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Troubleshooting SNA Switching Services: A Guide To Problem Resolution

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SNASw TROUBLESHOOTING OVERVIEW

SNA Switching Services (SNASw), like many network technologies that perform a protocol integration function, has characteristics that can make problem resolution difficult. Because the product operates both in an SNA environment as well as an IP environment, it is sometimes necessary to gather information from several sources to debug a particular problem. There are a number of good tools available to help diagnose and resolve any problem you might encounter. However, it is important to understand the specific nature and scope of the problem so that you can determine where to do your analysis.
This guide is designed to provide a strategy for dealing with problems related to SNASw, to explain the tools available to help diagnose problems, and to provide specific actions to take for various types of problems you may encounter. It is in no way meant to replace the IOS Command Reference and Configuration Guides, which should be used to find out more about the snasw commands referenced in this document.

OVERVIEW OF SNASw ENVIRONMENT

SNASw is the Cisco® recommended solution for supporting SNA-related devices and traffic in an IP-based network. SNASw is available as a component of the Cisco IOS® Software and is supported on a wide variety of router platforms.
SNASw implements an Advanced Peer-to-Peer Networking (APPN) branch network node (BrNN). As such, it appears as a network node (NN) to the downstream devices that connect through the node and as an end node (EN) to other upstream APPN nodes. SNASw also supports the Enterprise Extender (EE) transport option that transmits SNA traffic natively using IP/User Datagram Protocol (UDP). With EE, flow control and Layer 4 connection functions are handled by a protocol known as High Performance Routing (HPR)/IP.
The very nature of the software and its ability to support both SNA and IP transport protocols facilitates network designs that adhere to one of two main topologies: SNASw remote (see Figure 1) and SNASw with Data-Link Switching Plus (DLSw+) (see Figure 2).

Figure 1 Figure 2

SNASw Remote SNASw with DLSw+

There are various connection segments within the network, and this is where problems are likely to be seen and where diagnosis takes place. The type of problem dictates the information that needs to be gathered and from which points in the network information should be obtained. For example, Figure 1 shows a network with HPR/IP as the upstream connection from SNASw. In connection segment 1, a downstream physical unit (PU type 2 or 2.1) connects to an interface on the router using Logical Link Control, Type 2 (LLC2) or Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC) protocol. Figure 2 shows a network that uses DLSw+ to transport SNA traffic over an IP network. SNASw is used at the data center to provide enhanced redundancy to the mainframe Parallel Sysplex environment. In connection segment 3, the upstream connection from SNASw can be HPR/IP or SNA HPR using LLC2. In connection segment 2, DLSw+ peering connects data center and branch routers. As before, downstream devices connect using LLC2 or SDLC in connection segment 1.
A number of general actions take place in the network to provide data transport services for downstream devices. Figure 3 depicts a typical network with SNASw deployed at the branch using Enterprise Extender (HPR/IP) as the transport protocol for SNA traffic. In this environment, several actions permit connectivity and subsequent data transfer to occur. First, it is common to define the primary NN server and backup NN server as upstream links from SNASw. One link must be in an Active state with a control point (CP)-to-CP session for subsequent connectivity to occur. If the links are not active, then follow the troubleshooting steps outlined in the section Uplink Fails to Connect. Downstream devices also connect to SNASw.

Figure 3

High-Level Data Flows for SNASw

For example, Figure 3 shows the high-level data flows that occur in SNASw as a series of steps. In step 1, a downstream PU 2 establishes an LLC2 connection by initiating a TEST request to a Media Access Control (MAC) address locally defined to SNASw, followed by an eXchange IDentifier (XID). In step 2, SNASw, acting as the Dependent Logical Unit Requestor (DLUR), establishes a DLUR/Dependent LU Server (DLUS) path with the DLUS. SNASw passes a REQACTPU (containing the XID from the downstream PU) over the DLUR/DLUS pipe and the downstream PU and LUs are then activated (System Services Control Point [SSCP]-to-PU/LU sessions via ACTPU/LU from the DLUS). An end user (LU) then requests a session with an application LU, named APPLA, which resides on the APPN EN host. In step 3, SNASw passes the INITSELF or USSLOGON to the DLUS over the DLUR/DLUS pipe. In step 4, the NN server informs the application of the session request and provides a route to the SNASw BrNN that handles the LU. Because a connection network has been defined, in step 5, the EN host is able to establish a direct link to the SNASw router over IP. The LU-to-LU session is then activated and data transfer begins.
This is a very simplistic description of the connectivity actions that are required to establish data transfer in this environment. When troubleshooting, try to determine the specific sequence and point in the flow where your problem occurs and then start your debug activities targeting that particular point.

TROUBLESHOOTING BASICS

Internetworking of IP and SNA can be complex and this particular environment imposes some difficulty because of the historical differences inherent in TCP/IP and SNA networks and the skills required in each area. When faced with a problem that requires detailed analysis, using a standard troubleshooting methodology reduces the time it takes to isolate and resolve the problem.

Troubleshooting Methodology Overview

It is important that you approach any internetworking problem using a problem-solving model. First, establish a clear understanding and definition of the problem. Next, gather all relevant information using the tools and techniques described in this document. After analyzing the information, create an action plan to address the likely cause of the problem. If the symptoms are not resolved, try another action plan or gather additional information that might lead to another conclusion.
The troubleshooting methodology adopted in this document follows these general steps:

Diagram the problem¾Begin with a detailed diagram of the network. Maintaining accurate diagrams of the physical and logical components and their relationships is important to ensure continued operation and availability. It helps to further illustrate the components involved in the data path specific to the problem at hand.

Isolate the problem¾Gather detailed information about the problem. This includes configurations, protocols, data paths, and historical performance data. Determine the starting point as well as fault isolation procedures.

Correct the problem¾Make appropriate hardware, software, or configuration changes to correct the problem.

Verify that the trouble is corrected¾Perform operational tests to verify that the trouble is corrected.

The troubleshooting steps presented in Troubleshooting SNASw Operational Problems and the example scenarios presented in the appendix, Diagnostic Output Examples, generally follow this methodology in listing typical symptoms and provide associated diagnostics measures.

Tools

SNASw was designed with support in mind. The product includes trace analysis and debugging tools to help you and Cisco diagnose any problem that might be encountered. These tools, in conjunction with various show snasw commands, enable problem diagnosis, isolation, and resolution of most problems. At times, additional trace and debug information, such as that available from IBM hosts or LAN analyzers, is required.

snasw pdlog

SNASw contains its own problem determination logging facility known as the pdlog. This is a cyclic buffer that provides detailed information on recent state transitions, traffic, and events for SNASw. The pdlog is always enabled (cannot be turned off), but the size of the buffer and the type of abbreviated pdlog messages written to the router log is controlled with the snasw pdlog command:
snasw pdlog [problem | exception | info] [buffer-size buffer-size-value] [file filename timestamp]
All detailed pdlog records (problem, exception, and informational) are written to the internal pdlog buffer whether snasw pdlog is configured or not. However, the pdlog configuration command determines which level of associated pdlog messages are written to the router log. If not configured, the default is exception, which means that only problem and exception pdlog messages will be seen in the router log.
The buffer-size keyword determines the size of the pdlog buffer (in processor memory). With IOS 12.1 and 12.2, the maximum buffer-size is 16,000 KB. With Cisco IOS Release 12.3 and above, the maximum buffer-size is 64,000 KB. If not coded, the default is a 500-KB buffer.
You can display information from the pdlog buffer at the router console using the show snasw pdlog command:
show snasw pdlog [brief | detail] [all] [last] [next] [filter filterstring] [id recordid]
You can also copy the entire pdlog file to a file server or flash using the snasw dump command (which is explained later in this document).

Note: The snasw pdlog is a very useful tool, and should be one of the first places you look when diagnosing a problem. The pdlog messages you see in the router log have an identifier that can be used to examine the detailed entry in the pdlog cyclic buffer. This detailed entry often contains resource names, session identifiers, sense codes, and so on that can lead you directly to the next step in resolving the problem.

snasw dlctrace

The snasw dlctrace command traces frames arriving and leaving the SNASw stack within IOS:
snasw dlctrace [buffer-size buffer-size-value] [file filename [timestamp]] [frame-size frame-size-value | auto-terse] [format [brief | detail | analyzer]] [nostart]
This trace facility is designed for use by network support personnel to troubleshoot connectivity problems. The trace can be stopped and started using the snasw stop|start dlctrace command.
The buffer-size keyword determines the size of the dlctrace buffer (in processor memory). With Cisco IOS Releases 12.1 and 12.2, the maximum buffer-size is 16,000 KB. With Cisco IOS Release 12.3 and above, the maximum buffer-size is 64,000 KB. The larger the buffer you configure, the better the chance that important trace records will not be lost. If not coded, the default is a 500-KB buffer.
Unless a problem requires you to see application data in the trace, it is recommended that you configure frame-size auto-terse. This trims all application data from the trace records, allowing more trace records to fit within the cyclic buffer. You can also filter which records are written to the buffer (thus allowing a longer duration of trace) by using the snasw dlcfilter configuration command.
You can use the show snasw dlctrace command to examine the dlctrace records (they are printed to the router log), but it is often easier to copy the dlctrace file to a file server (see the snasw dump command later in this document).

Note: The snasw dlctrace is a very powerful tool. Because it has very little overhead (between 2 and 8 percent), Cisco recommends that it be enabled when testing new implementations. Some customers also choose to leave it enabled in production to facilitate collecting documentation in the event that a problem is encountered.

snasw ipstrace

The snasw ipstrace command, or interprocess signal trace, is used for debugging internal SNASw software problems. It copies internal signal flows into a cyclic memory buffer, which can affect router performance by as much as 20 percent. Therefore, you should use this command only as directed by Cisco service personnel:
snasw ipstrace [buffer-size buffer-size-value] [file filename timestamp]
The impact on performance can be reduced by configuring the snasw ipsfilter command prior to enabling the snasw ipstrace command. This allows you to specify only those internal components identified by Cisco personnel as being related to the problem at hand.
The buffer-size keyword determines the size of the ipstrace buffer (in processor memory). With Cisco IOS Releases 12.1 and 12.2, the maximum buffer-size is 16,000 KB. With Cicsco IOS Release 12.3 and above, the maximum buffer-size is 64,000 KB. The larger the buffer you configure, the better the chance that important trace records will not be lost. If not coded, the default is a 500-KB buffer.
After the trace has been captured, it can be copied to a server using the snasw dump command covered in the next section of this document. This enables the Cisco engineer to perform additional processing of the data contained in the file. There is also a show snasw ipstrace command, but its use is not recommended except as advised by a Cisco engineer.

snasw summary-ipstrace

snasw summary-ipstrace [buffer-size buffer-size-value] [file filename timestamp]
There is an abbreviated version of the ipstrace called a summary-ipstrace. This trace is always enabled (cannot be turned off), but the size of the buffer and the file url are specified via the snasw summary-ipstrace command. Because of its limited information, the summary-ipstrace is rarely used.

snasw dump

snasw dump all | dlctrace | ipstrace | summary-ipstrace | pdlog
The snasw dump command copies the pdlog and dlc, ips, and summary-ips traces from their internal buffers to an external file server or to Flash memory. The command uses the file destinations previously specified using the file keyword on the related snasw dlctrace, snasw ipstrace, and snasw pdlog commands. For example, to copy the pdlog to a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server, you would use the following configuration:
snasw pdlog problem buffer-size 10000 file tftp://myhost/path/pdlogfilename
If no file was specified on the configuration and you issue snasw dump dlctrace or ipstrace or summary-ipstrace or pdlog, then you will be prompted for the file name. However, snasw dump all does not prompt for file names (they must have been previously configured for the command to succeed).
The files that are generated for the pdlog and dlctrace (in format detail) may be up to twice as large as the configured buffer-size. This is because the binary data in the buffer is converted to ascii text and then written to the file. In Cisco IOS Releases 12.1 and 12.2, buffer-size was limited to 16 MB to avoid the dumped ascii file size from exceeding the TFTP maximum size of 32 MB. Beginning with Cisco IOS Release 12.3, SNASw allows buffer-size to be specified to a maximum value of 64 MB. If TFTP is the transport protocol being used, SNASw copies the first 32 MB of ascii text to the configured file name and then copies subsequent 32-MB files with .01, .02, etc. appended to the name.
The files that are generated for the dlctrace (in format analyzer which is SnifferPro™-compatible) and ipstrace consist of binary data, so their size is the same or less than the configured buffer-size.

snasw msgdump

The snasw msgdump command can be used to enable automatic dumping of the dlctrace, ipstrace, and pdlog files (and optionally to execute a write core command) when a specified SNASw pdlog message is written to the router log:
snasw msgdump pdlog_message_id [writecore]
This can be very helpful to trigger trace information capture following a particular event, and is usually configured at the direction of Cisco support when trying to collect documentation for a service request. This is a one-time-only trigger-you must remove snasw msgdump from the configuration (using the no form of the command) and add it in again to re-enable the automatic dumping.
When using snasw msgdump, it is important that you correctly configure the file keyword on the respective snasw pdlog, snasw dlctrace, and snasw ipstrace commands, otherwise when the msgdump is triggered, the files will be lost. Also, you may find it helpful to configure the timestamp keyword, which appends the time the file was dumped to the end of the file name. This allows you to know when the file was written and to avoid the file copy from failing because of a duplicate file name.
An enhancement was made to the snasw msgdump processing in Cisco IOS Release 12.3 to add SNA alert support. In order to take advantage of this, SNASw must have an Alert focal point. Use the show snasw node command to see if there is a cpname in the Alert focal point field. If not, and if SNASw has an active Network Node Server (NNS), on the NetView host you can issue the command:
FOCALPT CHANGE,FPCAT=ALERT,TARGET=snasw-cpname | snasw-nns-cpname
When the SNASw router (or its NNS) is in NetView's alert sphere of control, then when a msgdump event is triggered, SNASw will send an MDS-MU alert. The alert will have an identifier of x'DAED5B0B', and will contain the pdlog entry which triggered the msgdump. This informs the network operator that a monitored event has occurred (so they know to retrieve the pdlog/trace files dumped by SNASw), and can trigger host automation to collect VTAM traces or take other appropriate action. This is especially useful when tracking down DLUR/DLUS-related issues.
If writecore is specified, a write core command is attempted whenever the msgdump condition is triggered (in addition to the dumping of the pdlog, dlc and ips traces). The write core command is issued using the existing configuration parameters: server host, transfer protocol, user name, and password. For the write core command to be successful, the exception dump statement must be configured to specify the destination server. Cisco also recommends that the compress option be used for the core file name in the exception core command to save space on the server.
exception dump <host name or address>
exception core-file <core file name> compress
If no exception protocol is configured, the write core operation would be attempted using tftp; the core file is written under the /tftpboot directory. If ftp is specified for exception, then the user name and password information must be configured:
ip ftp user <userid>
ip ftp password <password>
exception protocol ftp

Note: The user must be aware that the write core operation puts a load on the router and may momentarily cause some network disruption. Therefore, the writecore option should be used only at the explicit request from Cisco TAC.

snasw arbdata

The HPR protocol in SNASw utilizes the Adaptive Rate Based (ARB) algorithm to monitor the available bandwidth of the network and obtain the best throughput for HPR connections. When performance problems are detected with HPR connections, it is sometimes necessary to gather real-time values of ARB algorithm variables as the data flows through the HPR connection. This can be accomplished by issuing:
snasw start | stop arbdata local-tcid
Output from the start form of this command is written to the router log and can consist of many lines of text per second, so it is best to make sure that you have configured logging buffered and no logging console before issuing this command. You issue the stop form of the command to stop the messages from being written to the router log.

Note: Interpreting output from the snasw arbdata command requires a detailed understanding of the HPR Architecture and ARB algorithm. Also, this command can result in a high volume of messages being written to the router log. For these reasons, Cisco recommends this command only be used under the direction of Cisco service personnel.

snasw event

By default, only defined links and DLUS events are sent to the pdlog console. To get more information for debug purposes, use the snasw event global configuration command:
snasw event [cpcp] [dlc] [implicit-ls] [port]

SNASw Debug Commands

Output from Cisco IOS debug commands provides a valuable source of information and feedback concerning state transitions and functions when assessing problems. However, the snasw dlctrace and snasw ipstrace commands should be favored over debug snasw dlc and debug snasw ips commands in an SNASw environment. The snasw trace commands write directly to a cyclic buffer rather than to the router log, thereby avoiding flooding and providing flexibility in accessing the trace records.
Other debug commands, such as debug dlsw or debug llc, may be useful in environments where DLSw+ is used in conjunction with SNASw or to trace activity at the interface level.

Core Files

If your router crashes, it is sometimes useful to obtain a full copy of the memory image (called a core dump) to identify the cause of the crash. Not all crash types produce a core dump. The following example configures a router to use FTP to dump a core file named dumpfile to the FTP server at 172.17.92.2 when it crashes:
ip ftp username red
ip ftp password blue
exception protocol ftp
exception dump 172.17.92.2
exception core-file dumpfile
Details covering the procedure for obtaining a core dump can be found at: http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios122/122cgcr/ffun_c/fcfprt3/fcf013.htm.
You can initiate transfer of a core dump manually by entering:
write core
cheney#wr core
Remote host [172.18.60.179]?
Base name of core files to write [cheney-core]?
writing compressed ftp://172.18.60.179/cheney-coreiomem.Z
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Writing cheney-coreiomem.Z
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
EOF-inputbuf 4000000! [OK]
5242880 bytes copied in 41.4 secs (127875 bytes/sec)
writing compressed ftp://172.18.60.179/cheney-core.Z
!
Writing cheney-core.Z
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
EOF-inputbuf 83B00000 [OK]
61865984 bytes copied in 321.672 secs (192728 bytes/sec)
cheney#
You might be requested to perform this action by the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) for debug purposes even if your router did not crash.

Note: The snasw ipstrace and snasw dlctrace commands provide additional important debug information for the development engineers. If these trace facilities are activated, stop them by issuing snasw stop dlctrace and snasw stop ipstrace before forcing wr core. If the traces are not stopped prior to the wr core command, some corruption of trace records can occur.

Host Commands and Traces

In some cases, it may be necessary or helpful to perform traces and displays from the host in addition to traces at the SNASw router. This section provides examples of various host-based trace facilities and associated job control information.

VTAM Internal Trace

Because VTAM is a NNS and Dependent Logical Unit Server (DLUS) for SNASw, it is often necessary to collect a VTAM Internal Trace (VIT) to diagnose problems. The VIT has many options and can be collected in several ways (GTF or Data Space), so it is best to refer to the VTAM Diagnosis Guide (a licensed manual) for details.

Collecting Buffer and CCW Traces Using the Generalized Trace Facility

Use JCL similar to the following statements to invoke the generalized trace facility (GTF):
//GTFNEW PROC MEMBER=GTFPARM
//IEFPROC EXEC PGM=AHLGTF,PARM='MODE=EXT,DEBUG=NO,TIME=YES', *
// TIME=1440,REGION=2880K
//IEFRDER DD DSNAME=SYS4.TRACE,DISP=SHR
//SYSLIB DD DSNAME=SYS1.PARMLIB(&MEMBER),DISP=SHR
Follow these steps to perform a buffer trace. First, start the GTF:
s gtf
AHL103I TRACE OPTIONS SELECTED --USR,RNIO
*10 AHL125A RESPECIFY TRACE OPTIONS OR REPLY U
r 10,u
Then start the buffer trace by entering the statement:
f net,trace,type=buf,id=<resource>
Take action to recreate the problem you are tracing. When complete, stop the buffer trace with the statement:
f net,notrace,type=buf,id=<resource>
Then, stop the GTF by displaying the job and using the purge command:
d a,gtf
RESPONSE=DEREK
IEE115I 12.02.03 2001.303 ACTIVITY 203
JOBS M/S TS USERS SYSAS INITS ACTIVE/MAX VTAM OAS
00000 00011 00002 00024 00004 00002/00010 00001
GTF 0342 IEFPROC NSW S A=002C PER=NO SMC=000
PGN=001 DMN=005 AFF=NONE
CT=000.770S ET=076.525S
WUID=STC00229 USERID=++++++++
ADDR SPACE ASTE=05323B00
4020000 DEREK 01303 12:01:22.91 STC00229 00000090 AHL031I GTF INITIALIZATION COMPLETE
p gtf.342
If you need to get a channel command word (CCW) trace, start the GTF and enter these statements where addr is the address to trace, len is how much of each datastream to collect (the default is 256), and num ccws is the number of CCWs to collect:
s gtf
r nn,trace=siop,iop,ccwp
r nn,io=sio=<addr>,ccw=(data=<len>,ccwn=<num ccws>),end
r nn,u
S GTF
IRR813I NO PROFILE WAS FOUND IN THE STARTED CLASS FOR 214
GTF WITH JOBNAME GTF. RACF WILL USE ICHRIN03.
$HASP100 GTF ON STCINRDR
IEF695I START GTF WITH JOBNAME GTF IS ASSIGNED TO USER
++++++++
$HASP373 GTF STARTED
IEF403I GTF - STARTED - TIME=13.32.44
AHL121I TRACE OPTION INPUT INDICATED FROM MEMBER GTFPARM OF PDS
SYS1.PARMLIB
TRACE=RNIO,USR
00010000
AHL103I TRACE OPTIONS SELECTED --USR,RNIO
*11 AHL125A RESPECIFY TRACE OPTIONS OR REPLY U
R 11,TRACE=SIOP,IOP,CCWP
IEE600I REPLY TO 11 IS;TRACE=SIOP,IOP,CCWP
TRACE=SIOP,IOP,CCWP
AHL138I SIO TRACE OPTION REPLACED BY SSCH TRACE OPTION
*12 AHL101A SPECIFY TRACE EVENT KEYWORDS --IO=,SSCH=,CCW=,IO=SSCH=
R 12,IO=SIO=400,CCW=(DATA=1024,CCWN=50),END
IEE600I REPLY TO 12 IS;IO=SIO=400,CCW=(DATA=1024,CCWN=50),END
IO=SIO=400,CCW=(DATA=1024,CCWN=50),END
AHL103I TRACE OPTIONS SELECTED --IO=SSCH=(0400)
AHL103I CCW=(SI,CCWN=50,DATA=1024)
13 AHL125A RESPECIFY TRACE OPTIONS OR REPLY U
R 13,U
IEE600I REPLY TO 13 IS;U
Recreate your problem and then stop the trace facility. After you have trace data, you can format the trace information using interprocess communications subsystem (IPCS). The following example shows sample JCL to format a buffer trace with IPCS:
//IPCSRUN JOB CLASS=A,MSGCLASS=X,NOTIFY=WINNETT
//IPCS EXEC PGM=IKJEFT01,DYNAMNBR=20,REGION=1500K
//SYSPROC DD DSN=SYS1.SBLSCLI0,DISP=SHR
//IPCSPRNT DD SYSOUT=*
//IPCSTOC DD SYSOUT=*
//SYSUDUMP DD SYSOUT=*
//SYSTSPRT DD SYSOUT=*
//SYSTSIN DD *
DELETE 'SYS4.IPCS.DDIR.CLUSTER' PURGE CLUSTER
BLSCDDIR DSNAME('SYS4.IPCS.DDIR.CLUSTER') VOLUME(OPWK01)
IPCS NOPARM
SETDEF DSNAME('SYS4.TRACE') LIST NOCONFIRM NOPRINT
GTF USR(FEF)
END
This example shows how to format a CCW trace with IPCS:
//IPCSRUN JOB CLASS=A,MSGCLASS=X,NOTIFY=WINNETT
//IPCS EXEC PGM=IKJEFT01,DYNAMNBR=20,REGION=1500K
//SYSPROC DD DSN=SYS1.SBLSCLI0,DISP=SHR
//IPCSPRNT DD SYSOUT=*
//IPCSTOC DD SYSOUT=*
//SYSUDUMP DD SYSOUT=*
//SYSTSPRT DD SYSOUT=*
//SYSTSIN DD *
DELETE 'SYS4.IPCS.DDIR.CLUSTER' PURGE CLUSTER
BLSCDDIR DSNAME('SYS4.IPCS.DDIR.CLUSTER') VOLUME(OPWK01)
IPCS NOPARM
SETDEF DSNAME('SYS4.TRACE') LIST NOCONFIRM NOPRINT
GTF USR(ALL) CCW(SI) SSCHIO(400)
END

TROUBLESHOOTING SNASw OPERATIONAL PROBLEMS

Problems related to SNASw can be categorized into several basic areas:

• Upstream link activation problems

• Downstream device activation problems

• DLUR/DLUS problems

• Session failures

• Performance-related problems

In addition, problems can be categorized as being associated with particular types of equipment or issues with particular data paths. Because of similarities between symptoms and problems for these different situations, this document addresses these diagnostic topics collectively.
Begin troubleshooting by following the process suggested in the section Troubleshooting Methodology Overview. The diagnostics summaries in this section address the troubleshooting process using three basic stages:
1. Identifying symptoms
2. Isolating problems
3. Resolving problems
Each diagnostic section includes suggestions for identifying and isolating problems. It is assumed that relevant network topology diagrams have been obtained for reference prior to troubleshooting. Specific diagnostic output is included to illustrate how network entities react to failures and how to discern specific failures. Sample output for some of the commands is shown in Appendix B, Diagnostic Output Examples. If you need additional help in debugging or analyzing a particular problem, please contact the Cisco TAC at www.cisco.com.

Uplink Fails to Connect

If the uplink fails to connect, follow these troubleshooting steps:
Step 1. Verify the status of the defined uplinks using the sh snasw link command.
Step 2. Use show snasw pdlog detail all | include linkname to see if there are any entries specific to this link name in the pdlog. If so, you will need to show or dump the entire pdlog and find out which records apply.
Step 3. A defined uplink will attempt to establish connection when SNASw is started if the nostart parameter is not used. Issue the sh run | include snasw command to see the configuration for SNASw.
Step 4. If the link definition uses ip-dest ip-address, then the link is defined for HPR/IP EE. Verify IP connectivity to the host by issuing an extended ping originating from the interface associated with the hpr-ip port.
Step 5. If the ping fails, continue troubleshooting the IP connectivity issue using commands such as trace, sh ip ospf. Check neighbor connectivity to the host, Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) definitions on the host, and routing to the Virtual IP Addressing (VIPA) address.
Step 6. If the ping succeeds, then check the interaction between Virtual Telecommunications Access Method (VTAM) and the TCP/IP stack, including that vtam TCPNAME points to the correct stack (see d net,vtamspts) and VTAM external communication adapter (XCA) major node is set for medium=HPRIP.
Step 7. If the upstream link is SNA LLC2, then begin troubleshooting connectivity at Layer 2.
Step 8. Verify that the remote MAC and remote service access point (SAP) is defined on the snasw link.
Step 9. Trace the LLC2 layer using debug llc2 state and debug llc2 packet. Be sure to set access-list 1100 to limit debug output.
Step 10. You can also use the SNASw trace facility to trace the SNASw DLC layer. Issue snasw dlctrace. Try the link again with the trace on. Display the trace using the sh snasw dlctrace or snasw dump dlctrace command.
Step 11. Examine and collect system or netlog information from the host network node.
Step 12. Use the information gathered to diagnose the cause of the failure.
Step 13. Check the VTAM definitions, node type, and CPNAME.

Downstream PU Does Not Activate

The downstream PU may be having trouble trying to connect to SNASw or the problem may be upstream of SNASw for DLUR PUs. Follow these troubleshooting steps:
Step 1. Issue the sh snasw link command.
Step 2. Examine the pdlog for error or exception data related to this link or PU.
Step 3. Issue the sh snasw dlus command. The DLUS will be active if, and only if, there is DLUR traffic.
Step 4. Issue the sh snasw pu command.
Step 5. Check to see if other PUs have established connectivity through this node.
Step 6. Gather host information, including D NET,ID=puname; D NET,DLURS.
Step 7. Issue the sh snasw port command. Determine the port through which the downstream PU connects and verify that it is active.
Step 8. If the port is not active, troubleshoot as a configuration problem or interface problem.
Step 9. Check that the MAC/SAP on the downstream device matches that defined for SNASw on interface.
Step 10. Ensure that you have enabled port event notifications using the snasw event dlc implicit-ls port command. This causes messages to be written to the router log for certain events.
Step 11. Examine snasw dlctrace data.

Problem Establishing Connection for Downstream End Node

You may encounter a problem with an APPN device downstream from SNASw. After you have established that no physical or lower layer problem exists, begin troubleshooting the connection establishment sequence using these steps:
Step 1. Issue the sh snasw link command.
Step 2. Try starting the link on the downstream device and observe pdlog messages. If there is a problem with the XID between the downstream device and snaswitch, the detailed pdlog message will have additional information, including the last sent and received XIDs.
Step 3. Check that the MAC/SAP on the downstream device matches that defined for SNASw on interface.
Step 4. Verify the node name and node type.
Step 5. Trace the link activation using the snasw dlctrace command.
Step 6. Examine the snasw dlctrace data.

User Cannot Connect to Application

The reason an end user cannot connect to the application may be due to a network problem in establishing a dynamic link to the EN host. In this case, use the following troubleshooting steps:
Step 1. Issue the sh snasw link command. Determine whether an active link has been established to the EN data host.
Step 2. If no link exists, perform snasw dlctrace on the upstream port.
Step 3. Verify the connection network definition (that is, the virtual routing node [VRN] name) between the SNASw and host definitions.
Step 4. Observe any error messages in pdlog, in the upstream NN server, and at the destination host.
Step 5. Examine information gathered for the cause of failure.

Intermittent Session Failures

Intermittent session failures are sometimes hard to troubleshoot, particularly if you cannot readily recreate the problem. You can use the snasw msgdump command to trigger a dump of trace files when a particular message occurs. If the problem is repeatable, follow these steps:
Step 1. Determine any messages related to the last occurrence of a problem.
Step 2. Use snasw msgdump <msg-id> to trigger a dump of dlctrace information on failure.
Step 3. Examine the snasw dlctrace data.

Poor Performance

There are many reasons that an end user may experience performance problems or observe high response time or low throughput. It is important to determine the correct cause of the poor performance. Try to determine whether poor performance results from excessive traffic rates (lack of router capacity) or if it is related to specific session parameters or connection types, using the following steps:
Step 1. Issue the sh snasw port det command.
Step 2. Examine the router for high CPU utilization (see the next section).
Step 3. Examine any historical and trending information that is available (Cisco Internet Performance Monitor data, for example).
Step 4. Examine the links along the path between the user and the host. Check the utilization and quality of service (QoS) settings.
Step 5. Issue the sh interface command and look for dropped packets.
Step 6. If using HPR, issue the sh snasw rtp detail command.
Step 7. Work with a specific user to isolate performance.
Step 8. Gather session information using snasw dlctrace.
Step 9. If using HPR, and as advised by Cisco service personnel, gather snasw arbdata log messages.

High CPU Utilization

If the router CPU utilization is above 95 percent, the performance of the router may be affected, and packets can be delayed or dropped. It is important to investigate the cause to determine if there is extraneous traffic, a misconfiguration, a need for a more powerful router platform, or a possible software defect. If you have access to the router and can enter show commands, follow these steps to determine if SNASw is the cause of the high CPU:
Step 1. Issue the show processes cpu command. If process switched IP traffic is causing problems, then the IP Input process will reflect this in the output. In this situation it would be important to collect the output from the show interfaces, show interfaces stat, and show interface switching commands to further diagnose the problem.
Step 2. If the high CPU is attributed to the process SNA Switch, then SNASw is using high CPU.
Step 3. Issue the show snasw statistics command to determine which SNASw component is responsible.
Step 4. Collect dlctrace, ipstrace, and sniffer traces and look for patterns. The ipstrace in particular can be useful in detecting software loops within SNASw.
Step 5 It may be that the traffic load is simply beyond the capability of the platform in use. See capacity planning and performance data at http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk331/tk336/technologies_design_guide09186a0080214a16.shtml.

SNASw CHARACTERISTICS AND KNOWN ISSUES

In some cases, the normal mode of operation is not immediately understood and a problem is perceived when there really is none. One particular case is observation of messages indicating a loss of DLUS connection. The DLUS connection is taken down as a normal course of operation if there are no downstream DLUR PUs that require the services of the DLUS. Therefore, the loss of connectivity to the DLUS does not always indicate a problem. Also, repeated activation and deactivation of the DLUR/DLUS session pipe may be the result of a single PU failure.
Another case is that of a REQACTPU failure. It may be that the PU is simply not defined to VTAM or is inactive rather than in a connectable state. Or it could be that the PU definition has the wrong control point name or station identifier. Always check for basic configuration problems before embarking on a full analysis session. In many cases, a quick look with the sh snasw pdlog command can determine the cause of the failure.

Session Pacing

You may encounter performance issues with interactive traffic if batch traffic is allowed to operate unpaced or with too large a variable pacing window. Cisco recommends that batch devices such as printers be configured with a fixed pacing window of 7. You can also adjust the maximum receive pacing window for variable pacing using the max-pacing-window parameter on the snasw cpname configuration command:
cheney(config)#snasw cpname NETIFD.CPNAME max-pacing-window ?
<7-65535> Maximum window size
For more information, refer to the SNASw documentation listed in Appendix A, Related Publications.

Production Recovery and Data Collection

Murphy's Law states, "If anything can go wrong, it will," and furthermore, it certainly will happen at the most inopportune time. For this reason, it is useful to establish a basic procedure for off-hours operations staff to follow in the event that a problem arises and no one is available to perform detailed troubleshooting.
In many cases, stopping and restarting SNASw on a specific router will clear up a problem. This can be done with several commands. Use the snasw stop command to terminate all sessions, stop all ports and links, and shut down SNASw. To start SNASw, use the snasw start privileged EXEC command. Before recycling SNASw, Cisco recommends that operations staff collect the following information at a minimum:

show tech

snasw dump pdlog

snasw dump dlctrace

APPENDIX A: RELATED PUBLICATIONS

For Cisco publications, if you are using a version of Cisco IOS different than what is referenced below, you can find a matching version of the documentation by searching for the title at http://www.cisco.com/public/pubsearch.html.

SNASw Documentation

• Cisco SNASw Website, http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk331/tk897/tsd_technology_support_sub-protocol_home.html

Cisco IOS Bridging and IBM Networking Configuration Guide, Release 12.3, http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios123/123cgcr/ibm_vcg.htm

Cisco IOS Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference, Volume 2 of 2, Release 12.3, http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios123/123cgcr/ibm_r2/index.htm

• "SNASw Messages," Release 12.3, http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios123/123sup/123sems/123semv2/emgsnasw.htm

Related Troubleshooting Information

• "Troubleshooting High CPU Utilization on Cisco Routers," http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/routers/ps133/products_tech_note09186a00800a70f2.shtml

• "SDLC Debugging," http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk331/tk336/technologies_tech_note09186a0080094745.shtml

• "Troubleshooting DLSw," http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk331/tk336/technologies_tech_note09186a008009424a.shtml

• "Fine-Tuning the LLC2 Timers for Better Performance," http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk331/tk336/technologies_tech_note09186a0080093d89.shtml

• "Understanding and Troubleshooting Network Media Translation," http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk331/tk336/technologies_tech_note09186a0080093fa1.shtml

• "Understanding and Troubleshooting Local Source-Route Bridging," http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk331/tk660/technologies_tech_note09186a0080094742.shtml

• Tech Notes, http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk331/tk336/tech_tech_notes_list.html

Related IBM Documentation

TCP/IP Trace Guide

IBM Systems Network Architecture: LU6.2 Reference: Peer Protocols (SC31-6808)

IBM Systems Network Architecture: APPN Architecture Reference (SC30-3422)

IBM Systems Network Architecture: Management Services (SC30-3346)

IBM Systems Network Architecture: Formats (GA27-3136)

IBM APPN Architecture and Product Implementations Tutorial (GG24-3669)

IBM AS/400 Advanced Peer-to-Peer Networking (GG24-3287)

IBM Communications Manager/2 System Management Programming Reference (SC31-6173)

IBM Communications Manager/2 APPC Programming Guide and Reference (SC31-6160)

IBM System/370 Principles of Operation (GA22-7000)

IBM Systems Network Architecture: Technical Overview (GC30-3073)

IBM Systems Network Architecture: VTAM Programming for LU Type 6.2 (SC30-3400)

IBM Systems Network Architecture Concepts and Products (GC30-3072)

IBM Systems Network Architecture Format and Protocol Reference Manual: Architecture Logic or LU Type 6.2 (SC30-3269)

IBM Systems Network Architecture: Introduction to APPC (GG24-1584)

IBM Systems Network Architecture: Transaction Programmer's Reference Manual for LU Type 6.2 (GC30-3084)

IBM Systems Network Architecture: Introduction to Sessions between Logical Units (GC20-1869)

IBM Systems Network Architecture Format and Protocol Reference Manual: Architectural Logic (SC30-3112)

AIW Documentation

• AIW publications, http://www.networking.ibm.com/app/aiwhome.htm

Many architecture references (including those listed above in Related IBM Documentation) can be found at this Website.

APPENDIX B: DIAGNOSTIC OUTPUT EXAMPLES

Show Commands

show snasw session

cheney#show snasw session
Number of local endpoint sessions 9
SNA Local Endpoint Sessions
PCID (hex) Partner LU Name Link/RTP Mode COS
---------------- ----------------- --------- -------- -------
1> C193D9033CB91A56 NETA.IBDNT1 @I000013 CPSVCMG CPSVCMG
2> EB3FE7B419B132A3 NETA.IBDNT1 @I000013 CPSVCMG CPSVCMG
3> C193D9033CB91A50 NETA.MVSB @R000024 #INTER #INTER
4> C193D9033CB91A4E NETA.MVSB @R000023 SNASVCMG SNASVCMG
5> C193D9033CB91A4C NETA.MVSA @R000022 #INTER #INTER
6> C3BBDE1E415E9C29 NETA.MVSA @R000021 CPSVRMGR SNASVCMG
7> C193D9033CB91A3A NETA.MVSA @R000021 CPSVRMGR SNASVCMG
8> C3BBDE1E415E9C05 NETA.MVSA @R000002 CPSVCMG CPSVCMG
9> C193D9033CB91A01 NETA.MVSA @R000001 CPSVCMG CPSVCMG
Number of intermediate sessions 0
SNA Intermediate Sessions
PCID (hex) Primary LU Name Secondary LU Name Mode COS
---------------- ----------------- ----------------- -------- -------
Number of intermediate DLUR sessions 1
SNA DLUR Assisted Intermediate Sessions
PCID (hex) Primary LU Name Secondary LU Name Mode COS
---------------- ----------------- ----------------- -------- -------
1> C3BBDE1E415E9C4F NETA.TSOA0002 NETA.RW982303 #CONNECT

show snasw dlus

cheney#show snasw dlus
Number of Dependent LU Servers 1
SNA Dependent LU Servers
DLUS Name Default? Backup? Pipe State PUs
----------------- -------- ------- ---------------- -------
1> NETA.MVSA Yes No Active 2
cheney#
cheney#show snasw dlus det
Number of Dependent LU Servers 1
1>
DLUS name NETA.MVSA
Is this the default DLUS Yes
Is this the backup default DLUS No
Pipe state Active
Number of active PUs 2
DLUS pipe statistics:
REQACTPUs sent 11
REQACTPU responses received 11
ACTPUs received 11
ACTPU responses sent 11
DACTPUs received 9
DACTPU responses sent 9
REQDACTPUs sent 9
REQDACTPU responses received 9
ACTLUs received 9
ACTLU responses sent 9
DACTLUs received 0
DACTLU responses sent 0
SSCP-PU MUs sent 31
SSCP-PU MUs received 31
SSCP-LU MUs sent 37
SSCP-LU MUs received 36

show snasw lu

cheney#sh snasw lu
Number of DLUR LUs 1
SNA DLUR LUs
LU Name PU Name DLUS Name PLU Name
-------- -------- ----------------- -----------------
1> RW982303 IBDNT223 NETA.MVSA NETA.TSOA0002
cheney#sh snasw lu det
Number of DLUR LUs 1
1>
LU name RW982303
LU status Active
SLU status In Session
PU name IBDNT223
DLUS name NETA.MVSA
Primary LU name NETA.TSOA0002
LU location Downstream
LU FSM history (00,00)->(01,01)->(02,0E)->(0
3,03)->04
SLU FSM history (00,00)->(01,01)->(02,03)->(0
3,06)->(03,05)->(04,07)->(00,0C)->(00,00)->(01,01)->02

show snasw port

cheney#show snasw port
Number of ports 3
SNA Ports HPR
Name State SAP SAP Interface Address
-------- -------- --- --- --------------------- --------------
1> DNFE01 Active x04 x00 FastEthernet0/1 4000.0195.0101
2> HPRLO0 Active Loopback0 10.88.192.13
3> VTOK0 Active x04 x00 Virtual-TokenRing0 4000.0195.0201
cheney#

show snasw pu

cheney#show snasw pu det
Number of DLUR PUs 2
1>
PU name IBDNT223
Backup DLUS name
Active DLUS name NETA.MVSA
PU ID (IDBLK/IDNUM) X'08198023'
PU location Downstream
PU status Active
DLUS session state Active
Automatic Network Shutdown support Stop
DLUS retry timeout (seconds) 0
DLUS retry limit 0
DLUS pipe PCID X'C193D9033CB91A55'
DLUS pipe CP Name NETA.CHENEY
PU FSM history (00,01)->(01,03)->(02,04)->(0
2,06)->(03,11)->(03,07)->04
2>
PU name RWTPA001
Backup DLUS name
Active DLUS name NETA.MVSA
PU ID (IDBLK/IDNUM) X'08199001'
PU location Downstream
PU status Active
DLUS session state Active
Automatic Network Shutdown support Stop
DLUS retry timeout (seconds) 0
DLUS retry limit 0
DLUS pipe PCID X'C193D9033CB91A39'
DLUS pipe CP Name NETA.CHENEY
PU FSM history (03,07)->(04,0C)->(06,0D)->(0
7,10)->(00,02)->(01,03)->(02,04)->(02,06)->(03,11)->(03,07)->04
cheney#

show snasw link

Number of links 3
SNA Links HPR
Link Name State Port Name Adjacent CP Name Node Type Sess Sup
--------- -------- --------- ---------------- ------------ ---- ---
1> @I000001 Active VTOK NETA.RW98P002 LEN Node 0 No
2> EELNKA Retrying EEPORT Learn 0 No
3> EELNKB Inactive EEPORT Learn 0 Yes

sh run | include snasw

roo#sh run | inc snasw
snasw cpname NETA hostname
snasw dlus NETA.MVSA prefer-active retry 300 10
snasw port VTOK Virtual-TokenRing0
snasw port EEPORT hpr-ip Loopback0
snasw port DLSW1 vdlc 100 mac 4000.1111.0001 conntype nohpr
snasw link EELNKB port EEPORT ip-dest 10.2.9.1 nostart
snasw link EELNKA port EEPORT ip-dest 10.2.8.1
cheney#sh run | inc snasw
snasw pdlog exception
snasw dlctrace
snasw cpname NETA.CHENEY
snasw port HPRLO0 hpr-ip Loopback0 vnname NETA.IBDCN
snasw port DNFE01 FastEthernet0/1 conntype nohpr
snasw port VTOK0 Virtual-TokenRing0 conntype nohpr
snasw link MVSA port HPRLO0 ip-dest 10.88.24.1 nns
cheney#
cheney#sh run | inc snasw
snasw pdlog exception file tftp://172.18.60.179/cheney-pdlog
snasw dlctrace file tftp://172.18.60.179/cheney-dlctrc
snasw event implicit-ls port dlc cpcp
snasw msgdump HPR_LOG_6
snasw cpname NETA.CHENEY
snasw port HPRLO0 hpr-ip Loopback0 vnname NETA.IBDCN
snasw port DNFE01 FastEthernet0/1 conntype nohpr
snasw port VTOK0 Virtual-TokenRing0 conntype nohpr
snasw link MVSA port HPRLO0 ip-dest 10.88.24.1 nns
cheney#

show process cpu

In this display example, the offered load is beyond the capability of the Cisco 2621 platform, resulting in high CPU:
cheney#sh proc cpu
CPU utilization for five seconds: 99%/5%; one minute: 98%; five minutes: 75%
PID Runtime(ms) Invoked uSecs 5Sec 1Min 5Min TTY Process
1 796 363730 2 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Load Meter
2 1156 353 3274 0.00% 0.00% 0.03% 0 Exec
3 1113680 215280 5173 0.00% 0.06% 0.05% 0 Check heaps
4 4 1 4000 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Chunk Manager
5 44 23 1913 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Pool Manager
6 0 2 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Timers
7 0 2 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Serial Backgroun
8 8600 362802 23 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 ALARM_TRIGGER_SC
9 48 60632 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Environmental mo
10 1284 32887 39 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 ARP Input
11 4 2 2000 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 DDR Timers
12 0 2 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Dialer event
13 8 3 2666 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Entity MIB API
14 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 SERIAL A'detect
15 0 5 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Critical Bkgnd
16 2544 236403 10 0.00% 0.01% 0.00% 0 Net Background
17 188 42760 4 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Logger
18 20464 1816849 11 0.00% 0.01% 0.00% 0 TTY Background
19 14040 1816973 7 0.00% 0.01% 0.00% 0 Per-Second Jobs
20 0 2 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Hawkeye Backgrou
21 84416 679842 124 3.84% 3.59% 2.67% 0 HyBridge Input P
PID Runtime(ms) Invoked uSecs 5Sec 1Min 5Min TTY Process
22 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 HDV background
23 0 2 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 VNM DSPRM MAIN
24 167112 3731121 44 0.32% 0.22% 0.18% 0 Net Input
25 3464 363730 9 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Compute load avg
26 849868 30803 27590 0.00% 0.06% 0.00% 0 Per-minute Jobs
27 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 CES Line Conditi
28 0 2 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 AAA Dictionary R
29 1023280 1589598 643 4.99% 4.02% 3.87% 0 IP Input
30 38556 244756 157 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 CDP Protocol
31 16 3027 5 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 MOP Protocols
32 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 X.25 Encaps Mana
33 44 30317 1 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 LDP Background
34 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 frr_tunnel
35 0 2 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 PASVC create VA
36 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Asy FS Helper
37 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 PPP IP Add Route
38 5824 30351 191 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 IP Background
39 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 SNMP Timers
40 0 61 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 TCP Timer
41 44 31 1419 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 TCP Protocols
42 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Probe Input
43 4 1 4000 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 RARP Input
PID Runtime(ms) Invoked uSecs 5Sec 1Min 5Min TTY Process
44 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 HTTP Timer
45 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Socket Timers
46 4 2 2000 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 DHCPD Receive
47 1808 30303 59 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 IP Cache Ager
48 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 COPS
49 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 PAD InCall
50 0 2 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 X.25 Background
51 28 30316 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 TCP Intercept Ti
52 0 2 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 SPX Input
53 2232 30322 73 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Adj Manager
54 0 2 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Tag Input
55 11540 1816935 6 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 RUDPV1 Main Proc
56 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 bsm_timers
57 5452 1816863 3 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 bsm_xmt_proc
58 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 CES Client SVC R
59 0 2 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 TC-ATM Proc
60 32388 2013930 16 0.00% 0.01% 0.00% 0 Tbridge Monitor
61 8 2 4000 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 CCVPM_HDSPRM
62 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Router Autoconf
63 4 1 4000 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 TSP
64 4 1 4000 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 QOS_MODULE_MAIN
65 4 1 4000 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 CCVPM_HTSP
PID Runtime(ms) Invoked uSecs 5Sec 1Min 5Min TTY Process
66 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 CCVPM_R2
67 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 CCSWVOICE
68 0 2 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Background Loade
69 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 sssapp
70 253844 21525 11792 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Syslog Traps
71 6816 181794 37 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 BUSYOUT SCAN
72 11996 1813957 6 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 trunk conditioni
73 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 trunk conditioni
74 22160 33087 669 2.37% 2.74% 2.11% 0 CLS Background
75 7620 1820495 4 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 DSPU Msg Proc
76 3284 1818054 1 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 SRB Background
77 8476 1816860 4 0.08% 0.00% 0.00% 0 RSRB Background
78 179680 36271901 4 0.40% 0.33% 0.28% 0 LLC2 Timer
79 246304 3198429 77 0.08% 0.09% 0.08% 0 Spanning Tree
80 22840 1816435 12 0.08% 0.03% 0.00% 0 DLSw Background
81 115720 2356346 49 0.16% 0.07% 0.04% 0 IP-EIGRP Hello
82 36 60 600 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 DLSw msg proc
83 53256 115026 462 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 IP SNMP
84 48512 46803 1036 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 PDU DISPATCHER
85 372488 190879 1951 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 SNMP ENGINE
86 31696 440 72036 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 SNMP ConfCopyPro
87 84 13 6461 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 SNMP Traps
PID Runtime(ms) Invoked uSecs 5Sec 1Min 5Min TTY Process
88 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 Crash writer
89 4736 1827811 2 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 NTP
90 16 15159 1 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 DHCPD Timer
91 26200 515136 50 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 DHCPD Database
92 114664 786662 145 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 IP-EIGRP Router
93 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 DLSw Peer Proces
94 0 1 0 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 TCP Driver
95 6972 26218 265 0.65% 0.83% 0.61% 0 VDLC Background
96 8157192 22244960 366 80.08% 80.36% 62.65% 0 SNA Switch
97 99052 311396 318 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0 SNASw NetMan
98 13360 9624 1388 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 67 SNA-NM Exec

show snasw statistics

cheney#sh snasw statistics
SNA Switch Subsystem Uptime 21 days, 1 hrs, 2 mins, 7 secs
Directory Statistics:
Maximum number of cache entries 10000
Current number of cache entries 0
Current number of home entries 3
Current number of registry entries 4
Total number of entries in directory 7
Total cache hits 0
Total cache misses 0
Number of directed locates sent 18
Number of directed locates returned not found 0
Number of directed locates received 0
Number of broadcast locates sent 0
Number of broadcast locates returned not found 0
Number of broadcast locates received 13
Number of locates outstanding 0
Toplogy Statistics:
Maximum number of nodes 0
Current number of nodes 2
Total number of received TDUs 0
Total number of sent TDUs 0
Total received Node updates with lower RSN 0
Total received Node updates with equal RSN 0
Total received Node updates with higher RSN 0
Total received Node updates with higher odd RSN 0
Total node state changes requiring TDUs 0
Total database inconsistencies detected 0
Total number of timer based TDUs generated 0
Total number of node records purged 0
Total received TG updates with lower RSN 0
Total received TG updates with equal RSN 0
Total received TG updates with higher RSN 0
Total received TG updates with higher odd RSN 0
Total TG state changes requiring TG updates 1
Total TG database inconsistencies detected 0
Total number of timer TG updates generated 0
Total number of TG records purged 0
Total number of routes calculated 6
Total number of routes rejected 0
Total number of cache hits in route calculation 0
Total number of cache misses in rte calculation 7
Total number of TDU wars detected 0
Number of processes 24
CPU/Memory usage per SNA Switch process
Process Name CPU Time (ms) Memory Used (bytes)
----------------------------------- ------------- -------------------
1> NOF API 36880 10
2> N-Base allocated memory 0 62569
3> Buffer Manager (BM) 21348 208
4> Node Operator Facility (NOF) 24564 13117
5> Address Space Manager (ASM) 100 1408
6> Address Space (AS) 92 0
7> Session Services (SS) 881408 1824
8> Directory Services (DS) 578332 548736
9> Configuration Services (CS) 122720 12063
10> Management Services (MS) 2064564 7690
11> Multiple Domain Support (MDS) 24 0
12> Topology & Routing Services (TRS) 146952 22816
13> Session Connector Manager (SCM) 856 3957
14> Session Connector (SCO) 65900 2980
15> Session Manager (SM) 478684 16429
16> Resource Manager (RM) 583176 0
17> Presentation Services (PS) 577496 0
18> Half Session (HS) 10280 0
19> Path Control (PC) 359292 25052
20> Data Link Control (DLC) 153596 1760
21> Dependent LU Requester (DR) 358360 17160
22> High Performance Routing (HPR) 632 5315
23> Rapid Transport Protocol (RTP) 144064 34904
24> UDP stub 117984 388
cheney#

show interface (busy router)

These interface displays were taken on an overloaded router:
cheney#sh int
FastEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is AmdFE, address is 0030.193e.78c0 (bia 0030.193e.78c0)
Internet address is 10.88.194.1/24
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 100000 Kbit, DLY 100 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
Full-duplex, 100Mb/s, 100BaseTX/FX
ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
Last input 00:00:00, output 00:00:00, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
Queueing strategy: fifo
Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 187 drops
5 minute input rate 748000 bits/sec, 136 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 10000 bits/sec, 12 packets/sec
1324128 packets input, 232077079 bytes
Received 484517 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
0 watchdog
0 input packets with dribble condition detected
1444001 packets output, 135351792 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 4 interface resets
0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
FastEthernet0/1 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is AmdFE, address is 0030.193e.78c1 (bia 0030.193e.78c1)
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 100000 Kbit, DLY 100 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation 802.1Q Virtual LAN, Vlan ID 1., loopback not set
Keepalive set (10 sec)
Full-duplex, 100Mb/s, 100BaseTX/FX
ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
Last input 00:00:00, output 00:00:00, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
Queueing strategy: fifo
Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
5 minute input rate 19000 bits/sec, 71 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 693000 bits/sec, 78 packets/sec
10476356 packets input, 739980107 bytes
Received 9906592 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored
0 watchdog
0 input packets with dribble condition detected
3185209 packets output, 352143821 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 1 interface resets
0 babbles, 0 late collision, 0 deferred
0 lost carrier, 0 no carrier
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
FastEthernet0/1.1 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is AmdFE, address is 0030.193e.78c1 (bia 0030.193e.78c1)
Internet address is 10.88.195.1/24
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 100000 Kbit, DLY 100 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation 802.1Q Virtual LAN, Vlan ID 11.
ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
FastEthernet0/1.2 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is AmdFE, address is 0030.193e.78c1 (bia 0030.193e.78c1)
Internet address is 10.88.196.1/24
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 100000 Kbit, DLY 100 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation 802.1Q Virtual LAN, Vlan ID 22.
ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
Loopback0 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is Loopback
Internet address is 10.88.192.13/30
MTU 1514 bytes, BW 8000000 Kbit, DLY 5000 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation LOOPBACK, loopback not set
Last input 00:00:02, output never, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
Queueing strategy: fifo
Output queue 0/0, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
393515 packets output, 23610900 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
Virtual-TokenRing0 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is Virtual-TokenRing, address is 4000.0195.0201 (bia 4000.0000.0004)
MTU 8136 bytes, BW 16000 Kbit, DLY 5000 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation SNAP, loopback not set
ARP type: SNAP, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
Last input 00:00:00, output never, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
Queueing strategy: fifo
Output queue 0/0, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 2 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
3638675 packets input, 95741279 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
7277657 packets output, 190414215 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
0 transitions
Virtual-TokenRing1 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is Virtual-TokenRing, address is 4000.0195.0202 (bia 4000.0000.0005)
MTU 8136 bytes, BW 16000 Kbit, DLY 5000 usec,
reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255
Encapsulation SNAP, loopback not set
ARP type: SNAP, ARP Timeout 04:00:00
Last input 00:00:00, output never, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
Queueing strategy: fifo
Output queue 0/0, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 2 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
3638955 packets input, 94672265 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles
0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
7277743 packets output, 190415695 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
0 transitions

show interface switching (busy router)

cheney#sh int switching
FastEthernet0/0
Throttle count 0
Drops RP 187 SP 0
SPD Flushes Fast 0 SSE 0
SPD Aggress Fast 0
SPD Priority Inputs 785740 Drops 0
Protocol Path Pkts In Chars In Pkts Out Chars Out
Other Process 60635 3031750 182052 10923120
Cache misses 0
Fast 0 0 0 0
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0
IP Process 1177647 220772721 1157116 98799561
Cache misses 0
Fast 59494 3496772 71667 15502217
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0
DEC MOP Process 0 0 3027 233079
Cache misses 0
Fast 0 0 0 0
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0
ARP Process 128 7680 133 7980
Cache misses 0
Fast 0 0 0 0
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0
CDP Process 30343 7949866 30347 9923469
Cache misses 0
Fast 0 0 0 0
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0
FastEthernet0/1
Throttle count 0
Drops RP 0 SP 0
SPD Flushes Fast 0 SSE 0
SPD Aggress Fast 0
SPD Priority Inputs 0 Drops 0
Protocol Path Pkts In Chars In Pkts Out Chars Out
Other Process 142205 6809398 487526 155714244
Cache misses 0
Fast 0 0 0 0
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0
IP Process 296549 34079257 786924 61376008
Cache misses 0
Fast 71667 15502217 59494 3734748
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0
Trans. Bridge Process 0 0 0 0
Cache misses 0
Fast 249657 14997755 0 0
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0
DEC MOP Process 0 0 3026 233002
Cache misses 0
Fast 0 0 0 0
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0
Spanning Tree Process 1819333 105519542 1819246 123708728
Cache misses 0
Fast 0 0 0 0
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0
ARP Process 2440 146400 601 38444
Cache misses 0
Fast 0 0 0 0
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0
CDP Process 30337 7978631 30357 9925755
Cache misses 0
Fast 0 0 0 0
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0
Loopback0
Throttle count 0
Drops RP 0 SP 0
SPD Flushes Fast 0 SSE 0
SPD Aggress Fast 0
SPD Priority Inputs 0 Drops 0
Protocol Path Pkts In Chars In Pkts Out Chars Out
IP Process 393520 23611200 393520 23611200
Cache misses 0
Fast 0 0 0 0
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0
Virtual-TokenRing0
Throttle count 0
Drops RP 0 SP 0
SPD Flushes Fast 0 SSE 0
SPD Aggress Fast 0
SPD Priority Inputs 0 Drops 0
Protocol Path Pkts In Chars In Pkts Out Chars Out
Other Process 24 2400 7277753 190416711
Cache misses 0
Fast 0 0 0 0
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0
SR Bridge Process 6 150 0 0
Cache misses 0
Fast 0 0 0 0
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0
Virtual-TokenRing1
Throttle count 0
Drops RP 0 SP 0
SPD Flushes Fast 0 SSE 0
SPD Aggress Fast 0
SPD Priority Inputs 0 Drops 0
Protocol Path Pkts In Chars In Pkts Out Chars Out
Other Process 24 1776 7277835 190418087
Cache misses 0
Fast 0 0 0 0
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0
SR Bridge Process 64 1216 0 0
Cache misses 0
Fast 0 0 0 0
Auton/SSE 0 0 0 0

show interface statistics (busy router)

cheney#sh int stat
FastEthernet0/0
Switching path Pkts In Chars In Pkts Out Chars Out
Processor 1271430 233832865 1372900 119912472
Route cache 59497 3496941 71672 15502531
Total 1330927 237329806 1444572 135415003
FastEthernet0/1
Switching path Pkts In Chars In Pkts Out Chars Out
Processor 10157328 709544152 3128881 352579691
Route cache 321814 30529457 59497 3734929
Total 10479142 740073609 3188378 356314620
Loopback0
Switching path Pkts In Chars In Pkts Out Chars Out
Processor 0 0 393523 23611380
Route cache 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 393523 23611380
Virtual-TokenRing0
Switching path Pkts In Chars In Pkts Out Chars Out
Processor 3638747 95743151 7277801 190417959
Route cache 0 0 0 0
Total 3638747 95743151 7277801 190417959
Virtual-TokenRing1
Switching path Pkts In Chars In Pkts Out Chars Out
Processor 3639027 94674137 7277887 190419439
Route cache 0 0 0 0
Total 3639027 94674137 7277887 190419439
cheney#

Trace Commands

show snasw dlctrace

cheney#sh snasw dlctrace
DLC Trace Output
16625 MVSA In sz:45 HPR Stat Rq Stat Rpy
16626 MVSA Out sz:52 HPR Stat Rpy
16627 MVSA In sz:68 SEND_MU
16628 MVSA In sz:45 HPR Stat Rq Stat Rpy
16629 MVSA Out sz:52 HPR Stat Rpy
16630 MVSA Out sz:52 HPR Stat Rq Stat Rpy
16631 MVSA In sz:68 SEND_MU
16632 MVSA In sz:45 HPR Stat Rpy
16633 MVSA In sz:45 HPR Stat Rq Stat Rpy
16634 MVSA Out sz:52 HPR Stat Rpy
16635 MVSA In sz:45 HPR Stat Rq Stat Rpy
16636 MVSA Out sz:52 HPR Stat Rpy
16637 MVSA In sz:68 SEND_MU
16638 MVSA In sz:45 HPR Stat Rq Stat Rpy
16639 MVSA Out sz:52 HPR Stat Rpy
16640 MVSA In sz:45 HPR Stat Rq Stat Rpy
16641 MVSA Out sz:52 HPR Stat Rpy
16642 MVSA In sz:68 SEND_MU
16643 MVSA In sz:45 HPR Stat Rq Stat Rpy
16644 MVSA Out sz:52 HPR Stat Rpy
cheney#

ping sna

cheney#ping sna neta.mvsa
cheney#
SNA APING successful
Partner LU name NETA.MVSA
Mode name #INTER
Allocate duration 92 ms
Duration statistics Min = 8 ms Ave = 10 ms Max = 12 ms
cheney#

d net,vtamopts

* CNM21 D NET,VTAMOPTS
CNM21 IST097I DISPLAY ACCEPTED
' CNM21
IST1188I VTAM CSV2R8 STARTED AT 09:28:08 ON 10/29/01
IST1349I COMPONENT ID IS 5695-11701-801
IST1348I VTAM STARTED AS INTERCHANGE NODE
IST1189I ALSREQ = NO APPNCOS = NONE
IST1189I ASIRFMSG = OLUSSCP ASYDE = TERM
IST1189I AUTHLEN = YES AUTORTRY = AUTOCAP
IST1189I AUTOTI = 0 BN = YES
IST1189I BNDYN = FULL BNORD = PRIORITY
IST1189I BSCMDRS = (STATS,INOPS) BSCTMOUT = 286
IST1189I CACHETI = 8 CDRDYN = YES
IST1189I CDRSCTI = 480S CDSERVR = YES
IST1189I CDSREFER = ***NA*** CINDXSIZ = 8176
IST1189I CMPMIPS = 100 CMPVTAM = 0
IST1189I CNMTAB = *BLANKS* COLD = YES
IST1189I CONFIG = MA CONNTYPE = APPN
IST1189I CPCDRSC = YES CPCP = YES
IST1189I CSALIMIT = 90112K CSA24 = 1024K
IST1189I DATEFORM = MDY DIALRTRY = YES
IST1189I DIRSIZE = 0 DIRTIME = 691200S
IST1189I DISCNTIM = (15,0) DLRORDER = STATNID
IST1189I DLRTCB = 32 DSPLYDEF = 300
IST1189I DSPLYMAX = 16384 DSPLYWLD = FULLWILD
IST1189I DUPDEFS = ALL DYNADJCP = YES
IST1189I DYNASSCP = YES DYNDLGMD = NONE
IST1189I DYNHPPFX = *BLANKS* DYNLU = YES
IST1189I DYNMODTB = NONE DYNPUPFX = *BLANKS*
IST1189I DYNVNPFX = *BLANKS* ENCRPREF = NONE
IST1189I ENCRYPTN = 31 ENHADDR = YES
IST1189I ESIRFMSG = ALLSSCP FLDTAB = MSGFLOOD
IST1189I FSIRFMSG = OLUSSCP GWSSCP = YES
IST1189I HNTSIZE = 4080 HOSTPU = ISTPUS
IST1189I HOSTSA = 57 HOTIOTRM = 20
IST1189I HPR = (RTP,RTP) HPRARB = RESPMODE
IST1189I HPRNCPBF = NO HPRPST = LOW 480S
IST1189I HPRPST = MEDIUM 240S HPRPST = HIGH 120S
IST1189I HPRPST = NETWRK 60S HSRTSIZE = 9973
IST1189I INITDB = NONE INOPDUMP = OFF
IST1189I IOINT = 900 IOMSGLIM = 2
IST1189I IOPURGE = 300S IPADDR = 0.0.0.0
IST1189I IRNSTRGE = 0 ISTCOSDF = INDLU
IST1189I LIMINTCP = 43200 LIST = 00
IST1189I MAINTLVL = *BLANKS* MAXLOCAT = 5000
IST1189I MAXLURU = 6144 MAXSSCPS = 10
IST1189I MAXSUBA = 63 MIHTMOUT = 1800
IST1189I MSGLEVEL = BASE MSGMOD = NO
IST1189I MXSAWBUF = 10000 MXSSCPRU = 4096
IST1189I MXSUBNUM = 511 NCPBUFSZ = 512
IST1189I NETID = NETA NMVTLOG = NPDA
IST1189I NNSPREF = ***NA*** NODELST = *BLANKS*
IST1189I NODETYPE = NN NQNMODE = NAME
IST1189I NSRTSIZE = *BLANKS* NUMTREES = 200
IST1189I OSIEVENT = PATTERNS OSIMGMT = NO
IST1189I OSITOPO = ILUCDRSC OSRTSIZE = 43
IST1189I PDTRCBUF = 2 PIUMAXDS = 200
IST1189I PLUALMSG = NOSUPP PPOLOG = YES
IST1189I PSRETRY = LOW 0S PSRETRY = MEDIUM 0S
IST1189I PSRETRY = HIGH 0S PSRETRY = NETWRK 0S
IST1189I PSSTRACE = NORB PSWEIGHT = LESSTHAN
IST1189I RESUSAGE = 100 ROUTERES = 128
IST1189I SACONNS = YES SAVERSCV = (NO,KEEP)
IST1189I SAWMAXDS = 100 SAWMXQPK = 0
IST1189I SDLCMDRS = (STATS,INOPS) SECLVLCP = ***NA***
IST1189I SIRFMSG = ALLSSCP SLOWVAL = (0,0)
IST1189I SLUALMSG = NOSUPP SMEAUTH = DISCARD
IST1189I SNAPREQ = 1000 SNVC = 15
IST1189I SONLIM = (60,30) SORDER = APPN
IST1189I SRCHRED = OFF SRCOUNT = 10
IST1189I SRTIMER = 30S SSCPDYN = YES
IST1189I SSCPID = 57 SSCPNAME = MVSA
IST1189I SSCPORD = PRIORITY SSDTMOUT = 30
IST1189I SSEARCH = CACHE STRGR = ISTGENERIC
IST1189I STRMNPS = ISTMNPS SUPP = NOSUP
IST1189I SWNORDER = CPNAME TCPNAME = *BLANKS* ç Must specify
IST1189I TNSTAT = NOCNSL,TIME=60 TRANSLAT = (0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7)
IST1189I UPDDELAY = 60S USSTAB = *BLANKS*
IST1188I VTAM CSV2R8 STARTED AT 09:28:08 ON 10/29/01
IST1189I VERIFYCP = NONE VFYRED = YES
IST1189I VFYREDTI = OFF VOSDEACT = NO
IST1189I VRTG = NO VRTGCPCP = YES
IST1189I VTAMEAS = 32001 WARM = NO
IST1189I XCFINIT = YES XNETALS = NO
IST314I END

APPENDIX C: TROUBLESHOOTING COMMAND SUMMARY

Stopping SNASw and SNASw Ports and Links

Unless otherwise defined with the nostart operand, SNASw and SNASw port and link definitions are started automatically when SNASw starts. To stop SNASw or to stop SNASw ports and links when making configuration changes or when resetting the ports or links, use one of the commands in Table 1 in privileged EXEC mode, as needed.

Table 1. SNASw Start and Stop Commands

Command

Purpose

Router#snasw start | stop

Activates/Deactivates SNASw

Router#snasw start | stop link linkname

Activates/Deactivates the specified SNASw link

Router#snasw start | stop port portname

Activates/Deactivates the specified SNASw port

Note: Removing a CP name definition stops SNASw and deletes other SNASw configuration statements.

Verifying SNASw

To verify that you have connectivity between SNASw and other nodes supporting the APINGD transaction program, issue the ping sna command.

Monitoring and Maintaining SNASw

You can monitor the status and configuration of SNASw by issuing any of the commands listed in Table 2 in privileged EXEC mode.

Table 2. SNASw Commands

Command

Purpose

Router#ping sna [-1] [-c consecutive packets]
[-i number-iterations] [-m mode] [-n] [-r] [-s size]
[-t tpname] [-u userid -p password] destination

Initiates an Advanced Program-to-Program Communications (APPC) session with a named destination LU to run the APING transaction program to check network integrity and timing characteristics

Router#show snasw class-of-service [brief | detail]

Displays the predefined Class of Service (COS) definitions

Router#show snasw connection-network [brief | detail]

Displays the connection networks (virtual nodes) defined to the local node

Router#show snasw directory [name resourcenamefilter] [brief | detail]

Displays the SNASw directory entries

Router#show snasw dlus [brief | detail]

Displays the SNASw DLUS objects

Router#show snasw link [brief | detail] [cpname cpnamefilter] [name linknamefilter] [port portnamefilter] [rmac macfilter] [xid xidfilter]

Displays the SNASw link objects

Router#show snasw lu [brief | detail][name luname] [pu puname]

Displays the SNASw dependent LUs

Router#show snasw mode

Displays the SNASw modes

Router#show snasw node

Displays details of the SNASw operation

Router#show snasw port [brief | detail]
[name portnamefilter]

Displays the SNASw port objects

Router#show snasw pu [brief | detail] [dlus dlusfilter] [name punamefilter]

Displays the SNASw PUs

Router#show snasw rtp [brief | detail] [class-of-service cosname] [cpname netid.cpname] [name connectionnamefilter] [tcid tcidconnection]

Displays the SNASw Rapid Transport Protocol (RTP) connections

You can troubleshoot SNASw by issuing any of the commands listed in Table 3 in privileged EXEC mode.

Table 3. SNASw Troubleshooting Commands

Command

Purpose

Router#ping sna [-1] [-c consecutive packets]
[-i number-iterations] [-m mode] [-n] [-r] [-s size]
[-t tpname] [-u userid -p password] destination

Initiates an APPC session with a named destination LU to run the APING transaction program to check network integrity and timing characteristics

Router#show snasw dlctrace [all | last | next] [brief | detail] [filter filter-string] [id recordid]

Displays the captured DLC trace information to the console

Router#show snasw ipstrace [all | next | last]
[filter filterstring] [id recordid]

Displays the interprocess signal trace on the router console

Router#show snasw pdlog [brief | detail] [all] [last] [next] [filter filterstring] [id recordid]

Displays entries in the cyclical problem determination log to the console

Router#show snasw summary-ipstrace [id recordid]
[last number-records | filter number-records | all | next | last]

Displays the special "footprint" summary interprocess signal trace on the router console

Router#snasw dump

Initiates file transfer of SNASw trace files from internal buffers to a file server

Router#snasw pathswitch [rtp-connection-name | all]

Forces an HPR pathswitch for an RTP connection

Router#snasw start | stop arbdata local-tcid

Starts/stops the display of arbdata router log messages for the specified SNASw rtp

You can also troubleshoot SNASw by issuing any of the commands listed in Table 4 in global configuration mode.

Table 4. SNASw Trace Commands

Command

Purpose

Router#snasw dlcfilter [link linkname [session session-address]] [port portname] [rmac mac-address-value [session session-address]] [rtp rtpname [session session-address]] [[type [cls] [hpr-cntl] [hpr-data] [isr] [xid]]

Filters frames captured by the snasw dlctrace or debug snasw dlc commands

Router#snasw dlctrace [buffer-size buffer-size-value] [file filename] [frame-size frame-size-value] [format brief | detail | analyzer] [nostart]

Traces frames arriving at and leaving SNASw

Router#snasw event [cpcp] [dlc] [implicit-ls] [port]

Indicates which events are logged to the console

Router#snasw ipsfilter [as] [asm] [bm] [ch] [cpc] [cs] [di] [dlc] [dma] [dr] [ds] [es] [ha] [hpr] [hs] [lm] [mds] [ms] [nof] [pc] [ps] [pu] [px] [rm] [rtp] [ru] [scm] [sco] [sm] [spc] [ss] [trs]

Filters interprocess signal trace elements being traced via the snasw ipstrace or debug snasw ips commands

Router#snasw ipstrace [buffer-size buffer-size-value] [file filename]

Sets up a trace buffer and begins tracing interprocess signal trace elements

Router#snasw pdlog [problem | error | info] [buffer-size buffer-size-value] [file filename timestamp]

Controls logging of messages to the console and the SNA problem determination log cyclic buffer

APPENDIX D: SENSE DATA

Messages may include "sense" data to describe particular types of failures and causes. Table 5 lists common sense codes and their meanings.

Table 5. Native IP DLC Link Activation Failure Sense Data

Error Description

Sense Data

The link specified in the RSCV is not available.

X'08010000'

The limit for null exchange identifier (XID) responses by a called node was reached.

X'0809003A'

A BIND was received over a subarea link, but the next hop is over a port that supports only HPR links. The receiver does not support this configuration.

X'08400002'

The contents of the DLC Signaling Type (X'91') subfield of the TG Descriptor (X'46') control vector contained in the RSCV were invalid.

X'086B4691'

The contents of the IP Address and Link Service Access Point (LSAP) Address (X'A5') subfield of the TG Descriptor (X'46') control vector contained in the RSCV were invalid.

X'086B46A5'

No DLC Signaling Type (X'91') subfield was found in the TG Descriptor (X'46') control vector contained in the RSCV.

X'086D4691'

No IP Address and Link Service Access Point Address (X'A5') subfield was found in the TG Descriptor (X'46') control vector contained in the RSCV.

X'086D46A5'

Multiple sets of DLC signaling information were found in the TG Descriptor (X'46') control vector contained in the RSCV. IP supports only one set of DLC signaling information.

X'08770019'

Link Definition Error: A link is defined as not supporting HPR, but the port only supports HPR links.

X'08770026'

A called node found no TG Identifier (X'80') subfield within a TG Descriptor (X'46') control vector in a prenegotiation XID for a defined link in an IP network.

X'088C4680'

The XID3 received from the adjacent node does not contain an HPR Capabilities (X'61') control vector. The IP port supports only HPR links.

X'10160031'

The RTP Supported indicator is set to 0 in the HPR Capabilities (X'61') control vector of the XID3 received from the adjacent node. The IP port supports only links to nodes that support RTP.

X'10160032'

The Control Flows over RTP Supported indicator is set to 0 in the HPR Capabilities (X'61') control vector of the XID3 received from the adjacent node. The IP port supports only links to nodes that support control flows over RTP.

X'10160033'

The LDLC Supported indicator is set to 0 in the HPR Capabilities (X'61') control vector of the XID3 received from the adjacent node. The IP port supports only links to nodes that support LDLC.

X'10160034'

The HPR Capabilities (X'61') control vector received in XID3 does not include an IEEE 802.2 LLC (X'80') HPR Capabilities subfield. The subfield is required on an IP link.

X'10160044'

Multiple defined links between a pair of switched ports is not supported by the local node. A link activation request was received for a defined link, but there is an active defined link between the paired switched ports.

X'10160045'

Multiple dynamic links across a connection network between a pair of switched ports is not supported by the local node. A link activation request was received for a dynamic link, but there is an active dynamic link between the paired switched ports across the same connection network.

X'10160046'

Link failure.

X'80020000'

Route selection services has determined that no path to the destination node exists for the specified COS.

X'80140001'

For other sense code information, issue the command SENSE xxxxxxxx, where xxxxxxxx is the sense code from the NetView console, or refer to the IBM SNA Formats manual.