Intelligent Services Gateway Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS XE Release 3S
Configuring ISG Access for PPP Sessions
Downloads: This chapterpdf (PDF - 1.34MB) The complete bookPDF (PDF - 5.67MB) | The complete bookePub (ePub - 1.6MB) | Feedback

Configuring ISG Access for PPP Sessions

Contents

Configuring ISG Access for PPP Sessions

Intelligent Services Gateway (ISG) is a Cisco IOS XE software feature set that provides a structured framework in which edge devices can deliver flexible and scalable services to subscribers. This document provides information about how to configure ISG access for Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) subscribers.

Finding Feature Information

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Prerequisites for ISG Access for PPP Sessions

The specific access protocol that is being used must be provisioned on the interface.

If local PPP authentication is required, the ppp authentication command must be configured on the interface or virtual template.

The tasks and examples in this document assume that you know how to configure and use ISG control policies. See the module “Configuring ISG Control Policies” for information about how to configure control policies.

Restrictions for ISG Access for PPP Sessions

The idle timeout value configured with the ppp timeout idle command in a virtual template applies to a PPP session even when the session is forwarded.

Information About ISG Access for PPP Sessions

Overview of ISG Access for PPP Sessions

Layer 2 sessions are established by means of control protocols that operate between the peer entities and the ISG device. Typically, Layer 2 sessions are encapsulated to isolate them from other sessions on the same physical media.

Although the system provides default handling for Layer 2 sessions, you may want to configure policies to forward or locally terminate the protocol or to locally authenticate subscribers on the basis of identity data that is collected from the access protocol. ISG control policies can be configured to extract identity and credentials of peer entities from access protocols. This mechanism allows services to be provisioned for Layer 2 sessions on the basis of any identity pertaining to the session, whether explicitly provided via the protocol or native to the underlying media or access port.

ISG supports the following Layer 2 access protocols:

  • PPP
  • PPP over Ethernet (PPPoE)
  • Layer 2 Tunnel Protocol (L2TP)

ISG Subscriber IP Address Management for PPP Sessions

ISG subscriber IP address management applies to IP sessions or Layer 2 (PPP) sessions that are terminated locally.

For a subscriber to be routable within a given IP service domain, the subscriber must present a domain-specific IP address to the network. If a subscriber transfers between IP service domains (which includes any private domain managed by the access provider), the IP address presented to the network must change to reflect the new domain. For locally terminated PPP sessions, ISG supports the following methods of IP address assignment:

  • IP address in a user profile
  • IP subnet in a user profile
  • Named address pool in a user profile
  • Local address pools
  • Standard methods of IP address management for PPP

When a locally terminated PPP session is transferred from one virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instance to another VRF, the peer IP address is renegotiated using IPCP.

VRF Transfer for PPP Sessions

VRF transfer enables an ISG subscriber session to move from one VRF to another following selection of a new primary service. Once a PPP session comes up with the IP address from the network access point (NAP), the subscriber can access a web portal and choose a service provider. On VRF transfers in PPP sessions, ISG must reassign the IP address from the new domain to the PPP session. In PPP sessions, the IP address is reassigned by IP Control Protocol (IPCP) renegotiation.

Without PPP renegotiation, VRF transfer is not supported for PPP sessions.

Default Policy for ISG Access for PPP Sessions

ISG provides default handling of Layer 2 sessions in the absence of a configured control policy. If the vpdn enable command is configured and a domain name is specified in the username (for example, user@domain) or a Dialed Number Identification Service (DNIS) number has been provided, the system will perform authorization on the basis of this information. If virtual private dialup network (VPDN) tunnel information is found, the session will be forwarded for handling at an L2TP network server (LNS). If authentication is required by the remote LNS, the ppp authentication command must be configured at the PPP interface or virtual template. If the vpdn authen-before-forward command is configured, the system will attempt to authenticate the PPP session locally before forwarding it on to the LNS.

If tunnel information is not found for the domain name or DNIS or the vpdn enable command is not configured, Stack Group Bidding Protocol (SGBP) authorization will be attempted (if SGBP is configured). If no authorization information is located using SGBP, the PPP session will be terminated locally. Local termination means that the PPP session will be established between the peer and the ISG device, and the IP payload will be routed. In the latter case, authentication will occur only if the ppp authentication command is configured on the PPP interface or virtual template.

If an ISG control policy is defined for the session-start event, that policy will override the default handling.

How to Configure ISG Access for PPP Sessions Using Control Policies

To configure ISG Layer 2 access, perform the following steps:

  1. Decide how you want Layer 2 session handling to be influenced by subscriber identity. Do you want to forward the protocol or terminate it locally? Do you want to authenticate subscribers locally?
  2. Configure control policies to provide Layer 2 session handling. See the module "Configuring ISG Control Policies" for information about how to configure control policies. See the "Configuration Examples for ISG Access for PPP Sessions" section for an example of a control policy for Layer 2 access.
  3. Enable ISG VRF transfer for PPP sessions.
  4. Verify and troubleshoot the configuration as needed.

This section contains the following tasks:

Enabling ISG VRF Transfer for PPP Sessions

VRF transfer enables an ISG subscriber session to move from one VRF to another when a new primary service is activated for a session. Services can be configured in service profiles on an external authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) server or they can be configured on the ISG device in service policy maps. Perform this task to configure a VRF in a service policy map on the ISG device.

Before You Begin

This procedure assumes that you have configured support for PPP sessions by configuring a virtual template and method of IP address allocation. Note that the original VRF, loopback interface, and IP address pool must be specified in a virtual template rather than in a user profile in order for VRF transfer to work. For information about how to configure virtual templates and support for PPP sessions, see the Cisco IOS XEDial Technologies Configuration Guide.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    enable

    2.    configure terminal

    3.    policy-map type service policy-map-name

    4.    ip vrf forwarding name-of-vrf

    5.    sg-service-type primary

    6.    sg-service-group service-group-name


DETAILED STEPS
     Command or ActionPurpose
    Step 1 enable


    Example:
    Router> enable
     

    Enables privileged EXEC mode.

    • Enter your password if prompted.
     
    Step 2 configure terminal


    Example:
    Router# configure terminal
     

    Enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 3 policy-map type service policy-map-name


    Example:
    Router(config)# policy-map type service service1
     

    Creates or modifies a service policy map, which is used to define an ISG service, and enters service policy-map configuration mode.

     
    Step 4 ip vrf forwarding name-of-vrf


    Example:
    Router(config-service-policymap)# ip vrf forwarding blue
     

    Associates the service with a VRF.

     
    Step 5 sg-service-type primary


    Example:
    Router(config-service-policymap)# sg-service-type primary
     

    Defines the service as a primary service.

    • A primary service is a service that contains a network-forwarding policy. A primary service must be defined as a primary service by using the sg-service-type primary command. Any service that is not a primary service is defined as a secondary service by default.
     
    Step 6 sg-service-group service-group-name


    Example:
    Router(config-service-policymap)# sg-service-group group1
     

    (Optional) Associates an ISG service with a service group.

    • A service group is a grouping of services that may be active simultaneously for a given session. Typically, a service group includes one primary service and one or more secondary services.
     

    Verifying VRF Transfer for PPP Sessions

    Perform this task to verify VRF transfer for PPP sessions. All of the show steps are optional and may be performed in any order.

    SUMMARY STEPS

      1.    enable

      2.    show subscriber session all

      3.    show idmgr {memory [detailed [component [substring]]] | service key session-handle session-handle-string service-key key-value | session key {aaa-unique-id aaa-unique-id-string | domainip-vrf ip-address ip-address vrf-id vrf-id| nativeip-vrf ip-address ip-address vrf-id vrf-id | portbundle ip ip-address bundle bundle-number | session-guid session-guid | session-handle session-handle-string | session-id session-id-string} | statistics}

      4.    show ip route [vrf vrf-name]


    DETAILED STEPS
       Command or ActionPurpose
      Step 1 enable


      Example:
      Router> enable
       

      Enables privileged EXEC mode.

      • Enter your password if prompted.
       
      Step 2 show subscriber session all


      Example:
      Router# show subscriber session all
       

      Displays information pertaining to the service chosen by the subscriber.

       
      Step 3 show idmgr {memory [detailed [component [substring]]] | service key session-handle session-handle-string service-key key-value | session key {aaa-unique-id aaa-unique-id-string | domainip-vrf ip-address ip-address vrf-id vrf-id| nativeip-vrf ip-address ip-address vrf-id vrf-id | portbundle ip ip-address bundle bundle-number | session-guid session-guid | session-handle session-handle-string | session-id session-id-string} | statistics}


      Example:
      Router# show idmgr session key session-handle 48000002
       

      Displays information related to ISG session and service identity.

       
      Step 4 show ip route [vrf vrf-name]


      Example:
      Router# show ip route
       

      Displays the current state of the routing table.

       

      Troubleshooting ISG Access for PPP Sessions

      The commands in this task can be used to monitor and troubleshoot Layer 2 sessions. All of these commands are optional and do not need to be entered in a particular order.

      SUMMARY STEPS

        1.    enable

        2.    show subscriber session detailed

        3.    debug condition condition

        4.    debug subscriber packet [event| full| detail]

        5.    debug subscriber error

        6.    debug subscriber event

        7.    debug subscriber fsm

        8.    debug ppp {packet | negotiation | error | authentication | subscriber switch}


      DETAILED STEPS
         Command or ActionPurpose
        Step 1 enable


        Example:
        Router> enable
         

        Enables privileged EXEC mode.

        • Enter your password if prompted.
         
        Step 2 show subscriber session detailed


        Example:
        Router# show subscriber session detailed
         

        Displays information about ISG subscriber sessions.

         
        Step 3 debug condition condition


        Example:
        Router# debug condition username user5@isp.com
         

        Filters debug output on the basis of the specified condition.

        Note   

        See the module "Troubleshooting ISG with Session Monitoring and Distributed Conditional Debugging" for information about conditional debugging.

         
        Step 4 debug subscriber packet [event| full| detail]


        Example:
        Router# debug subscriber packet event
         

        Displays diagnostic information about packets during Subscriber Service Switch (SSS) call setup.

         
        Step 5 debug subscriber error


        Example:
        Router# debug subscriber error
         

        Displays diagnostic information about errors that can occur during SSS call setup.

         
        Step 6 debug subscriber event


        Example:
        Router# debug subscriber event
         

        Displays diagnostic information about SSS call setup events.

         
        Step 7 debug subscriber fsm


        Example:
        Router# debug subscriber fsm
         

        Displays diagnostic information about the SSS call setup state.

         
        Step 8 debug ppp {packet | negotiation | error | authentication | subscriber switch}


        Example:
        Router# debug ppp packet
         

        Displays information on traffic and exchanges in an internetwork that is implementing the PPP.

         

        Example

        In the following example, the output of the debug subscriber packet detail command is filtered on the basis of the username “cpe6_1@isp.com”:

        Router# debug condition username cpe6_1@isp.com
        Condition 1 set
        Router# show debug
         
        Condition 1: username cpe6_1@isp.com (0 flags triggered)
         
        Router# debug subscriber packet detail
        SSS packet detail debugging is on
        Router# show debug
        SSS:
          SSS packet detail debugging is on
         
        Condition 1: username cpe6_1@isp.com (0 flags triggered)
        

        Configuration Examples for ISG Access for PPP Sessions

        Configuring ISG Access for PPP Sessions Example

        The following example shows the configuration of an ISG policy that provides services to PPP subscribers. This example configures ISG to perform the following actions:

        • PPP local termination

        ISG will provide local termination by activating the service “ispa” for subscribers matching the domain “ispa”. The system will authenticate the subscriber using method-list “list1”. For local termination services, the global VRF is applied by default unless another VRF is specified in the service profile, on the interface, or in the virtual template.

        • PPP authentication before forwarding

        ISG will locally authenticate subscribers matching domain “ispb” before forwarding the sessions to an LNS. (Sessions are forwarded to an LNS because service policy map “ispb” specifies a VPDN group). The system will authenticate the subscribers using method-list “list2”.

        • PPP forwarding without local authentication

        ISG will forward sessions to an LNS without local authentication for subscribers matching domain “ispc”.

        • PPP domain exclusion

        ISG will deny service to and disconnect the session for subscribers matching domain “ispd”.

        • PPP domain-based service activation

        For subscribers matching all other domains, ISG will activate a service that has the same name as the specified domain.

        Configure control class maps, which define the conditions that must be met before a control policy rule will be executed.

        class-map type control match-all PPP_SESSION
          match protocol ppp
         
        class-map type control match-all NAS_PORT_CONDITION
          class type control match identifier name PPP_SESSION 
          less-than identifier nas-port type atm vpi 200 vci 100
        class-map type control match-all ISPA
          match unauthenticated-domain ispa
         
        class-map type control match-all ISPB
          match unauthenticated-domain ispb
         
        class-map type control match-all ISPC
          match unauthenticated-domain ispc
         
        class-map type control match-all ISPD
          match unauthenticated-domain ispd
         

        Define the top-level control policy map.

        policy-map type control L2_ACCESS
        

        Define a control policy rule that activates a forwarding service on the basis of the ATM VPI/VCI on which the call came in.

         class type control NAS_PORT_CONDITION event session-start
          1 service-policy type service xconnect
         

        Define a control policy rule that collects the domain name from the protocol. The domain name is available from a structured user name (e.g., user@domain).

         class type control PPP_SESSION event session-start
          1 collect identifier unauthenticated-domain
          2 service-policy type control DOMAIN_BASED_ACCESS
         

        Define the nested control policy.

        policy-map type control DOMAIN_BASED_ACCESS
         

        Define a control policy rule that provides local termination by activating the service “ispa”.

         class type control ISPA event session-start
          1 authenticate aaa list list1
          2 service-policy type service ispa
         

        Define a control policy rule that configures the system to authenticate the subscriber locally before activating service “ispb”. The service “ispb” specifies forwarding the session to an LNS.

         class type control ISPB event session-start
          1 authenticate aaa list list2
          2 service-policy type service ispb
         

        Define a control policy rule that activates service “ispc”, which specifies forwarding.

         class type control ISPC event session-start
          1 service-policy type service ispc
         

        Define a control policy rule that results in session disconnection for subscribers that match service “ispd”.

         class type control ISPD event session-start
          service disconnect
         

        Define a control policy rule that defines the default for all other domains, which is to activate a service having the same name as the specified domain.

         class type control always event session-start
            service-policy type service identifier unauthenticated-domain
        

        Configure the service policy maps.

        policy-map type service xconnect
          service vpdn group 1
         
        policy-map type service ispa
          service local
          ip vrf forwarding red
         
        policy-map type service ispb
          service vpdn group 2
         
        policy-map type service ispc
          service vpdn group 3
         

        Apply the control policy map globally.

        service-policy type control L2_ACCESS

        VRF Transfer for PPP Sessions Using IPCP Renegotiation Example

        The following example shows a configuration that uses PPPoE to establish a session, and the RADIUS service profile that is created to associate the VRF. In this example, when a PPP session initially comes up, it belongs to the default routing table, and the IP address is assigned from the default IP address pool “DEF-POOL”. When the subscriber selects the “ISP-RED” service, ISG downloads the “ISP-RED” service profile and applies it to the session. The PPP session is then transferred to VRF “RED”. IPCP renegotiation occurs between the client device and the ISG device, and the subscriber is assigned a new IP address from the pool “POOL-RED”.

        ip vrf RED
         rd 1:1
        interface Loopback0
         ip address 10.0.0.1 255.255.255.0
        interface Loopback1
         ip address 10.0.1.0 255.255.255.0
         ip vrf forwarding RED
        !
        interface Ethernet0/0
          pppoe enable
        interface Virtual-Template1
         ip unnumbered Loopback0
         service-policy control RULE2
         peer default ip address pool DEF-POOL
         ppp authentication chap 
        ip local pool DEF-POOL 172.16.5.1 172.16.5.250
        ip local pool POOL-RED 172.20.5.1 172.20.5.250
        

        Service Profile for ISP RED

        Cisco-AVpair = ip:vrf-id=RED
        Cisco-AVpair = "ip:ip-unnumbered=loopback 1"
        Cisco-AVpair = ip:addr-pool=POOL-RED
        Cisco-AVpair = subscriber:sg-service-type=primary
        Cisco-AVpair = subscriber:sg-service-group=RED-GROUP
        Cisco-SSG-Service-Info = IPPPOE-RED
        Cisco-SSG-Service-Info = R10.1.1.0;255.255.255.0
        Framed-Protocol = PPP
        Service-Type = Framed

        Additional References

        Related Documents

        Related Topic

        Document Title

        ISG commands

        Cisco IOS Intelligent Services Gateway Command Reference

        AAA configuration tasks

        The "Authentication" section in the Cisco IOS XE Security Configuration Guide

        AAA commands

        The "Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (AAA)" section in the Cisco IOS XE Security Command Reference

        PPP configuration tasks

        The “PPP Configuration�? section in the Cisco IOS XE Dial Services Configuration Guide

        PPP commands

        Cisco IOS XE Dial Services Command Reference

        Technical Assistance

        Description

        Link

        The Cisco Support website provides extensive online resources, including documentation and tools for troubleshooting and resolving technical issues with Cisco products and technologies.

        To receive security and technical information about your products, you can subscribe to various services, such as the Product Alert Tool (accessed from Field Notices), the Cisco Technical Services Newsletter, and Really Simple Syndication (RSS) Feeds.

        Access to most tools on the Cisco Support website requires a Cisco.com user ID and password.

        http:/​/​www.cisco.com/​public/​support/​tac/​home.shtml

        Feature Information for ISG Access for PPP Sessions

        The following table provides release information about the feature or features described in this module. This table lists only the software release that introduced support for a given feature in a given software release train. Unless noted otherwise, subsequent releases of that software release train also support that feature.

        Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to www.cisco.com/​go/​cfn. An account on Cisco.com is not required.

        Table 1 Feature Information for ISG Layer 2 Access

        Feature Name

        Releases

        Feature Configuration Information

        ISG:Session: Creation: P2P Session (PPPoE, PPPoXoX)

        Cisco IOS XE Release 2.2

        The ISG session is the primary context to which services and policies are associated across specific data flows. Point-to-point (P2P) sessions are established through a signaling protocol. ISG handles many variants of P2P encapsulation, such as PPP, PPPoE and PPPoA.