Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Command Reference
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Quality of Service Commands

Table Of Contents

Quality of Service Commands

access-list rate-limit

account

atm-address (qos)

auto discovery qos

auto qos

auto qos voip

auto qos voip (6500)

bandwidth (policy-map class)

bandwidth qos-reference

bandwidth remaining ratio

bump

bundle

bundle svc

class (EtherSwitch)

class (policy-map)

class arp-peruser

class-bundle

class-map

class-map arp-peruser

class type tag

clear control-plane

clear ip nbar

clear ip nbar protocol-discovery

clear ip rsvp authentication

clear ip rsvp counters

clear ip rsvp hello instance counters

clear ip rsvp hello instance statistics

clear ip rsvp hello statistics

clear ip rsvp high-availability counters

clear ip rsvp msg-pacing

clear ip rsvp reservation

clear ip rsvp sender

clear ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair statistics

clear ip rsvp signalling rate-limit

clear ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction

clear mls qos

clear service-group traffic-stats

compression header ip

control-plane

copy interface

custom-queue-list


Quality of Service Commands


Cisco IOS quality of service (QoS) commands are used to configure quality of service, a measure of performance for a transmission system that reflects its transmission quality and service availability.

access-list rate-limit

To configure an access list for use with committed access rate (CAR) policies, use the access-list rate-limit command in global configuration mode. To remove the access list from the configuration, use the no form of this command.

access-list rate-limit acl-index {precedence | mac-address | exp | mask mask}

no access-list rate-limit acl-index {precedence | mac-address | exp | mask mask}

Syntax Description

acl-index

Access list number. To classify packets by

IP precedence, use any number from 1 to 99

MAC address, use any number from 100 to 199

Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) experimental field, use any number from 200 to 299

precedence

IP precedence. Valid values are numbers from 0 to 7.

mac-address

MAC address.

exp

MPLS experimental field. Valid values are numbers from 0 to 7.

mask mask

Mask. Use this option if you want to assign multiple IP precedences or MPLS experimental field values to the same rate-limit access list.


Command Default

No CAR access lists are configured.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

11.1CC

This command was introduced.

12.1(5)T

This command now includes an access list based on the MPLS experimental field.

12.2(2)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(2)T.

12.2(4)T

This command was implemented on the Cisco MGX 8850 switch and the MGX 8950 switch with a Cisco MGX RPM-PR card.

12.2(4)T2

This command was implemented on the Cisco 7500 series.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

Use this command to classify packets by the specified IP precedence, MAC address, or MPLS experimental field values for a particular CAR access list. You can then apply CAR policies, using the rate-limit command, to individual rate-limit access lists. When packets in an access list are classified in this manner, the packets with different IP precedences, MAC addresses, or MPLS experimental field values are treated differently by the CAR process.

You can specify only one command for each rate-limit access list. If you enter this command multiple times using the same access list number, the new command overwrites the previous command.

Use the mask keyword to assign multiple IP precedences or MPLS experimental field values to the same rate-limit list. To ascertain the mask value, perform the following steps.

1. Decide which precedences you want to assign to this rate-limit access list.

2. Convert the precedences or MPLS experimental field values into 8-bit numbers with each bit corresponding to one value. For example, an MPLS experimental field value of 0 corresponds to 00000001; 1 corresponds to 00000010; 6 corresponds to 01000000; and 7 corresponds to 10000000.

3. Add the 8-bit numbers for the selected MPLS experimental field values. For example, the mask for MPLS experimental field values 1 and 6 is 01000010.

4. The access-list rate-limit command expects hexadecimal format. Convert the binary mask into the corresponding hexadecimal number. For example, 01000010 becomes 42 and is used in the command. Any packets that have an MPLS experimental field value of 1 or 6 will match this access list.

A mask of FF matches any precedence, and 00 does not match any precedence.

Examples

In the following example, MPLS experimental fields with the value of 7 are assigned to the rate-limit access list 200:

Router(config)# access-list rate-limit 200 7
 
   

You can then use the rate-limit access list in a rate-limit command so that the rate limit is applied only to packets matching the rate-limit access list.

Router(config)# interface atm4/0.1 mpls
Router(config-if)# rate-limit input access-group rate-limit 200 8000 8000 8000 
conform-action set-mpls-exp-transmit 4 exceed-action set-mpls-exp-transmit 0

Related Commands

Command
Description

rate-limit

Configures CAR and DCAR policies.

show access-lists rate-limit

Displays information about rate-limit access lists.


account

To enable collection of statistics for packets matching the traffic class where this command is configured, use the account command in policy-map class configuration mode. To disable statistics collection, use the no form of this command.

account [drop]

no account

Syntax Description

drop

(Optional) Enables the collection of statistics for packets dropped for the traffic class where it is configured. This is the default behavior.


Command Default

When the account command is configured, the default behavior is collection of drop statistics. No statistics are collected if the account command is not configured.

Command Modes

Policy-map class (config-pmap-c)

Command History

Release
Modification

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The account command was implemented as part of the QoS: Policies Aggregation Enhancements feature in Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6 on the Cisco ASR 1000 Series Aggregation Services Routers to support the collection of per-subscriber statistics.

By default when configured, the command enables collection of drop statistics for traffic in the class where it is configured. Therefore, the optional drop keyword is not required to enable collection of drop statistics.

You can display the subscriber statistics collected for a certain traffic class using the show policy-map interface command.

Examples

The following example shows enabling of drop statistics collection (the default) for the EF traffic class for the subscriber policy-map:

Router(config)# policy-map subscriber
Router(config-pmap)# class EF
Router(config-pmap-c)# account

Related Commands

Command
Description

class (policy-map)

Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change or to specify the default class (commonly known as the class-default class) before you configure its policy.

policy-map

Enters policy-map configuration mode and creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy.

show policy-map interface

Displays the statistics and the configurations of the input and output policies that are attached to an interface.


atm-address (qos)

To specify the QoS parameters associated with a particular ATM address, use the atm-address command in LANE QoS database configuration mode. To revert to the default value, use the no form of this command.

atm-address atm-address [ubr+ pcr value mcr value]

no atm-address atm-address [ubr+ pcr value mcr value]

Syntax Description

atm-address

Control ATM address.

ubr+

(Optional) Unspecified bit rate plus virtual channel connection (VCC).

pcr

(Optional) Peak cell rate (PCR).

value

(Optional) UBR+ pcr value in kbps.

mcr value

(Optional) Minimum cell rate (MCR) value in kbps


Command Default

No default ATM address.

Command Modes

LANE QoS database configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.1(2)E

This command was introduced.

12.2(14)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(14)S.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Examples

The following example shows how to enter the required QoS parameters using PCR and MCR values on a specific ATM address. This command is entered from LANE QoS database configuration mode.

Router(lane-qos)# atm-address 47.0091810000000061705B0C01.00E0B0951A40.0A ubr+ pcr 500000 
mcr 100000

Related Commands

Command
Description

lane client qos

Applies a QoS over LANE database to an interface.

lane qos database

Begins the process of building a QoS over LANE database.

show lane qos database

Displays the contents of a specific QoS over LANE database.

ubr+ cos

Maps a CoS value to a UBR+ VCC.


auto discovery qos

To begin discovering and collecting data for configuring the AutoQoS for the Enterprise feature, use the auto discovery qos command in interface configuration mode. To stop discovering and collecting data, use the no form of this command.

auto discovery qos [trust]

no auto discovery qos

Syntax Description

trust

(Optional) Indicates that the differentiated services code point (DSCP) markings of a packet are trust (that is, relied on) for classification of the voice, video, and data traffic.

If the optional trust keyword is not specified, the voice, video, and data traffic is classified using network-based application recognition (NBAR), and the packets are marked with the appropriate DSCP value.


Defaults

No data collection is performed.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.3(7)T

This command was introduced.

12.3(11)T

The trust mode was modified to classify packets by DSCP value rather than by protocol type.


Usage Guidelines

The auto discovery qos command initiates the Auto-Discovery (data collection) phase of the AutoQoS for the Enterprise feature. This command invokes NBAR protocol discovery to collect data and analyze the traffic at the egress direction of the interface.

The no auto discovery qos command terminates the Auto-Discovery phase and removes any data collection reports generated.

The trust keyword is used for the trusted model based on the specified DSCP marking. For more information, see the "Trusted Boundary" section of the AutoQoS for the Enterprise feature module, Cisco IOS Release 12.3(7)T.

Examples

The following is a sample configuration showing the Auto-Discovery (data collection) phase of the AutoQoS for the Enterprise feature enabled on a serial2/1/1 subinterface.

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface serial2/1.1
Router(config-if)# frame-relay interface-dlci 58
Router(config-if)# auto discovery qos
Router(config-if)# end

Related Commands

Command
Description

auto qos

Installs the QoS class maps and policy maps created by the AutoQoS for the Enterprise feature.

service policy

Attaches a policy map to an input interface or VC, or an output interface or VC, to be used as the service policy for that interface or VC.

show auto qos

Displays the interface configurations, policy maps, and class maps created by AutoQoS on a specific interface or all interfaces.


auto qos

To install the quality-of-service (QoS) class maps and policy maps created by the AutoQoS for the Enterprise feature, use the auto qos command in interface configuration mode. To remove the QoS policies, use the no form of this command.

auto qos

no auto qos

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

No QoS policies are installed.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.3(7)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The class maps and policy maps are created from the templates that are automatically generated by the AutoQoS for the Enterprise feature. These templates (and the resulting class maps and policy maps) are generated on the basis of the data collected during the Auto-Discovery phase of the AutoQoS for the Enterprise feature. For more information about the Auto-Discovery phase, see the "Configuration Phases" section of the AutoQoS for the Enterprise feature module, Cisco IOS Release 12.3(7)T.

The no auto qos command removes any AutoQoS-generated class maps and policy maps installed on the interface.

The auto qos command is not supported on gigabit interfaces.

Examples

The following is a sample configuration showing the AutoQoS for the Enterprise feature enabled on a serial2/1/1 subinterface. In this configuration, the AutoQoS class maps and policy maps will be installed on the serial2/1 interface.

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface serial2/1
Router(config-if)# frame-relay interface-dlci 58
Router(config-if)# auto qos
Router(config-if)# end

Related Commands

Command
Description

service policy

Attaches a policy map to an input interface or VC, or an output interface or VC, to be used as the service policy for that interface or VC.

show auto qos

Displays the interface configurations, policy maps, and class maps created by AutoQoS on a specific interface or all interfaces.


auto qos voip

To configure the AutoQoS—VoIP feature on an interface, use the auto qos voip command in interface configuration mode or Frame Relay DLCI configuration mode. To remove the AutoQoS—VoIP feature from an interface, use the no form of this command.

auto qos voip [trust] [fr-atm]

no auto qos voip [trust] [fr-atm]

Syntax Description

trust

(Optional) Indicates that the differentiated services code point (DSCP) markings of a packet are trusted (relied on) for classification of the voice traffic. If the optional trust keyword is not specified, the voice traffic is classified using network-based application recognition (NBAR), and the packets are marked with the appropriate DSCP value.

fr-atm

(Optional) Enables the AutoQoS—VoIP feature for Frame-Relay-to-ATM links. This option is available on the Frame Relay data-link connection identifiers (DLCIs) for Frame-Relay-to-ATM interworking only.


Command Default

Default mode is disabled.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)
Frame Relay DLCI configuration (for use with Frame Relay DLCIs) (config-fr-dlci)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(15)T

This command was introduced.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

To enable the AutoQoS—VoIP feature for Frame-Relay-to-ATM interworking, the fr-atm keyword must be configured explicitly. However, the fr-atm keyword affects low-speed DLCIs only. It does not affect high-speed DLCIs.


Note DLCIs with link speeds lower than or equal to 768 kbps are considered low-speed DLCIs; DLCIs with link speeds higher than 768 kbps are considered high-speed DLCIs.


Depending on whether the trust keyword has been configured for this command, the AutoQoS—VoIP feature automatically creates one of the following two policy maps:

"AutoQoS-Policy-Trust" (created if the trust keyword is configured)

"AutoQoS-Policy-UnTrust" (created if the trust keyword is not configured)

Both of these policy maps are designed to handle the Voice over IP (VoIP) traffic on an interface or a permanent virtual circuit (PVC) and can be modified to suit the quality of service (QoS) requirements of the network. To modify these policy maps, use the appropriate Cisco IOS command.

These policy maps should not be attached to an interface or PVC by using the service-policy command. If the policy maps are attached in this manner, the AutoQoS—VoIP feature (that is, the policy maps, class maps, and access control lists [ACLs]) will not be removed properly when the no auto qos voip command is configured.

For low-speed Frame Relay DLCIs that are interconnected with ATM PVCs in the same network, the fr-atm keyword must be explicitly configured in the auto qos voip command to configure the AutoQoS—VoIP feature properly. That is, the command must be configured as auto qos voip fr-atm.

For low-speed Frame Relay DLCIs that are configured with Frame-Relay-to-ATM, Multilink PPP (MLP) over Frame Relay (MLPoFR) is configured automatically. The subinterface must have an IP address. When MLPoFR is configured, this IP address is removed and put on the MLP bundle. The AutoQoS—VoIP feature must also be configured on the ATM side by using the auto qos voip command.

The auto qos voip command is not supported on subinterfaces.

The auto qos voip command is not supported on gigabit interfaces (this restriction does not apply to Catalyst 6500 switches).

The auto qos voip command is available for Frame Relay DLCIs.

Disabling AutoQoS—VoIP

The no auto qos voip command disables the AutoQoS—VoIP feature and removes the configurations associated with the feature.

When the no auto qos voip command is used, the no forms of the individual commands originally generated by the AutoQoS—VoIP feature are configured. With the use of individual no forms of the commands, the system defaults are reinstated. The no forms of the commands will be applied just as if the user had entered the commands individually. As the configuration reinstating the default setting is applied, any messages resulting from the processing of the commands are displayed.


Note If you delete a subinterface or PVC (either ATM or Frame Relay PVCs) without configuring the no auto qos voip command, the AutoQoS—VoIP feature will not be removed properly.


Examples

The following example shows the AutoQoS—VoIP feature configured on serial point-to-point subinterface 4/1.2. In this example, both the trust and fr-atm keywords are configured.

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface serial4/1.2 point-to-point
Router(config-if)# bandwidth 100
Router(config-if)# ip address 192.168.0.0 255.255.255.0
Router(config-if)# frame-relay interface-dlci 102
Router(config-fr-dlci)# auto qos voip trust fr-atm
Router(config-fr-dlci)# end
Router(config-if# exit

Related Commands

Command
Description

service-policy

Attaches a policy map to an input interface or VC, or an output interface or VC, to be used as the service policy for that interface or VC.

show auto qos

Displays the configurations created by the AutoQoS—VoIP feature on a specific interface or all interfaces.


auto qos voip (6500)

To configure AutoQoS on a voice over IP (VoIP) port interface, use the auto qos voip command in interface configuration mode. To remove AutoQos from the configuration, use the no form of this command.

auto qos voip {cisco-phone | cisco-softphone | trust}

no auto qos voip {cisco-phone | cisco-softphone | trust}

Syntax Description

cisco-phone

Enables the quality of service (QoS) ingress macro for the Cisco IP Phone.

cisco-softphone

Enables the QoS ingress macro for the Cisco IP SoftPhone.

trust

Specifies AutoQoS for ports trusting differentiated services code point (DSCP) and class of service (CoS) traffic markings.


Command Default

AutoQos trusts DSCP and CoS traffic markings.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SXH

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

The auto qos voip command is not supported on gigabit interfaces.

The automation of QoS (AutoQoS) allows you to specify the type of QoS parameters desired on a particular port. For example, entering the auto qos voip cisco-softphone command enables the QoS ingress macro for the Cisco IP SoftPhone.

The Smartports feature provides a set of tools for configuring all switch settings related to a specific application with a single command. For example, entering the auto qos voip cisco-phone command configures all the settings necessary to connect an IP phone to the switch.

You can enter the show auto qos command to display the configured AutoQoS macros.

AutoQoS and Smartports are supported on the following modules:

WS-X6548-RJ45

WS-X6548-RJ21

WS-X6148-GE_TX

WS-X6548-GE-TX-CR

WS-X6148-RJ45V

WS-X6148-RJ21V

WS-X6348-RJ45

WS-X6348-RJ21

WS-X6248-TEL


Note The no auto qos voip interface configuration command does not disable QoS globally or delete the received CoS-to-internal-DSCP maps created by AutoQoS.


The auto qos voip cisco-phone and the auto qos voip cisco-softphone commands allow you to enable the inbound QoS configuration macros for AutoQoS on an interface. In some cases, the interface-specific auto qos voip commands also generate configuration commands that are applied globally.

You must configure the interface with the switchport command if you enter the auto qos voip cisco-phone command. You cannot configure the interface with the switchport command if you enter the auto qos voip cisco-softphone command.

If you configure an interface with the switchport command, AutoQoS configures the interface to trust CoS. If you do not configure the interface with the switchport command, AutoQoS configures the interface to trust DSCP.

AutoQoS uses a nondefault CoS-to-DSCP map. For this reason, you must configure port trust on a per-port-ASIC basis.

When you enter the auto qos voip cisco-phone command, the following behavior occurs:

QoS is enabled if it is disabled.

The port is changed to port-based QoS.

The appropriate CoS map is set.

All ports are changed to port-based mode (if applicable).

A trust-CoS QoS policy is created and applied for the ports that need a trust-CoS QoS policy (COIL2 and COIL1).

A trusted boundary is enabled on the port.

The CoS value for a trust boundary is set to zero.

The port trust is set to trust-cos.

Only 10/100 ports and 10/100/1000 ports are supported.

A warning message is displayed if the CDP version is not version 2.

When you enter the auto qos voip cisco-softphone command, the following behavior occurs:

The cisco-softphone macro is a superset of the cisco-phone macro and configures all features that are required for a Cisco IP Phone to work properly on the Catalyst 6500 series switch.

The global settings for AutoQoS policy maps, class maps, and access lists are created to classify VoIP packets and to put them in the priority queue or another low-latency queue. The interface settings are created depending on the type of interface and the link speed.

Two rate limiters are associated with the interface on which the cisco-softphone port-based autoqos macro is executed. The two rate limiters ensure that all inbound traffic on a cisco-softphone port have the following characteristics:

The rate of DCSP 46 is at or less than that of the expected softphone rate.

The rate of DSCP 26 is at or less than the expected signaling rate.

All other traffic is re-marked to DSCP 0 (default traffic).

DSCP 46 is policed at the rate of 320 kbps with a burst of 2 Kb. DSCP 26 is policed at 32 kbps with a burst of 8 Kb.

The port is set to untrusted for all port types. The policed-dscp-map is set to ensure that DSCP 46 is marked down to DSCP 0 and DSCP 26 is marked down to DSCP 0. The default QoS IP ACL re-marks all other traffic to DSCP 0.

When you enter the auto qos voip soft-phone command, the following behavior occurs:

Enables QoS if QoS is disabled.

Changes the port to port-based QoS.

Sets the appropriate police-dscp-map.

Sets the appropriate CoS-to-DSCP map.

Changes all ports to port-based mode (if applicable).

Creates a trust-dscp QoS policy for the ports that need it (COIL2 and COIL1).

Applies the trust-dscp QoS policy to the port (COIL2 and COIL1).

Disables a trusted boundary on the port.

Changes trust to untrusted.

Allows 10/100 ports and 10/100/1000 ports only.

Applies two rate limiters, one for DSCP 46 and one for DSCP 26 inbound traffic, and trusts only inbound DSCP 46 and DSCP 26 traffic.

Marks violations of either rate limiter results in traffic down to DSCP 0.

Re-marks all other (non-DSCP 26 and 46) inbound traffic to DSCP 0.

When you enter the auto qos voip trust command, the following applies:

The DSCP and the CoS markings are trusted for classification of the voice traffic.

Enables QoS if QoS is disabled.

Changes the port to port-based QoS.

Changes all ports to port-based mode (if applicable).

Creates a trust-dscp and a trust-cos QoS policy for the ports that need it (COIL2 and COIL1).

Applies the trust-dscp and a trust-cos QoS policy to the port (COIL2 and COIL1).

Disables the trusted boundary on the port.

Sets port trust to trust-cos.

All ports are supported.

Bases queueing for all ports that allow dscp-to-q mapping on DSCP. If not, queueing is based on CoS.

Examples

The following example shows how to enable the QoS ingress macro for the Cisco IP Phone:

Router(config-if)# auto qos voip cisco-phone

Related Commands

Command
Description

show auto qos

Displays AutoQoS information.

show running-config interface

Displays the status and configuration of the interface.

switchport

Configures the LAN interface as a Layer 2 switched interface.


bandwidth (policy-map class)

To specify or modify the bandwidth allocated for a class belonging to a policy map, or to enable ATM overhead accounting, use the bandwidth command in policy-map class configuration mode. To remove the bandwidth specified for a class or disable ATM overhead accounting, use the no form of this command.

bandwidth {bandwidth-kbps | remaining percent percentage | percent percentage} [

no bandwidth

Cisco 10000 Series Router (PRE3)

bandwidth {bandwidth-kbps | percent percentage | remaining percent percentage} account {qinq | dot1q} {aal5 | aal3}subscriber-encapsulation | user-defined offset [atm]

no bandwidth

Syntax Description

bandwidth-kbps

Amount of bandwidth, in kilobits per second (kbps), to be assigned to the class. The amount of bandwidth varies according to the interface and platform in use.

remaining percent percentage

Specifies the percentage of guaranteed bandwidth based on a relative percent of available bandwidth. The percentage can be a number from 1 to 100.

percent percentage

Specifies the percentage of guaranteed bandwidth based on an absolute percent of available bandwidth to be set aside for the priority class. The percentage can be a number from 1 to 100.

aal3

Specifies the ATM Adaptation Layer 5 that supports both connectionless and connection-oriented links. You must specify either aal3 or aal5.

user-defined

Specifies that the router is to use an offset size when calculating ATM overhead.

offset

Specifies the offset size when calculating ATM overhead. Valid values are from -63 to 63 bytes.

Note The router configures the offset size if you do not specify the user-defined offset option.

atm

Applies ATM cell tax in the ATM overhead calculation.

Note Configuring both the offset and atm options adjusts the packet size to the offset size and then adds ATM cell tax.


Command Default

No bandwidth is specified.

ATM overhead accounting is disabled.

Command Modes

Policy-map class configuration (config-pmap-c)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)T

This command was introduced.

12.0(5)XE

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(5)XE and implemented on Versatile Interface Processor (VIP)-enabled Cisco 7500 series routers.

12.0(7)T

This command was modified. The percent keyword was added.

12.0(17)SL

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(17)SL and implemented on Cisco 10000 series routers.

12.0(22)S

This command was modified. Support for the percent keyword was added on Cisco 10000 series routers.

12.0(23)SX

This command was modified. Support for the remaining percent keyword was added on Cisco 10000 series routers.

12.1(5)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.1(5)T and implemented on VIP-enabled Cisco 7500 series routers.

12.2(2)T

This command was modified. The remaining percent keyword was added.

12.2(28)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(28)SB.

12.2(31)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB and implemented on Cisco 10000 series routers.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(17)SL and implemented on the PRE3 for the Cisco 10000 series router, and was enhanced for ATM overhead accounting on the Cisco 10000 series router for the PRE3.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.

12.2(31)SB6

This command was modified to specify an offset size when calculating ATM overhead and implemented on the Cisco 10000 series router for the PRE3.

12.2(33)SRC

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRC and implemented on Cisco 7600 series routers.

12.2(33)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SB and implemented on Cisco 7300 series routers.

12.4(20)T

This command was modified. Support was added for hierarchical queueing framework (HQF) using the Modular Quality of Service (QoS) Command-Line Interface (CLI) (MQC).

15.1(1)T

This command was modified. The allowed values for the bandwidth-kbps argument were changed. The value must be between 8 and 2,000,000 kbps.


Usage Guidelines

Configuring a Policy Map

Use the bandwidth command when you configure a policy map for a class defined by the class-map command. The bandwidth command specifies the bandwidth for traffic in that class. Class-based weighted fair queueing (CBWFQ) derives the weight for packets belonging to the class from the bandwidth allocated to the class. CBWFQ then uses the weight to ensure that the queue for the class is serviced fairly.

Configuring Strict Priority with Bandwidth

You can configure only one class with strict priority. Other classes cannot have priority or bandwidth configuration. To configure minimum bandwidth for another class, use the bandwidth remaining percent command.

Specifying Bandwidth as a Percentage for All Supported Platforms Except the Cisco 10000 Series Routers

Besides specifying the amount of bandwidth in kilobits per second (kbps), you can specify bandwidth as a percentage of either the available bandwidth or the total bandwidth. During periods of congestion, the classes are serviced in proportion to their configured bandwidth percentages. The bandwidth percentage is based on the interface bandwidth or when used in a hierarchical policy. Available bandwidth is equal to the interface bandwidth minus the sum of all bandwidths reserved by the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) feature, the IP RTP Priority feature, and the low latency queueing (LLQ) feature.


Note It is important to remember that when the bandwidth remaining percent command is configured, hard bandwidth guarantees may not be provided and only relative bandwidths are assured. That is, class bandwidths are always proportional to the specified percentages of the interface bandwidth. When the link bandwidth is fixed, class bandwidth guarantees are in proportion to the configured percentages. If the link bandwidth is unknown or variable, the router cannot compute class bandwidth guarantees in kbps.


Specifying Bandwidth as a Percentage for the Cisco 10000 Series Routers

Besides specifying the amount of bandwidth in kilobits per second (kbps), you can specify bandwidth as a percentage of either the available bandwidth or the total bandwidth. During periods of congestion, the classes are serviced in proportion to their configured bandwidth percentages. The minimum bandwidth percentage is based on the nearest parent shape rate.


Note It is important to remember that when the bandwidth remaining percent command is configured, hard bandwidth guarantees may not be provided and only relative bandwidths are assured. That is, class bandwidths are always proportional to the specified percentages of the interface bandwidth. When the link bandwidth is fixed, class bandwidth guarantees are in proportion to the configured percentages. If the link bandwidth is unknown or variable, the router cannot compute class bandwidth guarantees in kbps.


The router converts the specified bandwidth to the nearest multiple of 1/255 (ESR-PRE1) or 1/65,535 (ESR-PRE2) of the interface speed. Use the show policy-map interface command to display the actual bandwidth.

Restrictions for All Supported Platforms

The following restrictions apply to the bandwidth command:

The amount of bandwidth configured should be large enough to also accommodate Layer 2 overhead.

A policy map can have all the class bandwidths specified in kbps or all the class bandwidths specified in percentages, but not a mix of both in the same class. However, the unit for the priority command in the priority class can be different from the bandwidth unit of the nonpriority class.

When the bandwidth percent command is configured, and a policy map containing class policy configurations is attached to the interface to stipulate the service policy for that interface, available bandwidth is assessed. If a policy map cannot be attached to a particular interface because of insufficient interface bandwidth, the policy is removed from all interfaces to which it was successfully attached. This restriction does not apply to the bandwidth remaining percent command.

For more information on bandwidth allocation, see the "Congestion Management Overview" module in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

Note that when the policy map containing class policy configurations is attached to the interface to stipulate the service policy for that interface, available bandwidth is assessed. If a policy map cannot be attached to a particular interface because of insufficient interface bandwidth, then the policy is removed from all interfaces to which it was successfully attached.

Modular QoS Command-Line Interface Queue Limits

The bandwidth command can be used with MQC to specify the bandwidth for a particular class. When used with MQC, the bandwidth command uses a default queue limit for the class. This queue limit can be modified using the queue-limit command, thereby overriding the default set by the bandwidth command.


Note To meet the minimum bandwidth guarantees required by interfaces, it is especially important to modify the default queue limit of high-speed interfaces by using the queue-limit command.


Cisco 10000 Series Router

The Cisco 10000 series routers supports the bandwidth command on outbound interfaces only. It does not support this command on inbound interfaces.

On the PRE2, you specify a bandwidth value and a unit for the bandwidth value. Valid values for the bandwidth are from 1 to 2488320000 and units are bps, kbps, mbps, gbps. The default unit is kbps. For example, the following commands configure a bandwidth of 10000 bps and 10000 kbps on the PRE2:

bandwidth 10000 bps
 
   
bandwidth 10000
 
   

On the PRE3, you only specify a bandwidth value. Because the unit is always kbps, the PRE3 does not support the unit argument. Valid values are from 1 to 2000000. For example, the following command configures a bandwidth of 128,000 kbps on the PRE3:

bandwidth 128000
 
   

The PRE3 accepts the PRE2 bandwidth command only if the command is used without the unit argument. The PRE3 rejects the PRE2 bandwidth command if the specified bandwidth is outside the valid PRE3 bandwidth value range (1 to 2000000).

Besides specifying the amount of bandwidth in kilobits per second (kbps), you can specify bandwidth as a percentage of either the available bandwidth or the total bandwidth. During periods of congestion, the classes are serviced in proportion to their configured bandwidth percentages. The bandwidth percentage is based on the interface bandwidth or when used in a hierarchical policy the minimum bandwidth percentage is based on the nearest parent shape rate.


Note It is important to remember that when the bandwidth remaining percent command is configured, hard bandwidth guarantees may not be provided and only relative bandwidths are assured. Class bandwidths are always proportional to the specified percentages of the interface bandwidth. When the link bandwidth is fixed, class bandwidth guarantees are in proportion to the configured percentages. If the link bandwidth is unknown or variable, the router cannot compute class bandwidth guarantees in kbps.


The router converts the specified bandwidth to the nearest multiple of 1/255 (PRE1) or 1/65535 (PRE2, PRE3) of the interface speed. Use the show policy-map interface command to display the actual bandwidth.

Overhead Accounting for ATM (Cisco 10000 Series Router)

When configuring ATM overhead accounting, you must specify the BRAS-DSLAM, DSLAM-CPE, and subscriber line encapsulation types. The router supports the following subscriber line encapsulation types:

snap-rbe

mux-rbe

snap-dot1q-rbe

mux-dot1q-rbe

snap-pppoa

mux-pppoa

snap-1483routed

mux-1483routed

The user-defined offset values must match for the child and parent policies.

Examples

Cisco 10000 Series Router: Example

In the following example, the policy map named VLAN guarantees 30 percent of the bandwidth to the class named Customer1 and 60 percent of the bandwidth to the class named Customer2. If you apply the VLAN policy map to a 1-Mbps link, 300 kbps (30 percent of 1 Mbps) is guaranteed to class Customer1 and 600 kbps (60 percent of 1 Mbps) is guaranteed to class Customer2, with 100 kbps remaining for the class-default class. If the class-default class does not need additional bandwidth, the unused 100 kbps is available for use by class Customer1 and class Customer2. If both classes need the bandwidth, they share it in proportion to the configured rates. In this example, the sharing ratio is 30:60 or 1:2:

Router(config)# policy-map VLAN
Router(config-pmap)# class Customer1
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 30
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# class Customer2
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 60

CBWFQ Bandwidth Guarantee: Example

The following example shows how to create a policy map with two classes, shows how bandwidth is guaranteed when only CBWFQ is configured, and shows how to attach the policy to serial interface 3/2/1:

Router(config)# policy-map policy1
Router(config-pmap)# class class1
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 50
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# class class2
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 25
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# exit
Router(config)# interface serial3/2/1
Router(config-if)# service output policy1
Router(config-if)# end
 
   

The following output from the show policy-map command shows the configuration for the policy map named policy1:

Router# show policy-map policy1
 
   
Policy Map policy1
 Class class1
  Weighted Fair Queueing
   Bandwidth 50 (%) Max Threshold 64 (packets)
 Class class2
  Weighted Fair Queueing
   Bandwidth 25 (%) Max Threshold 64 (packets)
 
   

The output from the show policy-map interface command shows that 50 percent of the interface bandwidth is guaranteed for the class named class1, and 25 percent is guaranteed for the class named class2. The output displays the amount of bandwidth as both a percentage and a number of kbps.

Router# show policy-map interface serial3/2
 
   
Serial3/2
 
   
Service-policy output:policy1
 
   
Class-map:class1 (match-all)
 0 packets, 0 bytes
 5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
 Match:none
 Weighted Fair Queueing
  Output Queue:Conversation 265
  Bandwidth 50 (%)
  Bandwidth 772 (kbps) Max Threshold 64 (packets)
  (pkts matched/bytes matched) 0/0
  (depth/total drops/no-buffer drops) 0/0/0
 
   
Class-map:class2 (match-all)
 0 packets, 0 bytes
 5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
 Match:none
 Weighted Fair Queueing
  Output Queue:Conversation 266
  Bandwidth 25 (%)
  Bandwidth 386 (kbps) Max Threshold 64 (packets)
  (pkts matched/bytes matched) 0/0
  (depth/total drops/no-buffer drops) 0/0/0
 
   
Class-map:class-default (match-any)
 0 packets, 0 bytes
 5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
 Match:any
 
   

In this example, serial interface 3/2 has a total bandwidth of 1544 kbps. During periods of congestion, 50 percent (or 772 kbps) of the bandwidth is guaranteed to the class named class1, and 25 percent (or 386 kbps) of the link bandwidth is guaranteed to the class named class2.

CBWFQ and LLQ Bandwidth Allocation: Example

In the following example, the interface has a total bandwidth of 1544 kbps. During periods of congestion, 50 percent (or 772 kbps) of the bandwidth is guaranteed to the class named class1, and 25 percent (or 386 kbps) of the link bandwidth is guaranteed to the class named class2.

The following sample output from the show policy-map command shows the configuration of a policy map named p1:

Router# show policy-map p1
 
   
Policy Map p1
 Class voice
  Weighted Fair Queueing
   Strict Priority
   Bandwidth 500 (kbps) Burst 12500 (Bytes)
 Class class1
  Weighted Fair Queueing
   Bandwidth remaining 50 (%) Max Threshold 64 (packets)
 Class class2
  Weighted Fair Queueing
   Bandwidth remaining 25 (%) Max Threshold 64 (packets)
 
   

The following output from the show policy-map interface command on serial interface 3/2 shows that 500 kbps of bandwidth is guaranteed for the class named voice1. The classes named class1 and class2 receive 50 percent and 25 percent of the remaining bandwidth, respectively. Any unallocated bandwidth is divided proportionally among class1, class2, and any best-effort traffic classes.


Note In this sample output (unlike many of the others earlier in this section) the bandwidth is displayed only as a percentage for class 1 and class 2. Bandwidth expressed as a number of kbps is not displayed because the percent keyword was used with the bandwidth remaining command. The bandwidth remaining percent command allows you to allocate bandwidth as a relative percentage of the total bandwidth available on the interface.


Router# show policy-map interface serial3/2
 
   
Serial3/2
 
   
Service-policy output:p1
 
   
 Class-map:voice (match-all)
  0 packets, 0 bytes
  5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
  Match:ip precedence 5
  Weighted Fair Queueing
   Strict Priority
   Output Queue:Conversation 264
   Bandwidth 500 (kbps) Burst 12500 (Bytes)
   (pkts matched/bytes matched) 0/0
   (total drops/bytes drops) 0/0
 
   
 Class-map:class1 (match-all)
  0 packets, 0 bytes
  5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
  Match:none
  Weighted Fair Queueing
   Output Queue:Conversation 265
   Bandwidth remaining 50 (%) Max Threshold 64 (packets)
   (pkts matched/bytes matched) 0/0
   (depth/total drops/no-buffer drops) 0/0/0
 
   
 Class-map:class2 (match-all)
  0 packets, 0 bytes
  5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
  Match:none
  Weighted Fair Queueing
   Output Queue:Conversation 266
   Bandwidth remaining 25 (%) Max Threshold 64 (packets)
   (pkts matched/bytes matched) 0/0
   (depth/total drops/no-buffer drops) 0/0/0
 
   
 Class-map:class-default (match-any)
  0 packets, 0 bytes
  5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
  Match:any	

Traffic Shaping Overhead Accounting for ATM: Example

When a parent policy has ATM overhead accounting enabled, you are not required to enable ATM overhead accounting on a child traffic class that does not contain the bandwidth or shape command. In the following configuration example, ATM overhead accounting is enabled for bandwidth on the gaming and class-default class of the child policy map named subscriber_classes and on the class-default class of the parent policy map named subscriber_line. The voip and video classes do not have ATM overhead accounting explicitly enabled; these priority queues have overhead accounting implicitly enabled because ATM overhead accounting is enabled on the parent policy. Notice that the features in the parent and child policies use the same encapsulation type.

Router(config)# policy-map subscriber_classes
Router(config-pmap)# class voip
Router(config-pmap-c)# priority level 1
Router(config-pmap-c)# police 8000
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# class video
Router(config-pmap-c)# priority level 2
Router(config-pmap-c)# police 20
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# class gaming
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining percent 80 account aal5 snap-rbe-dot1q
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining percent 20 account aal5 snap-rbe-dot1q
Router(config-pmap-c)# policy-map subscriber_line
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth remaining ratio 10 account aal5 snap-rbe-dot1q
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 512 account aal5 snap-rbe-dot1q
Router(config-pmap-c)# service policy subscriber_classes
 
   

In the following example, the router uses 20 overhead bytes and ATM cell tax in calculating ATM overhead. The child and parent policies contain the required matching offset values. The parent policy is attached to virtual template 1.

Router(config)# policy-map child
Router(config-pmap)# class class1
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth 500 account user-defined 20 atm
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# class class2 
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average 30000 account user-defined 20 atm
Router(config-pmap)# exit
Router(config)# exit
Router(config)#

Related Commands

Command
Description

class (policy-map)

Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change, and the default class (commonly known as the class-default class) before you configure its policy.

class-map

Creates a class map to be used for matching packets to a specified class.

max-reserved-bandwidth

Changes the percent of interface bandwidth allocated for CBWFQ, LLQ, and IP RTP Priority.

policy-map

Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy.

priority

Specifies the priority of a class of traffic belonging to a policy map.

queue-limit

Specifies or modifies the maximum number of packets the queue can hold for a class policy configured in a policy map.

random-detect (interface)

Enables WRED or DWRED.

random-detect exponential-weighting-
constant

Configures the WRED and DWRED exponential weight factor for the average queue size calculation.

random-detect precedence

Configures WRED and DWRED parameters for a particular IP precedence.

show policy-map

Displays the configuration of all classes for a specified service policy map or all classes for all existing policy maps.

show policy-map interface

Displays the packet statistics of all classes that are configured for all service policies either on the specified interface or subinterface or on a specific PVC on the interface.


bandwidth qos-reference

To configure bandwidth to be used as a reference for calculating rates of quality of service (QoS) percent configurations on a physical or logical interface, use the bandwidth qos-reference command in interface configuration or subinterface configuration mode. To remove this explicitly specified reference bandwidth, use the no form of this command.

bandwidth qos-reference bandwidth-amount

no bandwidth qos-reference bandwidth-amount

Syntax Description

bandwidth-amount

Amount of bandwidth in kilobits per second (kb/s). Valid values are 1 to 10000000.


Command Default

This command is disabled. Reference bandwidth for a logical interface is derived from the main interface or the main interface QoS policy.

Command Modes

Interface configuration (config-if)
Subinterface configuration (config-subif)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)XNE

This command was introduced.

15.1(3)T

Support for logical interfaces is expanded to include the main interface, subinterface, and Frame Relay.


Usage Guidelines

The bandwidth qos-reference command is used only as reference for calculating rates of QoS percent configurations on a logical interface. This command does not actually allocate a specified amount of bandwidth for a logical interface.


Note In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)XNE, the bandwidth qos-reference command is supported only on a tunnel logical interface.

In Cisco IOS Release 15.1(3)T, support is expanded to include main interface, subinterface, and Frame Relay as well as tunnel logical interfaces.


Compatibility with the shape (percent) and the police (percent) Commands

The bandwidth qos-reference command is compatible with and related to the shape (percent) and police (percent) commands. The shape (percent) command allows you to configure average-rate or peak-rate traffic shaping on the basis of a percentage of bandwidth available on an interface. The police (percent) command allows you to configure traffic policing on the basis of a percentage of bandwidth available on an interface.

The bandwidth qos-reference command interacts with the shape (percent) and police (percent) commands in the following ways:

If the bandwidth qos-reference command is used to specify the bandwidth, the shape (percent) command and the police (percent) commands will use this specified amount to calculate the respective bandwidth percentages.

If the bandwidth qos-reference command is not used to specify the bandwidth, the shape (percent) command and the police (percent) commands will use the amount of bandwidth available on the interface to calculate the respective bandwidth percentages.

Compatibility with bandwidth (interface) Command

The bandwidth (interface) command allows you to set the inherited and received bandwidth values for an interface.

If both the bandwidth (interface) and bandwidth qos-reference commands are enabled on any interface, the value specified by the bandwidth qos-reference command is used as the reference for calculating rates for QoS percent configurations on that particular physical or logical interface. The value specified by the bandwidth (interface) command is disregarded.

In the sample configuration shown below, the value for the bandwidth qos-reference command is entered as 8000 kb/s, and the value for the bandwidth (interface) command is entered as 900 kb/s. The value for the shape average percent command is set to 50. The effect is seen in the output for the target shape rate command, which is set to 4000000 bits per second (50 percent of 8000 kb/s):

Router(config)# interface e0/1
Router(config-if)# bandwidth qos-reference 8000
Router(config-if)# bandwidth 900     
Router(config)# interface e0/1
Router(config-if)# bandwidth 900
Router(config-if)# end
Router# show running-config interface e0/1
 
   
interface Ethernet0/1
 bandwidth 900 
 bandwidth qos-reference 8000
 no ip address
 load-interval 30
end
 
   
Router(config-if)# policy-map test
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average percent 50
Router(config-pmap-c)# interface e0/1
Router(config-if)# service-policy out test
Router# show policy-map interface
 Ethernet0/1 
 
   
Service-policy output: test
 
   
 Class-map: class-default (match-any)
  79 packets, 7837 bytes
  30 second offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
  Match: any 
  Queueing
  queue limit 64 packets
  (queue depth/total drops/no-buffer drops) 0/0/0
  (pkts output/bytes output) 79/7837
  shape (average) cir 4000000, bc 40000, be 40000
  target shape rate 4000000 

Examples

The following example shows how to configure the bandwidth qos-reference command to allocate 2000 kb/s of bandwidth as a reference rate for tunnel interface 1:

Router> enable
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface tunnel1
Router#(config-if)# bandwidth qos-reference 2000

The following example shows how to configure the bandwidth qos-reference command to use 700 kb/s of bandwidth as a reference rate for the main interface e0/1:

Router(config)# interface e0/1
Router(config-if)# bandwidth qos-ref 700
Router(config-if)# policy-map test
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average percent 50
Router(config-pmap-c)# interface e0/1
Router(config-if)# service-policy out test

The following example shows how to configure the bandwidth qos-reference command to use 500 kb/s of bandwidth as a reference rate for the subinterface e0/1.1:

Router(config-subif)# interface e0/1
Router(config-if)# no service-policy out test
Router(config-if)# interface e0/1.1
Router(config-subif)# bandwidth qos-ref 500
Router(config-subif)# service-policy ou test

The following example shows how to configure the bandwidth qos-reference command to use 400 kb/s of bandwidth as a reference rate for the Frame Relay interface s6/0.1:

Router(config)# no policy-map test
Router(config)# policy-map test
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# shape average percent 50
Router(config-pmap-c)# map-class frame-relay fr1
Router(config-map-class)# service-policy out test
Router(config-map-class)# end
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface s6/0.1
Router(config-subif)# bandwidth qos-ref 400
Router(config-subif)# end
 
   

Related Commands

Command
Description

bandwidth (interface)

Sets the inherited and received bandwidth values for an interface.

police (percent)

Configures traffic policing on the basis of a percentage of bandwidth available on an interface.

shape (percent)

Specifies average-rate or peak-rate traffic shaping on the basis of a percentage of bandwidth available on an interface.


bandwidth remaining ratio

To specify a bandwidth-remaining ratio for class-level or subinterface-level queues to be used during congestion to determine the amount of excess bandwidth (unused by priority traffic) to allocate to nonpriority queues, use the bandwidth remaining ratio command in policy-map class configuration mode. To remove the bandwidth-remaining ratio, use the no form of this command.

bandwidth remaining ratio ratio

no bandwidth remaining ratio ratio

Cisco 7300 Series Router, Cisco 7600 Series Router, and Cisco 10000 Series Router

bandwidth remaining ratio ratio [account {qinq | dot1q} [aal5] {subscriber-encapsulation | user-defined offset}]

no bandwidth remaining ratio ratio [account {qinq | dot1q} [aal5] {subscriber-encapsulation | user-defined offset}]

Cisco ASR 1000 Series Router

bandwidth remaining ratio ratio

no bandwidth remaining ratio ratio

Syntax Description

ratio

Relative weight of this subinterface or class queue with respect to other subinterfaces or class queues. Valid values are from 1 to 1000. At the subinterface level, the default value is platform dependent. At the class queue level, the default is 1.

Cisco 7300 Series Router, Cisco 7600 Series Router, and Cisco 10000 Series Router

ratio

Relative weight of this subinterface or class queue with respect to other subinterfaces or class queues.

Note For the Cisco 7300 series router and 7600 series router, valid values are from 1 to 10000, and the default value is 1.

Note For the Cisco 10000 series router, valid values are from 1 to 1000, and the default is 1.

account

(Optional) Enables ATM overhead accounting.

qinq

(Optional) Specifies queue-in-queue encapsulation as the Broadband Remote Access Server - Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer (BRAS-DSLAM) encapsulation type.

dot1q

(Optional) Specifies IEEE 802.1Q VLAN encapsulation as the BRAS-DSLAM encapsulation type.

aal5

(Optional) Specifies the ATM adaptation layer 5 that supports connection-oriented variable bit rate (VBR) services.

subscriber-encapsulation

(Optional) Specifies the encapsulation type at the subscriber line. Encapsulation type varies according to subscriber line.

user-defined offset

(Optional) Specifies the offset size, in bytes, that the router uses when calculating the ATM overhead.

Note For the Cisco 7300 series router and 7600 series router, valid values are from -48 to +48.

Note For the Cisco 10000 series router, valid values are from -63 to +63.

Cisco ASR 1000 Series Routers

ratio

Relative weight of this subinterface or class queue with respect to other subinterfaces or class queues. Valid values are from 1 to 1000. At the subinterface level and class-queue level, the default is 1.


Command Default

For most platforms, the default bandwidth ratio is 1.

Cisco 10000 Series Router

When you use default bandwidth-remaining ratios at the subinterface level, the Cisco 10000 series router distinguishes between interface types. At the subinterface level, the default bandwidth-remaining ratio is 1 for VLAN subinterfaces and Frame Relay Data Link Connection Identifiers (DLCI). For ATM subinterfaces, the router computes the default bandwidth-remaining ratio based on the subinterface speed.

When you use default bandwidth-remaining ratios at the class level, the Cisco 10000 series router makes no distinction between interface types. At the class level, the default bandwidth-remaining ratio is 1.

Command Modes

Policy-map class (config-pmap-c)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(31)SB2

This command was introduced. This command was implemented on the Cisco 10000 series router for the PRE3.

12.2(33)SRC

This command was modified. It was implemented on the Cisco 7600 series routers. Additional keywords and arguments were added to support ATM overhead accounting (optional) on the Cisco 7600 series router and the Cisco 10000 series router for the PRE3.

12.2(33)SB

This comand was modified. Support for the Cisco 7300 series routers was added. The additional keyword and arguments associated with ATM overhead accounting were also supported.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.1

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS XE Release 2.1.


Usage Guidelines

Cisco 10000 Series Router

The scheduler uses the ratio specified in the bandwidth remaining ratio command to determine the amount of excess bandwidth (unused by priority traffic) to allocate to a class-level queue or a subinterface-level queue during periods of congestion. The scheduler allocates the unused bandwidth relative to other queues or subinterfaces.

The bandwidth remaining ratio command cannot coexist with another bandwidth command in different traffic classes of the same policy map. For example, the following configuration is not valid and causes an error message to display:

policy-map Prec1
 class precedence_0
  bandwidth remaining ratio 10
 class precedence_2
  bandwidth 1000
 
   

For the PRE2, the bandwidth remaining ratio command can coexist with another bandwidth command in the same class of a policy map. On the PRE3, the bandwidth remaining ratio command cannot coexist with another bandwidth command in the same class. For example, the following configuration is not valid on the PRE3 and causes an error message to display:

policy-map Prec1
 class precedence_0
  bandwidth 1000
  bandwidth remaining ratio 10
 
   

In a hierarchical policy map in which the parent policy has only the class-default class defined with a child queuing policy applied, the router accepts only the bandwidth remaining ratio form of the bandwidth command in the class-default class.

The bandwidth remaining ratio command cannot coexist with the priority command in the same class. For example, the following configuration is not valid and causes an error message to display:

policy-map Prec1
 class precedence_1
  priority
  police percent 30
  bandwidth remaining ratio 10
 
   

All of the queues for which the bandwidth remaining ratio command is not specified receive the platform-specified minimum bandwidth-remaining ratio. The router determines the minimum committed information rate (CIR) based on the configuration.

ATM Overhead Accounting (Optional)

The bandwidth remaining ratio command can also be used to enable ATM overhead accounting. To enable ATM overhead accounting, use the account keyword and the subsequent keywords and arguments as documented in the Syntax Description table.

Cisco 7200 Series Routers

The bandwidth remaining ratio command is not supported on the Cisco 7200 series routers. If you have upgraded from Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRD to Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRE, you may see parser errors when you run this command. You can use the bandwidth remaining percent command in place of the bandwidth remaining ratio command on Cisco 7200 series routers to achieve the same functionality.

Examples

Cisco 7300 Series Router, Cisco 7600 Series Router, and Cisco 10000 Series Router

The following example shows how to configure a bandwidth-remaining ratio on an ATM subinterface. In the example, the router guarantees a peak cell rate of 50 Mbps for the variable bit rate nonreal-time (VBR-nrt) PVC 0/200. During periods of congestion, the subinterface receives a share of excess bandwidth (unused by priority traffic) based on the bandwidth-remaining ratio of 10, relative to the other subinterfaces configured on the physical interface.

policy-map Child
 class precedence_0
  bandwidth 10000
 class precedence_1
  shape average 100000
  bandwidth 100
!
policy-map Parent
 class class-default
  bandwidth remaining ratio 10
  shape average 20000000
  service-policy Child
!
interface ATM2/0/3.200 point-to-point
 ip address 10.20.1.1 255.255.255.0
 pvc 0/200
 protocol ip 10.20.1.2
 vbr-nrt 50000
 encapsulation aal5snap
 service-policy output Parent
 
   

The following example shows how to configure bandwidth remaining ratios for individual class queues. Some of the classes configured have bandwidth guarantees and a bandwidth-remaining ratio explicitly specified. When congestion occurs within a subinterface level, the class queues receive excess bandwidth (unused by priority traffic) based on their class-level bandwidth-remaining ratios: 20, 30, 120, and 100, respectively, for the precedence_0, precedence_1, precedence_2, and precedence_5 classes. Normally, the precedence_3 class (without a defined ratio) would receive bandwidth based on the bandwidth-remaining ratio of the class-default class defined in the Child policy. However, in the example, the Child policy does not define a class-default bandwidth remaining ratio. Therefore, the router uses a ratio of 1 to allocate excess bandwidth to precedence_3 traffic.

policy-map Child
 class precedence_0
  shape average 100000
  bandwidth remaining ratio 20
 class precedence_1
  shape 10000
  bandwidth remaining ratio 30
 class precedence_2
  shape average 200000
  bandwidth remaining ratio 120
 class precedence_3
  set ip precedence 3
 class precedence_5
  set ip precedence 5
  bandwidth remaining ratio 100
policy-map Parent
 class class-default
  bandwidth remaining ratio 10
  service-policy Child
!
interface GigabitEthernet 2/0/1.10
 encapsulation dot1q 10
 service-policy output Parent

Overhead Accounting: Example

The following example shows how to configure overhead accounting by using the optional account keyword and associated keywords and arguments:

policy-map subscriber_line
 class class-default
  bandwidth remaining ratio 10 account dot1q aal5 snap-rbe-dot1q
  shape average 512 account dot1q aal5 snap-rbe-dot1q
  service policy subscriber_classes

Related Commands

Command
Description

bandwidth remaining percent

Specifies a bandwidth-remaining percentage for class-level or subinterface-level queues to be used during congestion to determine the amount of excess bandwidth (unused by priority traffic) to allocate to nonpriority queues.

show policy-map

Displays the configuration of all classes for a specified service policy map or all classes for all existing policy maps.

show policy-map interface

Displays the packet statistics of all classes that are configured for all service policies either on the specified interface or subinterface or on a specific PVC on the interface.


bump

To configure the bumping rules for a virtual circuit (VC) class that can be assigned to a VC bundle, use the bump command in VC-class configuration mode. To remove the explicit bumping rules for the VCs assigned to this class and return to the default condition of implicit bumping, use the no bump explicit command or the bump implicit command. To specify that the VC bundle members do not accept any bumped traffic, use the no form of this command.

To configure the bumping rules for a specific VC or permanent virtual circuit (PVC) member of a bundle, use the bump command in bundle-vc or SVC-bundle-member configuration mode. To remove the explicit bumping rules for the VC or PVC bundle member and return to the default condition of implicit bumping, use the bump implicit command. To specify that the VC or PVC bundle member does not accept any bumped traffic, use the no bump traffic command.

bump {explicit precedence-level | implicit | traffic}

no bump {explicit precedence-level | implicit | traffic}

Syntax Description

explicit precedence-level

Specifies the precedence level to which traffic on a VC or PVC will be bumped when the VC or PVC goes down. Valid values for the precedence-level argument are numbers from 0 to 7.

implicit

Applies the implicit bumping rule, which is the default, to a single VC or PVC bundle member or to all VCs in the bundle (VC-class mode). The implicit bumping rule stipulates that bumped traffic is to be carried by a VC or PVC with a lower precedence level.

traffic

Specifies that the VC or PVC accepts bumped traffic (the default condition). The no form stipulates that the VC or PVC does not accept any bumped traffic.


Command Default

Implicit bumping

Permit bumping (VCs accept bumped traffic)

Command Modes

VC-class configuration (for a VC class)
Bundle-vc configuration (for an ATM VC bundle member)
SVC-bundle-member configuration (for an SVC bundle member)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(3)T

This command was introduced.

12.2(4)T

This command was made available in SVC-bundle-member configuration mode.

12.0(23)S

This command was made available in VC-class and bundle-vc configuration modes on the 8-port OC-3 STM-1 ATM line card for Cisco 12000 series Internet routers.

12.0(26)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(26)S and implemented on the Cisco 10000 series router.

12.2(16)BX

This command was implemented on the ESR-PRE2.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(31)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

Use the bump command in bundle-vc configuration mode (for an ATM VC bundle member) or SVC-bundle-member configuration mode (for an SVC bundle member) to configure bumping rules for a discrete VC or PVC bundle member. Use the bump command in VC-class configuration mode to configure a VC class that can be assigned to a bundle member.

The effects of different bumping configuration approaches are as follows:

Implicit bumping—If you configure implicit bumping, bumped traffic is sent to the VC or PVC configured to handle the next lower precedence level. When the original VC or PVC that bumped the traffic comes back up, the traffic that it is configured to carry is restored to it. If no other positive forms of the bump command are configured, the bump implicit command takes effect.

Explicit bumping—If you configure a VC or PVC with the bump explicit command, you can specify the precedence level to which traffic will be bumped when that VC or PVC goes down, and the traffic will be directed to a VC or PVC mapped with that precedence level. If the VC or PVC that picks up and carries the traffic goes down, the traffic is subject to the bumping rules for that VC or PVC. You can specify only one precedence level for bumping.

Permit bumping—The VC or PVC accepts bumped traffic by default. If the VC or PVC has been previously configured to reject bumped traffic, you must use the bump traffic command to return the VC or PVC to its default condition.

Reject bumping—To configure a discrete VC or PVC to reject bumped traffic when the traffic is directed to it, use the no bump traffic command.


Note When no alternative VC or PVC can be found to handle bumped traffic, the bundle is declared down. To avoid this occurrence, configure explicitly the bundle member VC or PVC that has the lowest precedence level.


To use this command in VC-class configuration mode, you must enter the vc-class atm global configuration command before you enter this command.

To use this command to configure an individual bundle member in bundle-VC configuration mode, first issue the bundle command to enter bundle configuration mode for the bundle to which you want to add or modify the VC member to be configured. Then use the pvc-bundle command to specify the VC to be created or modified and enter bundle-vc configuration mode.

This command has no effect if the VC class that contains the command is attached to a standalone VC; that is, if the VC is not a bundle member. In this case, the attributes are ignored by the VC.

VCs in a VC bundle are subject to the following configuration inheritance guidelines (listed in order of next-highest precedence):

VC configuration in bundle-vc mode

Bundle configuration in bundle mode (with the effect of assigned VC-class configuration)

Subinterface configuration in subinterface mode

Examples

The following example configures the class called "five" to define parameters applicable to a VC in a bundle. If the VC goes down, traffic will be directed (bumped explicitly) to a VC mapped with precedence level 7:

vc-class atm five
 ubr 5000
 precedence 5
 bump explicit 7
 
   

The following example configures the class called "premium-class" to define parameters applicable to a VC in a bundle. Unless overridden with a bundle-vc bump configuration, the VC that uses this class will not allow other traffic to be bumped onto it:

vc-class atm premium-class
 no bump traffic
 bump explicit 7

Related Commands

Command
Description

bundle

Enters bundle configuration mode to create a bundle or modify an existing bundle.

class

Assigns a map class or VC class to a PVC or PVC bundle member.

class-vc

Assigns a VC class to an ATM PVC, SVC, or VC bundle member.

dscp (frame-relay vc-bundle-member)

Specifies the DSCP value or values for a specific Frame Relay PVC bundle member.

precedence

Configures precedence levels for a VC or PVC class that can be assigned to a VC or PVC bundle and thus applied to all members of that bundle.

protect

Configures a VC or PVC class with protected group or protected VC or PVC status for application to a VC or PVC bundle member.

pvc-bundle

Adds a PVC to a bundle as a member of the bundle and enters bundle-vc configuration mode in order to configure that PVC bundle member.

pvc (frame-relay vc-bundle)

Creates a PVC and PVC bundle member and enters frame-relay vc-bundle-member configuration mode.

svc-bundle

Creates or modifies a member of an SVC bundle.

ubr

Configures UBR QoS and specifies the output peak cell rate for an ATM PVC, SVC, VC class, or VC bundle member.

ubr+

Configures UBR QoS and specifies the output peak cell rate and output minimum guaranteed cell rate for an ATM PVC, SVC, VC class, or VC bundle member.

vbr-nrt

Configures the VBR-NRT QoS and specifies output peak cell rate, output sustainable cell rate, and output maximum burst cell size for an ATM PVC, SVC, VC class, or VC bundle member.

vc-class atm

Configures a VC class or an ATM VC or interface.


bundle

To create a bundle or modify an existing bundle to enter bundle configuration mode, use the bundle command in subinterface configuration mode. To remove the specified bundle, use the no form of this command.

bundle bundle-name

no bundle bundle-name

Syntax Description

bundle-name

The name of the bundle to be created. The limit is 16 alphanumeric characters.


Command Default

No bundle is specified.

Command Modes

Subinterface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(3)T

This command was introduced.

12.0(26)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(26)S and implemented on the Cisco 10000 series router.

12.2(16)BX

This command was implemented on the ESR-PRE2.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(31)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

From within bundle configuration mode you can configure the characteristics and attributes of the bundle and its members, such as the encapsulation type for all virtual circuits (VCs) in the bundle, the bundle management parameters, and the service type. Attributes and parameters you configure in bundle configuration mode are applied to all VC members of the bundle.

VCs in a VC bundle are subject to the following configuration inheritance guidelines (listed in order of next highest precedence):

VC configuration in bundle-vc mode

Bundle configuration in bundle mode

Subinterface configuration in subinterface mode

To display status on bundles, use the show atm bundle and show atm bundle statistics commands.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure a bundle called bundle1. The example specifies the IP address of the subinterface and the router protocol—the router uses Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS) as an IP routing protocol—then configures the bundle:

interface atm1/0.1 multipoint 
 ip address 10.0.0.1 255.255.255.0 
 ip router isis 
 bundle bundle1

Related Commands

Command
Description

class-bundle

Configures a VC bundle with the bundle-level commands contained in the specified VC class.

oam-bundle

Enables end-to-end F5 OAM loopback cell generation and OAM management for all VC members of a bundle, or for a VC class that can be applied to a VC bundle.

pvc-bundle

Adds a PVC to a bundle as a member of the bundle and enters bundle-vc configuration mode in order to configure that PVC bundle member.

show atm bundle

Displays the bundle attributes assigned to each bundle VC member and the current working status of the VC members.

show atm bundle statistics

Displays statistics on the specified bundle.


bundle svc

To create or modify a switched virtual circuit (SVC) bundle, use the bundle svc command in interface configuration mode. To remove the specified bundle, use the no form of this command.

bundle svc bundle-name nsap nsap-address

no bundle svc bundle-name nsap nsap-address

Syntax Description

bundle-name

Unique bundle name that identifies the SVC bundle in the router. The bundle names at each end of the virtual circuit (VC) must be the same. Length limit is 16 alphanumeric characters.

nsap nsap-address

Destination network services access point (NSAP) address of the SVC bundle.


Command Default

No SVC bundle is created or modified.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(4)T

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

This command causes the system to enter SVC-bundle configuration mode. The bundle name must be the same on both sides of the VC.

From SVC-bundle configuration mode, you can configure the characteristics and attributes of the bundle and its members, such as the encapsulation type for all virtual circuits (VCs) in the bundle, the bundle management parameters, the service type, and so on. Attributes and parameters you configure in SVC-bundle configuration mode are applied to all VC members of the bundle.

VCs in a VC bundle are subject to the following configuration inheritance guidelines (listed in order of next-highest precedence):

VC configuration in bundle-VC mode

Bundle configuration in bundle mode

Subinterface configuration in subinterface mode

To display the status of bundles, use the show atm bundle svc and show atm bundle svc statistics commands.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure an SVC bundle called "sanfrancisco":

interface ATM1/0.1 multipoint
 ip address 10.0.0.1 255.255.255.0
 atm esi-address 111111111111.11
 bundle svc sanfrancisco nsap 47.0091810000000003E3924F01.999999999999.99
  protocol ip 10.0.0.2
broadcast
 oam retry 4 3 10
 encapsulation aal5snap
 oam-bundle manage
 svc-bundle seven
  class-vc seven
 svc-bundle six
  class-vc six
 svc-bundle five
  class-vc five
 svc-bundle four
  class-vc four
 svc-bundle three
  class-vc three
 svc-bundle two
  class-vc two
 svc-bundle one
  class-vc one
 svc-bundle zero
  class-vc zero

Related Commands

Command
Description

class-bundle

Configures a VC bundle with the bundle-level commands contained in the specified VC class.

oam-bundle

Enables end-to-end F5 OAM loopback cell generation and OAM management for all VC members of a bundle, or for a VC class that can be applied to a VC bundle.

pvc-bundle

Adds a PVC to a bundle as a member of the bundle and enters bundle-vc configuration mode in order to configure that PVC bundle member.

show atm bundle svc

Displays the bundle attributes assigned to each bundle VC member and the current working status of the VC members.

show atm bundle svc statistics

Displays statistics on the specified bundle.


class (EtherSwitch)

To define a traffic classification for a policy to act on using the class-map name or access group, use the class command in policy-map configuration mode. To delete an existing class map, use the no form of this command.

class class-map-name [access-group acl-index-or-name]

no class class-map-name

Syntax Description

class-map-name

Name of the class map.

access-group acl-index-or-name

(Optional) Number or name of an IP standard or extended access control list (ACL). For an IP standard ACL, the index range is 1 to 99 and 1300 to 1999; for an IP extended ACL, the index range is 100 to 199 and 2000 to 2699.


Command Default

No policy-map class maps are defined.

Command Modes

Policy-map configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.1(6)EA2

This command was introduced.

12.2(15)ZJ

This command was implemented on the following platforms: Cisco 2600 series, Cisco 3600 series, and Cisco 3700 series routers.

12.3(4)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.3(4)T on the following platforms: Cisco 2600 series, Cisco 3600 series, and Cisco 3700 series routers.


Usage Guidelines

Before you use the class (EtherSwitch) command, use the policy-map global configuration command to identify the policy map and to enter policy-map configuration mode. After you specify a policy map, you can configure a policy for new classes or modify a policy for any existing classes in that policy map. You attach the policy map to an interface by using the service-policy interface configuration command; however, you cannot attach one that uses an ACL classification to the egress direction.

The class name that you specify in the policy map ties the characteristics for that class to the class map and its match criteria as configured by using the class-map global configuration command.

The class (EtherSwitch) command performs the same function as the class-map global configuration command. Use the class (EtherSwitch) command when a new classification, which is not shared with any other ports, is needed. Use the class-map command when the map is shared among many ports.


Note In a policy map, the class named "class-default" is not supported. The Ethernet switch network module does not filter traffic on the basis of the policy map defined by the class class-default policy-map configuration command.


After entering the class (EtherSwitch) command, you enter policy-map class configuration mode. When you are in this mode, these configuration commands are available:

default—Sets a command to its default.

exit—Exits policy-map class configuration mode and returns to policy-map configuration mode.

no—Returns a command to its default setting.

police—Defines a policer for the classified traffic. The policer specifies the bandwidth limitations and the action to take when the limits are exceeded. For more information, see the police command.

To return to policy-map configuration mode, use the exit command. To return to privileged EXEC mode, use the end command.


Note For more information about configuring IP ACLs, refer to the "Configuring IP Services" chapter in the Cisco IOS IP Application Services Configuration Guide.


Examples

The following example shows how to create a policy map named "policy1." When attached to the ingress port, it matches all the incoming traffic defined in class1 and polices the traffic at an average rate of 1 Mbps and bursts at 131072 bytes. Traffic exceeding the profile is dropped.

Router(config)# policy-map policy1
Router(config-pmap)# class class1
Router(config-pmap-c)# police 1000000 131072 exceed-action drop
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
 
   

You can verify your settings by entering the show policy-map privileged EXEC command.

Related Commands

Command
Description

class-map

Creates a class map to be used for matching packets to the class whose name you specify.

match (class-map configuration)

Defines the match criteria to classify traffic.

police

Configures traffic policing.

policy-map

Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to multiple interfaces to specify a service policy.

service-policy

Attaches a policy map to an input interface or VC, or an output interface or VC, to be used as the service policy for that interface or VC.

show policy-map

Displays QoS policy maps.


class (policy-map)

To specify the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change or to specify the default class (commonly known as the class-default class) before you configure its policy, use the class command in policy-map configuration mode. To remove a class from the policy map, use the no form of this command.

class {class-name | class-default [fragment fragment-class-name]} [insert-before class-name] [service-fragment fragment-class-name]

no class {class-name | class-default}

Syntax Description

class-name

Name of the class to be configured or whose policy is to be modified. The class name is used for both the class map and to configure a policy for the class in the policy map.

class-default

Specifies the default class so that you can configure or modify its policy.

fragment fragment-class-name

(Optional) Specifies the default traffic class as a fragment, and names the fragment traffic class.

insert-before class-name

(Optional) Adds a class map between any two existing class maps.

Inserting a new class map between two existing class map provides more flexibility when modifying existing policy map configurations. Without this option, the class map is appended to the end of the policy map.

This keyword is supported only on flexible packet matching (FPM) policies.

service-fragment fragment-class-name

(Optional) Specifies that the class is classifying a collection of fragments. The fragments being classified by this class must all share the same fragment-class-name.


Command Default

No class is specified.

Command Modes

Policy-map configuration (config-pmap)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)T

This command was introduced.

12.0(5)XE

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(5)XE.

12.0(7)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(7)S.

12.1(1)E

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.1(1)E.

12.2(14)SX

Support for this command was introduced on Cisco 7600 routers.

12.2(17d)SXB

This command was implemented on the Cisco 7600 router and integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(17d)SXB.

12.2(18)SXE

The class-default keyword was added to the Cisco 7600 router.

12.4(4)T

The insert-before class-name option was added.

12.2(28)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(28)SB.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was introduced on the PRE3 for the Cisco 10000 series router.

12.2(18)ZY

The insert-before class-name option was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)ZY on the Catalyst 6500 series of switches equipped with the Programmable Intelligent Services Accelerator (PISA).

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.1

This command was implemented on Cisco ASR 1000 series routers. The fragment fragment-class-name and service-fragment fragment-class-name options were introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Policy Map Configuration Mode

Within a policy map, the class (policy-map) command can be used to specify the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change. First, the policy map must be identified.

To identify the policy map (and enter the required policy-map configuration mode), use the policy-map command before you use the class (policy-map) command. After you specify a policy map, you can configure policy for new classes or modify the policy for any existing classes in that policy map.

Class Characteristics

The class name that you specify in the policy map ties the characteristics for that class—that is, its policy—to the class map and its match criteria, as configured using the class-map command.

When you configure policy for a class and specify its bandwidth and attach the policy map to an interface, class-based weighted fair queueing (CBWFQ) determines if the bandwidth requirement of the class can be satisfied. If so, CBWFQ allocates a queue for the bandwidth requirement.

When a class is removed, available bandwidth for the interface is incremented by the amount previously allocated to the class.

The maximum number of classes that you can configure for a router—and, therefore, within a policy map—is 64.

Predefined Default Class

The class-default keyword is used to specify the predefined default class called class-default. The class-default class is the class to which traffic is directed if that traffic does not match any of the match criteria in the configured class maps.

Tail Drop or WRED

You can define a class policy to use either tail drop by using the queue-limit command or Weighted Random Early Detection (WRED) by using the random-detect command. When using either tail drop or WRED, note the following points:

The queue-limit and random-detect commands cannot be used in the same class policy, but they can be used in two class policies in the same policy map.

You can configure the bandwidth command when either the queue-limit command or the random-detect command is configured in a class policy. The bandwidth command specifies the amount of bandwidth allocated for the class.

For the predefined default class, you can configure the fair-queue (class-default) command. The fair-queue command specifies the number of dynamic queues for the default class. The fair-queue command can be used in the same class policy as either the queue-limit command or the random-detect command. It cannot be used with the bandwidth command.

Fragments

A default traffic class is marked as a fragment within a policy map class statement using the fragment keyword. Multiple fragments can then be classified collectively in a separate policy map that is created using the service-fragment keyword. When fragments are used, default traffic classes marked as fragments have QoS applied separately from the non-default traffic classes.

When using fragments, note the following guidelines:

Only default traffic classes can be marked as fragments.

The fragment fragment-class-name option within a default class statement marks that default class as a fragment.

The service-fragment fragment-class-name option when defining a class in a policy map is used to specify a class of traffic within the Modular QoS CLI that contains all fragments sharing the same fragment-class-name.

Fragments can only be used within the same physical interface. Policy maps with fragments sharing the same fragment-class-name on different interfaces cannot be classified collectively using a class with the service-fragment fragment-class-name option.

Cisco 10000 Series Router

The PRE2 allows you to configure 31 class queues in a policy map.

In a policy map, the PRE3 allows you to configure one priority level 1 queue, plus one priority level 2 queue, plus 12 class queues, plus one default queue.

Cisco ASR 1000 Series Routers

The maximum number of classes that you can configure for a Cisco ASR 1000 Series Router—and, therefore, within a policy map—is 8.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure three class policies included in the policy map called policy1. Class1 specifies policy for traffic that matches access control list 136. Class2 specifies policy for traffic on interface ethernet101. The third class is the default class to which packets that do not satisfy configured match criteria are directed:

! The following commands create class-maps class1 and class2 
! and define their match criteria:
class-map class1
 match access-group 136
class-map class2
 match input-interface ethernet101
 
   
! The following commands create the policy map, which is defined to contain policy
! specification for class1, class2, and the default class:
policy-map policy1
 
   
Router(config)# policy-map policy1
Router(config-pmap)# class class1
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth 2000
Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 40
 
   
Router(config-pmap)# class class2
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth 3000
Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect
Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect exponential-weighting-constant 10
 
   
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# fair-queue 16
Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 20
 
   

Class1—A minimum of 2000 kbps of bandwidth is expected to be delivered to this class in the event of congestion, and the queue reserved for this class can enqueue 40 packets before tail drop is enacted to handle additional packets.

Class2—A minimum of 3000 kbps of bandwidth is expected to be delivered to this class in the event of congestion, and a weight factor of 10 is used to calculate the average queue size. For congestion avoidance, WRED packet drop is used, not tail drop.

The default class—16 dynamic queues are reserved for traffic that does not meet the match criteria of other classes whose policy is defined by the policy map called policy1, and a maximum of 20 packets per queue is enqueued before tail drop is enacted to handle additional packets.


Note When the policy map that contains these classes is attached to the interface to stipulate the service policy for that interface, available bandwidth is assessed, taking into account all class policies and Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP), if configured.


The following example shows how to configure policy for the default class included in the policy map called policy8. The default class has these characteristics: 20 dynamic queues are available for traffic that does not meet the match criteria of other classes whose policy is defined by the policy map called policy8, and a weight factor of 14 is used to calculate the average queue size. For congestion avoidance, WRED packet drop is used, not tail drop:

Router(config)# policy-map policy8
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# fair-queue 20
Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect exponential-weighting-constant 14
 
   

The following example shows how to configure policy for a class called acl136 included in the policy map called policy1. Class acl136 has these characteristics: a minimum of 2000 kbps of bandwidth is expected to be delivered to this class in the event of congestion, and the queue reserved for this class can enqueue 40 packets before tail drop is enacted to handle additional packets. Note that when the policy map that contains this class is attached to the interface to stipulate the service policy for that interface, available bandwidth is assessed, taking into account all class policies and RSVP, if configured:

Router(config)# policy-map policy1
Router(config-pmap)# class acl136
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth 2000
Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 40
 
   

The following example shows how to configure policy for a class called int101 included in the policy map called policy8. Class int101 has these characteristics: a minimum of 3000 kbps of bandwidth are expected to be delivered to this class in the event of congestion, and a weight factor of 10 is used to calculate the average queue size. For congestion avoidance, WRED packet drop is used, not tail drop. Note that when the policy map that contains this class is attached to the interface to stipulate the service policy for that interface, available bandwidth is assessed:

Router(config)# policy-map policy8
Router(config-pmap)# class int101
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth 3000
Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect exponential-weighting-constant 10
 
   

The following example shows how to configure policy for the class-default default class included in the policy map called policy1. The class-default default class has these characteristics: 10 hashed queues for traffic that does not meet the match criteria of other classes whose policy is defined by the policy map called policy1; and a maximum of 20 packets per queue before tail drop is enacted to handle additional enqueued packets:

Router(config)# policy-map policy1
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# fair-queue
Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 20
 
   

The following example shows how to configure policy for the class-default default class included in the policy map called policy8. The class-default default class has these characteristics: 20 hashed queues for traffic that does not meet the match criteria of other classes whose policy is defined by the policy map called policy8; and a weight factor of 14 is used to calculate the average queue size. For congestion avoidance, WRED packet drop is used, not tail drop:

Router(config)# policy-map policy8
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# fair-queue 20
Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect exponential-weighting-constant 14
 
   

The following example shows how to configure FPM for blaster packets. The class map contains the following match criteria: TCP port 135, 4444 or UDP port 69; and pattern 0x0030 at 3 bytes from start of IP header:

load protocol disk2:ip.phdf
load protocol disk2:tcp.phdf
load protocol disk2:udp.phdf 
 
   
class-map type stack match-all ip-tcp
 match field ip protocol eq 0x6 next tcp
 
   
class-map type stack match-all ip-udp
 match field ip protocol eq 0x11 next udp
 
   
class-map type access-control match-all blaster1
 match field tcp dest-port eq 135
 match start 13-start offset 3 size 2 eq 0x0030
 
   
class-map type access-control match-all blaster2
 match field tcp dest-port eq 4444
Router(config-cmap)# match start 13-start offset 3 size 2 eq 0x0030
 
   
class-map type access-control match-all blaster3
 match field udp dest-port eq 69
 match start 13-start offset 3 size 2 eq 0x0030
 
   
policy-map type access-control fpm-tcp-policy
 class blaster1
 drop
 class blaster2
 drop
 
   
 
   
policy-map type access-control fpm-udp-policy
 class blaster3
 drop
 
   
 
   
policy-map type access-control fpm-policy
 class ip-tcp
 service-policy fpm-tcp-policy
 class ip-udp
 service-policy fpm-udp-policy
 
   
 
   
interface gigabitEthernet 0/1
 service-policy type access-control input fpm-policy
 
   

The following example shows how to create a fragment class of traffic to classify the default traffic class named BestEffort. All default traffic from the policy maps named subscriber1 and subscriber2 is part of the fragment default traffic class named BestEffort. This default traffic is then shaped collectively by creating a class called data that uses the service-fragment keyword and the shape command:

Note the following about this example:

The class-name for each fragment default traffic class is "BestEffort."

The class-name of "BestEffort" is also used to define the class where the service-fragment keyword is entered. This class applies a shaping policy to all traffic forwarded using the fragment default traffic classes named "BestEffort."

policy-map subscriber1
class voice
set cos 5
priority level 1
class video
set cos 4
priority level 2
class class-default fragment BestEffort
shape average 200
bandwidth remaining ratio 10
 
   
policy-map subscriber 2
class voice
set cos 5
priority level 1
class video
set cos 4
priority level 2
class class-default fragment BestEffort
shape average 200
bandwidth remaining ratio 10
 
   
policy-map input_policy
class class-default
set dscp default
 
   
policy-map main-interface
class data service-fragment BestEffort
shape average 400
 
   
interface portchannel1.1001
encapsulation dot1q 1001service-policy output subscriber1
service-policy input input_policy
 
   
interface portchannel1.1002
encapsulation dot1q 1002
service-policy output subscriber2
service-policy input input_policy
 
   
interface gigabitethernet 0/1 
description member-link1
port channel 1
service-policy output main-interface
 
   
interface gigabitethernet 0/2
description member-link2
port channel 1

service-policy output main-interface

Related Commands

Command
Description

bandwidth (policy-map class)

Specifies or modifies the bandwidth allocated for a class belonging to a policy map.

class-map

Creates a class map to be used for matching packets to a specified class.

fair-queue (class-default)

Specifies the number of dynamic queues to be reserved for use by the class-default class as part of the default class policy.

policy-map

Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy.

queue-limit

Specifies or modifies the maximum number of packets the queue can hold for a class policy configured in a policy map.

random-detect (interface)

Enables WRED or DWRED.

random-detect exponential-weighting-constant

Configures the WRED and DWRED exponential weight factor for the average queue size calculation.

random-detect precedence

Configures WRED and DWRED parameters for a particular IP Precedence.


class arp-peruser

To create a control class for arp-peruser, use the class arp-peruser command in policy map configuration mode. To remove the arp-peruser class, use the no form of this command.

class arp-peruser

no class arp-peruser

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

A control policy map is not created.

Command Modes

Policy map configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRB

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Use this command when creating a per-user policy map.

Examples

The following example shows creating a per-user policy map.

Router(config-pmap)# class arp-peruser
Router(config)# policy-map copp-peruser
Router(config-pmap)# class arp-peruser
Router(config-pmap-c)# police rate 5 pps burst 50 packets
Router(config-pmap-c)# class dhcp-peruser
Router(config-pmap-c)# police rate 10 pps burst 100 packets

Related Commands

Command
Description

class-map arp-peruser

Creates a class map to be used for matching ARP per-user packets.

policy-map copp-peruser

Creates a policy map that defines a CoPP per-user policy.


class-bundle

To configure a virtual circuit (VC) bundle with the bundle-level commands contained in the specified VC class, use the class-bundle command in bundle or SVC-bundle configuration mode. To remove the VC class parameters from a VC bundle, use the no form of this command.

class-bundle vc-class-name

no class-bundle vc-class-name

Syntax Description

vc-class-name

Name of the VC class that you are assigning to your VC bundle.


Command Default

No VC class is assigned to the VC bundle.

Command Modes

Bundle configuration
SVC-bundle configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0T

This command was introduced, replacing the class command for configuring ATM VC bundles.

12.0(26)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(26)S and implemented on the Cisco 10000 series router.

12.2(16)BX

This command was implemented on the ESR-PRE2.

12.2(4)T

This command was made available in SVC-bundle configuration mode.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(31)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

To use this command, you must first enter the bundle or bundle svc command to create the bundle and enter bundle or SVC-bundle configuration mode.

Use this command to assign a previously defined set of parameters (defined in a VC class) to an ATM VC bundle. Parameters set through bundle-level commands that are contained in a VC class are applied to the bundle and its VC members.

You can add the following commands to a VC class to be used to configure a VC bundle: broadcast, encapsulation, inarp, oam-bundle, oam retry, and protocol.

Bundle-level parameters applied through commands that are configured directly on a bundle supersede bundle-level parameters applied through a VC class by the class-bundle command. Some bundle-level parameters applied through a VC class or directly to the bundle can be superseded by commands that you directly apply to individual VCs in bundle-VC configuration mode.

Examples

In the following example, a class called "class1" is created and then applied to the bundle called "bundle1":

! The following commands create the class class1:
vc-class atm class1
 encapsulation aal5snap
 broadcast
 protocol ip inarp
 oam-bundle manage 3
 oam 4 3 10
 
   
! The following commands apply class1 to the bundle called bundle1:
bundle bundle1
 class-bundle class1
 
   

With hierarchy precedence rules taken into account, VCs belonging to the bundle called "bundle1" will be characterized by these parameters: aal5snap, encapsulation, broadcast on, use of Inverse Address Resolution Protocol (Inverse ARP) to resolve IP addresses, and Operation, Administration, and Maintenance (OAM) enabled.

Related Commands

Command
Description

broadcast

Configures broadcast packet duplication and transmission for an ATM VC class, PVC, SVC, or VC bundle.

bundle

Creates a bundle or modifies an existing bundle to enter bundle configuration mode.

bundle svc

Creates an SVC bundle or modifies an existing SVC bundle.

class-int

Assigns a VC class to an ATM main interface or subinterface.

class-vc

Assigns a VC class to an ATM PVC, SVC, or VC bundle member.

encapsulation

Sets the encapsulation method used by the interface.

inarp

Configures the Inverse ARP time period for an ATM PVC, VC class, or VC bundle.

oam-bundle

Enables end-to-end F5 OAM loopback cell generation and OAM management for all VC members of a bundle, or for a VC class that can be applied to a VC bundle.

oam retry

Configures parameters related to OAM management for an ATM PVC, SVC, VC class, or VC bundle.

protocol (ATM)

Configures a static map for an ATM PVC, SVC, VC class, or VC bundle. Enables Inverse ARP or Inverse ARP broadcasts on an ATM PVC by configuring Inverse ARP either directly on the PVC, on the VC bundle, or in a VC class (applies to IP and IPX protocols only).

pvc-bundle

Adds a PVC to a bundle as a member of the bundle and enters bundle-vc configuration mode in order to configure that PVC bundle member.


class-map

To create a class map to be used for matching packets to a specified class, use the class-map command in global configuration mode. To remove an existing class map from the router, use the no form of this command. The class-map command enters class-map configuration mode in which you can enter one of the match commands to configure the match criteria for this class.

Cisco 2600, 3660, 3845, 6500, 7200, 7401, and 7500 Series Routers

class-map [type {stack | access-control | port-filter | queue-threshold | logging log-class}] [match-all | match-any] class-map-name

no class-map [type {stack | access-control | port-filter | queue-threshold | logging log-class}] [match-all | match-any] class-map-name

Cisco 7600 Series Routers

class-map class-map-name [match-all | match-any]

no class-map class-map-name [match-all | match-any]

Syntax Description

type stack

(Optional) Enables flexible packet matching (FPM) functionality to determine the correct protocol stack to examine.

If the appropriate protocol header description files (PHDFs) have been loaded onto the router (via the load protocol command), a stack of protocol headers can be defined so that the filter can determine which headers are present and in what order.

type access-control

(Optional) Determines the exact pattern to look for in the protocol stack of interest.

Note You must specify a stack class map (via the type stack keywords) before you can specify an access-control class map (via the type access-control keywords).

type port-filter

(Optional) Creates a port-filter class map that enables the TCP/UDP port policing of control plane packets. When enabled, it provides filtering of traffic that is destined to specific ports on the control-plane host subinterface.

type queue-threshold

(Optional) Enables queue thresholding that limits the total number of packets for a specified protocol that are allowed in the control plane IP input queue. This feature applies only to the control-plane host subinterface.

type logging log-class

(Optional) Enables logging of packet traffic on the control plane. The log-class is the name of the log class.

match-all

(Optional) Determines how packets are evaluated when multiple match criteria exist. Matches statements under this class map based on the logical AND function. One statement and another are accepted. If you do not specify the match-all or match-any keyword, the default keyword is match-all.

match-any

(Optional) Determines how packets are evaluated when multiple match criteria exist. Matches statements under this class map based on the logical OR function. One statement or another is accepted. If you do not specify the match-any or match-all keyword, the default keyword is match-all.

class-map-name

Name of the class for the class map. The class name is used for both the class map and to configure a policy for the class in the policy map. The class name cannot contain spaces.


Command Default

No class map is configured by default.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(5)T

This command was introduced.

12.0(5)XE

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(5)XE.

12.0(7)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(7)S.

12.1(1)E

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.1(1)E.

12.2(14)SX

Support for this command was introduced on Cisco 7600 series routers.

12.2(17d)SXB

This command was implemented on the Cisco 7600 series routers and integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(17d)SXB.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.4(4)T

The type stack and type access-control keywords were added to support FPM. The type port-filter and type queue-threshold keywords were added to support Control Plane Protection.

12.4(6)T

The type logging keyword was added to support control plane packet logging.

12.2(18)ZY

The type stack and type access-control keywords were integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)ZY on the Catalyst 6500 series of switches equipped with the Programmable Intelligent Services Accelerator (PISA)

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.1

This command was implemented on Cisco ASR 1000 series routers.


Usage Guidelines

Cisco 2600, 3660, 3845, 6500, 7200, 7401, 7500, and ASR 1000 Series Routers

Use the class-map command to specify the class that you will create or modify to meet the class-map match criteria. This command enters class-map configuration mode in which you can enter one of the match commands to configure the match criteria for this class. Packets that arrive at either the input interface or the output interface (determined by how the service-policy command is configured) are checked against the match criteria configured for a class map to determine if the packets belong to that class.

When configuring a class map, you can use one or more match commands to specify match criteria. For example, you can use the match access-group command, the match protocol command, or the match input-interface command. The match commands vary according to the Cisco IOS release. For more information about match criteria and match commands, see the "Modular Quality of Service Command-Line Interface (CLI) (MQC)" chapter of the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.

Cisco 7600 Series Routers

You apply the class-map command and its subcommands on a per-interface basis to define packet classification, marking, aggregate, and flow policing as part of a globally named service policy.

You can attach a service policy to an EtherChannel. Do not attach a service policy to a port that is a member of an EtherChannel.

After you are in class-map configuration mode, the following configuration commands are available:

exit—Used to exit from class-map configuration mode.

no—Used to remove a match statement from a class map.

match—Used to configure classification criteria. The following optional match subcommands are available:

access-group {acl-index | acl-name}

ip {dscp | precedence} value1 value2 ... value8

The following subcommands appear in the CLI help but are not supported on LAN interfaces or WAN interfaces on the Optical Service Modules (OSMs):

input-interface {interface-type interface-number | null number | vlan vlan-id}

protocol link-type

destination-address mac mac-address

source-address mac mac-address

OSMs are not supported on Cisco 7600 series routers that are configured with a Supervisor Engine 32.

Policy Feature Card (PFC) QoS does not support the following commands:

input-interface {interface-type interface-number | null number | vlan vlan-id}

protocol link-type

destination-address mac mac-address

source-address mac mac-address

qos-group group-value

If you enter these subcommands, PFC QoS does not detect the unsupported keywords until you attach a policy map to an interface. When you try to attach the policy map to an interface, you get an error message. For additional information, see the Cisco 7600 Series Router Cisco IOS Software Configuration Guide and the Cisco IOS Release 12.2 Command Reference publications.

After you have configured the class-map name and are in class-map configuration mode, you can enter the match access-group and match ip dscp subcommands. The syntax for these subcommands is as follows:

match [[access-group {acl-index | acl-name}] | [ip {dscp | precedence} value]]

See Table 1 for a syntax description of the match subcommands.

Table 1 match Syntax Description 

Optional Subcommand
Description

access-group acl-index | acl-name

(Optional) Specifies the access list index or access list names; valid access list index values are from 1 to 2699.

access-group acl-name

(Optional) Specifies the named access list.

ip dscp value1 value2 ... value8

(Optional) Specifies the IP DSCP values to match; valid values are from 0 to 63. You can enter up to 8 DSCP values and separate each value with one white space.

ip precedence value1 value2 ... value8

(Optional) Specifies the IP precedence values to match; valid values are from 0 to 7. You can enter up to 8 precedence values and separate each value with one white space.


Examples

The following example specifies class101 as the name of a class, and it defines a class map for this class. The class called class101 specifies policy for traffic that matches access control list 101.

Router(config)# class-map class101
Router(config-cmap)# match access-group 101
 
   

The following example shows how to define FPM traffic classes for slammer and UDP packets. The match criteria defined within the class maps are for slammer and UDP packets with an IP length not to exceed 404 bytes, UDP port 1434, and pattern 0x4011010 at 224 bytes from the start of the IP header.

Router(config)# load protocol disk2:ip.phdf
Router(config)# load protocol disk2:udp.phdf
 
   
Router(config)# class-map type stack match-all ip-udp
Router(config-cmap)# description "match UDP over IP packets"
Router(config-cmap)# match field ip protocol eq 0x11 next udp
 
   
Router(config)# class-map type access-control match-all slammer
Router(config-cmap)# description "match on slammer packets"
Router(config-cmap)# match field udp dest-port eq 0x59A
Router(config-cmap)# match field ip length eq 0x194
Router(config-cmap)# match start 13-start offset 224 size 4 eq 0x4011010
 
   

The following example shows how to configure a port-filter policy to drop all traffic that is destined to closed or "nonlistened" ports except SNMP.

Router(config)# class-map type port-filter pf-class
Router(config-cmap)# match not port udp 123
Router(config-cmap)# match closed-ports
Router(config-cmap)# exit
Router(config)# policy-map type port-filter pf-policy
Router(config-pmap)# class pf-class
Router(config-pmap-c)# drop
Router(config-pmap-c)# end
 
   

The following example shows how to access the class-map commands and subcommands, configure a class map named ipp5, and enter a match statement for IP precedence 5:

Router(config)# class-map ipp5
Router(config-cmap)# match ip precedence 5
 
   

Related Commands

Command
Description

class (policy-map)

Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change, and the default class (commonly known as the class-default class) before you configure its policy.

class class-default

Specifies the default class for a service policy map.

match (class-map)

Configures the match criteria for a class map on the basis of port filter and/or protocol queue policies.

match access-group

Configures the match criteria for a class map on the basis of the specified ACL.

match input-interface

Configures a class map to use the specified input interface as a match criterion.

match ip dscp

Identifies one or more DSCP, AF, and CS values as a match criterion

match mpls experimental

Configures a class map to use the specified EXP field value as a match criterion.

match protocol

Configures the match criteria for a class map on the basis of the specified protocol.

policy-map

Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy.

service-policy

Attaches a policy map to an input interface or virtual circuit (VC) or to an output interface or VC to be used as the service policy for that interface or VC.

show class-map

Displays class-map information.

show policy-map interface

Displays the statistics and the configurations of the input and output policies that are attached to an interface.


class-map arp-peruser

To create a class map to be used for matching Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) per-user packets, use the class-map arp-peruser command in global configuration mode. To disable this functionality, use the no form of the command.

class-map arp-peruser

no class map arp-peruser

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

No class map is configured.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRB

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Use this command to create an ARP class map when configuring CoPP.

Examples

The following example shows creating an ARP class-map:

Router(config)# class-map arp-peruser
Router(config-cmap)# match protocol arp
Router(config-cmap)# match subscriber access

Related Commands

Command
Description

match protocol arp

Matches ARP traffic to a policy map.

match subscriber access

Matches subscriber access traffic to a policy map.


class type tag

To associate a class map with a policy map, use the class type tag command in policy map configuration mode. To disassociate the command, use the no form of this command.

class type tag class-name [insert-before class-name]

no class type tag class-name [insert-before class-name]

Syntax Description

class-name

Name of the class map.

insert-before class-name

(Optional) Adds a class map between any two existing class maps.

Note Inserting a new class map between two existing class maps provides more flexibility when modifying existing policy map configurations. Without this option, the class map is appended to the end of the policy map.


Command Default

A class map is not associated with a policy map.

Command Modes

Policy map configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.4(6)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

If this command is used and the class is not configured, an error is generated. The error may be something such as "% class map {name} not configured." If the class needs to be inserted before a specific class map, the insert-before keyword can be used. The insert-before keyword is typically needed if the administrator is configuring any per-host class maps and would like it inserted before a specific class map. The class type tag command creates the policy-map class configuration mode. There can be multiple classes under the policy map.

Examples

The following example shows how to associate the class map "usergroup1_class" with a policy map:

class type tag usergroup1_class

Related Commands

Command
Description

policy-map

Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy.


clear control-plane

To clear counters for control-plane interfaces or subinterfaces, use the clear control-plane command in privileged EXEC mode.

clear control-plane [* | aggregate | host | transit | cef-exception]

Syntax Description

*

(Optional) Clears counters for all control-plane features.

aggregate

(Optional) Clears counters for all features on the control-plane aggregate path.

host

(Optional) Clears counters for all features on the control-plane host feature path.

transit

(Optional) Clears counters for all features on the control-plane transit feature path.

cef-exception

(Optional) Clears counters for all features on the control-plane CEF-exception feature path.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.4(4)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Use the clear control-plane command to clear counters for all features on the control-plane interfaces or subinterfaces.

Examples

The following example clears the counters for all features on the control-plane host feature path.

Router# clear control-plane host

Related Commands

Command
Description

control-plane

Enters control-plane configuration mode, which allows you to associate or modify attributes or parameters that are associated with the control plane of the device.

debug control-plane

Displays debugging output from the control-plane routines.

show control-plane cef-exception counters

Displays the control plane packet counters for the control-plane CEF-exception subinterface.

show control-plane cef-exception features

Displays the configured features for the control-plane CEF-exception subinterface.

show control-plane counters

Displays the control-plane packet counters for the aggregate control-plane interface.

show control-plane features

Displays the configured features for the aggregate control-plane interface.

show control-plane host counters

Displays the control-plane packet counters for the control-plane host subinterface.

show control-plane host features

Displays the configured features for the control-plane host subinterface.

show control-plane host open-ports

Displays a list of open TCP/UDP ports that are registered with the port-filter database.

show control-plane transit counters

Displays the control-plane packet counters for the control-plane transit subinterface.

show control-plane transit features

Displays the configured features for the control-plane transit subinterface.


clear ip nbar

To clear the buffers, filters, and port statistics gathered by network-based application recognition (NBAR), use the clear ip nbar command in privileged EXEC mode.

clear ip nbar [capture | filter | trace | unclassified-port-stats]

Syntax for Cisco IOS Release 15.0(1)M and Later Releases

clear ip nbar [capture | filter | unclassified-port-stats]

Syntax Description

capture

(Optional) Specifies the packet capture buffers.

filter

(Optional) Specifies the session selection filter.

trace

(Optional) Specifies the state-graph tracing buffers.

unclassified-port-stats

(Optional) Specifies the port statistics for unclassified packets.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

15.0(1)M

This command was introduced in a release earlier than Cisco IOS Release 15.0(1)M.

12.2(33)SRC

This command was integrated into a release earlier than Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRC.

12.2(33)SXI

This command was integrated into a release earlier than Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXI.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.1

This command was implemented on the Cisco ASR 1000 Series Aggregation Services Routers.


Examples

The following example shows how to clear the port statistics gathered by NBAR:

Router# clear ip nbar unclassified-port-stats

Related Commands

Command
Description

clear ip nbar protocol-discovery

Clears the statistics gathered by the NBAR protocol discovery feature.


clear ip nbar protocol-discovery

To clear the statistics gathered by the network-based application recognition (NBAR) Protocol Discovery feature, use the clear ip nbar protocol-discovery command in privileged EXEC mode.

clear ip nbar protocol-discovery [interface type number]

Syntax Description

interface

(Optional) Specifies the type of interface to be configured.

type

(Optional) Type of interface.

number

(Optional) Interface or subinterface number.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

15.0(1)M

This command was introduced in a release earlier than Cisco IOS Release 15.0(1)M.

12.2(33)SRC

This command was integrated into a release earlier than Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRC.

12.2(33)SXI

This command was integrated into a release earlier than Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXI.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.1

This command was implemented on the Cisco ASR 1000 Series Aggregation Services Routers.


Usage Guidelines

Use the clear ip nbar protocol-discovery command to clear the statistics gathered by the NBAR Protocol Discovery feature. By default, this command clears the statistics for all the interfaces on which the protocol discovery feature is enabled.

Examples

The following example shows how to clear the statistics gathered by the NBAR Protocol Discovery feature:

Router# clear ip nbar protocol-discovery interface serial 3/1

Related Commands

Command
Description

clear ip nbar

Clears the buffers, filters, and port statistics gathered by the NBAR feature.


clear ip rsvp authentication

To eliminate Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) security associations before their lifetimes expire, use the clear ip rsvp authentication command in privileged EXEC mode.

clear ip rsvp authentication [ip-address | hostname]

Syntax Description

ip-address

(Optional) Frees security associations with a specific neighbor.

hostname

(Optional) Frees security associations with a specific host.



Note The difference between the ip-address and hostname arguments is the difference of specifying the neighbor by its IP address or by its name.


Command Default

The default behavior is to clear all security associations.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(15)T

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

Use the clear ip rsvp authentication command for the following reasons:

To eliminate security associations before their lifetimes expire

To free up memory

To resolve a problem with a security association being in some indeterminate state

To force reauthentication of neighbors

You can delete all RSVP security associations if you do not enter an IP address or a hostname, or just the ones with a specific RSVP neighbor or host.

If you delete a security association, it is re-created as needed when the trusted RSVP neighbors start sending more RSVP messages.

Examples

The following command shows how to clear all security associations before they expire:

Router# clear ip rsvp authentication

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp authentication lifetime

Controls how long RSVP maintains security associations with other trusted RSVP neighbors.

show ip rsvp authentication

Displays the security associations that RSVP has established with other RSVP neighbors.


clear ip rsvp counters

To clear (set to zero) all IP Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) counters that are being maintained, use the clear ip rsvp counters command in privileged EXEC mode.

clear ip rsvp counters [confirm]

Syntax Description

confirm

(Optional) Requests a confirmation that all IP RSVP counters were cleared.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(14)ST

This command was introduced.

12.2(14)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(14)S.

12.0(22)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(22)S.

12.2(28)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(28)SB.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T.


Usage Guidelines

This command allows you to set all IP RSVP counters to zero so that you can see changes easily.

Examples

In the following example, all IP RSVP counters that are being maintained are cleared:

Router# clear ip rsvp counters
 
   
Clear rsvp counters [confirm]

Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip rsvp counters

Displays counts of RSVP messages that were sent and received.


clear ip rsvp hello instance counters

To clear (refresh) the values for hello instance counters, use the clear ip rsvp hello instance counters command in privileged EXEC mode.

clear ip rsvp hello instance counters

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(22)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(18)SXD1

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXD1.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB2.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SXH.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T.


Examples

Following is sample output from the show ip rsvp hello instance detail command and then the clear ip rsvp hello instance counters command. Notice that the "Statistics" fields have been cleared to zero.

Router# show ip rsvp hello instance detail 
 
   
Neighbor 10.0.0.2  Source  10.0.0.1
 State: UP      (for 2d18h)
 Type: PASSIVE  (responding to requests)
 I/F: Et1/1
 LSPs protecting: 0
 Refresh Interval (msec) (used when ACTIVE)
  Configured: 100
  Statistics: (from 2398195 samples)
   Min:      100
   Max:      132
   Average:  100
   Waverage: 100 (Weight = 0.8)
   Current:  100
 Src_instance 0xA9F07C13, Dst_instance 0x9BBAA407
 Counters:
 Communication with neighbor lost:
  Num times: 0
  Reasons:
   Missed acks:             0
   Bad Src_Inst received:   0
   Bad Dst_Inst received:   0
   I/F went down:           0
   Neighbor disabled Hello: 0
  Msgs Received:   2398194
   Sent:       2398195
   Suppressed: 0
 
   
 
   
Router# clear ip rsvp hello instance counters 
 
   
Neighbor 10.0.0.2  Source  10.0.0.1
 State: UP      (for 2d18h)
 Type: PASSIVE  (responding to requests)
 I/F: Et1/1
 LSPs protecting: 0
 Refresh Interval (msec) (used when ACTIVE)
  Configured: 100
  Statistics: 
   Min:        0
   Max:        0
   Average:    0
   Waverage:   0 
   Current:    0
 Src_instance 0xA9F07C13, Dst_instance 0x9BBAA407
 Counters:
  Communication with neighbor lost:
  Num times: 0
  Reasons:
   Missed acks:             0
   Bad Src_Inst received:   0
   Bad Dst_Inst received:   0
   I/F went down:           0
   Neighbor disabled Hello: 0
  Msgs Received:   2398194
   Sent:       2398195
   Suppressed: 0

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello (configuration)

Enables hello globally on a router.

ip rsvp signalling hello (interface)

Enables hello on an interface where you need Fast Reroute protection.

ip rsvp signalling hello statistics

Enables hello statistics on a router.

show ip rsvp hello statistics

Displays how long hello packets have been in the hello input queue.


clear ip rsvp hello instance statistics

To clear hello statistics for an instance, use the clear ip rsvp hello instance statistics command in privileged EXEC mode.

clear ip rsvp hello instance statistics

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

Hello statistics are not cleared for an instance.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(22)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(18)SXD1

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXD1.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(31)SB2

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB2.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SXH.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T.


Examples

This example shows sample output from the show ip rsvp hello statistics command and the values in those fields after you enter the clear ip rsvp hello instance statistics command.

Router# show ip rsvp hello statistics
 
   
 Status: Enabled
 Packet arrival queue:
  Wait times (msec)
   Current:0
   Average:0
   Weighted Average:0 (weight = 0.8)
   Max:4
  Current length: 0 (max:500)
 Number of samples taken: 2398525 
Router# clear ip rsvp hello instance statistics 
 
   
Status: Enabled
 Packet arrival queue:
  Wait times (msec)
   Current:0
   Average:0
   Weighted Average:0 (weight = 0.8)
   Max:0
  Current length: 0 (max:500)
 Number of samples taken: 0

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello (configuration)

Enables hello globally on a router.

ip rsvp signalling hello (interface)

Enables hello on an interface where you need Fast Reroute protection.

ip rsvp signalling hello statistics

Enables hello statistics on a router.

show ip rsvp hello statistics

Displays how long hello packets have been in the hello input queue.


clear ip rsvp hello statistics

To clear hello statistics globally, use the clear ip rsvp hello statistics command in privileged EXEC mode.

clear ip rsvp hello statistics

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

Hello statistics are not globally cleared.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(22)S

This command was introduced.

12.2(18)SXD1

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXD1.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(31)SB2s

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SB2.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(31)SXH.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T.


Usage Guidelines

Use this command to remove all information about how long hello packets have been in the hello input queue.

Examples

Following is sample output from the show ip rsvp hello statistics command and the clear ip rsvp hello statistics command. Notice that the values in the "Packet arrival queue" fields have been cleared.

Router# show ip rsvp hello statistics
 
   
Status: Enabled
 Packet arrival queue:
  Wait times (msec)
   Current:0
   Average:0
   Weighted Average:0 (weight = 0.8)
   Max:4
  Current length: 0 (max:500)
Number of samples taken: 2398525 
 
   
Router# clear ip rsvp hello statistics
 
   
Status: Enabled
 Packet arrival queue:
  Wait times (msec)
   Current:0
   Average:0
   Weighted Average:0 (weight = 0.8)
   Max:0
  Current length: 0 (max:500)
 Number of samples taken: 16 

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling hello statistics

Enables hello statistics on a router.

show ip rsvp hello statistics

Displays how long hello packets have been in the hello input queue.


clear ip rsvp high-availability counters

To clear (set to zero) the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) traffic engineering (TE) high availability (HA) counters that are being maintained by a Route Processor (RP), use the clear ip rsvp high-availability counters command in privileged EXEC mode.

clear ip rsvp high-availability counters

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRA

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRB

Support for In-Service Software Upgrade (ISSU) was added.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.


Usage Guidelines

Use the clear ip rsvp high-availability counters command to clear (set to zero) the HA counters, which include state, ISSU, resource failures, and historical information.

Examples

The following example clears all the HA information currently being maintained by the RP:

Router# clear ip rsvp high-availability counters

Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip rsvp high-availability counters

Displays the RSVP TE HA counters that are being maintained by an RP.


clear ip rsvp msg-pacing


Note Effective with Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T, the clear ip rsvp msg-pacing command is not available in Cisco IOS software. This command was replaced by the clear ip rsvp signalling rate-limit command.


To clear the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) message pacing output from the show ip rsvp neighbor command, use the clear ip rsvp msg-pacing command in privileged EXEC mode.

clear ip rsvp msg-pacing

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.0(14)ST

This command was introduced.

12.2(14)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(14)S.

12.0(22)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(22)S.

12.2(28)SB

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(28)SB.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.

12.2(13)T

This command was replaced by the clear ip rsvp signalling rate-limit command.

12.4(20)T

This command was removed.


Examples

The following example clears the RSVP message pacing output:

Router# clear ip rsvp msg-pacing

Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip rsvp counters

Displays the number of RSVP messages that were sent and received.

show ip rsvp neighbor

Displays the current RSVP neighbors and indicates whether the neighbor is using IP or UDP encapsulation for a specified interface or for all interfaces.


clear ip rsvp reservation

To remove Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) RESV-related receiver information currently in the database, use the clear ip rsvp reservation command in EXEC mode.

clear ip rsvp reservation {session-ip-address sender-ip-address {tcp | udp | ip-protocol} session-dport sender-sport | *}

Syntax Description

session-ip-address

For unicast sessions, this is the address of the intended receiver; for multicast sessions, it is the IP multicast address of the session.

sender-ip-address

The IP address of the sender.

tcp | udp | ip-protocol

TCP, User Datagram Protocol (UDP), or IP protocol in the range from 0 to 65535.

session-dport

The destination port.

Note Port numbers are specified in all cases, because the use of 16-bit ports following the IP header is not limited to UDP or TCP. If destination is zero, source must be zero, and the implication is that ports are not checked. If destination is nonzero, source must be nonzero (except for wildcard filter (wf) reservations, for which the source port is always ignored and can therefore be zero).

sender-sport

The source port.

Note Port numbers are specified in all cases, because the use of 16-bit ports following the IP header is not limited to UDP or TCP. If destination is zero, source must be zero, and the implication is that ports are not checked. If destination is nonzero, source must be nonzero (except for wildcard filter (wf) reservations, for which the source port is always ignored and can therefore be zero).

*

Wildcard used to clear all senders.


Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

11.2

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

Use the clear ip rsvp reservation command to remove the RESV-related sender information currently in the database so that when reservation requests arrive, based on the RSVP admission policy, the relevant ones can be reestablished.

Whenever you change the clockrate or bandwidth of an interface, RSVP does not update its database to reflect the change. This is because such a change requires that RSVP reestablish reservations based on the new clockrate or bandwidth value and arbitrarily dropping some reservations while retaining others is not desired. The solution is to clear the RESV state by issuing the clear ip rsvp reservation command.

The clear ip rsvp reservation command clears the RESV state from the router on which you issued the command and causes the router to send a PATH TEAR message to the upstream routers thereby clearing the RESV state for that reservation on all the upstream routers.

Examples

The following example clears all the RESV-related receiver information currently in the database:

Router# clear ip rsvp reservation *

The following example clears all the RESV-related receiver information for a specified reservation currently in the database:

Router# clear ip rsvp reservation 10.2.1.1 10.1.1.2 udp 10 20

Related Commands

Command
Description

clear ip rsvp sender

Removes RSVP PATH-related sender information currently in the database.


clear ip rsvp sender

To remove Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) PATH-related sender information currently in the database, use the clear ip rsvp sender command in EXEC mode.

clear ip rsvp sender {session-ip-address sender-ip-address {tcp | udp | ip-protocol} session-dport sender-sport | *}

Syntax Description

session-ip-address

For unicast sessions, this is the address of the intended receiver; for multicast sessions, it is the IP multicast address of the session.

sender-ip-address

The IP address of the sender.

tcp | udp | ip-protocol

TCP, User Datagram Protocol (UDP), or IP protocol in the range from 0 to 65535.

session-dport

The destination port.

Note Port numbers are specified in all cases, because the use of 16-bit ports following the IP header is not limited to UDP or TCP. If destination is zero, source must be zero, and the implication is that ports are not checked. If destination is nonzero, source must be nonzero (except for wildcard filter (wf) reservations, for which the source port is always ignored and can therefore be zero).

sender-sport

The source port.

Note Port numbers are specified in all cases, because the use of 16-bit ports following the IP header is not limited to UDP or TCP. If destination is zero, source must be zero, and the implication is that ports are not checked. If destination is nonzero, source must be nonzero (except for wildcard filter (wf) reservations, for which the source port is always ignored and can therefore be zero).

*

Wildcard used to clear all senders.


Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

11.2

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.


Usage Guidelines

Use the clear ip rsvp sender command to remove the PATH-related sender information currently in the database so that when reservation requests arrive, based on the RSVP admission policy, the relevant ones can be reestablished.

Whenever you change the clockrate or bandwidth of an interface, RSVP does not update its database to reflect the change. This is because such a change requires that RSVP reestablish reservations based on the new clockrate or bandwidth value and arbitrarily dropping some reservations while retaining others is not desired. The solution is to clear the PATH state by issuing the clear ip rsvp sender command.

The clear ip rsvp sender command clears the PATH state from the router on which you issued the command and causes the router to send a PATH TEAR message to the downstream routers thereby clearing the PATH state for that reservation on all the downstream routers.

Examples

The following example clears all the PATH-related sender information currently in the database:

Router# clear ip rsvp sender *

The following example clears all the PATH-related sender information for a specified reservation currently in the database:

Router# clear ip rsvp sender 10.2.1.1 10.1.1.2 udp 10 20

Related Commands

Command
Description

clear ip rsvp reservation

Removes RSVP RESV-related receiver information currently in the database.


clear ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair statistics

To clear (set to zero) the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) fast local repair (FLR) counters, use the clear ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair statistics command in user EXEC or privileged EXEC mode.

clear ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair statistics

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Default

The default is to clear all the RSVP FLR counters.

Command Modes

User EXEC (>)
Privileged EXEC (#)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRB

This command was introduced.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6.


Usage Guidelines

Use the clear ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair statistics command to set all the RSVP FLR counters to zero. The statistics include information about FLR procedures such as the current state, the start time, and the repair rate.

Examples

The following example clears all the RSVP FLR counters being maintained in the database:

Router# clear ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair statistics

Related Commands

Command
Description

show ip rsvp signalling fast-local-repair

Displays FLR-related information.


clear ip rsvp signalling rate-limit

To clear (set to zero) the number of Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) messages that were dropped because of a full queue, use the clear ip rsvp signalling rate-limit command in privileged EXEC mode.

clear ip rsvp signalling rate-limit

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(13)T

This command was introduced. This command replaces the clear ip rsvp msg-pacing command.

12.4(20)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.4(20)T.


Usage Guidelines

Use the clear ip rsvp signalling rate-limit command to clear the counters recording dropped messages.

Examples

The following command shows how to clear all dropped messages:

Router# clear ip rsvp signalling rate-limit

Related Commands

Command
Description

debug ip rsvp rate-limit

Displays debug messages for RSVP rate-limiting events.

ip rsvp signalling rate-limit

Controls the transmission rate for RSVP messages sent to a neighboring router during a specified amount of time.

show ip rsvp signalling rate-limit

Displays rate-limiting parameters for RSVP messages.


clear ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction

To clear (set to zero) the counters associated with the number of retransmissions and the number of out-of-order Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) messages, use the clear ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction command in EXEC mode.

clear ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Modes

EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(13)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Use the clear ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction command to clear the counters recording retransmissions and out-of-order RSVP messages.

Examples

The following command shows how all the retransmissions and out-of-order messages are cleared:

Router# clear ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction

Related Commands

Command
Description

ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction

Enables refresh reduction.

show ip rsvp signalling refresh reduction

Displays refresh-reduction parameters for RSVP messages.


clear mls qos

To clear the multilayer switching (MLS) aggregate-quality of service (QoS) statistics, use the clear mls qos command in privileged EXEC mode.

clear mls qos [ip | ipx | mac | mpls | ipv6 | arp [interface-type interface-number | null interface-number | port-channel number | vlan vlan-id]]

Syntax Description

ip

(Optional) Clears MLS IP aggregate-QoS statistics.

ipx

(Optional) Clears MLS IPX aggregate-QoS statistics.

mac

(Optional) Clears MLS MAC aggregate-QoS statistics.

mpls

(Optional) Clears MLS MPLS aggregate-QoS statistics.

ipv6

(Optional) Clears MLS IPv6 aggregate QoS statistics.

arp

(Optional) Clears MLS ARP aggregate QoS statistics.

interface-type

(Optional) Interface type; possible valid values are ethernet, fastethernet, gigabitethernet, and tengigabitethernet. See the "Usage Guidelines" section for additional valid values.

interface-number

(Optional) Module and port number; see the "Usage Guidelines" section for valid values.

null interface-number

(Optional) Specifies the null interface; the valid value is 0.

port-channel number

(Optional) Specifies the channel interface; valid values are a maximum of 64 values ranging from 1 to 256.

vlan vlan-id

(Optional) Specifies the VLAN ID; valid values are from 1 to 4094.


Command Default

This command has no default settings.

Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(14)SX

Support for this command was introduced on the Supervisor Engine 720.

12.2(17a)SX

This command was changed to include the mpls keyword.

12.2(17d)SXB

Support for this command on the Supervisor Engine 2 was extended to Release 12.2(17d)SXB.

12.2(18)SXD

This command was changed to include the arp keyword.

12.2(18)SXE

This command was changed to include the ipv6 and arp keywords on the Supervisor Engine 720 only.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.


Usage Guidelines

The valid values for interface-type include the ge-wan, atm, and pos keywords that are supported on Cisco 7600 series routers that are configured with a Supervisor Engine 2.

The ipx keyword is supported on Cisco 7600 series routers that are configured with a Supervisor Engine 2 only.

The ipv6 and arp keywords are supported on Cisco 7600 series routers that are configured with a Supervisor Engine 720 only.

The interface-number argument designates the module and port number. Valid values for interface-number depend on the specified interface type and the chassis and module that are used. For example, if you specify a Gigabit Ethernet interface and have a 48-port 10/100BASE-T Ethernet module that is installed in a 13-slot chassis, valid values for the module number are from 1 to 13 and valid values for the port number are from 1 to 48.

If you enter the clear mls qos command with no arguments, the global and per-interface aggregate QoS counters for all protocols are cleared.

If you do not enter an interface type, the protocol aggregate-QoS counters for all interfaces are cleared.


Note Entering the clear mls qos command affects the policing token bucket counters and might briefly allow traffic to be forwarded that would otherwise be policed.


Examples

This example shows how to clear the global and per-interface aggregate-QoS counters for all protocols:

Router# clear mls qos
 
   

This example shows how to clear the specific protocol aggregate-QoS counters for all interfaces:

Router# clear mls qos ip 

Related Commands

Command
Description

show mls qos

Displays MLS QoS information.


clear service-group traffic-stats

To clear the traffic statistics for one or all service groups, use the clear service-group traffic-stats command in privileged EXEC mode.

clear service-group traffic-stats [group service-group-identifier]

Syntax Description

group

(Optional) Service group.

service-group-identifier

(Optional) Service group number. Enter the number of the service group for which you want to clear statistics.


Command Modes

Privileged EXEC

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(33)SRE

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

If a service group number is not specified, statistics for all service groups are cleared.


Note Clearing the traffic statistics for the service group does not clear the traffic statistics for the group members. To clear the traffic statistics for the group members, use the clear ethernet service instance command. For more information about the clear ethernet service instance command, see the Cisco IOS Carrier Ethernet Command Reference.


Examples

The following shows how to clear the traffic statistics for all service groups:

Router> enable
Router# clear service-group traffic-stats

Related Commands

Command
Description

clear ethernet service instance

Clears Ethernet service instance attributes such as MAC addresses and statistics or purges Ethernet service instance errors.


compression header ip

To configure Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) or TCP IP header compression for a specific class, use the compression header ip command in policy-map class configuration mode. To remove RTP or TCP IP header compression for a specific class, use the no form of this command.

compression header ip [rtp | tcp]

no compression header ip

Syntax Description

rtp

(Optional) Configures RTP header compression.

tcp

(Optional) Configures TCP header compression.


Defaults

If you do not specify either RTP or TCP header compression (that is, you press the enter key after the command name) both RTP and TCP header compressions are configured. This is intended to cover the "all compressions" scenario.

Command Modes

Policy-map class configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(13)T

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Using any form of the compression header ip command overrides any previously entered form.

The compression header ip command can be used at any level in the policy map hierarchy configured with the Modular Quality of Service (QoS) Command-Line Interface (CLI) (MQC) feature.

Examples

In the following example, the compression header ip command has been configured to use RTP header compression for a class called "class1". Class1 is part of policy map called "policy1".

Router(config)# policy-map policy1
Router(config-pmap)# class-map class1
Router(config-pmap-c)# compression header ip rtp
Router(config-pmap-c)# end
 
   

Related Commands

Command
Description

show policy-map

Displays the configuration of all classes for a specified service policy map or all classes for all existing policy maps.

show policy-map class

Displays the configuration for the specified class of the specified policy map.

show policy-map interface

Displays the packet statistics of all classes that are configured for all service policies either on the specified interface or subinterface or on a specific PVC on the interface.


control-plane

To enter control-plane configuration mode, which allows users to associate or modify attributes or parameters (such as a service policy) that are associated with the control plane of the device, use the control-plane command in global configuration mode. To remove an existing control-plane configuration from the router, use the no form of this command.

Syntax for T Releases

control-plane [host | transit | cef-exception]

no control-plane [host | transit | cef-exception]

Syntax for 12.0S Releases

control-plane [slot slot-number] [host | transit | cef-exception]

no control-plane [slot slot-number] [host | transit | cef-exception]

Syntax for 12.2S Releases for Cisco 7600 Series Routers

control-plane

no control-plane

Syntax for ASR 1000 Series Routers

control-plane [host]

no control-plane [host]

Syntax Description

host

(Optional) Applies policies to host control-plane traffic.

transit

(Optional) Applies policies to transit control-plane traffic.

cef-exception

(Optional) Applies policies to CEF-exception control-plane traffic.

slot slot-number

(Optional) Specifies the slot number for the line card to which you want to attach a QoS policy to configure distributed Control-Plane (CP) services.


Command Default

No control-plane service policies are defined.

Command Modes

Global configuration (config)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(18)S

This command was introduced.

12.3(4)T

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.3(4)T.

12.0(29)S

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.0(29)S.

12.0(30)S

The slot slot-number parameter was added to configure distributed Control-Plane (CP) services.

12.2(18)SXD1

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(18)SXD1.

12.4(4)T

The host, transit, and cef-exception keywords were added.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2(33)SXH

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SXH.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.2

This command was implemented on Cisco ASR 1000 series routers.


Usage Guidelines

After you enter the control-plane command, you can apply a control-plane policing (CoPP), port-filter, or queue-threshold policy to police traffic destined for the control plane. You can define aggregate CoPPs for the route processor (RP) and configure a service policy to police all traffic destined to the control plane:

From all line cards on the router (aggregate CP services)

From all interfaces on a line card (distributed CP services)

Aggregate CP services manage traffic destined for the control plane and received on the central switch engine from all line cards in the router.

Distributed CP services manage CP traffic from interfaces on a specified line card before CP packets are forwarded to the central switch engine where aggregate CP services are applied.


Note On the Cisco 12000 series Internet router, you can combine distributed and aggregate CP services to protect the control plane from DoS attacks and provide packet QoS. The slot slot-number parameter is used only for distributed CP services configurations.


Control-plane policing includes enhanced control-plane functionality. It provides a mechanism for early dropping of packets directed toward closed or nonlistened Cisco IOS TCP/UPD ports on the router. It also provides the ability to limit protocol queue usage such that no single misbehaving protocol process can wedge the control-plane interface hold queue.


Note The control-plane command is supported by Cisco IOS Release 12.2S only for the Cisco 7600 router. For other Cisco IOS releases, the Cisco 7600 supports only the no control-plane command to discontinue a previously existing configuration condition.


With this enhancement, you can classify control-plane traffic into different categories of traffic. These categories are as follows:

Control-plane host subinterface—Subinterface that receives all control-plane IP traffic that is directly destined for one of the router interfaces. Examples of control-plane host IP traffic include tunnel termination traffic, management traffic, or routing protocols such as SSH, SNMP, BGP, OSPF, and EIGRP. All host traffic terminates on and is processed by the router. Most control-plane protection features and policies operate strictly on the control-plane host subinterface. Since most critical router control-plane services, such as routing protocols and management traffic, are received on the control-plane host subinterface, it is critical to protect this traffic through policing and protection policies. CoPP, port-filtering, and per-protocol queue thresholding protection features can be applied on the control-plane host subinterface.

Control-plane transit subinterface—Subinterface that receives all control-plane IP traffic that is software switched by the route processor. This means packets not directly destined to the router itself but rather traffic traversing through the router. Nonterminating tunnels handled by the router are an example of this type of control-plane traffic. Control-plane protection allows specific aggregate policing of all traffic received at this subinterface.

Control-plane CEF-exception subinterface—Subinterface that receives all traffic that is either redirected as a result of a configured input feature in the CEF packet forwarding path for process switching or directly enqueued in the control-plane input queue by the interface driver (for example, ARP, L2 keepalives, and all non-IP host traffic). Control-plane protection allows specific aggregate policing of this specific type of control-plane traffic.

Examples

The following example shows how to configure trusted hosts with source addresses 10.1.1.1 and 10.1.1.2 to forward Telnet packets to the control plane without constraint, while allowing all remaining Telnet packets to be policed at the specified rate. The QoS policy is then applied for aggregate CP services to all packets that are entering the control plane from all line cards in the router.

! Allow 10.1.1.1 trusted host traffic.
Router(config)# access-list 140 deny tcp host 10.1.1.1 any eq telnet 
! Allow 10.1.1.2 trusted host traffic. 
Router(config)# access-list 140 deny tcp host 10.1.1.2 any eq telnet 
! Rate-limit all other Telnet traffic.
Router(config)# access-list 140 permit tcp any any eq telnet
! Define class map "telnet-class."
Router(config)# class-map telnet-class 
Router(config-cmap)# match access-group 140
Router(config-cmap)# exit
Router(config)# policy-map control-plane-in
Router(config-pmap)# class telnet-class
Router(config-pmap-c)# police 80000 conform transmit exceed drop
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# exit
! Define aggregate control-plane service for the active route processor.
Router(config)# control-plane
Router(config-cp)# service-policy input control-plane-in
Router(config-cp)# end
 
   

The next example also shows how to configure trusted hosts with source addresses 10.1.1.1 and 10.1.1.2 to forward Telnet packets to the control plane without constraint, while allowing all remaining Telnet packets that enter through slot 1 to be policed at the specified rate. The QoS policy is applied for distributed CP services to all packets that enter through the interfaces on the line card in slot 1 and that are destined for the control plane:

! Allow 10.1.1.1 trusted host traffic.
Router(config)# access-list 140 deny tcp host 10.1.1.1 any eq telnet 
! Allow 10.1.1.2 trusted host traffic. 
Router(config)# access-list 140 deny tcp host 10.1.1.2 any eq telnet 
! Rate-limit all other Telnet traffic.
Router(config)# access-list 140 permit tcp any any eq telnet
! Define class map "telnet-class."
Router(config)# class-map telnet-class 
Router(config-cmap)# match access-group 140
Router(config-cmap)# exit
Router(config)# policy-map control-plane-in
Router(config-pmap)# class telnet-class
Router(config-pmap-c)# police 80000 conform transmit exceed drop
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config-pmap)# exit
! Define aggregate control-plane service for the active route processor.
Router(config)# control-plane slot 1
Router(config-cp)# service-policy input control-plane-in
Router(config-cp)# end
 
   

The following example shows how to apply an aggregate CoPP policy to the host control-plane traffic by applying it to the host control-plane feature path:

Router(config)# control-plane host
Router(config-cp)# service-policy input cpp-policy-host
 
   

The following example shows how to apply an aggregate CoPP policy to the transit control-plane traffic by applying it to the control-plane transit feature path:

Router(config)# control-plane transit
Router(config-cp)# service-policy input cpp-policy-transit
 
   

The following example shows how to apply an aggregate CoPP policy to the CEF-exception control-plane traffic by applying it to the control-plane CEF-exception feature path:

Router(config)# control-plane cef-exception
Router(config-cp)# service-policy input cpp-policy-cef-exception

Related Commands

Command
Description

class (policy-map)

Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change or specifies the default class (commonly known as the class-default class) before you configure its policy.

class-map

Accesses the QoS class-map configuration mode to configure QoS class maps.

drop

Configures a traffic class to discard packets that belonging to a specific class.

match access-group

Configures the match criteria for a class map on the basis of the specified ACL.

policy-map

Accesses QoS policy-map configuration mode to configure the QoS policy map.

service-policy (control-plane)

Attaches a policy map to the control plane for aggregate or distributed control-plane services.

show policy-map control-plane

Displays the configuration of a class or all classes for the policy map attached to the control plane.


copy interface

To configure a traffic class to copy packets belonging to a specific class to the interface that is specified in the command, use the copy interface command in policy-map class configuration mode. To prevent the packets from getting copied, use the no form of the command.

copy interface interface type number

no copy interface interface type number

Syntax Description

interface type number

Type and number of the interace to which the packets need to be sent.


Command Default

If this command is not specified, the packets are not copied to an interface.

Command Modes

Policy-map class configuration (config-pmap-c)

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(18)ZYA1

This command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

Use this command to copy packets to a predefined interface. The original packet goes to the predefined destination and the copied packet goes to the target interface. You can also configure the copy interface command with the log command but not with a drop or redirect interface command. This command cannot be configured with a service policy for a stack class. The packets can be copied only to the following interfaces:

Ethernet

Fast Ethernet

Gigabit Ethernet

Ten Gigabit Ethernet

Examples

In the following example, a traffic class called cmtest has been created and configured for use in a policy map called pmtest. The policy map (service policy) is attached to FastEthernet interface 4/18. All packets in the cmtest class are copied to FastEthernet interface 4/15.

Router(config)# policy-map type access-control pmtest
Router(config-pmap)# class cmtest
Router(config-pmap-c)# copy interface FastEthernet 4/15
Router(config-pmap-c)# log
Router(config-pmap-c)# exit
Router(config)# interface FastEthernet 4/18
Router(config-if)# service-policy input pmtest

Related Commands

Command
Description

log

Generates a log of messages in the policy-map class configuration mode or class-map configuration mode.

show class-map

Displays all class maps and their matching criteria.

show policy-map

Displays the configuration of all classes for a specified service policy map or all classes for all existing policy maps.

show policy-map interface

Displays the packet statistics of all classes that are configured for all service policies either on the specified interface or subinterface or on a specific PVC on the interface.


custom-queue-list


Note Effective with Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6 and Cisco IOS Release 15.1(3)T, the custom-queue-list command is hidden. Although this command is still available in Cisco IOS software, the CLI interactive Help does not display it if you attempt to view it by entering a question mark at the command line.

This command will be completely removed in a future release, which means that you will need to use the appropriate replacement command (or sequence of commands). For more information (including a list of replacement commands), see the Legacy QoS Command Deprecation feature document in the Cisco IOS XE Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide or the Legacy QoS Command Deprecation feature document in the Cisco IOS Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.



Note Effective with Cisco IOS XE Release 3.2S, the custom-queue-list command is replaced by a modular QoS CLI (MQC) command (or sequence of MQC commands). For the appropriate replacement command (or sequence of commands), see the Legacy QoS Command Deprecation feature document in the Cisco IOS XE Quality of Service Solutions Configuration Guide.


To assign a custom queue list to an interface, use the custom-queue-list command in interface configuration mode. To remove a specific list or all list assignments, use the no form of this command.

custom-queue-list [list-number]

no custom-queue-list [list-number]

Syntax Description

list-number

Any number from 1 to 16 for the custom queue list.


Command Default

No custom queue list is assigned.

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

10.0

This command was introduced.

12.2(33)SRA

This command was integrated into Cisco IOS Release 12.2(33)SRA.

12.2SX

This command is supported in the Cisco IOS Release 12.2SX train. Support in a specific 12.2SX release of this train depends on your feature set, platform, and platform hardware.

Cisco IOS XE Release 2.6

This command was modified. This command was hidden.

15.1(3)T

This command was modified. This command was hidden.

Cisco IOS XE Release 3.2S

This command was replaced by an MQC command (or sequence of MQC commands).


Usage Guidelines

Only one queue list can be assigned per interface. Use this command in place of the priority-list interface command (not in addition to it). Custom queueing allows a fairness not provided with priority queueing. With custom queueing, you can control the bandwidth available on the interface when the interface is unable to accommodate the aggregate traffic enqueued. Associated with each output queue is a configurable byte count, which specifies how many bytes of data should be delivered from the current queue by the system before the system moves on to the next queue. When a particular queue is being processed, packets are sent until the number of bytes sent exceeds the queue byte count or until the queue is empty.

Use the show queueing custom and show interfaces commands to display the current status of the custom output queues.

Examples

In the following example, custom queue list number 3 is assigned to serial interface 0:

interface serial 0
 custom-queue-list 3

Related Commands

Command
Description

priority-list interface

Establishes queueing priorities on packets entering from a given interface.

queue-list default

Assigns a priority queue for those packets that do not match any other rule in the queue list.

queue-list interface

Establishes queueing priorities on packets entering on an interface.

queue-list queue byte-count

Specifies how many bytes the system allows to be delivered from a given queue during a particular cycle.

queue-list queue limit

Designates the queue length limit for a queue.

show interfaces

Displays statistics for all interfaces configured on the router or access server.

show queue

Displays the contents of packets inside a queue for a particular interface or VC.

show queueing

Lists all or selected configured queueing strategies.