Carrier Ethernet Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS XE Release 3S (Cisco ASR 900 Series)
Configuring Ethernet Local Management Interface at a Provider Edge
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Configuring Ethernet Local Management Interface at a Provider Edge

Contents

Configuring Ethernet Local Management Interface at a Provider Edge

The advent of Ethernet as a metropolitan-area network (MAN) and WAN technology imposes a new set of Operation, Administration, and Management (OAM) requirements on Ethernet's traditional operations, which had centered on enterprise networks only. The expansion of Ethernet technology into the domain of service providers, where networks are substantially larger and more complex than enterprise networks and the user-base is wider, makes operational management of link uptime crucial. More importantly, the timeliness in isolating and responding to a failure becomes mandatory for normal day-to-day operations, and OAM translates directly to the competitiveness of the service provider.

The “Configuring Ethernet Local Management Interface at a Provide Edge” module provides general information about configuring an Ethernet Local Management Interface (LMI), an OAM protocol, on a provider edge (PE) device.

Prerequisites for Configuring Ethernet Local Management Interface at a Provider Edge

  • Ethernet Operation, Administration, and Management (OAM) must be operational in the network.
  • For Ethernet OAM to operate, the provider edge (PE) side of a connection must be running Ethernet Connectivity Fault Management (CFM) and Ethernet Local Management Interface (LMI).
  • All VLANs used on a PE device to connect to a customer edge (CE) device must also be created on that CE device.
  • To use nonstop forwarding (NSF) and In Service Software Upgrade (ISSU), stateful switchover (SSO) must be configured and working properly.

Restrictions for Configuring Ethernet Local Management Interface at a Provider Edge

  • Ethernet Local Management Interface (LMI) is not supported on routed ports, EtherChannel port channels, ports that belong to an EtherChannel, private VLAN ports, IEEE 802.1Q tunnel ports, Ethernet over Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) ports, or Ethernet Flow Points (EFPs) on trunk ports.
  • Ethernet LMI cannot be configured on VLAN interfaces.
  • The high availability (HA) features NSF/SSO--E-LMI Support and ISSU--E-LMI Support are not supported on a customer edge (CE) device.

Information About Configuring Ethernet Local Management Interface at a Provider Edge

Ethernet Virtual Circuits Overview

An Ethernet virtual circuit (EVC) as defined by the Metro Ethernet Forum is a port level point-to-point or multipoint-to-multipoint Layer 2 circuit. EVC status can be used by a customer edge (CE) device to find an alternative path in to the service provider network or in some cases to fall back to a backup path over Ethernet or another alternative service such as ATM.

Ethernet LMI Overview

Ethernet Local Management Interface (LMI) is an Ethernet Operation, Administration, and Management (OAM) protocol between a customer edge (CE) device and a provider edge (PE) device. Ethernet LMI provides CE devices with the status of Ethernet virtual circuits (EVCs) for large Ethernet metropolitan-area networks (MANs) and WANs and provides information that enables CE devices to autoconfigure. Specifically, Ethernet LMI runs on the PE-CE User-Network Interface (UNI) link and notifies a CE device of the operating state of an EVC and the time when an EVC is added or deleted. Ethernet LMI also communicates the attributes of an EVC.

Ethernet LMI interoperates with Ethernet Connectivity Fault Management (CFM), an OAM protocol that runs within the provider network to collect OAM status. Ethernet CFM runs at the provider maintenance level (user provider edge [UPE] to UPE at the UNI). Ethernet LMI relies on the OAM Ethernet Infrastructure (EI) to interwork with CFM to learn the end-to-end status of EVCs across CFM domains.

Ethernet LMI is disabled globally by default. When Ethernet LMI is enabled globally, all interfaces are automatically enabled. Ethernet LMI can also be enabled or disabled at the interface to override the global configuration. The last Ethernet LMI command issued is the command that has precedence. No EVCs, Ethernet service instances, or UNIs are defined, and the UNI bundling service is bundling with multiplexing.

Ethernet CFM Overview

Ethernet Connectivity Fault Management (CFM) is an end-to-end per-service-instance (per VLAN) Ethernet layer Operation, Administration, and Management (OAM) protocol that includes proactive connectivity monitoring, fault verification, and fault isolation. End-to-end CFM can be from provider edge (PE) device to PE device or from customer edge (CE) device to CE device. For more information about Ethernet CFM, see “Configuring Ethernet Connectivity Fault Management in a Service Provider Network” in the Carrier Ethernet Configuration Guide.

OAM Manager Overview

The OAM manager is an infrastructure element that streamlines interaction between Operation, Administration, and Management (OAM) protocols. The OAM manager requires two interworking OAM protocols, Ethernet Connectivity Fault Management (CFM) and Ethernet Local Management Interface (LMI). No interactions are required between Ethernet LMI and the OAM manager on the customer edge (CE) side. On the User Provider-Edge (UPE) side, the OAM manager defines an abstraction layer that relays data collected from Ethernet CFM to the Ethernet LMI device.

Ethernet LMI and the OAM manager interaction is unidirectional, from the OAM manager to Ethernet LMI on the UPE side of the device. An information exchange results from an Ethernet LMI request or is triggered by the OAM manager when it receives notification from the OAM protocol that the number of UNIs has changed. A change in the number of UNIs may cause a change in Ethernet virtual circuit (EVC) status.

The OAM manager calculates EVC status given the number of active user network interfaces (UNIs) and the total number of associated UNIs. You must configure CFM to notify the OAM manager of all changes to the number of active UNIs or to the remote UNI ID for a given service provider VLAN (S-VLAN) domain.

The information exchanged is as follows:

  • EVC name and availability status (active, inactive, partially active, or not defined)
  • Remote UNI name and status (up, disconnected, administratively down, excessive frame check sequence [FCS] failures, or not reachable)
  • Remote UNI counts (the total number of expected UNIs and the number of active UNIs)

Benefits of Ethernet LMI at a Provider Edge

  • Communication of end-to-end status of the Ethernet virtual circuit (EVC) to the customer edge (CE) device
  • Communication of EVC and user network interface (UNI) attributes to a CE device
  • Competitive advantage for service providers

HA Features Supported by Ethernet LMI

In access and service provider networks using Ethernet technology, high availability (HA) is a requirement, especially on Ethernet operations, administration, and management (OAM) components that manage Ethernet virtual circuit (EVC) connectivity. End-to-end connectivity status information is critical and must be maintained on a hot standby Route Processor (RP) (a standby RP that has the same software image as the active RP and supports synchronization of line card, protocol, and application state information between RPs for supported features and protocols).

End-to-end connectivity status is maintained on the customer edge (CE), provider edge (PE), and access aggregation PE (uPE) network nodes based on information received by protocols such as Ethernet Local Management Interface (LMI), Connectivity Fault Managment (CFM), and 802.3ah. This status information is used to either stop traffic or switch to backup paths when an EVC is down.

Metro Ethernet clients (E-LMI, CFM, 802.3ah) maintain configuration data and dynamic data, which is learned through protocols. Every transaction involves either accessing or updating data in the various databases. If the database is synchronized across active and standby modules, the modules are transparent to clients.

The Cisco infrastructure provides component application programming interfaces (APIs) that are helpful in maintaining a hot standby RP. Metro Ethernet HA clients (E-LMI, HA/ISSU, CFM HA/ISSU, 802.3ah HA/ISSU) interact with these components, update the database, and trigger necessary events to other components.

Benefits of Ethernet LMI HA

  • Elimination of network downtime for Cisco software image upgrades, resulting in higher availability.
  • Elimination of resource scheduling challenges associated with planned outages and late night maintenance windows
  • Accelerated deployment of new services and applications and faster implementation of new features, hardware, and fixes due to the elimination of network downtime during upgrades
  • Reduced operating costs due to outages while the system delivers higher service levels due to the elimination of network downtime during upgrades

NSF SSO Support in Ethernet LMI

The redundancy configurations stateful switchover (SSO) and nonstop forwarding (NSF) are supported in Ethernet Local Management Interface (LMI) and are automatically enabled. A switchover from an active to a standby Route Processor (RP) or a standby Route Switch Processor (RSP) occurs when the active RP or RSP fails, is removed from the networking device, or is manually taken down for maintenance. The primary function of Cisco NSF is to continue forwarding IP packets following an RP or RSP switchover. NSF also interoperates with the SSO feature to minimize network downtime following a switchover.

For detailed information about the SSO and NSF features, see the High Availability Configuration Guide.

ISSU Support in Ethernet LMI

In Service Software Upgrade (ISSU) allows you to perform a Cisco software upgrade or downgrade without disrupting packet flow. Ethernet Local Management Interface (LMI) performs updates of the parameters within the Ethernet LMI database to the standby route processor (RP) or standby route switch processor (RSP). This checkpoint data requires ISSU capability to transform messages from one release to another. All the components that perform active processor to standby processor updates using messages require ISSU support. ISSU is automatically enabled in Ethernet LMI.

ISSU lowers the impact that planned maintenance activities have on network availability by allowing software changes while the system is in service. For detailed information about ISSU, see the High Availability Configuration Guide.

How to Configure Ethernet Local Management Interface at a Provider Edge

Configuring Ethernet LMI Interaction with CFM

For Ethernet Local Management Interface (LMI) to function with Connectivity Fault Management (CFM), you must configure Ethernet virtual circuits (EVCs), Ethernet service instances including untagged Ethernet flow points (EFPs), and Ethernet LMI customer VLAN mapping. Most of the configuration occurs on the provider edge (PE) device on the interfaces connected to the customer edge (CE) device. On the CE device, you need only enable Ethernet LMI on the connecting interface. Also, you must configure operations, administration, and management (OAM) parameters; for example, EVC definitions on PE devices on both sides of a metro network.

CFM and OAM interworking requires an inward facing Maintenance Entity Group End Point (MEP).

Configuring the OAM Manager


Note


If you configure, change, or remove a user network interface (UNI) service type, Ethernet virtual circuit (EVC), Ethernet service instance, or customer edge (CE)-VLAN configuration, all configurations are checked to ensure that the configurations match (UNI service type with EVC or Ethernet service instance and CE-VLAN configuration). The configuration is rejected if the configurations do not match.


Perform this task to configure the OAM manager on a provider edge (PE) device.
SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    enable

    2.    configure terminal

    3.    ethernet cfm domain domain-name level level-id

    4.    service csi-id evc evc-name vlan vlan-id

    5.    continuity-check

    6.    continuity-check interval time

    7.    exit

    8.    exit

    9.    ethernet evc evc-id

    10.    oam protocol {cfm domain domain-name | ldp}

    11.    uni count value [multipoint]

    12.    exit

    13.    Repeat Steps 3 through 12 to define other CFM domains that you want OAM manager to monitor.

    14.    interface type number

    15.    service instance id ethernet [evc-id]

    16.    ethernet lmi ce-vlan map {vlan-id [untagged] | any | default | untagged}

    17.    ethernet lmi interface

    18.    encapsulation dot1q vlan-id

    19.    bridge-domain domain-number

    20.    cfm mep domain domain-name mpid mpid-id

    21.    exit

    22.    service instance service-instance-id ethernet

    23.    encapsulation untagged

    24.    l2protocol peer

    25.    bridge-domain bridge-domain-number

    26.    exit

    27.    ethernet uni [bundle [all-to-one] | id uni-id | multiplex]

    28.    end


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 enable


Example:
Device> enable
 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2 configure terminal


Example:
Device# configure terminal
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3 ethernet cfm domain domain-name level level-id


Example:
Device(config)# ethernet cfm domain cstmr1 level 3
 

Defines a Connectivity Fault Management (CFM) domain, sets the domain leve,l and enters Ethernet CFM configuration mode.

 
Step 4 service csi-id evc evc-name vlan vlan-id


Example:
Device(config-ecfm)# service csi2 evc evc_1 vlan 10
 

Defines a universally unique customer service instance (CSI) and VLAN ID within the maintenance domain, and enters Ethernet CFM service configuration mode.

 
Step 5continuity-check


Example:
Device(config-ecfm-srv)# continuity-check
 

Enables the transmission of continuity check messages (CCMs).

 
Step 6continuity-check interval time


Example:
Device(config-ecfm-srv)# continuity-check interval 1s/10s/1m/10m
 

Enables the transmission of continuity check messages (CCMs) at specific intervals.

 
Step 7 exit


Example:
Device(config-ecfm-srv)# exit
 

Returns to Ethernet CFM configuration mode.

 
Step 8 exit


Example:
Device(config-ecfm)# exit
 

Returns to global configuration mode.

 
Step 9 ethernet evc evc-id


Example:
Device(config)# ethernet evc 50
 

Defines an EVC and enters EVC configuration mode.

 
Step 10 oam protocol {cfm domain domain-name | ldp}


Example:
Device(config-evc)# oam protocol cfm domain cstmr1
 

Configures the Ethernet virtual circuit (EVC) operations, administration, and management (OAM) protocol as CFM for the CFM domain maintenance level as configured in Steps 3 and 4.

Note   

If the CFM domain does not exist, this command is rejected, and an error message is displayed.

 
Step 11 uni count value [multipoint]


Example:
Device(config-evc)# uni count 3
 

(Optional) Sets the User Network Interface (UNI) count for the EVC.

  • If this command is not issued, the service defaults to a point-to-point service. If a value of 2 is entered, point-to-multipoint service becomes an option. If a value of 3 or greater is entered, the service is point-to-multipoint.
Note   

If you enter a number greater than the number of endpoints, the UNI status is partially active even if all endpoints are up. If you enter a UNI count less than the number of endpoints, status might be active, even if all endpoints are not up.

 
Step 12 exit


Example:
Device(config-evc)# exit
 

Returns to global configuration mode.

 
Step 13 Repeat Steps 3 through 12 to define other CFM domains that you want OAM manager to monitor.

Example:
 
 
Step 14 interface type number


Example:
Device(config)# interface gigabitethernet 1/3/1
 

Specifies a physical interface connected to the CE device and enters interface configuration mode.

 
Step 15 service instance id ethernet [evc-id]


Example:
Device(config-if)# service instance 400 ethernet 50
 

Configures an Ethernet service instance on the interface and enters Ethernet service configuration mode.

  • The Ethernet service instance identifier is a per-interface service identifier and does not map to a VLAN.
 
Step 16 ethernet lmi ce-vlan map {vlan-id [untagged] | any | default | untagged}


Example:
Device(config-if-srv)# ethernet lmi ce-vlan map 30
 

Configures an Ethernet LMI customer VLAN-to-EVC map for a particular UNI.

Note   

To specify both VLAN IDs and untagged VLANs in the map, specify the VLAN IDs first and then specify the untagged keyword as follows: ethernet lmi ce-vlan map 100,200,300,untagged. Also, if the untagged keyword is not specified in the map configuration, the main interface line protocol on the Customer Edge (CE) device will be down.

 
Step 17 ethernet lmi interface


Example:
Device(config-if-srv)# ethernet lmi interface
 

Enables Ethernet local management interface (LMI) on a UNI.

 
Step 18 encapsulation dot1q vlan-id


Example:
Device(config-if-srv)# encapsulation dot1q 2
 

Defines the matching criteria to map 802.1Q frames ingress on an interface to the appropriate service instance.

 
Step 19 bridge-domain domain-number


Example:
Device(config-if-srv)# brdige-domain 1
 

Binds a service instance to a bridge domain instance.

 
Step 20 cfm mep domain domain-name mpid mpid-id


Example:
Device(config-if-srv)# cfm mep domain provider mpid 10
 

Configures a maintenance endpoint (MEP) for a domain.

 
Step 21 exit


Example:
Device(config-if-srv)# exit
 

Returns to interface configuration mode.

 
Step 22 service instance service-instance-id ethernet


Example:
Device(config-if)# service instance 22 ethernet
 

Configures an Ethernet service instance on an interface and enters Ethernet service configuration mode.

 
Step 23 encapsulation untagged


Example:
Device(config-if-srv)# encapsulation untagged
 

Defines the matching criteria to map untagged ingress Ethernet frames on an interface to the appropriate service instance.

 
Step 24 l2protocol peer


Example:
Device(config-if-srv)# l2protocol peer
 

Configures transparent Layer 2 protocol peering on the interface.

 
Step 25 bridge-domain bridge-domain-number


Example:
Device(config-if-srv)# bridge-domain 1
 

Binds a service instance to a bridge domain instance.

 
Step 26 exit


Example:
Device(config-if)# exit
 

Returns to interface configuration mode.

 
Step 27 ethernet uni [bundle [all-to-one] | id uni-id | multiplex]


Example:
Device(config-if)# ethernet uni bundle
 

Sets UNI bundling attributes.

 
Step 28 end


Example:
Device(config-if)# end
 

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Enabling Ethernet LMI

The order in which the global and interface configuration commands are issued determines the configuration. The last command that is issued has precedence.

Perform this task to enable Ethernet Local Management Interface (LMI) on a device or on an interface.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    enable

    2.    configure terminal

    3.    interface type number

    4.    ethernet lmi interface

    5.    ethernet lmi {n393 value | t392 value}

    6.    end


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 enable


Example:
Device> enable
 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2 configure terminal


Example:
Device# configure terminal
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 3 interface type number


Example:
Device(config)# interface ethernet 1/3
 

Defines an interface to configure as an Ethernet LMI interface and enters interface configuration mode.

 
Step 4 ethernet lmi interface


Example:
Device(config-if)# ethernet lmi interface
 

Configures Ethernet LMI on the interface.

  • When Ethernet LMI is enabled globally, it is enabled on all interfaces unless you disable it on specific interfaces. If Ethernet LMI is disabled globally, you can use this command to enable it on specified interfaces.
 
Step 5 ethernet lmi {n393 value | t392 value}


Example:
Device(config-if)# ethernet lmi n393 10
 

Configures Ethernet LMI parameters for the UNI.

 
Step 6 end


Example:
Device(config-if)# end
 

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

 

Displaying Ethernet LMI and OAM Manager Information

Perform this task to display Ethernet Local Management Interface (LMI) or Operation, Administration, and Management (OAM) manager information. After step 1, all the steps are optional and can be performed in any order.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    enable

    2.    show ethernet lmi {{evc [detail evc-id [interface type number] | map interface type number]} | {parameters | statistics} interface type number | uni map [interface type number]}

    3.    show ethernet service evc [detail | id evc-id [detail] | interface type number [detail]]

    4.    show ethernet service instance [detail | id id | interface type number | policy-map | stats]

    5.    show ethernet service interface [type number] [detail]


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 enable


Example:
Device> enable
 

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

  • Enter your password if prompted.
 
Step 2 show ethernet lmi {{evc [detail evc-id [interface type number] | map interface type number]} | {parameters | statistics} interface type number | uni map [interface type number]}


Example:
Device# show ethernet lmi evc
 

Displays information that was sent to the customer edge (CE).

 
Step 3 show ethernet service evc [detail | id evc-id [detail] | interface type number [detail]]


Example:
Device# show ethernet service evc
 

Displays information about all Ethernet virtual circuits (EVCs) or about a specified EVC.

 
Step 4 show ethernet service instance [detail | id id | interface type number | policy-map | stats]


Example:
Device# show ethernet service instance detail
 

Displays information about customer service instances.

 
Step 5 show ethernet service interface [type number] [detail]


Example:
Device# show ethernet service interface ethernet 1/3 detail
 

Displays interface-only information about Ethernet customer service instances for all interfaces or for a specified interface.

 

Examples

The following example shows sample output from the show ethernet lmi command using the evc keyword:

Device# show ethernet lmi evc

St  EVC Id                                                       Port          
--- ------------------------------------------------------------ --------------
A  EVC_MP2MP_101                                                Gi0/1         
A  EVC_P2P_110                                                  Gi0/1 

The following example is sample output from the show ethernet service evc command:

Device# show ethernet service evc

Identifier                     Type  Act-UNI-cnt Status
50                             MP-MP     0       NotDefined

The following is sample output from the show ethernet service interface command using the detail keyword:

Device# show ethernet service interface gigabitethernet 1/3/1 detail

Interface: Gigabitethernet 1/3/1
ID: uni2 
CE-VLANS: 30
EVC Map Type: Bundling
Associated EVCs:
    EVC-ID                         CE-VLAN
    50                             30 
Associated Service Instances:
    Service-Instance-ID CE-VLAN
    400                 30 

The following is sample output from the show ethernet service instance command using the detail keyword:

Device# show ethernet service instance detail
 
Service Instance ID: 400
Associated Interface: GigabitEthernet1/3/1
Associated EVC: 50
CE-Vlans: 30 
State: AdminDown
EFP Statistics:
   Pkts In   Bytes In   Pkts Out  Bytes Out
         0          0          0          0

Configuration Examples for Ethernet Local Management Interface at a Provider Edge

Example: Ethernet OAM Manager on a PE Device Configuration

This example shows a sample configuration of Operation, Administration, and Management (OAM) manager, Connectivity Fault Management (CFM), and Ethernet Local Management Interface (LMI) on a provider edge (PE) device. In this example, a bridge domain is specified.

Device> enable
Device# configure terminal
Device(config)# ethernet cfm global
Device(config)# ethernet cfm domain provider level 4
Device(config-ecfm)# service customer_1 evc test1 vlan 10
Device(config-ecfm-srv)# continuity-check
Device(config-ecfm-srv)# continuity-check interval 1s/10s/1m/10m
Device(config-ecfm-srv)# exit
Device(config-ecfm)# exit
Device(config)# ethernet evc test1
Device(config-evc)# uni count 3
Device(config-evc)# oam protocol cfm domain provider
Device(config-evc)# exit
Device(config)#  interface gigabitEthernet 0/5/1
Device(config-if)# ethernet lmi interface
Device(config-if)# ethernet uni id CISCO
Device(config-if)# service instance 1 ethernet
Device(config-if-srv)# encapsulation untagged
Device(config-if-srv)# l2protocol peer
Device(config-if-srv)# bridge-domain 1
Device(config-if-srv)# exit
Device(config-if)# service instance 2 ethernet1
Device(config-if-srv)# ethernet lmi ce-vlan map 101
Device(config-if-srv)# encapsulation dot1q 2
Device(config-if-srv)# bridge-domain 2
Device(config-if-srv)# cfm mep domain provider mpid 10
Device(config-if-srv-ecfm-mep)# end


This example shows a configuration of OAM manager, CFM, and Ethernet LMI over an Xconnect configuration:

Device> enable
Device# configure terminal
Device(config)# ethernet cfm global
Device(config)# ethernet cfm domain provider level 4
Device(config-ecfm)# service customer_1 evc test1 
Device(config-ecfm-srv)# continuity-check
Device(config-ecfm-srv)# continuity-check interval 1s,10s,1m,10m
Device(config-ecfm-srv)# exit
Device(config-ecfm)# exit
Device(config)# ethernet evc test1
Device(config-evc)# oam protocol cfm domain provider
Device(config-evc)# exit
Device(config)#  interface gigabitEthernet 0/5/1
Device(config-if)# ethernet lmi interface
Device(config-if)# ethernet uni id CISCO
Device(config-if)# service instance 1 ethernet
Device(config-if-srv)# encapsulation untagged
Device(config-if-srv)# l2protocol peer
Device(config-if-srv)# bridge-domain 1
Device(config-if-srv)# exit
Device(config-if)# service instance 2 ethernet
Device(config-if-srv)# ethernet lmi ce-vlan map 101
Device(config-if-srv)# encapsulation dot1q 2
Device(config-if-srv)# xconnect 10.1.1.1 100 encapsulation mpls
Device(cfg-if-ether-vc-xconn)# exit
Device(config-if-srv)# cfm mep domain provider mpid 10
Device(config-if-srv-ecfm-mep)# end

Example: Ethernet LMI on a CE Device Configuration

This example shows how to configure Ethernet Local Management Interface (LMI) globally on a customer edge (CE) device:

Device# configure terminal
Device(config)# ethernet lmi global
Device(config)# ethernet lmi ce
Device(config)# exit