packets have been in the Hello input queue.


ip rsvp signalling initial-retransmit-delay

To configure the minimum amount of time that a Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP)-configured router waits for an acknowledgment (ACK) message before retransmitting the same message, use the ip rsvp signalling initial-retransmit-delay command in global configuration mode. To reset the delay value to its default, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling initial-retransmit-delay delay-value

no ip rsvp signalling initial-retransmit-delay

Syntax Description

delay-value

Minimum amount of time that a router waits for an ACK message before the first retransmission of the same message. The delay value ranges from 500 to 30,000 milliseconds (ms).


Defaults

The default value is 1000 ms (1.0 sec).

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(13)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp signalling initial-retransmit-delay command to configure the minimum amount of time that a router waits for an ACK message before retransmitting the same message.

If an ACK is not received for a state, the first retransmit occurs after the initial retransmit interval. If no ACK is received after the first retransmit, a second retransmit occurs. The message continues to be retransmitted, with the gap between successive retransmits being twice the previous interval, until an ACK is received. Then the message drops into normal refresh schedule if it needs to be refreshed (Path and Resv messages), or is processed (Error or Tear messages). If no ACK is received after five retransmits, the message is discarded as required.

Examples

The following command shows how to set the initial-retransmit-delay to 2 seconds:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling initial-retransmit-delay 2000

The following command shows how to reset the initial-retransmit-delay to the default (1.0 sec):

Router(config)# no ip rsvp signalling initial-retransmit-delay

ip rsvp signalling patherr state-removal

To reduce the amount of Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic messages in a network, use the ip rsvp signalling patherr state-removal command in global configuration mode. To disable this function, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling patherr state-removal [neighbor acl]

no ip rsvp signalling patherr state-removal

Syntax Description

neighbor

(Optional) Adjacent routers that are part of a particular traffic engineering tunnel.

acl

(Optional) A simple access list with values from 1 to 99.


Defaults

Disabled

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(13)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp signalling patherr state-removal command to allow routers to delete Path state automatically when forwarding a PathError message, thereby eliminating the need for a subsequent PathTear message.

This command is most effective when all network nodes support this feature. All nodes need to have the latest version of Cisco IOS software configured.

This command applies only to label-switched path (LSP) flows.

Examples

The following command shows how to enable ip rsvp signalling patherr state-removal:


Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling patherr state-removal

The following command shows how to disable ip rsvp signalling patherr state-removal:


Router(config)# no ip rsvp signalling patherr state-removal

The following example shows how to enable ip rsvp signalling patherr state-removal based on an access control list (ACL):

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling patherr state-removal neighbor 98

The following example shows how to disable ip rsvp signalling patherr state-removal based on an ACL:

Router(config)# no ip rsvp signalling patherr state-removal neighbor 98

ip rsvp signalling rate-limit

To control the transmission rate for Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) messages that are sent to a neighboring router during a specified amount of time, use the ip rsvp signalling rate-limit command in global configuration mode. To disable this function, use the no form of this command.

Releases Before Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T

ip rsvp signalling rate-limit [burst number] [maxsize bytes] [period ms]

no ip rsvp signalling rate-limit

Cisco IOS 12.0S Releases, 12.2S Releases, XE 2 Releases, Release 12.4(20)T, and Later T Releases

ip rsvp signalling rate-limit [burst number] [limit number] [maxsize bytes] [period ms]

no ip rsvp signalling rate-limit

Syntax Description

burst number

(Optional) Maximum number of RSVP messages that are sent to a neighboring router during each interval. Range is from 1 to 5000. Default is 8.

maxsize bytes

(Optional) Maximum size of the message queue, in bytes. Range is from 1 to 5000. Default is 2000.

period ms

(Optional) Length of the interval (time frame), in milliseconds (ms). Range is from 10 to 5000. Default is 20.

limit number

(Optional) Maximum number of messages to send per queue interval when the number of messages sent is less than the number of messages to be sent normally. Range is from 1 to 5000. Default is 37.


Command Default

If you do not enter this command, the default values are used.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(13)T

This command was introduced. This command replaces the ip rsvp msg-pacing command.

12.0(24)S

The limit keyword was added, and this command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(24)S.

12.0(29)S

The default argument values for the burst and maxsize keywords were increased to 8 messages and 2000 bytes, respectively.

12.2(28)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(28)SB.

12.2(18)SXF5

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXF5.

12.2(33)SRB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRB.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.3

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS XE Release 2.3.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp signalling rate-limit command to prevent a burst of RSVP traffic engineering signaling messages from overflowing the input queue of a receiving router, which would cause the router to drop some messages. Dropped messages substantially delay the completion of signaling.

This command replaces the ip rsvp msg-pacing command.

Examples

The following command shows how 6 messages with a message queue of 500 bytes are sent every 10 ms to any neighboring router:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling rate-limit burst 6 maxsize 500 period 10

Related Commands

Command
Description

clear ip rsvp signalling rate-limit

Clears (sets to zero) the number of messages that were dropped because of a full queue.

debug ip rsvp rate-limit

Displays debug messages for RSVP rate-limiting events.

show ip rsvp signalling rate-limit

Displays the RSVP rate-limiting parameters.


ip rsvp signalling refresh interval

To specify the interval between sending refresh messages for each Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) state, use the ip rsvp signalling refresh interval command in global configuration mode. To set the interval to its default value, use the no form of the command.

ip rsvp signalling refresh interval interval-value

no ip rsvp signalling refresh interval

Syntax Description

interval-value

Time, in milliseconds, between sending refreshes for each RSVP state. The range is from 5000 to 4294967295 milliseconds; the default value is 30000.


Command Default

30000 milliseconds (30 seconds)

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(26)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(28)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(28)SB.

12.2(18)SXF5

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXF5.

12.2(33)SRB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRB.

15.0(1)M

This command was integrated into a release earlier than Cisco IOS Release 15.0(1)M.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp signalling refresh interval command to specify the interval between sending refresh messages for each RSVP state.

The RSVP protocol relies on a soft-state mechanism to maintain state consistency in the face of network losses. This mechanism is based on continuous refresh messages to keep a state current. Each RSVP router is responsible for sending periodic refresh messages to its neighbors.


Note If you change the default value for this command and you are also using the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval command, ensure that the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval command is less than the value for the ip rsvp signalling refresh interval command. Otherwise, some or all of the label-switched paths (LSPs) may not be recovered after a stateful switchover (SSO) has occurred. We recommend that the value for the ip rsvp signalling refresh interval command be twice the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh interval command.


Examples

The following example shows how to specify a refresh interval of 60000 milliseconds (60 seconds):

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling refresh interval 60000

The following example shows how to return the refresh interval to the default value of 30 seconds:

Router(config)# no ip rsvp signalling refresh interval

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling refresh misses

Specifies the number of successive refresh messages that can be missed before RSVP removes a state from the database.


ip rsvp signalling refresh misses

To specify the number of successive refresh messages that can be missed before Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) removes a state from the database, use the ip rsvp signalling refresh misses command in global configuration mode. To return the missed refresh limit to its default value, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling refresh misses msg-count

no ip rsvp signalling refresh misses

Syntax Description

msg-count

Number of successive refresh messages that can be missed before RSVP considers the state expired and tears it down. The range is 2 to 10. The default is 4.


Command Default

4 messages

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(26)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(28)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(28)SB.

12.2(18)SXF5

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXF5.

12.2(33)SRB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRB.

15.0(1)M

This command was integrated into a release earlier than Cisco IOS Release 15.0(1)M.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp signalling refresh misses command to specify the number of successive refresh messages that can be missed before RSVP regards the router state as expired and removes that state from the database.


Note If you change the default value for this command and you are also using the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses command, ensure that the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses command is less than the value for the ip rsvp signalling refresh misses command. Otherwise, some or all of the label-switched paths (LSPs) may not be recovered after a stateful switchover (SSO) has occurred. We recommend that the value for the ip rsvp signalling refresh misses command be twice the value for the ip rsvp signalling hello graceful-restart refresh misses command.


Examples

The following example shows how to specify a missed refresh limit of 6 messages:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling refresh misses 6

The following example shows how to return the refresh misses limit to the default value of 4:

Router(config)# no ip rsvp signalling refresh misses

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling refresh interval

Specifies the interval between sending refresh messages for each RSVP state.


ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction

To enable Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) refresh reduction, use the ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction command in global configuration mode. To disable refresh reduction, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction

no ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Defaults

Disabled

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(13)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

RSVP refresh reduction is a set of extensions to reduce the messaging load imposed by RSVP and to help it scale to support larger numbers of flows.

The following features of the refresh reduction standard (RFC 2961) are supported and will be turned on with this command:

Setting the refresh-reduction-capable bit in message headers

Message-Identifier (ID) usage

Reliable messaging with rapid retransmit, acknowledgement (ACK) messages, and MESSAGE_ID objects

Summary refresh extension

Bundle messages (reception only)

Refresh reduction requires the cooperation of the neighbor to operate; for this purpose, the neighbor must also support the standard. If the router detects that a directly connected neighbor is not supporting the refresh reduction standard (either through observing the refresh-reduction-capable bit in messages received from the next hop, or by sending a MESSAGE_ID object to the next hop and receiving an error), refresh reduction will not be used on this link irrespective of this command.

Examples

The following example shows how to enable RSVP refresh reduction:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction

The following example shows how to disable RSVP refresh reduction:

Router(config)# no ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction

Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip rsvp interface

Displays RSVP-related interface information.

show ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction

Displays refresh-reduction parameters for RSVP messages.


ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction ack-delay

To configure the maximum amount of time that a Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP)-configured router holds on to an acknowledgment (ACK) message before sending it, use the ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction ack-delay command in global configuration mode. To reset the ack-delay value to its default, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction ack-delay delay-value

no ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction ack-delay

Syntax Description

delay-value

Maximum amount of time that a router holds on to an ACK message before sending it. Values range from 100 to 10000 milliseconds (ms).


Defaults

The default value is 250 ms (0.25 sec).

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(13)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction ack-delay command to configure the maximum amount of time that an RSVP-configured router keeps an ACK message before sending it.

Examples

The following example shows how to set the ack-delay value to 1 second:

Router(config)# ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction ack-delay 1000

The following example shows how to set the ack-delay value to the default value:

Router(config)# no ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction ack-delay

ip rsvp source

To configure a Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) router to populate an address other than the native interface address in the previous hop (PHOP) address field of the PHOP object when forwarding a PATH message onto that interface, use the ip rsvp source command in interface configuration mode. To keep the native interface address in the PHOP address field, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp source {address ip-address | interface type number}

no ip rsvp source

Syntax Description

address ip-address

IP address for the PHOP address field.

interface type number

Interface type and number that is used as the source for the PHOP address field.


Command Default

The native interface address is written in the PHOP address field.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.4(20)T

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRE

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRE.


Examples

The following example shows how to configure the IP address 10.1.3.13 for the PHOP address field:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# interface ethernet 0/0
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp bandwidth
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp source address 10.1.3.13
Router(config-if)# end

The following example shows how to configure the loopback interface 0 as the interface whose address is used in the PHOP address field:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# interface ethernet 1/0
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp bandwidth
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp source interface loopback 0
Router(config-if)# end

Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip rsvp interface

Displays RSVP-related information.


ip rsvp svc-required

To enable creation of a switched virtual circuit (SVC) to service any new Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) reservation made on the interface or subinterface of an Enhanced ATM port adapter (PA-A3), use the ip rsvp svc-required command in interface configuration mode. To disable SVC creation for RSVP reservations, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp svc-required

no ip rsvp svc-required

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

Disabled

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(3)T

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

This command applies exclusively to the RSVP-ATM QoS Interworking feature.

Usually reservations are serviced when RSVP classifies packets and a queueing mechanism schedules them for transmission to manage congestion. Traditionally, RSVP is used with weighted fair queueing (WFQ). When RSVP is coupled with WFQ, all of the packets visible to WFQ are also visible to RSVP, which allows RSVP to identify and take action on packets important to it. In this case, WFQ provides bandwidth guarantees.

However, when the ip rsvp svc-required command is used to configure an interface or subinterface, a new SVC is established and used to service each new reservation on the interface. ATM SVCs are used to provide bandwidth guarantees and NetFlow is used on input interfaces to make data packets visible to RSVP.


Note When RSVP is enabled, all packets are processed by the Route Switch Processor (RSP).


This command must be executed on both ends of an SVC driven by RSVP. This command is supported only for the Enhanced ATM port adapter (PA-A3) and its subinterfaces.


Note For this command to take effect, NetFlow must be enabled. Therefore, the ip route-cache flow command must precede this command in the configuration.


Use the show ip rsvp interface command to determine whether this command is in effect for any interface or subinterface.

Examples

The following example shows how to signal RSVP that reservations made on ATM interface 2/0/0 will be serviced by creation of an SVC:

interface atm2/0/0
 ip rsvp svc-required

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip route-cache flow

Enables NetFlow switching for IP routing.

ip rsvp atm-peak-rate-limit

Sets a limit on the peak cell rate of reservations for all newly created RSVP SVCs established on the current interface or any of its subinterfaces.

ip rsvp precedence

Allows you to set the IP Precedence values to be applied to packets that either conform to or exceed the RSVP flowspec.

show ip rsvp interface

Displays RSVP-related interface information.


ip rsvp tos

To enable the router to mark the five low-order type of service (ToS) bits of the IP header ToS byte for packets in a Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) reserved path using the specified values for traffic that either conforms to or exceeds the RSVP flowspec, use the ip rsvp tos command in interface configuration mode. To remove existing settings for the ToS bits, use the no form of this command; if neither the conform nor exceed keyword is specified, all settings for the ToS bits are removed.

ip rsvp tos {conform tos-value} {exceed tos-value}

no ip rsvp tos [conform] [exceed]

Syntax Description

conform tos-value

Specifies a ToS value in the range from 0 to 31 for traffic that conforms to the RSVP flowspec. The ToS value is written to the five low-order bits (bits 0 to 4) of the ToS byte in the IP header of a packet. Either the conform or exceed keyword is required; both keywords may be specified.

When used with the no form of the command, the conform keyword is optional.

exceed tos-value

(Optional) Specifies a ToS value in the range from 0 to 31 for traffic that exceeds the RSVP flowspec. The ToS byte value is written to the five low-order bits (bits 0 to 4) of the ToS byte in the IP header of a packet. Either the conform or exceed keyword is required; both keywords may be specified.

When used with the no form of the command, the exceed keyword is optional.


Command Default

The ToS bits of the ToS byte are left unmodified when this command is not used. (The default behavior is equivalent to use of the no ip rsvp tos command.)

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(3)T

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

Packets in an RSVP reserved path are divided into two classes: those that conform to the reservation flowspec and those that correspond to a reservation but that exceed, or are outside, the reservation flowspec.

The ip rsvp tos command allows you to set the ToS values to be applied to packets belonging to these two classes. You must specify the ToS value for at least one class of traffic when you use this command. You can use a single instance of the command to specify values for both classes, in which case you can specify the conform and exceed keywords in either order.

As part of its input processing, RSVP uses the ip rsvp tos command configuration to set the ToS bits of the ToS byte on conforming and nonconforming packets. If per-virtual circuit (VC) VIP-distributed Weighted Random Early Detection (DWRED) is configured, the system uses the ToS bit and IP Precedence bit settings on the output interface in its packet drop process. The ToS bit and IP Precedence bit settings of a packet can also be used by interfaces on downstream routers.

Execution of the ip rsvp tos command causes ToS bit values for all preexisting reservations on the interface to be modified.


Note RSVP must be enabled on an interface before you can use this command; that is, use of the ip rsvp bandwidth command must precede use of the ip rsvp tos command. RSVP cannot be configured with VIP-distributed Cisco Express Forwarding (dCEF).



Note The ip rsvp tos command sets bits 0 to 4 so that in combination with the IP Precedence bit settings every bit in the ToS byte is set. Use of these bits is made with full knowledge of the fact that certain canonical texts that address the ToS byte specify that only bits 1 to 4 are used as the ToS bits.


RSVP receives packets from the underlying forwarding mechanism. Therefore, to use the ip rsvp tos command to set the ToS bits, one of the following features is required:

Weighted fair queueing (WFQ) must be enabled on the interface.

RSVP switched virtual circuits (SVCs) must be used.

NetFlow must be configured to assist RSVP.


Note Use of the no form of this command is not equivalent to giving the ip rsvp tos 0 command, which sets all precedence on the packets to 0, regardless of previous precedence setting.


Examples

The following example sets the ToS bits value to 4 for all traffic on ATM interface 1 that conforms to the RSVP flowspec. ToS bits on packets exceeding the flowspec are not altered.

interface atm1
 ip rsvp tos conform 4

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp bandwidth

Enables RSVP for IP on an interface.

ip rsvp flow-assist

Enables RSVP to attach itself to NetFlow so that it can leverage NetFlow services.

ip rsvp policy cops minimal

Lowers the COPS server's load and improves latency times for messages on the governed router.

show ip rsvp

Displays the IP Precedence and ToS bit values to be applied to packets that either conform to or exceed the RSVP flowspec for a given interface.


ip rsvp transport

To create a Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) transport session, use the ip rsvp transport command in global configuration mode. To disable the RSVP transport session, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp transport {client client-id | statistics}

no ip rsvp transport {client client-id | statistics}

Syntax Description

client

Initiates RSVP transport client.

client-id

Client identifier. The range is from 1 to 65535.

statistics

Configures RSVP transport protocol (TP) information buffer size.


Command Default

RSVP is configured as transport protocol.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

15.1(3)T

This command was introduced.

15.1(1)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 15.1(1)S.


Usage Guidelines

You can use the ip rsvp transport command to configure RSVP to be used as transport mechanism for the clients. The client-id is used for identification of the client that initiates the RSVP as a transport protocol. The statistics keyword is used to record statistics for RSVP TP sessions. The statistics recorded includes information passed by RSVP to the RSVP TP client as part of callback. The maximum amount of information that can be recorded is 32 MB.

The ip rsvp transport command enables a router to simulate a host generating RSVP PATH message. This command is used for testing and debugging purposes.

Examples

The following example shows how to identify a client to establish an RSVP transport session:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# ip rsvp transport client 12

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp transport sender-host

Registers a transport client ID with RSVP.


ip rsvp transport sender-host

To register a transport client ID with Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP), use the ip rsvp transport sender-host command in global configuration mode. To disable the static RSVP host path configuration, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp transport sender-host [tcp | udp] destination-address source-address ip-protocol dest-port source-port client-id init-id instance-id [vrf vrf-name] [data data-value]

no ip rsvp transport sender-host [tcp | udp] destination-address source-address ip-protocol dest-port source-port client-id init-id instance-id [vrf vrf-name] [data data-value]

Syntax Description

tcp

(Optional) Specifies TCP to be used as transport mechanism.

udp

(Optional) Specifies User Datagram Protocol (UDP) to be used as transport mechanism.

destination-address

Destination address to where the PATH message is sent.

source-address

Source address from where the PATH message is sent.

ip-protocol

Identifier for configuring RSVP as a transport protocol. The range is from 0 to 255.

dest-port

Destination port to which the PATH message is sent.

source-port

Source port from which the PATH message is sent.

client-id

Identifier that initiates RSVP client.

init-id

Hostname or IP address that identifies the node initiating the transport service request.

instance-id

Instance ID that identifies the transport service request from a particular client application and from a particular initiator. The range is from 1 to 65535.

vrf vrf-name

(Optional) Configures VPN Routing and Forwarding (VRF) instance on the RSVP client.

data data-value

(Optional) Configures the RSVP transport data value.


Command Default

The static RSVP host path is configured.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

15.1(3)T

This command was introduced.

15.1(1)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 15.1(1)S.


Usage Guidelines

Use the ip rsvp transport sender-host command to configure the RSVP transport proxy path. When this command is configured, RSVP sends PATH messages downstream.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure an RSVP sender host path:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# ip rsvp transport sender-host 10.1.1.1 10.2.1.1 2 3 4 3 192.168.1.2 2 vrf 
vrf1 data d1

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp transport

Configures RSVP as transport protocol.


ip rsvp tunnel overhead-percent

To manually override the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) percentage bandwidth, use the ip rsvp tunnel overhead-percent command in interface configuration mode. To restore the tunnel overhead percentage to its default values, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp tunnel overhead-percent percentage

no ip rsvp tunnel overhead-percent

Syntax Description

percentage

Percentage overhead on the tunnel.


Command Default

The percentage overhead for generic routing encapsulation (GRE) or multipoint generic routing encapsulation (mGRE) interfaces is 4 percent. The percentage overhead for GRE and mGRE with IPsec interfaces ranges from 4 to 15 percent, with an average of 10 percent.

Command Modes

Interface configuration mode (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

15.1(2)T

This command was introduced.

15.1(1)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 15.1(1)S.


Usage Guidelines

During the bandwidth admission control, the Cisco IOS software must consider the additional IP overhead introduced because of tunneling and a possible encryption over these tunnels. The default values for the overhead depends on the average size of an Internet packet. However, you can manually override the default values by using the ip rsvp tunnel overhead-percent command.

For example, when the Cisco IOS software gets a reservation request for 100 bytes, and if the outbound interface is a GRE or an mGRE interface, then a bandwidth reservation request for 104 bytes is made available locally on that tunnel interface. In case the GRE or mGRE interface is in protected mode, 110 bytes is requested on the respective link. This IP overhead does not affect the bandwidth signaled via RSVP.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure the router to manually override the percentage bandwidth:

Router(config)# interface tunnel 1
Router(config-if)# ip rsvp tunnel overhead-percent 20

Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip rsvp interface detail

Displays the hello configuration for all interfaces.


ip rsvp udp-multicasts

To instruct the router to generate User Datagram Protocol (UDP)-encapsulated Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) multicasts whenever it generates an IP-encapsulated multicast packet, use the ip rsvp udp-multicasts command in interface configuration mode. To disable this function, use the no form of this command.

ip rsvp udp-multicasts [multicast-address]

no ip rsvp udp-multicasts [multicast-address]

Syntax Description

multicast-address

(Optional) Host name or UDP multicast address of router.


Command Default

The generation of UDP multicasts is disabled. If a system sends a UDP-encapsulated RSVP message to the router, the router begins using UDP for contact with the neighboring system. The router uses multicast address 224.0.0.14 and starts sending to UDP port 1699. If the command is entered with no specifying multicast address, the router uses the same multicast address.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

11.2

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

Use this command to instruct a router to generate UDP-encapsulated RSVP multicasts whenever it generates an IP-encapsulated multicast packet. Some hosts require this trigger from the router.

RSVP cannot be configured with VIP-distributed Cisco Express Forwarding (dCEF).

Examples

The following example shows how to reserve up to 7500 kbps on Ethernet interface 2, with up to 1 Mbps per flow. The router is configured to use UDP encapsulation with the multicast address 224.0.0.14:

interface ethernet 2
 ip rsvp bandwidth 7500 1000
 ip rsvp udp-multicasts 224.0.0.14

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp bandwidth

Enables RSVP for IP on an interface.

ip rsvp neighbor

Enables neighbors to request a reservation.

ip rsvp reservation

Enables a router to simulate receiving and forwarding RSVP RESV messages.

ip rsvp sender

Enables a router to simulate receiving and forwarding RSVP PATH messages.


ip rtp compression-connections

To specify the total number of Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) header compression connections that can exist on an interface, use the ip rtp compression-connections command in interface configuration mode. To restore the default value, use the no form of this command.

ip rtp compression-connections number

no ip rtp compression-connections

Syntax Description

number

Number of RTP header compression connections the cache supports, in the range from 3 to 1000.


Command Default

For PPP and High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC) interfaces, the default is 16 compression connections.

For Frame Relay interfaces, the default is 256 compression connections.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

11.3

This command was introduced.

12.0(7)T

For PPP and HDLC interfaces, the maximum number of compression connections increased from 256 to 1000.

For Frame Relay interfaces, the maximum number of compression connections increased from 32 to 256. The default number of compression connections was increased from 32 (fixed) to 256 (configurable).

12.1(4)E

This command was implemented on the Cisco 7100 series.

12.2(14)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(14)S.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

You should configure one connection for each RTP call through the specified interface.

Each connection sets up a compression cache entry, so you are in effect specifying the maximum number of cache entries and the size of the cache. Too few cache entries for the specified interface can lead to degraded performance, and too many cache entries can lead to wasted memory.


Note Both ends of the serial connection must use the same number of cache entries.


Examples

The following example changes the number of RTP header compression connections supported to 150:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface Serial1/0.0
Router(config-if)# encapsulation ppp
Router(config-if)# ip rtp header-compression
Router(config-if)# ip rtp compression-connections 150
Router(config-if)# end

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rtp header-compression

Enables RTP header compression.

show ip rtp header-compression

Displays RTP header compression statistics.


ip rtp header-compression

To enable Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) header compression, use the ip rtp header-compression command in interface configuration mode. To disable RTP header compression, use the no form of this command.

ip rtp header-compression [passive | iphc-format | ietf-format] [periodic-refresh]

no ip rtp header-compression [passive | iphc-format | ietf-format] [periodic-refresh]

Syntax Description

passive

(Optional) Compresses outgoing RTP packets only if incoming RTP packets on the same interface are compressed. If you do not specify the passive keyword, all RTP packets are compressed.

iphc-format

(Optional) Indicates that the IP Header Compression (IPHC) format of header compression will be used.

ietf-format

(Optional) Indicates that the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) format of header compression will be used.

periodic-refresh

(Optional) Indicates that the compressed IP header will be refreshed periodically.


Command Default

Disabled

For PPP interfaces, the default format for header compression is the IPHC format.

For High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC) and Frame Relay interfaces, the default format for header compression is the original proprietary Cisco format. The maximum number of compression connections for the proprietary Cisco format is 256.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

11.3

This command was introduced.

12.0

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0. This command was modified to include the iphc-format keyword.

12.3(2)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)T. This command was modified to include the periodic-refresh keyword.

12.3(4)T

This command was modified to include the ietf-format keyword.

12.2(25)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)S.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

You can compress IP/User Datagram Protocol (UDP)/RTP headers to reduce the size of your packets. Compressing headers is especially useful for RTP because RTP payload size can be as small as 20 bytes, and the uncompressed header is 40 bytes.

The passive Keyword

By default, the ip rtp header-compression command compresses outgoing RTP traffic. If you specify the passive keyword, outgoing RTP traffic is compressed only if incoming RTP traffic on the same interface is compressed. If you do not specify the passive keyword, all outgoing RTP traffic is compressed.

The passive keyword is ignored on PPP interfaces. PPP interfaces negotiate the use of header-compression, regardless of whether the passive keyword is specified. Therefore, on PPP interfaces, the passive keyword is replaced by the IPHC format, the default format for PPP interfaces.

The iphc-format Keyword

The iphc-format keyword indicates that the IPHC format of header compression that will be used. For PPP and HDLC interfaces, when the iphc-format keyword is specified, TCP header compression is also enabled. For this reason, the ip tcp header-compression command appears in the output of the show running-config command. Since both RTP header compression and TCP header compression are enabled, both UDP packets and TCP packets are compressed.

The iphc-format keyword includes checking whether the destination port number is even and is in the ranges of 16,385 to 32,767 (for Cisco audio) or 49,152 to 65,535 (for Cisco video). Valid RTP packets that meet the criteria (that is, the port number is even and is within the specified range) are compressed using the compressed RTP packet format. Otherwise, packets are compressed using the less-efficient compressed non-TCP packet format.

The iphc-format keyword is not available for interfaces that use Frame Relay encapsulation.


Note The header compression format (in this case, IPHC) must be the same at both ends of the network. That is, if you specify the iphc-format keyword on the local router, you must also specify the iphc-format keyword on the remote router.


The ietf-format Keyword

The ietf-format keyword indicates that the IETF format of header compression will be used. For HDLC interfaces, the ietf-format keyword compresses only UDP packets. For PPP interfaces, when the ietf-format keyword is specified, TCP header compression is also enabled. For this reason, the ip tcp header-compression command appears in the output of the show running-config command. Since both RTP header compression and TCP header compression are enabled, both UDP packets and TCP packets are compressed.

With the ietf-format keyword, any even destination port number higher than 1024 can be used. Valid RTP packets that meet the criteria (that is, the port number is even and is higher than 1024) are compressed using the compressed RTP packet format. Otherwise, packets are compressed using the less-efficient compressed non-TCP packet format.

The ietf-format keyword is not available for interfaces that use Frame Relay encapsulation.


Note The header compression format (in this case, IETF) must be the same at both ends of the network. That is, if you specify the ietf-format keyword on the local router, you must also specify the ietf-format keyword on the remote router.


Support for Serial Lines

RTP header compression is supported on serial lines using Frame Relay, HDLC, or PPP encapsulation. You must enable compression on both ends of a serial connection.

Unicast or Multicast RTP Packets

This command can compress unicast or multicast RTP packets, and, hence, multicast backbone (MBONE) traffic can also be compressed over slow links. The compression scheme is beneficial only when you have small payload sizes, as in audio traffic.

Custom or Priority Queueing

When you use the ip rtp header-compression command and configure custom or priority queueing on an encapsulated HDLC or Frame Relay interface, the compressed packets may go to the default queue instead of the user-defined queue, which results in protocol flaps (loss of keepalives). Therefore, we recommend that you use the Modular Quality of Service (QoS) Command-Line Interface (CLI) (MQC) model for configuring QoS features.

Examples

The following example shows how to enable RTP header compression on the Serial1/0 interface and limits the number of RTP header compression connections to 10. In this example, the optional iphc-format keyword of the ip rtp header-compression command is specified:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface Serial1/0
Router(config-if)# encapsulation ppp
Router(config-if)# ip rtp header-compression iphc-format
Router(config-if)# ip rtp compression-connections 10
Router(config-if)# end

The following example shows how to enable RTP header compression on the Serial2/0 interface and limits the number of RTP header compression connections to 20. In this example, the optional ietf-format keyword of the ip rtp header-compression command is specified:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface Serial2/0
Router(config-if)# encapsulation ppp
Router(config-if)# ip rtp header-compression ietf-format
Router(config-if)# ip rtp compression-connections 20
Router(config-if)# end

The following example shows how to enable RTP header compression on the Serial1/0 interface and the optional periodic-refresh keyword of the ip rtp header-compression command is specified:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface Serial1/0
Router(config-if)# encapsulation ppp
Router(config-if)# ip rtp header-compression iphc-format periodic-refresh
Router(config-if)# ip rtp compression-connections 10
Router(config-if)# end

Related Commands

Command
Description

clear ip rtp header-compression

Clears RTP header compression structures and statistics.

ip rtp compression-connections

Specifies the total number of RTP header compression connections that can exist on an interface.

show ip rtp header-compression

Displays RTP header compression statistics.

show running-config

Displays the contents of the currently running configuration file or the configuration for a specific interface, or map class information.


ip rtp priority


Note Effective with Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6, Cisco IOS Release 15.0(1)S, and Cisco IOS Release 15.1(3)T, the ip rtp priority command is hidden. Although this command is still available in Cisco IOS software, the CLI interactive Help does not display it if you attempt to view it by entering a question mark at the command line.

This command will be completely removed in a future release, which means that you will need to use the appropriate replacement command (or sequence of commands). For more information (including a list of replacement commands), see the Legacy QoS Command Deprecation feature document in the Cisco IOS XE Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide or the Legacy QoS Command Deprecation feature document in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.



Note Effective with Cisco IOS XE Release 3.2S, the ip rtp priority command is replaced by a modular QoS CLI (MQC) command (or sequence of MQC commands). For the appropriate replacement command (or sequence of commands), see the Legacy QoS Command Deprecation feature document in the Cisco IOS XE Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.


To reserve a strict priority queue for a set of Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) packet flows belonging to a range of User Datagram Protocol (UDP) destination ports, use the ip rtp priority command in interface configuration mode. To disable the strict priority queue, use the no form of this command.

ip rtp priority starting-rtp-port-number port-number-range bandwidth

no ip rtp priority

Syntax Description

starting-rtp-port-number

The starting RTP port number. The lowest port number to which the packets are sent. The port number can be a number from 2000 to 65,535.

port-number-range

The range of UDP destination ports. Number, when added to the starting-rtp-port-number argument, that yields the highest UDP port number. The range of UDP destination ports is from 0 to 16,383.

bandwidth

Maximum allowed bandwidth, in kbps. The maximum allowed bandwidth is from 0 to 2000.


Command Default

Disabled

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)T

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6

This command was modified. This command was hidden.

15.0(1)S

This command was modified. This command was hidden.

15.1(3)T

This command was modified. This command was hidden.

Cisco IOS XE Release 3.2S

This command was replaced by an MQC command (or sequence of MQC commands).


Usage Guidelines

This command is most useful for voice applications, or other applications that are delay-sensitive.

This command extends and improves on the functionality offered by the ip rtp reserve command by allowing you to specify a range of UDP/RTP ports whose voice traffic is guaranteed strict priority service over any other queues or classes using the same output interface. Strict priority means that if packets exist in the priority queue, they are dequeued and sent first—that is, before packets in other queues are dequeued. We recommend that you use the ip rtp priority command instead of the ip rtp reserve command for voice configurations.

This command can be used in conjunction with either weighted fair queueing (WFQ) or class-based WFQ (CBWFQ) on the same outgoing interface. In either case, traffic matching the range of ports specified for the priority queue is guaranteed strict priority over other CBWFQ classes or WFQ flows; voice packets in the priority queue are always serviced first.

Remember the following guidelines when using the ip rtp priority command:

When used in conjunction with WFQ, the ip rtp priority command provides strict priority to voice, and WFQ scheduling is applied to the remaining queues.

When used in conjunction with CBWFQ, the ip rtp priority command provides strict priority to voice. CBWFQ can be used to set up classes for other types of traffic (such as Systems Network Architecture [SNA]) that need dedicated bandwidth and need to be treated better than best effort and not as strict priority; the nonvoice traffic is serviced fairly based on the weights assigned to the enqueued packets. CBWFQ can also support flow-based WFQ within the default CBWFQ class if so configured.

Remember the following guidelines when configuring the bandwidth argument:

It is always safest to allocate to the priority queue slightly more than the known required amount of bandwidth, to allow room for network bursts.

The IP RTP Priority admission control policy takes RTP header compression into account. Therefore, while configuring the bandwidth argument of the ip rtp priority command you need to configure only for the bandwidth of the compressed call. Because the bandwidth argument is the maximum total bandwidth, you need to allocate enough bandwidth for all calls if there will be more than one call.

Configure a bandwidth that allows room for Layer 2 headers. The bandwidth allocation takes into account the payload plus the IP, UDP, and RTP headers but does not account for Layer 2 headers. Allowing 25 percent bandwidth for other overhead is conservative and safe.

The sum of all bandwidth allocation for voice and data flows on an interface cannot exceed 75 percent of the total available bandwidth, unless you change the default maximum reservable bandwidth. To change the maximum reservable bandwidth, use the max-reserved-bandwidth command on the interface.

For more information on IP RTP Priority bandwidth allocation, refer to the section "IP RTP Priority" in the chapter "Congestion Management Overview" in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

Examples

The following example shows how to first define a CBWFQ configuration and then reserve a strict priority queue with the following values: a starting RTP port number of 16384, a range of 16383 UDP ports, and a maximum bandwidth of 40 kbps:

! The following commands define a class map:
class-map class1
 match access-group 101
 exit

! The following commands create and attach a policy map:
policy-map policy1
class class1
 bandwidth 3000
 queue-limit 30
 random-detect
 random-detect precedence 0 32 256 100
 exit
interface Serial1
 service-policy output policy1

! The following command reserves a strict priority queue:
 ip rtp priority 16384 16383 40

Related Commands

Command
Description

bandwidth (policy-map class)

Specifies or modifies the bandwidth allocated for a class belonging to a policy map.

fair queue (WFQ)

Enables WFQ for an interface.

frame-relay ip rtp priority

Reserves a strict priority queue on a Frame Relay PVC for a set of RTP packet flows belonging to a range of UDP destination ports.

ip rtp reserve

Reserves a special queue for a set of RTP packet flows belonging to a range of UDP destination ports.

max-reserved-bandwidth

Changes the percent of interface bandwidth allocated for CBWFQ, LLQ, and IP RTP Priority.

policy-map

Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy.

ppp multilink

Enables MLP on an interface and, optionally, enables dynamic bandwidth allocation.

ppp multilink fragment-delay

Configures a maximum delay allowed for transmission of a packet fragment on an MLP bundle.

ppp multilink interleave

Enables interleaving of RTP packets among the fragments of larger packets on an MLP bundle.

priority

Gives priority to a class of traffic belonging to a policy map.

service-policy

Attaches a policy map to an input interface or VC, or an output interface or VC, to be used as the service policy for that interface or VC.

show policy-map

Displays the configuration of all classes for a specified service policy map or all classes for all existing policy maps.

show queue

Displays the contents of packets inside a queue for a particular interface or VC.


ip tcp compression-connections

To specify the total number of Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) header compression connections that can exist on an interface, use the ip tcp compression-connections command in interface configuration mode. To restore the default, use the no form of this command.

ip tcp compression-connections number

no ip tcp compression-connections

Syntax Description

number

Number of TCP header compression connections the cache supports, in the range from 3 to 256.


Command Default

For PPP and High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC) interfaces, the default is 16 compression connections.

For Frame Relay interfaces, the default is 256 compression connections.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

10.0

This command was introduced.

12.0(7)T

For Frame Relay interfaces, the maximum number of compression connections increased from 32 to 256. The default number of compression connections was increased from 32 (fixed) to 256 (configurable).

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

You should configure one connection for each TCP connection through the specified interface.

Each connection sets up a compression cache entry, so you are in effect specifying the maximum number of cache entries and the size of the cache. Too few cache entries for the specified interface can lead to degraded performance, and too many cache entries can lead to wasted memory.


Note Both ends of the serial connection must use the same number of cache entries.


Examples

The following example sets the first serial interface for header compression with a maximum of ten cache entries:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface serial 0
Router(config-if)# ip tcp header-compression
Router(config-if)# ip tcp compression-connections 10
Router(config-if)# end

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip tcp header-compression

Enables TCP header compression.

show ip tcp header-compressions

Displays TCP header compression statistics.


ip tcp header-compression

To enable Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) header compression, use the ip tcp header-compression command in interface configuration mode. To disable compression, use the no form of this command.

ip tcp header-compression [passive | iphc-format | ietf-format]

no ip tcp header-compression [passive | iphc-format | ietf-format]

Syntax Description

passive

(Optional) Compresses outgoing TCP packets only if incoming TCP packets on the same interface are compressed. If you do not specify the passive keyword, all TCP packets are compressed.

iphc-format

(Optional) Indicates that the IP Header Compression (IPHC) format of header compression will be used.

ietf-format

(Optional) Indicates that the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) format of header compression will be used.


Command Default

Disabled

For PPP interfaces, the default format for header compression is the IPHC format.

For High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC) and Frame Relay interfaces, the default format is as described in RFC 1144, Compressing TCP/IP Headers for Low-Speed Serial Links.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

10.0

This command was introduced.

12.0

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0. This command was modified to include the iphc-format keyword.

12.3(4)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.3(4)T. This command was modified to include the ietf-format keyword.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

You can compress the headers of your TCP/IP packets in order to reduce the size of your packets. TCP header compression is supported on serial lines using Frame Relay, HDLC, or PPP encapsulation. You must enable compression on both ends of a serial connection. Compressing the TCP header can speed up Telnet connections dramatically.

In general, TCP header compression is advantageous when your traffic consists of many small packets, not for traffic that consists of large packets. Transaction processing (usually using terminals) tends to use small packets and file transfers use large packets. This feature only compresses the TCP header, so it has no effect on User Datagram Protocol (UDP) packets or other protocol headers.

The passive Keyword

By default, the ip tcp header-compression command compresses outgoing TCP traffic. If you specify the passive keyword, outgoing TCP traffic is compressed only if incoming TCP traffic on the same interface is compressed. If you do not specify the passive keyword, all outgoing TCP traffic is compressed.

For PPP interfaces, the passive keyword is ignored. PPP interfaces negotiate the use of header-compression, regardless of whether the passive keyword is specified. Therefore, on PPP interfaces, the passive keyword is replaced by the IPHC format, the default format for PPP interfaces.

The iphc-format Keyword

The iphc-format keyword indicates that the IPHC format of header compression will be used. For PPP and HDLC interfaces, when the iphc-format keyword is specified, Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) header compression is also enabled. For this reason, the ip rtp header-compression command appears in the output of the show running-config command. Since both TCP header compression and RTP header compression are enabled, both TCP packets and UDP packets are compressed.

The iphc-format keyword is not available for interfaces that use Frame Relay encapsulation.


Note The header compression format (in this case, IPHC) must be the same at both ends of the network. That is, if you specify the iphc-format keyword on the local router, you must also specify the iphc-format keyword on the remote router.


The ietf-format Keyword

The ietf-format keyword indicates that the IETF format of header compression will be used. For HDLC interfaces, the ietf-format keyword compresses only TCP packets. For PPP interfaces, when the ietf-format keyword is specified, RTP header compression is also enabled. For this reason, the ip rtp header-compression command appears in the output of the show running-config command. Since both TCP header compression and RTP header compression are enabled, both TCP packets and UDP packets are compressed.

The ietf-format keyword is not available for interfaces that use Frame Relay encapsulation.


Note The header compression format (in this case, IETF) must be the same at both ends of the network. That is, if you specify the ietf-format keyword on the local router, you must also specify the ietf-format keyword on the remote router.


Examples

The following example shows how to set the first serial interface for header compression with a maximum of ten cache entries:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface serial 0
Router(config-if)# ip tcp header-compression
Router(config-if)# ip tcp compression-connections 10
Router(config-if)# end

The following example shows how to enable RTP header compression on the Serial1/0.0 subinterface and limits the number of RTP header compression connections to 10. In this example, the optional iphc-format keyword of the ip tcp header-compression command is specified:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface Serial1/0.0
Router(config-if)# encapsulation ppp
Router(config-if)# ip tcp header-compression iphc-format
Router(config-if)# ip tcp compression-connections 10
Router(config-if)# end

The following example shows how to enable RTP header compression on the Serial2/0.0 subinterface and limits the number of RTP header compression connections to 20. In this example, the optional ietf-format keyword of the ip tcp header-compression command is specified:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface Serial2/0.0
Router(config-if)# encapsulation ppp
Router(config-if)# ip tcp header-compression ietf-format
Router(config-if)# ip tcp compression-connections 20
Router(config-if)# end

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip tcp compression-connections

Specifies the total number of TCP header compression connections that can exist on an interface.

show ip tcp header-compression

Displays TCP/IP header compression statistics.

show running-config

Displays the contents of the currently running configuration file or the configuration for a specific interface, or map class information.


iphc-profile

To create an IP Header Compression (IPHC) profile and to enter IPHC-profile configuration mode, use the iphc-profile command in global configuration mode. To attach an existing IPHC profile to an interface or subinterface, use the iphc-profile command in interface configuration mode. To delete the IPHC profile, use the no form of this command.

iphc-profile profile-name {ietf | van-jacobson}

no iphc-profile profile-name

Syntax Description

profile-name

Name of the IPHC profile to be created or attached. The IPHC profile name can be a maximum of 32 characters.

ietf

Specifies that the IPHC profile is for Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) header compression.

van-jacobson

Specifies that the IPHC profile is for Van Jacobson header compression.


Command Default

No IPHC profile is created or attached.

Command Modes

Global configuration (to create an IPHC profile)
Interface configuration (to attach an existing IPHC profile to an interface or subinterface)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.4(9)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The iphc-profile command creates an IPHC profile used for enabling header compression and enters IPHC-profile configuration mode (config-iphcp). An IPHC profile is a template within which you can configure the type of header compression that you want to use, enable any optional features and settings for header compression, and then apply the profile to an interface, a subinterface, or a Frame Relay permanent virtual circuit (PVC).

Specifying the IPHC Profile Type

When you create an IPHC profile, you must specify the IPHC profile type by using either the ietf keyword or the van-jacobson keyword. The IETF profile type conforms to and supports the standards established with RFC 2507, RFC 2508, RFC 3544, and RFC 3545 and is typically associated with non-TCP header compression (for example, RTP header compression). The Van Jacobson profile type conforms to and supports the standards established with RFC 1144 and is typically associated with TCP header compression.


Note If you are using Frame Relay encapsulation, you must specify the ietf keyword (not the van-jacobson keyword).


Considerations When Specifying the IPHC Profile Type

When specifying the IPHC profile type, consider whether you are compressing TCP traffic or non-TCP traffic (that is, RTP traffic). Also consider the header compression format capabilities of the remote network link that will receive traffic. The IPHC profile type that you specify directly affects the header compression format used on the remote network links to which the IPHC profile is applied. Only TCP traffic is compressed on remote network links using a Van Jacobson IPHC profile, whereas TCP and/or non-TCP traffic (for example, RTP traffic) is compressed on remote network links using an IETF IPHC profile.


Note The header compression format in use on the router that you are configuring and the header compression format in use on the remote network link must match.


Configurable Header Compression Features and Settings

The specific set of header compression features and settings that you can configure (that is, enable or modify) is determined by the IPHC profile type that you specify (either IETF or Van Jacobson) when you create the IPHC profile. Both sets are listed below.

If you specify Van Jacobson as the IPHC profile type, you can enable TCP header compression and set the number of TCP contexts. Table 7 lists each available Van Jacobson IPHC profile type header compression feature and setting and the command used to enable it.

Table 7 Van Jacobson IPHC Profile Type Header Compression Features and Settings

Command
Feature or Setting

tcp

Enables TCP header compression.

tcp contexts

Sets the number of contexts available for TCP header compression.


If you specify IETF as the IPHC profile type, you can enable non-TCP header compression (that is, RTP header compression), along with a number of additional features and settings. Table 8 lists each available IETF IPHC profile type header compression feature and setting and the command or commands used to enable it.

Table 8 IETF IPHC Profile Type Header Compression Features and Settings 

Command
Feature or Setting

feedback

Enables the context-status feedback messages from the interface or link.

maximum header

Sets the maximum size of the compressed IP header.

non-tcp

Enables non-TCP header compression.

non-tcp contexts

Sets the number of contexts available for non-TCP header compression.

rtp

Enables RTP header compression.

recoverable-loss

Enables Enhanced Compressed Real-Time Transport Protocol (ECRTP) on an interface.

refresh max-period
refresh max-time
refresh rtp

Sets the context refresh (full-header refresh) options, such as the amount of time to wait before a full header is refreshed.

tcp

Enables TCP header compression.

tcp contexts

Sets the number of contexts available for TCP header compression.


For More Information About IPHC Profiles

For more information about using IPHC profiles to configure header compression, see the "Header Compression" module and the "Configuring Header Compression Using IPHC Profiles" module of the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide, Release 12.4T.

Examples

The following example shows how to create an IPHC profile called profile1, and the Van Jacobson IPHC profile type is specified:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# iphc-profile profile1 van-jacobson
Router(config-iphcp)# end

The following example shows how to create a second IPHC profile called profile2. For this IPHC profile, the IETF IPHC profile type is specified:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# iphc-profile profile2 ietf
Router(config-iphcp)# end

The following example shows how to attach an existing IPHC profile called profile2 to serial interface 3/0. For this IPHC profile, the IPHC profile type (in this case, IETF) of profile2 is specified:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface serial 3/0
Router(config-if)# iphc-profile profile2 ietf
Router(config-iphcp)# end

Related Commands

Command
Description

feedback

Enables the context-status feedback messages from the interface or link.

maximum header

Specifies the maximum size of the compressed IP header.

non-tcp

Enables non-TCP header compression within an IPHC profile.

non-tcp contexts

Sets the number of contexts available for non-TCP header compression.

recoverable-loss

Enables ECRTP on an interface.

refresh max-period

Sets the number of packets sent between full-header refresh occurrences.

refresh max-time

Sets the amount of time to wait before a full-header refresh occurrence.

refresh rtp

Enables a context refresh occurrence for RTP header compression.

rtp

Enables RTP header compression within an IPHC profile.

show iphc-profile

Displays configuration information for one or more IPHC profiles.

tcp

Enables TCP header compression within an IPHC profile.

tcp contexts

Set the number of contexts available for TCP header compression.


lane client qos

To apply a LAN Emulation (LANE) quality of service (QoS) database to an interface, use the lane client qos command in subinterface configuration mode. To remove the QoS over LANE feature from the interface, use the no form of this command.

lane client qos database-name

no lane client qos database-name

Syntax Description

database-name

Name of the QoS database.


Command Default

This command is not configured by default.

Command Modes

Subinterface configuration (config-subif)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.1(2)E

This command was introduced.

12.2(14)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(14)S.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Examples

This example shows how to apply a LANE QoS database to a subinterface:

Router(config-subif)# lane client qos user1

Related Commands

Command
Description

atm-address

Specifies the QoS parameters associated with a particular ATM address.

lane qos database

Begins the process of building a QoS over LANE database

show lane qos database

Displays the contents of a specific QoS over LANE database.

ubr+ cos

Maps a CoS value to a UBR+ VCC.


lane qos database

To build the LAN Emulation (LANE) quality-of-service database, use the lane qos database command in global configuration mode. To remove a LANE QoS database name, use the no form of this command.

lane qos database name

no lane qos database name

Syntax Description

name

Name of the LANE QoS database.


Command Default

This command is not configured by default.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.1(2)E

This command was introduced.

12.2(14)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(14)S.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

This command specifies a named database of QoS parameters. The database can be applied on the subinterfaces on which a LANE client is configured.

Examples

This example shows how to begin configuring a QoS over LANE database named user1 on a Catalyst 5000 family ATM switch:

ATM# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
ATM(config)# lane qos database user1

This example shows how to begin configuring a QoS over LANE database named user2 on a router:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# lane qos database user2

Related Commands

Command
Description

atm-address

Specifies the QoS parameters associated with a particular ATM address.

lane client qos

Applies a QoS over LANE database to an interface.

show lane qos database

Displays the contents of a specific QoS over LANE database.

ubr+ cos

Maps a CoS value to a UBR+ VCC.


load protocol

To load a protocol header description file (PHDF) onto a router, use the load protocol command in global configuration mode. To unload all protocols from a specified location or a single protocol, use the no form of this command.

load protocol location:filename

no load protocol {location:filename | protocol-name}

Syntax Description

location:filename

Location of the PHDF that is to be loaded onto the router.

When used with the no version of this command, all protocols loaded from the specified filename will be unloaded.

Note The location must be local to the router.

protocol-name

Unloads only the specified protocol.

Note If you attempt to unload a protocol that is being referenced by a filter, you will receive an error.


Command Default

If this command is not issued, no PHDFs will be loaded onto the router.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.4(4)T

This command was introduced.

12.2(18)ZY

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)ZY on the Catalyst 6500 series of switches equipped with the Programmable Intelligent Services Accelerator (PISA).


Usage Guidelines

Flexible packet matching allows users to classify traffic on the basis of any portion of a packet header given the protocol field, length, and pattern. Protocol headers are defined in separate files called PHDFs; the field names that are defined within the PHDFs are used for defining the packet filters. A PHDF is a file that allows the user to leverage the flexibility of extensible markup language (XML) to describe almost any protocol header. The important components of the PHDF are the version, the XML file schema location, and the protocol field definitions. The protocol field definitions name the appropriate field in the protocol header, allow for a comment describing the field, provide the location of the protocol header field in the header (the offset is relative to the start of the protocol header), and provide the length of the field. Users can choose to specify the measurement in bytes or in bits.


Note The total length of the header must be specified at the end of each PHDF.


In case of a redundant setup, users should ensure all PHDFs that are used in the flexible packet matching configuration are present on the corresponding standby disk. If the PHDFs are not on standby disk, all flexible packet matching policies using the PHDFs will be broken.

Users can write their own custom PHDFs via XML. However, the following standard PHDFs can also be loaded onto the router: ip.phdf, ether.phdf, tcp.phdf, and udp.phdf.

Standard PHDFs are available on Cisco.com at the following URL:
http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/tablebuild.pl/fpm

Because PHDFs are defined via XML, they are not shown in a running configuration.

Issue the load protocol command to apply filters to a protocol by defining and loading a PHDF for that protocol header.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure FPM for blaster packets. The class map contains the following match criteria: TCP port 135, 4444 or UDP port 69; and pattern 0x0030 at 3 bytes from start of IP header.

load protocol disk2:ip.phdf
load protocol disk2:tcp.phdf
load protocol disk2:udp.phdf 

class-map type stack match-all ip-tcp
 match field ip protocol eq 0x6 next tcp

class-map type stack match-all ip-udp
 match field ip protocol eq 0x11 next udp

class-map type access-control match-all blaster1
 match field tcp dest-port eq 135
 match start 13-start offset 3 size 2 eq 0x0030

class-map type access-control match-all blaster2
 match field tcp dest-port eq 4444
 match start 13-start offset 3 size 2 eq 0x0030

class-map type access-control match-all blaster3
 match field udp dest-port eq 69
 match start 13-start offset 3 size 2 eq 0x0030

policy-map type access-control fpm-tcp-policy
 class blaster1
 drop
 class blaster2
 drop

policy-map type access-control fpm-udp-policy
 class blaster3
 drop

policy-map type access-control fpm-policy
 class ip-tcp
 service-policy fpm-tcp-policy
 class ip-udp
 service-policy fpm-udp-policy

interface gigabitEthernet 0/1
 service-policy type access-control input fpm-policy