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Cisco MGX 8800 Series Switches

Release Notes for Cisco MGX Route Processor Module (RPM-PR) IOS Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX Releases 1.3.00 and 5.0.00

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Table Of Contents

Release Notes for Cisco MGX Route Processor Module (RPM-PR) IOS Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX Releases 1.3.00 and 5.0.00

Contents

About These Release Notes (IOS Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX Release 1.3.00)

New Features

Features Introduced with MGX 8800 Release 1.2.21

Previously Released Features

Automatic Cell Bus Clocking

VISM-PR to RPM-PR Connectivity

Configuring the Cell Bus Clock (CBC) Rate

LDP on RPM Running MGX Release 1.2.02 and Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)T1

Multi-LVC on RPM Running MGX Release 1.2.02 and Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)T1

Bypass Feature for RPM in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(4)T

Features Not Supported in This Release

RPM Redundancy Support

SNMP MIB

Notes and Cautions

Special Upgrade Procedure for Cisco IOS Release 12.1(5.3)T_XT

UPC Connection Parameters

Booting the RPM-PR

RPM-PR Bootflash Precautions

CLI Modifications in the MGX Release 1.2.21

Limitations and Restrictions

CWM Recognition of RPM-PR and MGX-RPM-128M/B Back Cards

RPM/B and RPM-PR Front Card Resets on the Back Card Removal

RPM/B and RPM-PR Back Ethernet Card Support

MGX-RPM-128M/B Ethernet Back Card Support

RPM/B and RPM-PR Limitations and Restrictions (MGX Release 1.3.00)

Resolved Caveats—Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX 1.3.00

Open Caveats—Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX 1.3.00

Compatibility Notes

RPM Boot File and Firmware File Names and Sizes

RPM Compatibility Matrix

MGX RPM/B and RPM-PR Hardware

Special Installation and Upgrade Requirements

Cisco IOS Release Compatibility Information

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(15)T5 Release

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(11)T1 Release

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(8)T4 Release

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(8)T1 Release

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T3 Release

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T1 Release

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T Release

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(2)T2 and 12.2(2)T3 Release

About the Cisco IOS 12.1(5.3)T_XT Release

Problems Fixed with Cisco IOS 12.1(5.3)T_XT

Upgrading from an MGX-RPM-128M/B Card to an RPM-PR Card

Upgrade Procedures for RPM Cards in MGX Release 1 (PXM1) Switches

Upgrading RPM Boot Software

Upgrading RPM Runtime Software

Upgrade Procedure for Boot Software and Runtime Software for Non-Redundant Cards

Upgrading RPM Boot Software and Runtime Software for 1:N Redundancy

Using XModem to Download Flash to RPM Cards

About These Release Notes (MGX 5.0.00)

New Features

Features Introduced with MGX 8800 Release 4.0.10

Previously Released Features

RPM Image Directory Change From E:RPM to C:/FW

Automatic Cell Bus Clocking

New Fields Added to dspcd

Using the switchredcd Command with RPM-PR Cards to Switch from Active to Standby Card

VISM-PR to RPM-PR Connectivity

Configuring the Cell Bus Clock (CBC) Rate

LDP on RPM-PR in MGX 8850 and MGX 8950

Multi-LVC on RPM in MGX 8850 and MGX 8950 Release 2.1.76 Running Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)T1

Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) over ATM using VC Merge in MGX 8850 and MGX 8950 Release 2.1.76 Running Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)T

Bypass Feature for RPM in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(4)T

Features Not Supported in This Release

RPM Redundancy Support

SNMP MIB

Notes and Cautions

UPC Connection Parameters

Booting the RPM-PR

RPM-PR Bootflash Precautions

CLI Modifications in MGX Release 5.0.00

Limitations and Restrictions

CWM Recognition of RPM-PR Back Card

RPM Front Card Resets on the Back Card Removal

RPM-PR Back Ethernet Card Support

RPM-PR Limitations and Restrictions (PXM45 and PXM1E)

Resolved Caveats—Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX 5.0.00

Open Caveats—Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX 5.0.00

Compatibility Notes

RPM Boot File and Firmware File Names and Sizes

RPM Compatibility Matrix

MGX RPM-PR Hardware

Special Installation and Upgrade Requirements

Cisco IOS Release Compatibility Information

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(11)T1 Release

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(8)T4 Release

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(8)T1 Release

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T3 Release

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T1 Release

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T Release

Upgrade Procedures for RPM-PR Cards in MGX 8000 Release 2.1 and Release 3 (PXM45 and PXM1E) Switches

Upgrading RPM Boot Software

Upgrading RPM Runtime Software

Upgrade Procedure for Boot Software and Runtime Software for Non-Redundant Cards

Upgrade Procedure for RPM-PR cards in MGX8000 Release 4 (PXM45 and PXM1E) Switches

Using XModem to Download Flash to RPM Cards

Related Documentation

Obtaining Documentation

Documentation Feedback

Obtaining Technical Assistance

Cisco.com

Technical Assistance Center

Cisco TAC Web Site

Cisco TAC Escalation Center


Release Notes for Cisco MGX Route Processor Module (RPM-PR) IOS Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX Releases 1.3.00 and 5.0.00


These release notes are part OL-4535-01 Rev. B0, August 18, 2004

Contents

About These Release Notes (IOS Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX Release 1.3.00)

Note that for MGX Release 1.3.00, the user documentation (command reference, overview, and installation and configuration guides) were not updated. Use the Release 1.1.3 and 1.2.10 documents in addition to this release note.

Product documentation for MGX 8850 is available at the following URL:
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/wanbu/mgx8850/12/index.htm

Product documentation for MGX 8250 is available at the following URL: http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/wanbu/mgx8250/12/index.htm

Product documentation for MGX 8230 is available at the following URL:
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/wanbu/mgx8230/12/index.htm

Product documentation for VISM 3.0(0) is available at the following URLs:
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/wanbu/mgx8850/

Product documentation for RPM-PR 2.1 and these release notes are available at the following URLs:
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/wanbu/mgx8850/12/rpm/index.htm
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/wanbu/mgx8250/12/rpm/index.htm
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/wanbu/mgx8230/12/rpm/index.htm

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New Features

No new features are introduced with this release.

Features Introduced with MGX 8800 Release 1.2.21

RPM in MGX 8800 Release 1.2.21 supports all new and existing features introduced in the Release 1.2.x baseline. There were four new features introduced for RPM implementations using IOS Release 12.2(15)T5:

MPLS CoS Transparency

This feature allows the service provider to set the MPLS experimental field instead of overwriting the value in the customer's IP precedence field. The IP header remains available for the customer's use; the IP packet's CoS is not changed as the packet travels through the multiprotocol label switching (MPLS) network.

Configuration information can be found at http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios122/122newft/122t/122t13/ftdtmode.htm

cRTP with MQC

The MQC acronym refers to the Modular Quality of Service (QoS) Command-Line Interface (CLI). RPM in MGX 8800 Release 1.2.21 supports using the MQC to configure the Compressed Real-Time Protocol (CRTP) header.

Below are the CLI commands introduced to support this feature:

ip rtp header-compression - enables RTP header compression for a particular interface.

no ip rtp header-compression - disables RTP header compression for a particular interface.

clear ip rtp header-compression <interface> - resets all statistics for the interface to 0.

show ip rtp header-compression <interface> [detail] - shows all statistics for an interface.

show policy-map int sw1.x -shows the number of packets which are compressed because of match in policy map.

Configuration information can be found at http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios122/122newft/122t/122t13/fthdrcmp.htm

LSC Redundancy

Configuration information can be found at
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/wanbu/8850px1e/rel4/scg/rpm.htm

MVPN

The frame-based Multicast VPN (MVPN) feature enables the RPM in MGX 8800 Release 1.2.21 to pass frame-based multicast traffic to VPNs across the ATM core.

Configuration information can be found at:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios122s/122snwft/release/122s14/fs_mvpn.htm

Previously Released Features

Automatic Cell Bus Clocking

To implement automatic cell bus clocking, a new -autoClkMode option has been added to the xcnfcbclk command. The default is disabled for backward compatibility. When the feature is enabled by entering the xcnfcbclk -autoClkMode enable command, the PXM scans the whole shelf to see whether there are any two RPMs residing on the same cell bus and changes that cell bus to be running at 42MHz clock rate. The clock rate for the rest of the cell buses are not changed. The active PXM updates the disk DB and sends the update to the standby PXM.

When the feature is enabled, the user will not be able to configure the cell bus clock rate manually for any of the cell buses. When disabled with xcnfcbclk -autoClkMode disable command, the PXM will not change the clock rate for any of the cell bus, but will still update the disk DB and send the update to the standby PXM.


Note The command to enable or disable the feature is on a per shelf basis.



Note The clock will be automatically changed to 21 MHz if one of the two RPM-PRs residing on the same cell bus is removed from the shelf.



Note After disabling the automatic cell bus clocking, you can manually configure the cell bus clock.


The output of dspcbclk command changes to reflect this new feature. A new column is added to show whether the feature is enabled or disabled on the cell buses.When the feature is enabled and an RPM card is inserted, the PXM checks whether the card that resides next to it on the same cell bus is also an RPM card. If both cards are RPM cards, and neither of them is in failed, reserved, unknown, self-test-fail, or no-card state, the cell bus clock rate is automatically set to 42MHz.

Conversely, when the feature is enabled, and an RPM card with a cell bus clock rate of 42MHz is removed or fails, the PXM sets the cell bus to 21MHz, as shown in the following example.

mgx574.1.7.PXM.a > dspcbclk

     CellBus    Rate (MHz)     Slot     AutoClkMode
    --------------------------------------------------
       CB1         21           1, 2       disable
       CB2         21           3, 4       disable
       CB3         21           5, 6       disable
       CB4         21        17 - 22       disable
       CB5         21          9, 10       disable
       CB6         21         11, 12       disable
       CB7         21         13, 14       disable
       CB8         21        25 - 30       disable

mgx574.1.7.PXM.a > cnfcbclk 1 42

WARNING: Certain Service Modules will not operate at the clock rate you specified.
         Please check the Service Modules in the slots where the Cell Bus clock rate is 
effected by this command.

mgx574.1.7.PXM.a > cnfcbclk 5 42

WARNING: Certain Service Modules will not operate at the clock rate you specified.
         Please check the Service Modules in the slots where the Cell Bus clock rate is 
effected by this command.

mgx574.1.7.PXM.a > dspcbclk

     CellBus    Rate (MHz)     Slot     AutoClkMode
    --------------------------------------------------
       CB1         42           1, 2       disable
       CB2         21           3, 4       disable
       CB3         21           5, 6       disable
       CB4         21        17 - 22       disable
       CB5         42          9, 10       disable
       CB6         21         11, 12       disable
       CB7         21         13, 14       disable
       CB8         21        25 - 30       disable

mgx574.1.7.PXM.a > xcnfcbclk
Not enough arguments (?)
xcnfcbclk "-cb <cellBus> -rate <clockRate> -autoClkMode <autoClkEnable>"
    -cb <cellBus>, where cellBus is a string CB1..CB8
    -rate <clockRate>, where clockRate is 21 or 42 (MHz)
    -autoClkMode <autoClkEnable>, where autoClkEnable is enable or disable

mgx574.1.7.PXM.a > xcnfcbclk -autoClkMode enable

mgx574.1.7.PXM.a > dspcbclk

     CellBus    Rate (MHz)     Slot     AutoClkMode
    --------------------------------------------------
       CB1         42           1, 2       enable 
       CB2         21           3, 4       enable 
       CB3         21           5, 6       enable 
       CB4         21        17 - 22       enable 
       CB5         21          9, 10       enable 
       CB6         42         11, 12       enable 
       CB7         21         13, 14       enable 
       CB8         21        25 - 30       enable

VISM-PR to RPM-PR Connectivity

VISM Release 3.0 introduced the new VISM-PR front cards for Cisco MGX Release 1.2.21 and Cisco IOS Release 12.2(15)T. The new VISM-PR-8E1 and VISM-PR-8T1 cards work in the MGX 8230, MGX 8250, and MGX 8850 PXM1-based switches, in combination with the PXM1 Processor Module card. The VISM-PR card supports 144 channels when used with the G.723.1 codec, whereas the current VISM card supports 64 channels with the G.723.1 codec.

Setting connections between a VISM-PR card and a RPM-PR card in your MGX 8230, MGX 8250, or MGX 8850 PXM1-based switch chassis requires that you use the new VBR (NRT)3 connection type.

For more information, refer to the Cisco VISM Installation and Configuration Guide.

Configuring the Cell Bus Clock (CBC) Rate

As of Cisco MGX Release 1.2.10 and Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)T4), when two RPM-PR cards are on the same cell bus, that is, they occupy adjacent slots (for example, slots 1 and 2 or slots 3 and 4), the cell bus clock (CBC) rate should be manually set to 42MHz. Correspondingly, if there is only one RPM on the cell bus, the clock should be at the default value of 21 MHz.

If, for any reason, one of the adjacent RPM-PRs goes to Failed or Empty state, the CBC for that cell bus must be reconfigured for the Traffic Shaping to work correctly on the active RPM. On MGX 1 switches with Release 1.2.10, the 42MHz to 21 MHz change must be explicitly performed using the cnfcbclk command. Use the dspcbclk command from the PXM1 to confirm the cell bus clock rate.

The following screen output displays the use of the cnfcbclk and dspcbclk commands used to change the clock on cell bus 1 (for slots 1 and 2) from 21 MHz to 42 MHz and confirm the change.

PXM> dspcbclk

     CellBus    Rate (MHz)    Slot
    -------------------------------
       CB1         21        1, 2
       CB2         21        3, 4
       CB3         21        5, 6
       CB4         21        17 - 22
       CB5         21        9, 10
       CB6         21        11, 12
       CB7         21        13, 14
       CB8         21        25 - 30

PXM> cnfcbclk CB1 42
WARNING: Certain Service Modules will not operate at the clock rate you specified.
         Please check the Service Modules in the slots where the Cell Bus clock rate is 
effected by this command

mgx3.1.7.PXM.a > dspcbclk

     CellBus    Rate (MHz)    Slot
    -------------------------------
       CB1         42        1, 2
       CB2         21        3, 4
       CB3         21        5, 6
       CB4         21        17 - 22
       CB5         21        9, 10
       CB6         21        11, 12
       CB7         21        13, 14
       CB8         21        25 - 30

RPM makes use of idle cells for Traffic Shaping and Scheduling. If there are two RPMs in adjacent slots on the same cell bus and one of the RPMs is put into a Failed state by the PXM, while that card is actually alive, then the "Failed" RPM must stop sending idle cells to avoid impacting the Traffic Shaping on the adjacent functional RPM. The command that implements the RPM support for this feature is rpm-auto-cbclk-change.

rpm-auto-cbclk-change enables the RPM to stop sending idle cells in the event of being put into a "FAILED" state by the PXM and thus prevent an impact on the Traffic Shaping on an adjacent functional RPM.

no rpm-auto-cbclk-change which disables the feature to stop sending of idle cells if the RPM is put into a FAILED state. This command may be used if Traffic Shaping is not required.

The following screen output displays an example of the rpm-auto-cbclk-change command.

RPM-11#config  terminal
  Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
  RPM-11(config)#int sw1
  RPM-11(config-if)#rpm-auto-cbclk-change
  RPM-11(config-if)#end
  RPM-11#write mem
  Building configuration...
  [OK]
  RPM-11#show run int sw1
Building configuration...

Current configuration :142 bytes
!
interface Switch1
 no ip address
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 rpm-auto-cbclk-change
 switch autoSynch off
end
! rpm_tag_id Apr 04 2002 02:49:04

If Traffic Shaping is not a requirement, enter the no rpm-cbclk-change command, either manually or during card configuration. The following screen output displays an example of the no rpm-auto-cbclk-change command.

RPM-11#config  terminal
  Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
  RPM-11(config)#int sw1
  RPM-11(config-if)#no rpm-auto-cbclk-change
  RPM-11(config-if)#end
  RPM-11#write mem
  Building configuration...
  [OK]
  RPM-11#show run int sw1
Building configuration...

Current configuration :145 bytes
!
interface Switch1
 no ip address
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 no rpm-auto-cbclk-change
 switch autoSynch off
end
! rpm_tag_id Apr 04 2002 02:49:57

Note By default on the RPM this feature is enabled.


LDP on RPM Running MGX Release 1.2.02 and Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)T1

The MPLS label distribution protocol (LDP), as standardized by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and as enabled by Cisco IOS software, allows the construction of highly scalable and flexible IP Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) that support multiple levels of services.

LDP provides a standard methodology for hop-by-hop or dynamic label distribution in an MPLS network by assigning labels to routes that have been chosen by the underlying Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) routing protocols. The resulting labeled paths, called label switch paths (LSPs), forward label traffic across an MPLS backbone to particular destinations. These capabilities enable service providers to implement Cisco's MPLS-based IP VPNs and IP+ATM services across multivendor MPLS networks.

From a historical and functional standpoint, LDP is a superset of Cisco's pre-standard Tag Distribution Protocol (TDP), which also supports MPLS forwarding along normally routed paths. For those features that LDP and TDP share in common, the pattern of protocol exchanges between network routing platforms is identical. The differences between LDP and TDP for those features supported by both protocols are largely embedded in their respective implementation details, such as the encoding of protocol messages, for example.

This software release of LDP provides the means for transitioning an existing network from a TDP operating environment to an LDP operating environment. Thus, you can run LDP and TDP simultaneously on any given router platform. The routing protocol that you select can be configured on a per-interface basis for directly-connected neighbors and on a per-session basis for non-directly-connected (targeted) neighbors. In addition, a label switch path (LSP) across an MPLS network can be supported by LDP on some hops and by TDP on other hops.

MPLS LDP offers the following features:

IETF Standards-based label distribution protocol

Multi-vendor interoperability

TDP to LDP migration and interoperability

Multi-LVC on RPM Running MGX Release 1.2.02 and Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)T1

This feature enables support for initiation of multiple label switched paths (LSPs) per destination on the RPM. Different label switched paths are established for different class of services. This feature enables interface level queueing rather than per-vc level on the RPM based on MPLS class of service policy. With Multi-LVC support, customers can deploy IP VPN services with Class of Service SLAs.

Bypass Feature for RPM in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(4)T


Note Information about the bypass feature and the IOS commands used to support it was not available at the time of the printing of the RPM documents; therefore, it is included in the these release notes.


RPM cards have a maximum storage of 128 KB for the NVRAM. This size limitation creates a problem for customers with large configurations, who find it impossible to store the complete configuration in the NVRAM, even with compression enabled.

In order to support storage of large configuration files, a new bypass feature is now available in the 12.2(4)T IOS Release. With the bypass feature enabled, the enhanced "write memory" is used to bypass the NVRAM and save the configuration on:

For MGX Release 1, the file auto_config_slot## located in the C:/RPM directory on the PXM1.

Where ## represents the zero-padded slot number in which the RPM card is seated in the MGX chassis.

To enable the bypass feature, issue the command rpmnvbypass from the IOS run time image—not in the IOS boot image.

To disable the bypass feature, enter the command no rpmnvbypass.

To verify that the bypass feature is either enabled or disabled, enter the show running-configuration command. If the bypass feature is enabled, rpmnvbypass is seen on the display. If it is not seen, the feature is not enabled.


Note Because the bypass feature bypasses NVRAM, it is not necessary to compress the configuration file using the command service compress-config.


Table 1 contains cautions important to the successful usage of the bypass feature.

Table 1 Boot Cautions 

Caution
Why is This Important?

When using the bypass feature, you can load the run time IOS image from the PXM hard-drive or from the boot flash.

In the case of an RPM module, the IOS image can be loaded in 3 ways:

1. From the PXM hard-drive.

2. From the boot flash.

3. From the network (for example, via TFTP) from the RPM backcard (Ethernet or Fast Ethernet).

When the bypass feature is enabled, the boot config statement:

c:auto_config_slot## 

is automatically generated. The NVRAM configuration is cleared upon entering a write memory command. In order to load from the network, the RPM must have an IP address for its backcard. This information is part of the NVRAM configuration, which was just cleared by enabling the bypass feature. Hence, it is not possible to load the IOS image from the network upon a reload of the RPM after the rpmnvbypass and write memory commands have been executed.

Do not execute the command no boot config.

Doing so may prevent the bypass feature from working properly.

When the bypass feature is enabled, the boot config statement:

c:auto_config_slot##

is automatically generated, and the NVRAM configuration is cleared.

Any writes are subsequently directed to the boot config file. This is essential, as a write memory command expects the boot config statement to be present.

If the boot config statement is not present, entering the write memory command would write the configuration into the NVRAM, which is not desirable when the objective is to save a complete configuration when the configuration is large and requires more space.

If the command write memory is issued with the bypass feature enabled, and is consequently followed by an RPM card reset, previous versions of the boot image will trigger the RPM card to go into boot mode (unable to load run-time IOS).

For safety purposes, the location of the system image is stored in a special area (called the ROMMON area) in the NVRAM. The ROMMON is always intact.

The 12.2(4)T boot image accesses and reads ROMMON in order to load the IOS image. Boot images prior to 12.2(4)T do not read the ROMMON area.

Generally, the IOS boot and run-time images are of the same versions. However, if you change the boot image to one prior to 12.2(4)T, on a reload, the boot image would see that the NVRAM configuration is empty, which is normal when the bypass feature is enabled. But because boot images prior to 12.2(4)T cannot access the ROMMON area, it cannot read the location of the IOS image. Unable to see the IOS image, it instead loads itself.


Example 1 through Example 5 illustrate how the bypass feature is enabled and disabled, and how to validate each of these actions from the configuration display.

Example 1 Running configuration without the bypass feature enabled

rpm_slot02#show running-config
Building configuration...

Current configuration : 470 bytes
!
version 12.2
service timestamps debug uptime
service timestamps log uptime
no service password-encryption
!
hostname rpm_slot02
!
boot system c:rpm-js-mz.<new_rel>
enable password cisco
!
ip subnet-zero
!
!
!
!
interface Switch1
 no ip address
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 switch autoSynch off
!
ip classless
no ip http server
ip pim bidir-enable
!
!
snmp-server community public RO
snmp-server community private RW
!
!
line con 0
line aux 0
line vty 0 4
 no login
!
end

Example 2 Enable the bypass feature (rpmnvbypass)

rpm_slot02#
rpm_slot02#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
rpm_slot02(config)#rpmnvbypass
The "boot config" statement has been (re)added to your
running configuration. Do not remove it else risk not
using the nvbypass feature

rpm_slot02(config)#end
rpm_slot02#

Example 3 Running configuration with bypass feature enabled (note rpmnvbypass at end of output)

rpm_slot02#show running-config
Building configuration...

Current configuration : 515 bytes
!
version 12.2
service timestamps debug uptime
service timestamps log uptime
no service password-encryption
!
hostname rpm_slot02
!
boot system c:rpm-js-mz.<new_rel>
boot config c:auto_config_slot02    <==== Line added as per output above
enable password cisco
!
ip subnet-zero
!
!
!
interface Switch1
 no ip address
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 switch autoSynch off
!
ip classless
no ip http server
ip pim bidir-enable
!
!
snmp-server community public RO
snmp-server community private RW
!
!
line con 0
line aux 0
line vty 0 4
 no login
!
rpmnvbypass
end

Example 4 Disable the bypass feature (no rpmnvbypass)

rpm_slot02#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
rpm_slot02(config)#no rpmnvbypass
rpm_slot02(config)#end
rpm_slot02#

Example 5 Running configuration after the bypass feature is disabled

rpm_slot02#show running-config
Building configuration...

Current configuration : 503 bytes
!
version 12.2
service timestamps debug uptime
service timestamps log uptime
no service password-encryption
!
hostname rpm_slot02
!
boot system c:rpm-js-mz.<new_rel>
boot config c:auto_config_slot02
enable password cisco
!
ip subnet-zero
!
!
!
!
interface Switch1
 no ip address
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 switch autoSynch off
!
ip classless
no ip http server
ip pim bidir-enable
!
!
snmp-server community public RO
snmp-server community private RW
!
!
line con 0
line aux 0
line vty 0 4
 no login
!
end

rpm_slot02#

Features Not Supported in This Release

The following features are not supported on RPM:

MPLS inter AS

MPLS TE

RPM Redundancy Support

RPM 1:N redundancy is used to switch configuration and traffic from one RPM card to another. The main benefits are:

Route processing continues even if an RPM fails and there is no operator or direct access to swap the failed card or fix the problem.

An RPM card with hardware problems can be fixed while the redundant standby card takes over its functionality.

Software upgrades are easier and can be done with less downtime.

SNMP MIB

SNMP MGX Release 1 MIB are provided with the delivery of this release. The MIB is in standard ASN.1 format and is located in the same directory within the release bundle on CCO. These files may be compiled with most standards-based MIB compilers. The tar file for MIB contains the file release notes that contains the MIB release notes.

For changes in this MIB from the previous release, please refer to the MIB release notes.


Note The old_mib_Format is discontinued as of this release.


Notes and Cautions

The following notes and cautions should be reviewed before using this release.

Special Upgrade Procedure for Cisco IOS Release 12.1(5.3)T_XT

Use the following procedure when upgrading from your current RPM/IOS runtime image 12.1(5.3)T_XT and MGX version for MGX Release 1.2.02 and 1.2.10:


Step 1 RPM IOS boot and runtime images should be upgraded before MGX images are upgraded. Please follow the RPM/IOS image upgrade procedure as specified in the "Upgrade Procedures for RPM Cards in MGX Release 1 (PXM-1) Switches" as described in later sections of this Release Notes Document.

Step 2 MGX software should be upgraded next as illustrated in the following steps.

a. install <image-name>

b. newrev <image-name>

c. commit <image-name>


For more detail on the MGX upgrade procedures, refer to the Release Notes for Cisco MGX 8230, MGX 8250, and MGX 8850 (PXM1), Software Version 1.2.10.

UPC Connection Parameters

In Release 1.1.40 and higher, the default PCR is 50 cps, and the default for policing is "enabled." These settings are insufficient for running RPM ISIS protocol over the connection, and with such settings, the ISIS protocol will fail. The PCR value needs to be increased, depending upon the number of interfaces configured for ISIS on the RPM.

Depending upon your connection type, you can use the following CLIs to modify the PCR parameter.

cnfupccbr

cnfupcvbr

cnfupcabr

cnfupcubr

Booting the RPM-PR

Refer to Chapter 5, "Configuring the MGX RPM" in the Cisco MGX Route Processor Module Installation and Configuration Guide, Release 1.1, (DOC-7812278=) and for complete details on configuring the RPM-PR cards. (See the "Obtaining Documentation" section for information on how to order a printed copy of this manual or locate the manual online.) A summary of the booting and upgrading procedures is presented here for your convenience.

When the RPM-PR is booted, the boot image must be the first file in the bootflash. If the bootflash does not have a valid boot image as a first file, the card may not be able to boot.

You can reboot the RPM-PR from the PXM by entering the command resetcd <card_number> from the switch CLI, where card_number is the slot number of the RPM-PR that is being rebooted.


Note Omitting the card number resets the entire system.


Also, you can reboot the RPM-PR from the RPM-PR using the RPM-PR console port and entering the reload command.

Each time you turn on power to the RPM-PR, by inserting the RPM-PR into the MGX 8850, it goes through the following boot sequence:

1. The RPM-PR runs diagnostics on the CPU, memory, and interfaces.

2. The system boot software, which is the boot image, executes and searches for a valid Cisco IOS image, which is the RPM-PR runtime software.

The source of the Cisco IOS image is determined by the configuration register setting. To verify this setting, you can enter either the show version or show bootvar command. (Refer to the "Viewing the Hardware Configuration" section of the Cisco MGX Route Processor Module Installation and Configuration Guide, Release 1.1 (DOC-7812278=).

a. If the configuration register is set to the factory-default setting of 0x01, RPM-PR will come up and stay in boot mode.

b. If the configuration register is 0x2, the RPM-PR will look for the runtime image either in bootflash or on the PXM1 C:/RPM drive.

3. The search for runtime image is determined by which boot system command is entered.

a. Entering the boot system c:<runtime_image_name> command will result in a search for a runtime image in the C:/RPM directory on the PXM1 hard disk.

b. Entering the boot system bootflash:<runtime_image_name> will result in a search for a run time image in the bootflash.

c. If the boot system bootflash:<runtime_image_name> is not entered, it will result in loading of the first available IOS image from C:/RPM, if one such image is present.

4. If the runtime software is not found after three attempts, the RPM-PR reverts to the boot mode.

5. If a valid Cisco IOS image is found, then the RPM-PR searches for a valid configuration, which can reside in NVRAM or as a configuration file either on the PXM hard disk C:/RPM drive or in bootflash.

If you want to load from a specific configuration file, you should enter either the boot config bootflash:<config_file> command or the boot config c:<config_file> command.

6. For normal RPM-PR operation, there must be a valid Cisco IOS image on the PXM-1 C:/RPM drive or in bootflash, and a configuration in NVRAM or configuration file in bootflash or on the PXM disk.

The first time you boot the RPM-PR, configure the RPM-PR interfaces and save the configuration to a file in NVRAM. Then follow the procedure described in "Initializing the RPM-PR Card." For information on the Cisco IOS instructions, refer to Appendix C, "IOS and Configuration Basics"of the Cisco MGX Route Processor Module Installation and Configuration Guide, Release 2.1 (DOC-7812510=)

RPM-PR Bootflash Precautions

The RPM-PR bootflash is used to store boot image, configuration and "run time" files. The Flash stores and accesses data sequentially, and the RPM-PR boot image must be the first file stored to successfully boot the card. Erasing the boot image or moving it from the first position on the Flash will cause the card to not boot.

The RPM boot image, which comes loaded on the Flash, will work for all RPM IOS images. Therefore, there is no reason to ever delete or move the factory installed boot image.


Caution Erasing or moving the boot image can cause RPM-PR boot failure. When this happens, the RPM card must be returned to Cisco and reflashed.

In order to avoid this unnecessary failure, requiring card servicing, you should

Never erase the boot file from the RPM Flash

Never change the position of the boot file on the RPM Flash

Use care when "squeezing" the Flash to clean it up.

As long as the boot file remains intact in the first position on the flash, the RPM will successfully boot.

CLI Modifications in the MGX Release 1.2.21

There are no new or modified RPM/B or RPM-PR CLI commands for MGX Release 1.2.21.

Limitations and Restrictions

CWM Recognition of RPM-PR and MGX-RPM-128M/B Back Cards

CWM does not distinguish between the Ethernet back card versions installed with the MGX-RPM-128M/B or RPM-PR. There is no functionality difference.

RPM/B and RPM-PR Front Card Resets on the Back Card Removal

The RPM front card may reset on an MGX 8250 and MGX8850 switches with PXM1 as controller card when the ethernet back card is removed or inserted.

This reset problem can be easily avoided if "shut" interface is executed before the removal of the back card.

RPM/B and RPM-PR Back Ethernet Card Support

For Ethernet connectivity with the RPM-PR, the model "/B" four-port Ethernet back card is required (order number: MGX-RJ45-4E/B).

MGX-RPM-128M/B Ethernet Back Card Support

The model "/B" four-port Ethernet back card can be used with the MGX-RPM-128M/B module only in combination with IOS 12.2(2)T2 or higher. The model "/B" back card will not work on the MGX-RPM-128M/B with earlier versions of the IOS.

The order number is order number: MGX-RJ45-4E/B.

Older back cards can be used with any version of the IOS.

4-port Ethernet back card used with MGX-RPM-128M/B
Required IOS

model "/B" back card

12.2(2)T2

earlier back card models

Min. IOS for MGX-RPM-128M/B on MGX 8250 is 12.0(7)T


RPM/B and RPM-PR Limitations and Restrictions (MGX Release 1.3.00)

The RPM/B and RPM-PR limitations and restrictions that apply to this release are as follows:

The MGX-RPM-128M/B is a NPE-150 based router card capable of sustaining 150,000 pps. The RPM-PR is an NPE-400 based router capable of sustaining over 350,000 pps. The RPM-PR will only operate with IOS 12.1(5.3)T_XT or later. For the following section "RPM" refers to both the MGX-RPM-128M/B and the RPM-PR, (unless specifically called out). Some software versions and limitations are not applicable to the RPM-PR because it does not support IOS versions before 12.1(5.3)T_XT.

With MGX-RPM-128M/B versions earlier than 12.0.7T1, some limitations in Inter-Process Communication when the MGX-RPM-128M/B is at high loads can cause the PXM to declare that the MGX-RPM-128M/B has Failed. To avoid this with MGX-RPM-128M/B, software releases earlier than 12.0.7T1, throughput is limited to 62,000 pps, and it is recommended that MPLS configurations are limited to 100 interfaces. With RPM software releases from 12.0.7T1, those limitations are removed. In a separate limitation, the number of directly connected OSPF networks supported by an RPM is currently limited to 27. This means that any or all of the subinterfaces supported by the RPM can run OSPF, but the number of distinct OSPF networks supported is limited to 27. (A work around is available and is discussed below.) The limit of 27 arises because of the overheads of supporting separate link-state databases for separate networks.

In an application where the RPM is a Provider Edge Router in an MPLS Virtual Private Network service, a much better solution in any case is to use a distance-vector routing protocol between the customer routers and the RPM. A distance-vector routing protocol provides exactly the information required for this application: reachability information, and not link-state information. The distance-vector routing protocols supported by the RPM are BGP, RIP v1 and RIP v2, as well as static routing. With RPM software releases from 12.0.7T1, distance-vector routing protocols can be used with as many different networks as subinterfaces.

Note that if the RPM is acting as a Provider Edge Router in an MPLS Virtual Private Network service, and even if OSPF is running in a customer network, it is not necessary to run OSPF between the customer router and the RPM. If the customer edge devices run Cisco IOS, they can redistribute OSPF routing information into RIP using the IOS commands, redistribute RIP in the OSPF configuration, and redistribute OSPF in the RIP configuration. Similar configurations are possible for BGP. (For more information on re advertisement, see the "Configuring IP Routing Protocol-Independent Features" chapter in the Cisco IOS Release 12.0 Network Protocols Configuration Guide, Part 1). Redistribution is not unique to Cisco CPE, and other vendors' equipment also supports redistribution.

Whenever there are 2 RPM cards on adjacent slots, driven by the same cell bus clock, the clock rate should be set to 42 MHz for traffic shaping, using the command cnfcbclk. This configuration will be lost if the node rebuilds due to resetsys or a power cycle. The user will have to manually re-configure the cell bus clock rate after the rebuild, using the cnfcbclk command.

On an MGX 8850 node, when the chassis is loaded with 6 or more RPM-PR cards, and if every card is configured to download the IOS runtime image from the PXM-1 hard disk, occasionally, upon entering a resetsys command or after a power cycle, some of the RPM-PR cards may go into the failed state. To reset the failed RPM-PR cards, enter the resetcd <slot #> command for each failed card.

A single RPM-PR can only function as either an Edge LSR or as an LSC, but not as both.

Total of (OC12 minus T3) Mbps intrashelf traffic for Cell bus based modules are supported.

To configure redundancy, the primary and secondary RPM-PR cards need to be in the Active state and the secondary card should not have any configuration.

Removing a back card does not cause RPM-PR switchover.

After establishing redundancy between two RPM-PR cards with the addred command, you must enter the copy run start command on the primary RPM-PR card to save the configuration change.

If a secondary RPM-PR card is redundant to primary cards x and y, you cannot delete redundancy for only card x.

If you need to enter the switchredcd and switchcc commands, Cisco Systems recommends that you wait at least 5 seconds after issuing the switchredcd command, and then enter the switchcc command.

IOS software images on primary and secondary RPM-PR cards do not have to be compatible, but the IOS software on a secondary card should be at the same level as the primary card or higher.

Whenever the RPM-PR configuration is changed and a user wants to store that configuration, the user must enter the copy run start command on the RPM-PR. If this is not done, the changed configuration will be lost on RPM-PR card reboot or RPM-PR switchover in case of redundancy.

Even though RPM-PR can have 1999 sub interfaces, the usage of sub interfaces should be planned in such a way that it does not cross a safe limit of 1985. This is because each sub interface takes one IDB (interface descriptor block) and the number of IDBs available in the card is 2000. Further, a user might need some IDBs for the RPM-PR back card and its ports.

For RPM/B and RPM-PR PVC dax connections, the slave end must be deleted before the master endpoint.

Resolved Caveats—Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX 1.3.00

Table 2 lists the resolved caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX 1.3.00 as of April 14, 2004.

Table 2 Resolved Caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX 1.3.00 

Caveat Number
Description

CSCeb63762

RPM-SAR RAS enhancement - Ability to reset SAR after crash

CSCec14559

PXM spontaneously fails over during 1:N RPM redundancy testing

CSCed26565

RPM-PR-512 reset multiple times due to SAR APU stall

CSCeb22233

RPM crash after FE backcard OIR

CSCeb61872

sw rev varbind not available when trap 60056 sent for RPM

CSCed40082

Duplicate ping atm command in RPM-PR

CSCed46492

Ethernet 2/1 on RPM-PR stays in shutdown state after switchredcd

CSCeb74637

During the RPM upgrade to 12.2(8)MC2d, startup config disappeared.

CSCed05581

The switch connection configuration in switch subinterfaces is lost after reload in RPM-PR.

CSCdz79827

SNMP loop at cipPrecedenceEntry on switch subinterface of rpm

CSCea26869

IPC message header cache below traceback kept coming

CSCea44854

Error Messages from RPM-PR module for SNMP requests are wrong

CSCea74335

On reloading an RPM-PR card using reload command it prompts for saving the config even if the configuration has not been modified.

CSCeb10082

No indication in the log that clear int sw1 was executed via CLI

CSCeb11734

Traceback messages on slot 14 after upgrade

CSCeb41501

traceback on RPM-PR with only VCC VPC switch partition configured

CSCeb65685

ip cef load-sharing algorithm tunnel command lost upon reset of RPM-PR

CSCeb78535

Multiple alignment errors adding switch connection

CSCeb78905

Incorrect configuration generation for RPM commands

CSCeb81588

Set PCI retry timer to non-zero value for RPM-PR platform

CSCed25513

watchdog timeout when malloc fails while resynching


Open Caveats—Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX 1.3.00

Table 3 lists the open caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX 1.3.00 as of April 14, 2004.

Table 3 Open Caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX 1.3.00 

Caveat Number
Description

CSCec16481

Symptom:

A Cisco device running Internetwork Operating System (IOS) and enabled for the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) Protocol is vulnerable to a Denial of Service (DoS) attack from a malformed OSPF packet. The OSPF protocol is not enabled by default.

Conditions:

The vulnerability is only present in IOS release trains based on 12.0S, 12.2, and 12.3. Releases based on 12.0, 12.1 mainlines and all IOS images prior to 12.0 are not affected. Refer to the Security Advisory for a complete list of affected release trains.

Workaround:

Further details and the workarounds to mitigate the effects are explained in the Security Advisory which is available at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20040818-ospf.shtml.

(This caveat was added August 18, 2004)

CSCed41381

LSNT: Input drops on framed PVC i/f cause ldp session flap

Symptom:

Input cell drops on the ingress frame PVC configured on switch interface which in turn causes LDP/TDP/OSPF flaps sometimes.

Conditions:

This might happen only if there is a lot of core traffic coming on ingress PVC (bigger bandwidth) and gets routed onto small bandwidth egress PVC.

Workaround:

None.

CSCed85438

RPM FE input stuck with burst traffic

Symptoms:

A Fast Ethernet 100BASE-TX port adapter on an RPM-PR card may stop receiving burst traffic packets.

Conditions:

This symptom is observed on a FE RPM-PR Backcard.

To identify this problem, the output of the command "show interface Fast Ethernet" shows no input packets and all packets as overrun:

30 second input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

30 second output rate 100000 bits/sec, 106 packets/sec

0 packets input, 0 bytes

Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles

0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 263523 overrun, 0 ignored

And the output of the command show controllers for the FastEthernet interface show a high number of rx_fifo_overflow, as well as throttled:

throttled=5352, enabled=5352, disabled=0

rx_fifo_overflow=434500, rx_no_enp=0, rx_state=0

Workaround:

To clear the symptom, enter the "shutdown" interface configuration command followed by the "no shutdown" interface configuration command on the FastEthernet interface.

Further Problem Description:

On the output of the command "show controllers" for the FastEthernet interface, locate the value for CFRV. If the last byte is either 0x20, 0x21, 0x22 or 0x23, then the FastEthernet is susceptible to the receive hang condition.

CSCed82475

LSC crash with Address Error (load or instruction fetch) exception

Symptom:

A Label Switch Controller (LSC) may reload unexpectedly when there is an Address Error (load or instruction fetch) exception.

Conditions:

This symptom is observed on a Cisco MGX 8850 Route Processor Module (RPM-PR) that function as an LSC.

Workaround:

None.

CSCed85540

Symptom:

LSC crashes in LSNT

Condition:

This problem was seen during normal operation in LSNT the RPM-PR cards were running 12.2 15(T)4c

Workaround:

None

CSCed74835

Symptom:

When copy big files from Cisco MGX8850 Route Processor Module (RPM-PR) to MGX8850 hard drive, it silently failed.

Conditions:

This happens only if copy of size greater than 8 MB.

Workaround:

None.

CSCec68542

LSNT:SAR not reassemble properly for big packets cause protocol down

Symptom:

SAR does not reassemble properly for big packets cause protocol down Conditions:

RPM-PR works as LER with dual LSCs

disable/enable multi-vc on RPM-PR

1000 spvcs with vrf enabled

500 eBGP sessions

80Mbps input traffic and 6Mbps output ip traffic

Workaround:

Reload card

CSCec76875

LVC tx_count > tx_limit causes i/f to stop passing traffic

Symptoms:

A provider edge (PE) router may not be able to ping other PE routers or a label switch controller (LSC), nor may other platforms be able to ping the PE router.

Conditions:

This symptom is observed on a Cisco MGX platform that is configured with a primary Route Processor Module PRemium (RPM-PR) that functions as a PE router and a secondary RPM.

Workaround:

Reset the primary RPM to initiate a switchover to the secondary RPM. The symptom does not occur on the secondary RPM.

CSCdv24154

Notify new tag mtu value after the interface mtu change.

Symptom:

Setting mtu size in xtagatm interface in LSC defaults to 4470

Condition:

Setting mtu size in xtagatm interface in LSC defaults to 4470

Workaround:

None.

CSCea62571

%UTIL-3-TREE: Data structure error with trace back logged on LSC

Symptom:

%UTIL-3-TREE: Data structure error--attempt to remove an unthreaded node from a tree with trace back logged on LSC

Conditions:

LSC hot redundancy reload LSC

Workaround:

Unknown

CSCea85160

snmpwalk on ifDescr should not respond to aal5 mib variable

Symptom:

snmpwalk on ifDescr responds to aal5 mib variable.

Conditions:

This symptom is observed when we query for the ifDescr

Workaround:

None

CSCea85395

BGP suppressed prefixes not reinstated after condition removed

Symptoms:

Previously suppressed prefixes are not automatically installed in the VRF.

Condition:

After VRF reaches max route limit subsequent prefixes are being suppressed and not installed in the VRF table. After the suppress condition is cleared routes should be put into VRF without any manual intervention.

Workaround:

Clear ip bgp

CSCec02155

All VSI sessions down, xtag to down/down state

Symptom:

All VSI sessions go to down and xtag interfaces to down/down state on LSC

Conditions:

RPM-PR work as LSC

Workaround:

Unknown

CSCec26512

After switchredcd 22 LVCs went to Bwait state

Symptom:

After switchover, 22 LVCs went to Bwait state.

Condition:

After switchover, 22 LVCs went to Bwait state.

Workaround:

None.


Compatibility Notes

RPM Boot File and Firmware File Names and Sizes

The following table displays the RPM boot and firmware file names and sizes for this release.

Table 4 RPM Boot and Firmware File Names and Sizes

 
File Name
File Size (in bytes)

Boot File

rpm-js-mz.123-2.T5

10655280

Firmware File

rpm-boot-mz.123-2.T5

3350304


RPM Compatibility Matrix

MGX SW version
1.1.32
1.1.34
1.1.40

IOS Version

12.1(5.3)T_XT

12.2(2)T2

12.2(4)T

CWM

10.4.01

10.4.01 Patch 1

10.5


MGX SW version
1.2.00 / 2.1.70
1.2.02 / 2.1.76
1.2.10 / 3.0.00
1.2.11 / 3.0.10
1.2.13 / 3.0.20

IOS Version

12.2(4)T1

12.2(8)T11

12.2(8)T4

12.2(11)T1

12.2(11)T2

CWM

10.5.10

10.5.10 Patch 1

11.0.00

11.0.10

11.0.10 Patch 1

1 MGX 1.2.02 has also been certified with IOS 12.2(4)T3.


MGX SW version
1.2.20
1.2.21
1.2.21
1.3.00

IOS Version

12.2(15)T4a

12.2(15)T5

12.3(2)T5

12.3(2)T5

CWM

11.0.11

12.0.00.1

12.0.00.2

15.0.00


MGX RPM/B and RPM-PR Hardware

Table 5 shows the front card and back card compatibility for the RPM/B and RPM-PR hardware supported in this release. The table lists the card model/ name, part numbers, the minimum version and the minimum revisions of each card supported. Note that there may be more than one 800 level part numbers for the same front cards. The minimum version is identified by the last 2 digits of the 800 level numbers.

Table 5 Hardware Compatibility Matrix

Front Cards
Part Number/
Min. Version
Rev.
Back Cards
Part Number/
Min. Version
Rev.

MGX-RPM-128M/B

800-05743-01

A0

MGX-RJ45-FE

MGX-MMF-FE

MGX-RJ45-4E

MGX-MMF-FDDI

MGX-MMF-FDDI/FD

MGX-SMF-FDDI

MGX-SMF-FDDI/FD

800-02735-02

800-03202-02

800-02737-02

800-02857-01

800-03820-01

800-02736-01

800-03822-01

A0

A0

A0

A0

A0

A0

A0

MGX-RPM-PR-256

800-07178-02

A0

MGX-RJ45-FE

MGX-MMF-FE

MGX-RJ45-4E/B

800-02735-02

800-03202-02

800-12134-01

A0

A0

A0

MGX-RPM-PR-512

800-07656-02

A0

MGX-RJ45-FE

MGX-MMF-FE

MGX-RJ45-4E/B

800-02735-02

800-03202-02

800-12134-01

A0

A0

A0


Special Installation and Upgrade Requirements

Existing customers should use the upgrade procedures Upgrade Procedures for RPM Cards in MGX Release 1 (PXM1) Switches and About These Release Notes (MGX 5.0.00) to upgrade. A graceful upgrade from any release previous to the current release is supported. For new customers, the image will be pre-installed and should use the PXM installation procedure to upgrade to future maintenance releases.

Cisco IOS Release Compatibility Information

This section describes the installation requirements and guidelines for RPM modules installed with this release.

All IOS firmware can be downloaded from CCO from the following location:

http://www.cisco.com/kobayashi/sw-center/sw-ios.shtml

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(15)T5 Release

The Cisco IOS 12.2(15)T5 supports existing features on the MGX-RPM-PR and MGX-RPM-128M/B cards.

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(11)T1 Release

The Cisco IOS 12.2(11)T1 supports existing features on the MGX-RPM-PR and MGX-RPM-128M/B cards.

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(8)T4 Release

The Cisco IOS 12.2(8)T4 supports existing features on the MGX-RPM-PR and MGX-RPM-128M/B cards.

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(8)T1 Release

The Cisco IOS 12.2(8)T1 supports existing features on the MGX-RPM-PR and MGX-RPM-128M/B cards and the CBC clock rate configuration feature described in "Features Not Supported in This Release" section.

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T3 Release

The Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T3 supports existing features on the MGX-RPM-PR and MGX-RPM-128M/B cards.

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T1 Release

The Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T1 or higher is used with MGX Release 1.2.00. This IOS release supports new RPM features and continues to support existing features on the RPM-PR and MGX-RPM-128M/B cards.

Note that MPLS inter AS and MPLS TE are not supported features on RPM for this release.

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T Release

The Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T or higher is used with MGX Release 1.1.40. This IOS release supports new RPM features and continues to support existing features on the RPM-PR and MGX-RPM-128M/B cards.

Note that MPLS inter AS and MPLS TE are not supported features on RPM for this release.

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(2)T2 and 12.2(2)T3 Release

The Cisco IOS 12.2(2)T2 and the 12.2(2)T3 Releases are used with MGX Releases 1.1.34 and 1.1.40. This IOS release does not support new RPM features, but has been tested with 1.1.34 and continues to support existing features on the RPM-PR and MGX-RPM-128M/B cards.

Please note the following anomaly in IOS Release 12.2(2)T2:

Problem Description:

Customers upgrading to 12.2(2)T2 image with RPMs might see some e-BGP sessions not coming up when the CE router is running an older version of IOS (12.0, 12.0.xT). This issue was first encountered with CE running 12.0(7)T image. In such cases, the CEs running old IOS versions were not able to create BGP sessions to PEs with the newer image (12.2(2)T2).

The issue is fixed in 12.2(2)T3. Customers who face the problems described with the 12.2(2)T2 image, may upgrade to 12.2(2)T3 image.

Symptom:

MPLS PE doesn't advertise BGP network to CE router running an older IOS image

Conditions:

A Cisco router that is running Cisco IOS Release 12.2(3.1)T or 12.2(2)T and is configured as a provider edge (PE) router may not support Label Distribution Protocol (LDP). This defect might cause the PE router not to advertise any Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) routes to a Cisco 2600 series customer edge (CE) router that is running Cisco IOS Release 12.0(18). However, the CE router will advertise routes to the PE router. Entering the neighbor ce-ipaddress don-capability-negotiate command on the PE router does not correct this defect.

Workaround:

Upgrade the CE router from Cisco IOS Release 12.0(18) to Cisco IOS Release 12.2(2)T3.

About the Cisco IOS 12.1(5.3)T_XT Release

The Cisco IOS 12.1(5.3)T_XT or higher is used with MGX Release 1.1.32 and provides support for:

RPM-PR in any MGX chassis
(Note: RPM-PR is FCS with Release 1.1.32; and General Availability with Release 1.1.34.)

MGX-RPM-128M/Bs in an MGX 8230 chassis

Multiple RPM card types

Cisco IOS 12.1(5.3)T_XT offers no other software features for the RPM.


Note To locate IOS-related anomalies or problems fixed, please refer to IOS release notes.


Problems Fixed with Cisco IOS 12.1(5.3)T_XT

Refer to the Cisco IOS Release 12.1 Release Notes at:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios121/121relnt/index.htm

Upgrading from an MGX-RPM-128M/B Card to an RPM-PR Card

To replace an MGX-RPM-128M/B card with an RPM-PR card, the PXM must be running MGX Software Release 1.1.34 or later, and the RPM must be running IOS release 12.2(4)T or later. Then perform the following procedure.


Step 1 Insert the RPM-PR in a test node.

Step 2 Copy the new RPM-PR boot image to the flash. Verify that the boot image is the first file in the flash.

Step 3 Modify the configuration of the file to use the latest IOS image on the c: drive by entering the boot system c:<IOS_filename> command.

Step 4 Enter the write memory command to save the configuration file in NVRAM.

Step 5 Enter the show bootvar command to check the BOOT variable and to verify that the card us configured to boot from the latest image.

Now the RPM-PR card is ready to replace an MGX-RPM-128M/B card.

Step 6 Verify the following before inserting the RPM-PR in the node:

PXM must be running a minimum firmware release of 1.1.34.

PXM disk contains the latest IOS image specified for the RPM-PR.



Caution Once an MGX-RPM-128M/B card is replaced with a RPM-PR card, the MGX-RPM-128M/B card can not be re-installed. If an attempt is made to re-install the MGX-RPM-128M/B, the module will be put into 'Mismatch'.


Caution After installing the RPM-PR card, be sure not to mix card redundancy.

Upgrade Procedures for RPM Cards in MGX Release 1 (PXM1) Switches

The following sections describe how to upgrade boot and runtime software on RPM cards in detail.

Upgrading RPM Boot Software

At the factory, a boot file is installed in the bootflash on the RPM card and is used to boot the card. The runtime software is updated more frequently than the boot software. However, the boot software is updated occasionally. When you are updating runtime software, check Table 4 to see if a boot software upgrade is required.

The boot software is stored in bootflash memory on the RPM card. To manage the software in bootflash, you access it as if it were a hard disk. For example, in copy and delete file commands, files are identified as bootflash:filename (which is similar to c:filename).

The following example shows a directory of bootflash contents:

Router(boot)#show flash:
-#- ED --type-- --crc--- -seek-- nlen -length- -----date/time------ name
1   .D config   D4F7352A   40330   18      686 Jan 30 2001 18:18:41 auto_config_slot09
2   .D config   CBF007C1   40660    9      688 Feb 22 2001 15:33:11 slot9.cnf
3   .. image    F596869A  2973E8   27  2452744 Feb 28 2001 03:16:05 
rpm-boot-mz_002.001.070.202


Note Although you can display directory contents with the dir bootflash: command, the show flash: command provides more detail. Also, although bootflash and flash are separate entities on other Cisco Systems Routers, both terms refer to the same entity on the RPM.


In the example above, the numbers in the left column indicate the order in which the RPM card will try to load software. The second column shows that the first two files are marked for deletion (D). The last column lists the names of the files stored in bootflash.

When managing the bootflash, you need to keep in mind the following:

When the RPM card is reset, it tries to load the first undeleted bootable image in bootflash.

Files are not removed from bootflash until the squeeze flash: command is entered.


Caution If all bootable images are deleted from bootflash, try to reinstall the bootflash file using the Xmodem download procedure found in Using XModem to Download Flash to RPM Cards. If this does not work, the card must be returned to the factory to be reprogrammed.

Upgrading RPM Runtime Software

The runtime software on the RPM can be loaded from the following sources:

The C:RPM directory on the PXM1 hard disk

Bootflash

A TFTP server on a LAN to which an RPM back card is connected.

Cisco Systems recommends that you configure the RPM card to load from the C:RPM directory on the PXM1 hard disk. Note that images will load much faster from bootflash, but if you are using multiple RPM cards, it takes longer to complete an upgrade because the runtime software must be copied to each RPM card's bootflash instead of to a single location.

At startup, the RPM card attempts to load the software in the order listed in the startup-config file. The following example shows an excerpt from a startup-config file:

!
boot system c:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T
boot system bootflash:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T
boot config c:auto_config_slot09
logging rate-limit console 10 except errors
enable password cisco
!

In the startup-config file example, the RPM card attempts to load the runtime software from the PXM1 card (C:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T) first, and if that fails, it attempts to load the image copy stored in bootflash. This configuration takes longer to upgrade, but it assures the card can reboot if someone accidentally removes the file on the PXM1 hard disk.


Note The convention is lowercase c for RPM commands and uppercase C for switch commands.


To configure the RPM to load upgraded runtime software from the PXM1 hard disk, you need to do the following:

Copy the upgraded file to the PXM1 hard disk

Update the boot system variable in the router startup-config file to load the new file.

Reset the RPM card so that it loads the new file.

RPM cards can be configured for 1:N redundancy as well as for non-redundant configurations. The procedures for both types of configuration are in the sections that follow.


Tip To simplify runtime software updates, copy the runtime file in the C:RPM directory and rename it to a generic name such as rpm-js-mz. The production runtime filenames have version numbers appended to them, but you can change this. This approach allows you to perform future upgrades by copying the file to the hard disk, renaming a copy of the file to your generic name, and resetting each card. The approach eliminates the need to reconfigure IOS on each card to recognize the new filename.


Upgrade Procedure for Boot Software and Runtime Software for Non-Redundant Cards

The following procedure describes how to upgrade boot software and runtime software.


Note The first part of this procedure describes boot software upgrade and the second part describes runtime software upgrade. RPM boot software can be upgraded either in boot mode or in runtime mode. The procedure described here shows an example for runtime mode. The same commands are applicable for upgrading boot software in boot mode.



Step 1 Copy the new boot software file for the RPM card to the switch (C:RPM).

Step 2 Establish a configuration session using any valid user name.

Step 3 Use the cc command to select the RPM card to update.

8850_LA.7.PXM.a > cc 9

(session redirected)

Router>

The switch displays the IOS prompt for the router on the RPM card. From this point on, all commands are Cisco IOS commands.


Note This procedure assumes that you are familiar with Cisco IOS, which is a topic that is beyond the scope of this book. This procedure details only those commands that are unique to setting up RPM on the switch. For general Cisco IOS commands, examples are given to show how to complete the task.


Step 4 Enter Enable mode for the router.

Router>enable
Password: 
Router#

Step 5 To verify router access to the PXM1 hard disk and display the boot file name, enter dir c: command.

Router#dir c:
Directory of c:/

65539  -rw-         815   Sep 13 2001 23:51:10  auto_config_slot09
65540  -rw-     2588780   Mar 22 2001 19:06:54  rpm-boot-mz_002.001.070.201
84611  -rw-     2452768   Apr 05 2001 05:34:44  rpm-boot-mz.122-4.T
66805  -rw-     8529104   Mar 22 2001 19:09:00  rpm-js-mz_002.001.070.201
85809  -rw-     7936012   Apr 05 2001 06:28:54  rpm-js-mz.122-4.T

104857600 bytes total (83068928 bytes free)

Step 6 To display the files in the bootflash, enter the show flash: command.

Router#show flash:
-#- ED --type-- --crc--- -seek-- nlen -length- -----date/time------ name
1   .. image    F596869A  296D88   27  2452744 Feb 28 2001 03:16:05 
rpm-boot-mz_002.001.070.201

30315128 bytes available (2452872 bytes used)

Step 7 To copy new boot software to the bootflash, use the copy command.

Router#copy c:rpm-boot-mz.122-4.T bootflash:
Destination filename [rpm-boot-mz.122-4.T]? 
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
2334044 bytes copied in 35.768 secs (66686 bytes/sec)


Tip When prompted for the destination filename, press enter to use the source filename shown in the prompt. To change the destination filename, type a new filename after the prompt.


Step 8 To verify that the file was copied, enter the show flash: command.

Step 9 To mark an older boot file for deletion from the bootflash, use the del bootflash: command as shown in the following example:

Router#del bootflash:
Delete filename []? rpm-js-mz
Delete bootflash:rpm-js-mz? [confirm]
Router#


Tip To unmark a bootflash file so that it won't be deleted when the squeeze flash: command is run, enter the undelete <number> command, where number is the file number displayed in the left-most column of the show flash: command display.


Step 10 To delete all files that are marked for deletion from bootflash, enter the squeeze flash: command as shown in the following example:

Router(boot)#squeeze flash:
All deleted files will be removed. Continue? [confirm]y
Squeeze operation may take a while. Continue? [confirm]
Squeeze of bootflash complete

Step 11 Enter the show flash: command to verify that the bootflash files are as you want them.


Caution If all bootable images are deleted from bootflash, try to reinstall the bootflash file using the Xmodem download procedure found in Using XModem to Download Flash to RPM Cards and restart the RPM card. If this does not work, the card must be returned to the factory to be reprogrammed. When you are done managing the bootflash, the show flash: command should display at least one bootable image, and the image you want the card to boot from must be the first bootable image in the list.


Tip If the show flash: command does not display a bootable image, copy a bootable image to bootflash as described earlier in this procedure. You can continue to manage the bootflash, even when there are no files in bootflash, until the router is restarted.



Tip If the bootflash contains bootable images and the sequence is such that the card will not start, you can enter rommon mode and load the bootable image. To get into rommon mode, establish a console connection to the RPM card, reset the RPM card using the resetcd <slot> command from the active PXM1 card, then quickly enter the CTRL-[, Break sequence at the RPM console. The command to send a Break depends on the computer platform and software you are using. It may take a couple of attempts to successfully get into rommon mode. When you are in rommon mode, the RPM card displays the rommon 1 > prompt.

Once in rommon mode, you can enter the dir bootflash: command to display the images in bootflash. To boot one of the images, enter a boot command the following format: boot bootflash:filename.

See Using XModem to Download Flash to RPM Cards.


This ends the boot software upgrade procedure. The following steps are for upgrading the runtime software. If you do not want to upgrade the runtime software, you need to restart the RPM card by entering the reload command.

Step 12 Copy the new runtime software file for the RPM card to the switch (C:RPM).

Step 13 Establish a configuration session using any valid user name.

Step 14 If you are using a generic filename for your runtime images, copy the file on the PXM1 hard disk and rename the copied file. For example:

8850_LA.8.PXM.a > copy rpm-js-mz.122-4.T rpm-js-mz

Step 15 If your RPM is already configured to use a file with a generic name, skip to Step 24.

Step 16 Use the cc command to select the RPM card to update.

pop20two.7.PXM.a > cc 9

(session redirected)

Router>

The switch displays the IOS prompt for the router on the RPM card. From this point on, all commands are Cisco IOS commands.


Note This procedure assumes that you are familiar with Cisco IOS, which is a topic that is beyond the scope of this book. This procedure details only those commands that are unique to setting up RPM on the switch. For general Cisco IOS commands, examples are given to show how to complete the task.


Step 17 Enter Enable mode for the router.

Router>enable
Password: 
Router#

Step 18 Configure the RPM card to store its configuration on the PXM1 hard disk by entering the following command:

Router> boot config c:auto_config_slot#

Step 19 Display the startup runtime software filename by entering the show bootvar command.

Router#show bootvar
BOOT variable = c:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T,12;
CONFIG_FILE variable = c:auto_config_slot09
BOOTLDR variable does not exist
Configuration register is 0x2

In the example above, the startup runtime software file is C:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T, and it has a version number attached to it. Another way to view the boot list is to enter the show startup-config command and look for the boot system commands.

Step 20 Enter the router global configuration mode.

Router#config terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.

Step 21 If you need to change the boot system filenames, remove the existing boot list using the boot system command as follows:

Router(config)# no boot system

Step 22 Create a new boot list by entering one or more boot system commands as follows:

Router(config)# boot system c:filename

Replace the filename variable with the name of the new runtime file that was previously transferred to the C:RPM directory on the switch. For example:

Router(config)# boot system c:rpm-js-mz

If you want to enter additional boot system commands, enter them in the order in which you want the RPM card to use them. The following example adds a statement to load from bootflash if the runtime file is not found on the PXM1 hard disk:

Router(config)# boot system bootflash:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T


Note Before the RPM card can load runtime software from bootflash, you must copy the runtime software to the bootflash. The procedure for copying files from the PXM1 hard disk to bootflash is described in a previous section.


Step 23 Exit global configuration mode and save the new configuration.

Router(config)#^Z
Router#copy run start
Destination filename [startup-config]? 
Building configuration...
[OK]

Step 24 To verify the change, enter the show bootvar or show run commands.

Step 25 Switch to the active PXM1 card and reset the RPM card. For example:

Router#cc 8

(session redirected)

8850_LA.8.PXM.a > resetcd 9
The card in slot number 9, will be reset. Please confirm action
resetcd: Do you want to proceed (Yes/No)? y

Upgrading RPM Boot Software and Runtime Software for 1:N Redundancy

Redundancy must be established before you use the procedure in this section. If redundancy has not been established, upgrade each RPM card using the procedure in the next section, "Upgrading Without Redundancy".

To upgrade the RPM runtime software for 1:N redundancy, use the following procedure. (Note that the directory on the PXM1 card uses (C:) and the directory within the router card uses (c:).)

The following procedure describes how to upgrade boot software and runtime software.


Note The first part of this procedure describes boot software upgrade and the second part describes runtime software upgrade. RPM boot software can be upgraded either in boot mode or in runtime mode. The procedure described here shows an example for runtime mode. The same commands are applicable for upgrading boot software in boot mode.



Step 1 Copy the new boot software file for the RPM card to the switch (C:RPM).

Step 2 Establish a configuration session using any valid user name.

Step 3 Use the cc command to select the RPM card to update.

8850_LA.7.PXM.a > cc 9

(session redirected)

Router>

The switch displays the IOS prompt for the router on the RPM card. From this point on, all commands are Cisco IOS commands.


Note This procedure assumes that you are familiar with Cisco IOS, which is a topic that is beyond the scope of this book. This procedure details only those commands that are unique to setting up RPM on the switch. For general Cisco IOS commands, examples are given to show how to complete the task.


Step 4 Enter Enable mode for the router.

Router>enable
Password: 
Router#

Step 5 To verify router access to the PXM1 hard disk and display the boot file name, enter dir c: command.

Router#dir c:
Directory of c:/

65539  -rw-         815   Sep 13 2001 23:51:10  auto_config_slot09
65540  -rw-     2588780   Mar 22 2001 19:06:54  rpm-boot-mz_002.001.070.201
84611  -rw-     2452768   Apr 05 2001 05:34:44  rpm-boot-mz.122-4.T
66805  -rw-     8529104   Mar 22 2001 19:09:00  rpm-js-mz_002.001.070.201
85809  -rw-     7936012   Apr 05 2001 06:28:54  rpm-js-mz.122-4.T

104857600 bytes total (83068928 bytes free)

Step 6 To display the files in the bootflash, enter the show flash: command.

Router#show flash:
-#- ED --type-- --crc--- -seek-- nlen -length- -----date/time------ name
1   .. image    F596869A  296D88   27  2452744 Feb 28 2001 03:16:05 
rpm-boot-mz_002.001.070.201

30315128 bytes available (2452872 bytes used)

Step 7 To copy new boot software to the bootflash, use the copy command.

Router#copy c:rpm-boot-mz.122-4.T bootflash:
Destination filename [rpm-boot-mz.122-4.T]? 
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
2334044 bytes copied in 35.768 secs (66686 bytes/sec)


Tip When prompted for the destination filename, press enter to use the source filename shown in the prompt. To change the destination filename, type a new filename after the prompt.


Step 8 To verify that the file was copied, enter the show flash: command.

Step 9 To mark an older boot file for deletion from the bootflash, use the del bootflash: command as shown in the following example:

Router#del bootflash:
Delete filename []? rpm-js-mz
Delete bootflash:rpm-js-mz? [confirm]
Router#


Tip To unmark a bootflash file so that it won't be deleted when the squeeze flash: command is run, enter the undelete <number> command, where number is the file number displayed in the left-most column of the show flash: command display.


Step 10 To delete all files that are marked for deletion from bootflash, enter the squeeze flash: command as shown in the following example:

Router(boot)#squeeze flash:
All deleted files will be removed. Continue? [confirm]y
Squeeze operation may take a while. Continue? [confirm]
Squeeze of bootflash complete

Step 11 Enter the show flash: command to verify that the bootflash files are as you want them.


Caution If all bootable images are deleted from bootflash, try to reinstall the bootflash file using the Xmodem download procedure found in Using XModem to Download Flash to RPM Cards and restart the RPM card. If this does not work, the card must be returned to the factory to be reprogrammed. When you are done managing the bootflash, the show flash: command should display at least one bootable image, and the image you want the card to boot from must be the first bootable image in the list.


Tip If the show flash: command does not display a bootable image, copy a bootable image to bootflash as described earlier in this procedure. You can continue to manage the bootflash, even when there are no files in bootflash, until the router is restarted.



Tip If the bootflash contains bootable images and the sequence is such that the card will not start, you can enter rommon mode and load the bootable image. To get into rommon mode, establish a console connection to the RPM card, reset the RPM card using the resetcd <slot> command from the active PXM1 card, then quickly enter the CTRL-[, Break sequence at the RPM console. The command to send a Break depends on the computer platform and software you are using. It may take a couple of attempts to successfully get into rommon mode. When you are in rommon mode, the RPM card displays the rommon 1 > prompt.

Once in rommon mode, you can enter the dir bootflash: command to display the images in bootflash. To boot one of the images, enter a boot command the following format: boot bootflash:filename.

See Using XModem to Download Flash to RPM Cards.


This ends the boot software upgrade procedure for the primary card. The following steps are for upgrading the runtime software. If you do not want to upgrade the runtime software for the primary card, skip steps 12 through 24 and go to step 25 to upgrade the boot software on the secondary card.

Step 12 Copy the new runtime software file for the RPM card to the switch (C:RPM).

Step 13 If you are using a generic filename for your runtime images, copy the file on the PXM1 hard disk and rename the copied file. For example:

8850_LA.8.PXM.a > copy rpm-js-mz.122-4.T rpm-js-mz

Step 14 Establish a configuration session using any valid user name.

Step 15 If your RPM is already configured to use a file with a generic name, skip to Step 25.

Step 16 Use the cc command to select the RPM card to update.

pop20two.7.PXM.a > cc 9

(session redirected)

Router>

The switch displays the IOS prompt for the router on the RPM card. From this point on, all commands are Cisco IOS commands.


Note This procedure assumes that you are familiar with Cisco IOS, which is a topic that is beyond the scope of this book. This procedure details only those commands that are unique to setting up RPM on the switch. For general Cisco IOS commands, examples are given to show how to complete the task.


Step 17 Enter Enable mode for the router.

Router>enable
Password: 
Router#

Step 18 Configure the RPM card to store its configuration on the PXM1 hard disk by entering the following command:

Router> boot config c:auto_config_slot#

Step 19 Display the startup runtime software filename by entering the show bootvar command.

Router#show bootvar
BOOT variable = c:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T,12;
CONFIG_FILE variable = c:auto_config_slot09
BOOTLDR variable does not exist
Configuration register is 0x2

In the example above, the startup runtime software file is c:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T, and it has a version number attached to it. Another way to view the boot list is to enter the show startup-config command and look for the boot system commands.

Step 20 Enter the router global configuration mode.

Router#config terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.

Step 21 If you need to change the boot system filenames, remove the existing boot list using the boot system command as follows:

Router(config)# no boot system

Step 22 Create a new boot list by entering one or more boot system commands as follows:

Router(config)# boot system c:filename

Replace the filename variable with the name of the new runtime file that was previously transferred to the C:RPM directory on the switch. For example:

Router(config)# boot system c:rpm-js-mz

If you want to enter additional boot system commands, enter them in the order in which you want the RPM card to use them. The following example adds a statement to load from bootflash if the runtime file is not found on the PXM1 hard disk:

Router(config)# boot system bootflash:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T


Note Before the RPM card can load runtime software from bootflash, you must copy the runtime software to the bootflash. The procedure for copying files from the PXM1 hard disk to bootflash is described in a previous section.


Step 23 Exit global configuration mode and save the new configuration.

Router(config)#^Z
Router#copy run start
Destination filename [startup-config]? 
Building configuration...
[OK]

Step 24 To verify the change, enter the show bootvar or show run commands.

Step 25 Switch to the active PXM1 card. For example:

Router#cc 8

(session redirected)

Step 26 Switch to the secondary card using the switchredcd command as follows:

8850_LA.8.PXM.a > switchredcd <fromSlot> <toSlot>

Replace <fromSlot> with the slot number of the primary card. Replace <toSlot> with the slot number of the secondary card.

This step makes the secondary card active and resets the primary RPM card. When the Primary card resets, it loads the upgraded software.

Step 27 cc to the secondary slot.

Step 28 Repeat steps 1through 11.

This ends the boot software upgrade on the secondary card. If you do not want to upgrade the runtime software, go to step 30.

The following steps are for upgrading runtime software on the secondary card.

Step 29 Repeat steps 12through 24.

Step 30 Switch back to the primary card using the switchredcd command as follows:

8850_LA.8.PXM.a > switchredcd <fromSlot> <toSlot>

Replace <fromSlot> with the slot number of the secondary card. Replace <toSlot> with the slot number of the primary card.

This step makes the primary card active and resets the secondary RPM card. When the reset is complete, the secondary card is ready to run the upgraded software.

Step 31 To verify that the router reboot is complete, enter the dspcds or dspcd <slot> commands. The reboot is complete when the card state displays as Active. Another way to verify router operation is to use the cc slot command. If you can access the router from the switch prompt, the router reboot is complete.

Step 32 If there are other primary cards with redundant (secondary) cards, repeat this procedure for each primary card.


Using XModem to Download Flash to RPM Cards

Use the xmodem feature to download the flash to an RPM/B or RPM-PR card. During this process, the card should be connected to a target machine through HyperTerminal with settings of 9600, n, 8, and 1.


Note This feature is only available for ROMMON image version 12.2(4r)T1 or greater. Use the show version command to the verify the ROMMON version installed on an RPM card.



Step 1 Put the node in monitor mode by entering the priv command to gain access to the privileged commands as follows:

rommon 1> priv
You now have access to the full set of monitor commands. Warning: 
some commands will allow you to destroy your configuration and/or  
system images and could render the machine unbootable.

Step 2 The xmodem command becomes available and the general syntax of this command and availability of this can be checked by giving xmodem command without any parameters on the CLI, as follows:

rommon 2 > xmodem
usage: xmodem [-cys]
-c  CRC-16
-y  ymodem-batch protocol
-s<speed> Set speed of download, where speed may be
          1200|2400|4800|9600|19200|38400
rommon 3 > 

The command line options for xmodem are as follows:

Option
Definition

-c

xmodem performs the download using CRC-16 error checking to validate packets. Default is 8-bit CRC.

-y

xmodem uses Ymodem-batch protocol for downloading, which uses CRC-16 error checking.

-s

Specifies the download speed. Default is 9600 bps.



Note If you do not find the xmodem commands, then the xmodem feature is not available on this rommom version. In that case, you must return the card to Cisco.



Note The rommon "xmodem/ymodem" transfer only works on the console port. You can only download files to the router. You cannot use "xmodem/ymodem" to get files from the router.


For example:

rommon 4> xmodem -cys 38400
Do not start sending the image yet... 
Invoke this application for disaster recovery. Do you wish to 
continue? y/n [n]: y 
Note, if the console port is attached to a modem, both the 
console port and the modem must be operating at the same baud 
rate. Use console speed 38400 bps for download [confirm]

Step 3 At this point, change the preferences in HyperTerminal and adjust the speed from 9600 to 38400.


Note You can continue at the speed of 9600 as well by either not specifying the -s option in the command, or by specifying 9600 explicitly, but it will take longer.


The console will display the following message:

Download will be performed at 38400. Make sure your terminal 
emulator is set to this speed before sending file. Ready to 
receive file ... 

Step 4 Use the Transfer-->Send File option in HyperTerminal to start the image transfer.

In the Filename box, browse and choose the image file to be downloaded. Also since we used the "y" option while invoking the xmodem, set the transfer protocol to ymodem or use Xmodem protocol by not specifying the -y option on the command line.

The transfer screen comes up and transfer starts. (The transfer may not start immediately; wait for some time and it should start.)

After the transfer is completed (it should typically take about 10-15 minutes), the following messages are displayed on HyperTerminal console:

Returning console speed to 9600. 

Please reset your terminal emulator to this speed... 

Step 5 Return the console speed back to 9600 baud through HyperTerminal's Preferences menu option.

Usually, due to time lag between changing HyperTerminal speed back to 9600 baud, you might see a bunch of garbage. To avoid this, disconnect and reconnect the HyperTerminal to get the console back again.

The system will reset itself from here and will boot with new software image.


About These Release Notes (MGX 5.0.00)

Cisco documentation and additional literature are available in a CD-ROM package, which ships with your product. The Documentation CD-ROM, a member of the Cisco Connection Family, is updated monthly. Therefore, it might be more current than printed documentation. To order additional copies of the Documentation CD-ROM, contact your local sales representative or call customer service. The CD-ROM package is available as a single package or as an annual subscription.

Note that for Release 5.0.00, the user documentation (command reference, overview, and installation and configuration guides) use the MGX Release 5 and Cisco IOS documents in addition to this release note.

For RPM-PR, use the Cisco MGX Route Processor Module (RPM-PR) Installation and Configuration Guide, Release 2.1 (DOC-7812510=) along with this release note. The RPM-PR documentation can be found at the following MGX 8850 and MGX 8950 Release 5 URLs:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/wanbu/8850px45/rel5/rpm/rpmpric/index.htm

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/wanbu/8950/rel5/rpm/rpmpric/index.htm

If you are reading Cisco product documentation on the World Wide Web, you can submit comments electronically. Click Feedback in the toolbar, select Documentation, and click Enter the feedback form. After you complete the form, click Submit to send it to Cisco. We appreciate your comments.

New Features

No new features are introduced with this release.

Features Introduced with MGX 8800 Release 4.0.10

RPM in MGX 8000 Release 4.0.10 supports all new and existing features introduced in the Release 4.0 baseline. There were four new features introduced for RPM implementations using IOS Release 12.2(15)T5:

MPLS CoS Transparency

This feature allows the service provider to set the MPLS experimental field instead of overwriting the value in the customer's IP precedence field. The IP header remains available for the customer's use; the IP packet's CoS is not changed as the packet travels through the multiprotocol label switching (MPLS) network.

Configuration information can be found at http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios122/122newft/122t/122t13/ftdtmode.htm

cRTP with MQC

The MQC acronym refers to the Modular Quality of Service (QoS) Command-Line Interface (CLI). RPM in MGX 8800 Release 4.0.10 supports using the MQC to configure the Compressed Real-Time Protocol (CRTP) header.

Below are the CLI commands introduced to support this feature:

ip rtp header-compression - enables RTP header compression for a particular interface.

no ip rtp header-compression - disables RTP header compression for a particular interface.

clear ip rtp header-compression <interface> - resets all statistics for the interface to 0.

show ip rtp header-compression <interface> [detail] - shows all statistics for an interface.

show policy-map int sw1.x -shows the number of packets which are compressed because of match in policy map.

Configuration information can be found at http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios122/122newft/122t/122t13/fthdrcmp.htm

LSC Redundancy

Configuration information can be found at
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/wanbu/8850px1e/rel4/scg/rpm.htm

MVPN

The frame-based Multicast VPN (MVPN) feature enables the RPM in MGX 8800 Release 4.0.10 to pass frame-based multicast traffic to VPNs across the ATM core.

Configuration information can be found at
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios122s/122snwft/release/122s14/fs_mvpn.htm

Previously Released Features

RPM Image Directory Change From E:RPM to C:/FW

Until this release, all files used by RPM were stored in E:RPM. All other service modules, including PXM, stores their firmware files in C:/FW. You can now use C:/FW (or x: from RPM-PR card) directory to download the RPM images. As with all other service modules, by storing all the firmware files, including the RPM files in C:/FW, the router blades can more easily integrate with the shelf architecture.


Note This change is backward compatible. That is, you can still use E:RPM or (e:from RPM card) to access and configure RPM images.


Due to the large number and size of RPM images in the E:RPM directory, the saveallcnf command would timeout. By moving these large image files to the C:/FW directory, and leaving only the configuration files in the E:RPM directory, this change alleviates the timeouts incurred when executing the saveallcnf command.

Automatic Cell Bus Clocking

Auto Clock Setting feature is enabled using the cnfndparms command.

The CLI commands dspcbclk and cnfcbclk allow for manual setting of the cellbus clock rates, as shown in the following listing.


unknown.7.PXM.a > dspcbclk


CellBus Rate (MHz) Slots Allowable Rates (MHz)

----------------------------------------------------------

CB1 21 1, 2 21, 42

CB2 21 3, 4 21, 42

CB3 21 5, 6 21, 42

CB4 21 17 - 22 21

CB5 21 9, 10 21, 42

CB6 21 11, 12 21, 42

CB7 21 13, 14 21, 42

CB8 21 25 - 30 21


To enable automatic setting of cellbus clock rates, a node parameter must be turned on. The CLI commands dspndparms and cnfndparms manipulate the node parameters, as shown in the following listing.


unknown.7.PXM.a > dspndparms
unknown                          System Rev: 03.00   Oct. 02, 2002 13:42:53 PST
MGX8850                                              Node Alarm: MINOR
NODE CONFIGURATION OPTIONS
Opt#  Value       Type           Description
----  -----       ----           -----------
1     3600        16bit Decimal  SHM Card Reset Sliding Window (secs)         
2     3           8bit Decimal   SHM Max Card Resets Per Window (0 = infinite)
3     Yes         Boolean        Core Redundancy Enabled                      
4     No          Boolean        Expanded Memory on PXM45B Enabled            
5     0x0         8bit Hex       Required Power Supply Module Bitmap          
6     0x0         8bit Hex       Required Fan Tray Unit Bitmap                
7     0           8bit Decimal   Trap Manager Aging timeout value(Hour(s))    
8     atm0        8bit Decimal   Primary IP interface for Netmgmt             
9     lnPci0      8bit Decimal   Secondary IP interface for Netmgmt           
10    No          Boolean        Auto Setting of Cellbus Clock Rate Enabled   
11    Yes         Boolean        Inband Node-to-Node IP Connectivity Enabled  

Turning node parameter 10 on allows for automatic setting of cellbus clock rates. After it is enabled, software immediately determines if any cellbus rates need to be changed. If, for example, two RPM-PR cards exist in one cellbus, that cellbus rate will be changed to 42MHz, as shown in the following listing.


unknown.7.PXM.a > cnfndparm 10 yes
NODE CONFIGURATION OPTIONS
Opt#  Value       Type           Description
----  -----       ----           -----------
10    Yes         Boolean        Auto Setting of Cellbus Clock Rate Enabled   

Once enabled, dspcbclk shows that manual setting is no longer allowed, as displayed in the following listing.


unknown.7.PXM.a > dspcbclk

     CellBus    Rate (MHz)    Slots     Allowable Rates (MHz)
    ----------------------------------------------------------
       CB1         21        1, 2            21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB2         21        3, 4            21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB3         21        5, 6            21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB4         21        17 - 22         21
       CB5         21        9, 10           21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB6         21        11, 12          21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB7         21        13, 14          21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB8         21        25 - 30         21

If you attempt to manually configure cellbus clock rate while automatic cellbus rate changes are enabled, you will receive an error message similar to the shown in the following listing.


unknown.7.PXM.a > cnfcblclk 1 42
Err: Illegal value for option -rate
    -cb <cellBus>, where cellBus is a string CB1..CB8
    -rate <clockRate>, where clockRate is 21 or 42 (MHz)

unknown.7.PXM.a > 

New Fields Added to dspcd

The dspcd cli command on the PXM now displays the following additional front and back card information:

Serial Number

800 Part number

73 Part Number

CLEI code

Prior to this release, the following information was displayed:

rswzen2.8.PXM.a > dspcd 3
rswzen2                          System Rev:03.00   Aug. 26, 2002 19:25:49 PDT
MGX8850                                              Node Alarm:MAJOR
Slot Number:  3    Redundant Slot:NONE 

                    Front Card          Upper Card          Lower Card
                    ----------          ----------          ----------

Inserted Card:     RPM_PR              FE_RJ45             ---                
Reserved Card:     UnReserved          UnReserved          UnReserved         
State:             Active              Active              Empty          
Serial Number:                                             ---         
Prim SW Rev:       ---                 ---                 ---
Sec SW Rev:        ---                 ---                 ---
Cur SW Rev:        ---                 ---                 ---
Boot FW Rev:       ---                 ---                 ---
800-level Rev:                                             ---  
800-level Part#:   000-00000-00        000-00000-00        ---         
CLEI Code:                                                 ---        
Reset Reason:      On Reset From Shell
Card Alarm:        NONE                
Failed Reason:     None                
Miscellaneous Information:

As of Release 3.0.10, the following information is displayed:

rswzen2.8.PXM.a > dspcd 1
rswzen2                          System Rev:03.00   Aug. 26, 2002 19:24:24 PDT
MGX8850                                              Node Alarm:MAJOR
Slot Number:  1    Redundant Slot:NONE 

                    Front Card          Upper Card          Lower Card
                    ----------          ----------          ----------

Inserted Card:     RPM_PR              FE_RJ45             ---                
Reserved Card:     UnReserved          UnReserved          UnReserved         
State:             Active              Active              Empty          
Serial Number:     SAG06041R16         SAG053355UV         ---         
Prim SW Rev:       ---                 ---                 ---
Sec SW Rev:        ---                 ---                 ---
Cur SW Rev:        12.2(11)T1           ---                 ---
Boot FW Rev:       12.2(11)T1           ---                 ---
800-level Rev:     A0                  B2                  ---  
800-level Part#:   800-07424-00        800-02560-00        ---         
CLEI Code:         BA3AY30CAA          BAEIAAAAAA          ---        
Reset Reason:      On Reset From Shell
Card Alarm:        NONE                
Failed Reason:     None                
Miscellaneous Information:

Type <CR> to continue, Q<CR> to stop:q

Using the switchredcd Command with RPM-PR Cards to Switch from Active to Standby Card

The MGX RPM-PR uses the switchredcd command to manually change the active card to the standby card as of Cisco MGX Release 3.0 and Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)T4) , similar to other MGX service modules. The switchredcd command replaces the softswitch command that was previously used and is now obsolete.

Be sure to execute the switchredcd command before removing an active RPM-PR card from the MGX 8000 series switch shelf.

See "Upgrade Procedures for RPM-PR Cards in MGX 8000 Release 2.1 and Release 3 (PXM45 and PXM1E) Switches" section and "Upgrade Procedures for RPM Cards in MGX Release 1 (PXM1) Switches" section.

For more information on the switchredcd command, refer to the Cisco MGX 8850, MGX 8950, and MGX 8830 Command Reference (PXM45/B and PXM1E), Release 3.

VISM-PR to RPM-PR Connectivity

The VISM-PR card supports 144 channels when used with the G.723.1 codec, whereas the current VISM card support supports 64 channels with the G.723.1 codec.

The following VISM Release 3.0 features require either the PXM1E or PXM45 card in your MGX 8000 Series switch chassis:

Expanded Clock Source Selection

Private Network-to-Network Interface Priority Routing

Specify a Connection Up or Down

AAL1 and AAL2 Switched Virtual Circuits

As of Cisco MGX Release 3.0 and Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)T4), setting connections between a VISM-PR card and a RPM-PR card in your MGX 8000 Series switch chassis requires that you use the new VBR (NRT) 3 connection type.

If you are using a VISM-PR card in combination with either a PXM1E or PXM45 card, you must use the VBR (NRT) 3 selection when adding a connection. Use the modified addcon or cnfcon commands to configure this connection type.

For more information, refer to the Cisco VISM Installation and Configuration Guide, Release 3.

Configuring the Cell Bus Clock (CBC) Rate

As of Cisco MGX Release 3.0 and Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)T4), when two RPM-PR cards are on the same cell bus, that is, they occupy adjacent slots (for example, slots 1 and 2, slots 3 and 4), the cell bus clock (CBC) rate will be automatically set to 42MHz. Correspondingly, if there is only one RPM on the cell bus, the clock should be at the default value of 21 MHz.

If, for any reason, one of the adjacent RPM-PRs goes to Failed or Empty state, the CBC for that cell bus must be reconfigured for the Traffic Shaping to work correctly on the active RPM. On MGX Release 3, reconfiguration of CBC rate from 42MHz to 21 MHz is done automatically.

RPM makes use of idle cells for Traffic Shaping and Scheduling. If there are two RPMs in adjacent slots on the same cell bus and one of the RPMs is put into a Failed state by the PXM, while that card is actually alive, then the "Failed" RPM must stop sending idle cells to avoid impacting the Traffic Shaping on the adjacent functional RPM. The command that implements the RPM support for this feature is rpm-auto-cbclk-change

rpm-auto-cbclk-change will enable the RPM to stop sending idle cells in the event of being put into a "FAILED" state by the PXM and thus prevent an impact on the Traffic Shaping on an adjacent functional RPM.

no rpm-auto-cbclk-change will disable the feature to stop sending of idle cells if the RPM is put into a FAILED state. This command may be used if Traffic Shaping is not required.

The following screen output displays an example of the rpm-auto-cbclk-change command.

RPM-11#config  terminal
  Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
  RPM-11(config)#int sw1
  RPM-11(config-if)#rpm-auto-cbclk-change
  RPM-11(config-if)#end
  RPM-11#write mem
  Building configuration...
  [OK]
  RPM-11#show run int sw1
Building configuration...

Current configuration :142 bytes
!
interface Switch1
 no ip address
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 rpm-auto-cbclk-change
 switch autoSynch off
end
! rpm_tag_id Apr 04 2002 02:49:04

If Traffic Shaping is not a requirement, enter the no rpm-cbclk-change command, either manually or during card configuration. The following screen output displays an example of the no rpm-auto-cbclk-change command.

RPM-11#config  terminal
  Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
  RPM-11(config)#int sw1
  RPM-11(config-if)#no rpm-auto-cbclk-change
  RPM-11(config-if)#end
  RPM-11#write mem
  Building configuration...
  [OK]
  RPM-11#show run int sw1
Building configuration...

Current configuration :145 bytes
!
interface Switch1
 no ip address
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 no rpm-auto-cbclk-change
 switch autoSynch off
end
! rpm_tag_id Apr 04 2002 02:49:57

Note By default on the RPM this feature is enabled.


LDP on RPM-PR in MGX 8850 and MGX 8950

The MPLS label distribution protocol (LDP), as standardized by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and as enabled by Cisco IOS software, allows the construction of highly scalable and flexible IP Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) that support multiple levels of services.

LDP provides a standard methodology for hop-by-hop, or dynamic label, distribution in an MPLS network by assigning labels to routes that have been chosen by the underlying Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) routing protocols. The resulting labeled paths, called label switch paths or LSPs, forward label traffic across an MPLS backbone to particular destinations. These capabilities enable service providers to implement Cisco's MPLS-based IP VPNs and IP+ATM services across multivendor MPLS networks.

From an historical and functional standpoint, LDP is a superset of Cisco's pre-standard Tag Distribution Protocol (TDP), which also supports MPLS forwarding along normally routed paths. For those features that LDP and TDP share in common, the pattern of protocol exchanges between network routing platforms is identical. The differences between LDP and TDP for those features supported by both protocols are largely embedded in their respective implementation details, such as the encoding of protocol messages, for example.

This software release of LDP provides the means for transitioning an existing network from a TDP operating environment to an LDP operating environment. Thus, you can run LDP and TDP simultaneously on any given router platform. The routing protocol that you select can be configured on a per-interface basis for directly connected neighbors and on a per-session basis for non directly connected (targeted) neighbors. In addition, a label switch path (LSP) across an MPLS network can be supported by LDP on some hops and by TDP on other hops.

MPLS LDP offers the following features:

IETF Standards-based Label distribution protocol

Multi-Vendor Interoperability

TDP to LDP migration and interoperability

Multi-LVC on RPM in MGX 8850 and MGX 8950 Release 2.1.76 Running Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)T1

This feature enables support for initiation of Multiple label switched paths (LSPs) per destination on the RPM. Different label switched paths are established for different class of services. This feature enables interface level queueing rather than per-vc level on the RPM based on MPLS class of service policy. With Multi-LVC support, customers can deploy IP VPN services with Class of service SLAs.

Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) over ATM using VC Merge in MGX 8850 and MGX 8950 Release 2.1.76 Running Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)T

The virtual circuit (VC) merge facility allows a switch to aggregate multiple incoming flows with the same destination address into a single outgoing flow. Wherever VC merge occurs, several incoming labels are mapped to one single outgoing label. Cells from different virtual channel identifiers (VCIs) going to the same destination are transmitted to the same outgoing VC using multipoint-to-point connections. This sharing of labels reduces the total number of VCs required for label switching.

Without VC merge, each path consumes one label VC on each interface along the path. VC merge reduces the label space shortage by sharing labels for different flows with the same destination. Therefore, VC-Merge connections are unidirectional, and furthermore, all merged connections must be of the same service type.


Note To support VC-merge, the ATM switch requires that AXSM cards allow multiple VC frames to be merged into a single VC without interleaving cells inside AAL5 frames. The RPM is the control point, where LSC resides.


VC Merge is enabled by default when the MPLS over ATM network is configured and is only used when the RPM is used as an LSC (Label Switch Controller). Because it is enabled by default, the only commands necessary are:

no tag-switching atm vc-merge to disable VC Merge

and

tag-switching atm vc-merge to enable VC Merge

For more information, see MPLS Label Switch Controller and Enhancements at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios122/122newft/122t/122t8/ftlsc.htm#xtocid15

Bypass Feature for RPM in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(4)T


Note Information about the bypass feature and the IOS commands used to support it was not available at the time of the printing of the RPM documents; therefore, it is included in the these release notes.


RPM cards have a maximum storage of 128 KB for the NVRAM. This size limitation creates a problem for customers with large configurations, who find it impossible to store the complete configuration in the NVRAM, even with compression enabled.

In order to support storage of large configuration files, a new bypass feature is now available in the 12.2(4)T IOS Release. With the bypass feature enabled, the enhanced write memory command is used to bypass the NVRAM and save the configuration on the file auto_config_slot## located in E:/RPM, where ## represents the zero-padded slot number in which the RPM-PR card is seated in the MGX chassis.

To enable the bypass feature, issue the command rpmnvbypass from the IOS run time image—not in the IOS boot image.

To disable the bypass feature, issue the command no rpmnvbypass.

To verify that the bypass feature is either enabled or disabled, issue the show running-configuration command. If the bypass feature is enabled, rpmnvbypass is seen on the display. If it is not seen, the feature is not enabled.


Note Because the bypass feature bypasses NVRAM, it is not necessary to compress the configuration file using the command service compress-config.


Table 6 contains cautions important to the successful usage of the bypass feature.

Table 6 Boot Cautions 

Caution
Why is This Important?

When using the bypass feature, you can only load the run time IOS image from the PXM hard-drive or from the boot flash.

In the case of an RPM module, the IOS image can be loaded in 3 ways:

1. From the PXM hard-drive.

2. From the boot flash.

3. From the network (for example, via TFTP) from the RPM back card (Ethernet or Fast Ethernet).

When the bypass feature is enabled, the boot config statement:

c:auto_config_slot##

is automatically generated. The NVRAM configuration is cleared upon a write memory. In order to load from the network, the RPM has to have an IP address for its backcard. This information is part of the NVRAM configuration, which was just cleared by enabling the bypass feature. Hence, it is not possible to load the IOS image from the network upon a reload of the RPM after the rpmnvbypass and write memory have been executed.

Do not execute the command no boot config because doing so may prevent the bypass feature from working properly.

When the bypass feature is enabled, the "boot config" statement:

c:auto_config_slot##

is automatically generated, and the NVRAM configuration is cleared.

Any writes now are directed to the boot config file. This is essential, as a write memory expects the boot config statement to be present.

If the boot config statement isn't present, it would write the configuration into the NVRAM, which of course, is not desirable when the objective is to save a complete configuration when the configuration is large and requires more space.

If the command write memory is issued with the bypass feature enabled, and is consequently followed by an RPM card reset, previous versions of the boot image will trigger the RPM card to go into boot mode (unable to load run-time IOS).

For safety purposes, the location of the system image is stored in a special area (called the ROMMON area) in the NVRAM. The ROMMON is always intact.

The 12.2(4)T boot image accesses and reads ROMMON in order to load the IOS image. Boot images prior to 12.2(4)T do not read the ROMMON area.

Generally, the IOS boot and run-time images are of the same versions. However, if the user changed his boot image to one prior to 12.2(4)T, on a reload, the boot image would see that the NVRAM configuration is empty (of course, this is normal when the bypass feature is enabled). However, since boot images prior to 12.2(4)T cannot access the ROMMON area, it cannot read there the location of the IOS image. Unable to see the IOS image, it instead loads itself.


Example 6 through Example 10 illustrate how the bypass feature is enabled and disabled, and how to validate each of these actions from the configuration display.

Example 6 Running configuration without the bypass feature enabled

rpm_slot02#show running-config
Building configuration...

Current configuration : 470 bytes
!
version 12.2
service timestamps debug uptime
service timestamps log uptime
no service password-encryption
!
hostname rpm_slot02
!
boot system c:rpm-js-mz.<new_rel>
enable password cisco
!
ip subnet-zero
!
!
!
!
interface Switch1
 no ip address
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 switch autoSynch off
!
ip classless
no ip http server
ip pim bidir-enable
!
!
snmp-server community public RO
snmp-server community private RW
!
!
line con 0
line aux 0
line vty 0 4
 no login
!
end

Example 7 Enable the bypass feature (rpmnvbypass)

rpm_slot02#
rpm_slot02#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
rpm_slot02(config)#rpmnvbypass
The "boot config" statement has been (re)added to your
running configuration. Do not remove it else risk not
using the nvbypass feature

rpm_slot02(config)#end
rpm_slot02#

Example 8 Running configuration with bypass feature enabled (note rpmnvbypass at end of output)

rpm_slot02#show running-config
Building configuration...

Current configuration : 515 bytes
!
version 12.2
service timestamps debug uptime
service timestamps log uptime
no service password-encryption
!
hostname rpm_slot02
!
boot system c:rpm-js-mz.<new_rel>
boot config c:auto_config_slot02    <==== Line added as per output above
enable password cisco
!
ip subnet-zero
!
!
!
!
interface Switch1
 no ip address
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 switch autoSynch off
!
ip classless
no ip http server
ip pim bidir-enable
!
!
snmp-server community public RO
snmp-server community private RW
!
!
line con 0
line aux 0
line vty 0 4
 no login
!
rpmnvbypass
end

Example 9 Disable the bypass feature (no rpmnvbypass)

rpm_slot02#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
rpm_slot02(config)#no rpmnvbypass
rpm_slot02(config)#end
rpm_slot02#

Example 10 Running configuration after the bypass feature is disabled

rpm_slot02#show running-config
Building configuration...

Current configuration : 503 bytes
!
version 12.2
service timestamps debug uptime
service timestamps log uptime
no service password-encryption
!
hostname rpm_slot02
!
boot system c:rpm-js-mz.<new_rel>
boot config c:auto_config_slot02
enable password cisco
!
ip subnet-zero
!
!
!
!
interface Switch1
 no ip address
 no atm ilmi-keepalive
 switch autoSynch off
!
ip classless
no ip http server
ip pim bidir-enable
!
!
snmp-server community public RO
snmp-server community private RW
!
!
line con 0
line aux 0
line vty 0 4
 no login
!
end

rpm_slot02#

Features Not Supported in This Release

MPLS inter AS

MPLS TE

RPM Redundancy Support

RPM 1:N redundancy is used to switch configuration and traffic from one RPM card to another. The main benefits are:

Route processing continues even if an RPM fails and there is no operator or direct access to swap the failed card or fix the problem.

An RPM card with hardware problems can be fixed while the redundant standby card takes over its functionality.

Software upgrades are easier and can be done with less downtime.

SNMP MIB

SNMP MGX Release 4.0 MIB are provided with the delivery of this release. The MIB is in standard ASN.1 format and is located in the same directory within the release bundle on CCO. These files may be compiled with most standards-based MIB compilers. The tar file for MIB contains the file release notes that contains the MIB release notes.

For changes in this MIB from the previous release, please refer to the MIB release notes.


Note The old_mib_Format is discontinued as of this release.


Notes and Cautions

The following notes and cautions should be reviewed before using this release.

UPC Connection Parameters

In Release 2.1.60 and higher, the default PCR is 50 cps, and the default for policing is enabled. These settings are insufficient for running RPM ISIS protocol over the connection, and with such settings, the ISIS protocol will fail. The PCR value needs to be increased, depending upon the number of interfaces configured for ISIS on the RPM.

Depending upon your connection type, you can use the following CLIs to modify the PCR parameter.

cnfupccbr

cnfupcvbr

cnfupcabr

cnfupcubr

Booting the RPM-PR

Refer to the Cisco MGX 8850 (PXM1E/PXM45), Cisco MGX 8950, and Cisco MGX 8830 Hardware Installation Guide and the Cisco MGX 8850 (PXM1E/PXM45), Cisco MGX 8950, and Cisco MGX 8830 Software Configuration Guide, Release 4 for complete details on configuring the RPM-PR cards. (See the "Obtaining Documentation" section for information on how to order a printed copy of this manual or locate the manual online.) A summary of the booting and upgrading procedures is presented here for your convenience.

When the RPM-PR is booted, the boot image must be the first file in the bootflash. If the bootflash does not have a valid boot image as a first file, the card may not be able to boot and can result in bootflash corruption. If the bootflash is corrupted, you will have to send the card back for an external burn with a valid boot image.

You can reboot the RPM-PR from the PXM by entering the command resetcd <card_number> from the switch CLI, where card_number is the slot number of the RPM-PR that is being rebooted.


Note Omitting the card number resets the entire system.


Also, you can reboot the RPM-PR from the RPM-PR using the RPM-PR console port and entering the reload command.

Each time you turn on power to the RPM-PR, by inserting the RPM-PR into the MGX 8850 or MGX 8950, it goes through the following boot sequence:

1. The RPM-PR runs diagnostics on the CPU, memory, and interfaces.

2. The system boot software, which is the boot image, executes and searches for a valid Cisco IOS image, which is the RPM-PR runtime software.

The source of the Cisco IOS image is determined by the configuration register setting. To verify this setting, you can enter either the show version or show bootvar command. (Refer to the "Viewing the Hardware Configuration" section of the Cisco MGX Route Processor Module Installation and Configuration Guide, Release 2.1 (DOC-7812510=).

a. If the configuration register is set to the factory-default setting of 0x01, RPM-PR will come up and stay in boot mode.

b. If the configuration register is 0x2, the RPM-PR will look for the runtime image either in bootflash or on the PXM45/B E:RPM drive.

3. The search for runtime image is determined by which boot system command is entered.

a. Entering the boot system e:<runtime_image_name> command will result in a search for a runtime image in the E:RPM directory on the PXM45 hard disk.

b. Entering the boot system bootflash:<runtime_image_name> will result in a search for a run time image in the bootflash.

4. If the runtime software is not found after three attempts, the RPM-PR reverts to the boot mode.

5. If a valid Cisco IOS image is found, then the RPM-PR searches for a valid configuration, which can reside in NVRAM or as a configuration file either on the PXM hard disk E: drive or in bootflash.

If you want to load from a specific configuration file, you should enter either the boot config bootflash:<config_file> command or the boot config e:<config_file> command.

6. For normal RPM-PR operation, there must be a valid Cisco IOS image on the PXM45 E: drive or in bootflash, and a configuration in NVRAM or configuration file in bootflash or on the PXM disk.

The first time you boot the RPM-PR, configure the RPM-PR interfaces and save the configuration to a file in NVRAM. Then follow the procedure described in "Initializing the RPM-PR Card." For information on the Cisco IOS instructions, refer to Appendix C, "IOS and Configuration Basics"of the Cisco MGX Route Processor Module Installation and Configuration Guide, Release 2.1 (DOC-7812510=)

RPM-PR Bootflash Precautions

The RPM-PR bootflash is used to store boot image, configuration and run time files. The Flash stores and accesses data sequentially, and the RPM-PR boot image must be the first file stored to successfully boot the card. Erasing the boot image or moving it from the first position on the Flash will cause the card to not boot.

The RPM boot image, which comes loaded on the Flash, will work for all RPM IOS images. Therefore, there is no reason to ever delete or move the factory installed boot image.


Caution Erasing or moving the boot image can cause RPM-PR boot failure. When this happens, the RPM must be returned to Cisco and reflashed.

In order to avoid this unnecessary failure, requiring card servicing, you should

Never erase the boot file from the RPM Flash

Never change the position of the boot file on the RPM Flash

Use care when "squeezing" the Flash to clean it up.

As long as the boot file remains intact in the first position on the flash, the RPM will successfully boot.

CLI Modifications in MGX Release 5.0.00

There are no new or modified RPM-PR CLI commands in Release 5.0.00.

Limitations and Restrictions

CWM Recognition of RPM-PR Back Card

CWM does not distinguish between the Ethernet back card versions installed with the RPM-PR. There is no functionality difference.

RPM Front Card Resets on the Back Card Removal

The RPM front card may reset on an MGX 8850 or MGX 8950 switch when the ethernet back card is removed or inserted.

This reset problem can be easily avoided if shut interface is executed before the removal of the back card.

RPM-PR Back Ethernet Card Support

For Ethernet connectivity with the RPM-PR, the model "/B" four-port Ethernet back card is required (order number: MGX-RJ45-4E/B).

RPM-PR Limitations and Restrictions (PXM45 and PXM1E)

The RPM-PR and MPLS limitations and restrictions that apply to this release are as follows:

In an application where the RPM is a Provider Edge Router in an MPLS Virtual Private Network service, a much better solution in any case is to use a distance-vector routing protocol between the customer routers and the RPM. A distance-vector routing protocol provides exactly the information required for this application: reachability information, and not link-state information. The distance-vector routing protocols supported by the RPM are BGP, RIP v1 and RIP v2, as well as static routing. With RPM software releases from 12.0.7T1, distance-vector routing protocols can be used with as many different networks as subinterfaces.

Note that if the RPM is acting as a Provider Edge Router in an MPLS Virtual Private Network service, and even if OSPF is running in a customer network, it is not necessary to run OSPF between the customer router and the RPM. If the customer edge devices run Cisco IOS, they can redistribute OSPF routing information into RIP using the IOS commands, redistribute RIP in the OSPF configuration, and redistribute OSPF in the RIP configuration. Similar configurations are possible for BGP. (For more information on re advertisement, see the "Configuring IP Routing Protocol-Independent Features" chapter in the Cisco IOS Release 12.0 Network Protocols Configuration Guide, Part 1). Redistribution is not unique to Cisco CPE, and other vendors' equipment also supports redistribution.

Whenever there are 2 RPM cards on adjacent slots, driven by the same cell bus clock, the clock rate should be set to 42 MHz for traffic shaping, using the command cnfcbclk. This configuration will be lost if the node rebuilds due to resetsys or a power cycle. The user will have to manually re-configure the cell bus clock rate after the rebuild, using the cnfcbclk command.

On PXM45-based switches, when the chassis is loaded with 6 or more RPM-PR cards, and if every card is configured to download the IOS runtime image from the PXM45 hard disk, occasionally, upon entering a resetsys command or after a power cycle, some of the RPM-PR cards may go into the failed state. To reset the failed RPM-PR cards, enter the resetcd <slot #> command for each failed card.

RPM-PR cannot be configured as ELSR (Edge Label Switch Router) with PXM1E as controller card.

Saveallcnf (issued on the PXM45/B card) captures configuration data saved by the RPM-PR card (as well as AXSM and PXM45 cards), and saves it on the active PXM45/B card's hard disk. Users must have configured RPM to store its configuration on the PXM45/B hard disk (E:/RPM). That is, on RPM, a user should have this line in its running configuration (boot config e:auto_config_slot#). To ensure that the saved file contains the latest RPM configuration, the user needs to execute the copy run start command on each RPM card prior to the saveallcnf command. This way, the RPM files on the active PXM45 hard disk will contain the latest configuration to be saved.

A single RPM-PR can only function as either an Edge LSR or as an LSC, but not as both.

Total of (OC12 minus T3) Mbps intrashelf traffic for Cell bus based modules are supported.

To configure redundancy, the primary and secondary RPM-PR cards need to be in the Active state and the secondary card should not have any configuration.

Removing a back card does not cause RPM-PR switchover.

After establishing redundancy between two RPM-PR cards with the addred command, you must enter the copy run start command on the primary RPM-PR card to save the configuration change.

If a secondary RPM-PR card is redundant to primary cards x and y, you cannot delete redundancy for only card x.

If you need to enter the switchredcd (formerly softswitch) and switchcc commands, Cisco Systems recommends that you wait at least 5 seconds after issuing the switchredcd command, and then enter the switchcc command.

IOS software images on primary and secondary RPM-PR cards do not have to be compatible, but the IOS software on a secondary card should be at the same level as the primary card or higher.

For ELSR to LSC connectivity, default control vc used is 32. If PNNI partition exists with VCI 32 as part of its partition range, then when MPLS partition is added, there are two options to handle the situation:

Add MPLS controller and define its partition with available range. On ELSR, define control vc from any VCI value within the range defined in partition. The same VC should be defined on LSC on xTag interface.

Reconfigure PNNI partition to spare the control VC usage both on RPM-PR and AXSM, AXSM/B or AXSM-E APS Management Information.

Whenever the RPM-PR configuration is changed and a user wants to store that configuration, the user must enter the copy run start command on the RPM-PR. If this is not done, the changed configuration will be lost on RPM-PR card reboot or RPM-PR switchover in case of redundancy.

Even though RPM-PR can have 1999 sub interfaces, the usage of sub interfaces should be planned in such a way that it does not cross a safe limit of 1985. This is because each sub interface takes one IDB (interface descriptor block) and the number of IDBs available in the card is 2000. Further, a user might need some IDBs for the RPM-PR back card and its ports.

Resolved Caveats—Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX 5.0.00

Table 7 lists the resolved caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX 5.0.00 as of April 14, 2004.

Table 7 Resolved Caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX 5.0.00 

Caveat Number
Description

CSCeb63762

RPM-SAR RAS enhancement - Ability to reset SAR after crash

CSCec14559

PXM spontaneously fails over during 1:N RPM redundancy testing

CSCed26565

RPM-PR-512 reset multiple times due to SAR APU stall

CSCeb22233

RPM crash after FE backcard OIR

CSCeb61872

sw rev varbind not available when trap 60056 sent for RPM

CSCed40082

Duplicate ping atm command in RPM-PR

CSCed46492

Ethernet 2/1 on RPM-PR stays in shutdown state after switchredcd

CSCeb74637

During the RPM upgrade to 12.2(8)MC2d, startup config disappeared.

CSCed05581

The switch connection configuration in switch subinterfaces is lost after reload in RPM-PR.

CSCdz79827

SNMP loop at cipPrecedenceEntry on switch subinterface of rpm

CSCea26869

IPC message header cache below traceback kept coming

CSCea44854

Error Messages from RPM-PR module for SNMP requests are wrong

CSCea74335

On reloading an RPM-PR card using reload command it prompts for saving the config even if the configuration has not been modified.

CSCeb10082

No indication in the log that clear int sw1 was executed via CLI

CSCeb11734

Traceback messages on slot 14 after upgrade

CSCeb41501

traceback on RPM-PR with only VCC VPC switch partition configured

CSCeb65685

ip cef load-sharing algorithm tunnel command lost upon reset of RPM-PR

CSCeb78535

Multiple alignment errors adding switch connection

CSCeb78905

Incorrect configuration generation for RPM commands

CSCeb81588

Set PCI retry timer to non-zero value for RPM-PR platform

CSCed25513

watchdog timeout when malloc fails while resynching


Open Caveats—Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX 5.0.00

Table 8 lists the open caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX 5.0.00 as of April 14, 2004.

Table 8 Open Caveats in Cisco IOS Release 12.3(2)T5 for MGX 5.0.00 

Caveat Number
Description

CSCec16481

Symptom:

A Cisco device running Internetwork Operating System (IOS) and enabled for the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) Protocol is vulnerable to a Denial of Service (DoS) attack from a malformed OSPF packet. The OSPF protocol is not enabled by default.

Conditions:

The vulnerability is only present in IOS release trains based on 12.0S, 12.2, and 12.3. Releases based on 12.0, 12.1 mainlines and all IOS images prior to 12.0 are not affected. Refer to the Security Advisory for a complete list of affected release trains.

Workaround:

Further details and the workarounds to mitigate the effects are explained in the Security Advisory which is available at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20040818-ospf.shtml.

(This caveat was added August 18, 2004)

CSCed41381

LSNT: Input drops on framed PVC i/f cause ldp session flap

Symptom :

Input cell drops on the ingress frame PVC confugred on switch interface which inturn causes LDP/TDP/OSPF flaps sometimes.

Conditions:

This might happen only if there is a lot of core traffic coming on ingress PVC (bigger bandwidth) and gets routed onto small bandwidth egress PVC.

Workaround :

None.

CSCed85438

RPM FE input stuck with burst traffic

Symptoms:

A Fast Ethernet 100BASE-TX port adapter on an RPM-PR card may stop receiving burst traffic packets.

Conditions:

This symptom is observed on a FE RPM-PR Backcard.

To identify this problem, the output of the command "show interface FastEthernet" shows no input packets and all packets as overrun:

30 second input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

30 second output rate 100000 bits/sec, 106 packets/sec

0 packets input, 0 bytes

Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles

0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 263523 overrun, 0 ignored

And the output of the command show controllers for the FastEthernet interface show a high number of rx_fifo_overflow, as well as throttled:

throttled=5352, enabled=5352, disabled=0

rx_fifo_overflow=434500, rx_no_enp=0, rx_state=0

Workaround:

To clear the symptom, enter the "shutdown" interface configuration command followed by the "no shutdown" interface configuration command on the FastEthernet interface.

Further Problem Description:

On the output of the command "show controllers" for the FastEthernet interface, locate the value for CFRV. If the last byte is either 0x20, 0x21, 0x22 or 0x23, then the FastEthernet is susceptible to the receive hang condition.

CSCed82475

LSC crash with Address Error (load or instruction fetch) exception

Symptom:

A Label Switch Controller (LSC) may reload unexpectedly when there is an Address Error (load or instruction fetch) exception.

Conditions:

This symptom is observed on a Cisco MGX 8850 Route Processor Module (RPM-PR) that function as an LSC.

Workaround:

None.

CSCed85540

Symptom:

LSC crashes in LSNT

Condition:

This problem was seen during normal operation in LSNT the RPM-PR cards were running 12.2 15(T)4c

Workaround:

None

CSCed74835

Symptom:

When copy big files from Cisco MGX8850 Route Processor Module (RPM-PR) to MGX8850 hard drive, it silently failed.

Conditions:

This happens only if copy of size greater than 8 MB.

Workaround:

None.

CSCec68542

LSNT:SAR not reassemble properly for big packets cause protocol down

Symptom:

SAR does not reassemble properly for big packets cause protocol down Conditions:

RPM-PR works as LER with dual LSCs

disable/enable multi-vc on RPM-PR

1000 spvcs with vrf enabled

500 eBGP sessions

80Mbps input traffic and 6Mbps output ip traffic

Workaround:

Reload card

CSCec76875

LVC tx_count > tx_limit causes i/f to stop passing traffic

Symptoms:

A provider edge (PE) router may not be able to ping other PE routers or a label switch controller (LSC), nor may other platforms be able to ping the PE router.

Conditions:

This symptom is observed on a Cisco MGX platform that is configured with a primary Route Processor Module PRemium (RPM-PR) that functions as a PE router and a secondary RPM.

Workaround:

Reset the primary RPM to initiate a switchover to the secondary RPM. The symptom does not occur on the secondary RPM.

CSCdv24154

Notify new tag mtu value after the interface mtu change.

Symptom:

Setting mtu size in xtagatm interface in LSC defaults to 4470

Condition:

Setting mtu size in xtagatm interface in LSC defaults to 4470

Workaround:

None.

CSCea62571

%UTIL-3-TREE: Data structure error with trace back logged on LSC

Symptom:

%UTIL-3-TREE: Data structure error--attempt to remove an unthreaded node from a tree with trace back logged on LSC

Conditions:

LSC hot redundancy reload LSC

Workaround:

Unknown

CSCea85160

snmpwalk on ifDescr should not respond to aal5 mib variable

Symptom:

snmpwalk on ifDescr responds to aal5 mib variable.

Conditions:

This symptom is observed when we query for the ifDescr

Workaround:

None

CSCea85395

BGP suppressed prefixes not reinstated after condition removed

Symptoms:

Previously suppressed prefixes are not automatically installed in the VRF.

Condition:

After VRF reaches max route limit subsequent prefixes are being suppressed and not installed in the VRF table. After the suppress condition is cleared routes should be put into VRF without any manual intervention.

Workaround:

Clear ip bgp

CSCec02155

All VSI sessions down, xtag to down/down state

Symptom:

All VSI sessions go to down and xtag interfaces to down/down state on LSC

Conditions:

RPM-PR work as LSC

Workaround:

Unknown

CSCec26512

After switchredcd 22 LVCs went to Bwait state

Symptom:

After switchover, 22 LVCs went to Bwait state.

Condition:

After switchover, 22 LVCs went to Bwait state.

Workaround:

None.


Compatibility Notes

RPM Boot File and Firmware File Names and Sizes

The following table displays the RPM boot and firmware file names and sizes for this release.

Table 9 RPM Boot and Firmware File Names and Sizes

 
File Name
File Size (in bytes)

Boot File

rpm-js-mz.123-2.T5

10655280

Firmware File

rpm-boot-mz.123-2.T5

3350304


RPM Compatibility Matrix

MGX SW version
1.1.32
1.1.34
1.1.40

IOS Version

12.1(5.3)T_XT

12.2(2)T2

12.2(4)T

CWM

10.4.01

10.4.01 Patch 1

10.5


MGX SW version
1.2.00 / 2.1.70
1.2.02 / 2.1.76
1.2.10 / 3.0.00
1.2.11 / 3.0.10
1.2.13 / 3.0.20

IOS Version

12.2(4)T1

12.2(8)T11

12.2(8)T4

12.2(11)T1

12.2(11)T2

CWM

10.5.10

10.5.10 Patch 1

11.0.00

11.0.10

11.0.10 Patch 1

1 MGX 1.2.02 has also been certified with IOS 12.2(4)T3.


MGX SW version
1.2.20 / 4.0.00
1.2.21 / 4.0.10
1.2.21 / 4.0.12
1.2.21 / 4.0.15
1.3.00 / 5.0.00

IOS Version

12.2(15)T4a

12.2(15)T5

12.3(2)T2

12.3(2)T5

12.3(2)T5

CWM

11.0.11

12.0.00.1

12.0.00.2

12.0.00.2

15.0.00


MGX RPM-PR Hardware

Table 10 shows the front card and back card compatibility for RPM-PR hardware supported in this release. The table lists the card model/ name, part numbers, the minimum version and the minimum revisions of each card supported. Note that there may be more than one 800 level part numbers for the same front cards. The minimum version is identified by the last 2 digits of the 800 level numbers.

Table 10 Hardware Compatibility Matrix

Front Cards
Part Number/
Min. Version
Rev.
Back Cards
Part Number/
Min. Version
Rev.

MGX-RPM-PR-256

800-07178-02

A0

MGX-RJ45-FE

MGX-MMF-FE

MGX-RJ45-4E/B

800-02735-02

800-03202-02

800-12134-01

A0

A0

A0

MGX-RPM-PR-512

800-07656-02

A0

MGX-RJ45-FE

MGX-MMF-FE

MGX-RJ45-4E/B

800-02735-02

800-03202-02

800-12134-01

A0

A0

A0


Special Installation and Upgrade Requirements

Existing customers should use the upgrade procedures Upgrade Procedures for RPM-PR Cards in MGX 8000 Release 2.1 and Release 3 (PXM45 and PXM1E) Switches to upgrade. A graceful upgrade from any release previous to the current release is supported. For new customers, the image will be pre-installed and should use the PXM installation procedure to upgrade to future maintenance releases.

Cisco IOS Release Compatibility Information

This section describes the installation requirements and guidelines for RPM modules installed with this release.

All IOS firmware can be downloaded from CCO from the following location:

http://www.cisco.com/kobayashi/sw-center/sw-ios.shtml

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(11)T1 Release

The Cisco IOS 12.2(11)T1 supports existing features on the MGX-RPM-PR card.

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(8)T4 Release

The Cisco IOS 12.2(8)T4 supports existing features on the MGX-RPM-PR card.

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(8)T1 Release

The Cisco IOS 12.2(8)T1 supports existing features on the MGX-RPM-PR card and the CBC clock rate configuration feature described in "Features Not Supported in This Release" section.

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T3 Release

The Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T3 supports existing features on the MGX-RPM-PR card.

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T1 Release

The Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T1 or higher is used with MGX Release 21.70. This IOS release supports new RPM features and continues to support existing features on the RPM-PR card.

Note that MPLS inter-AS and MPLS TE are not supported features on RPM for this release.

About the Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T Release

The Cisco IOS 12.2(4)T or higher is used with MGX Release 2.1.60. This IOS release supports new RPM features and continues to support existing features on the RPM-PR card.

Note that MPLS inter-AS and MPLS TE are not supported features on RPM for this release.

Upgrade Procedures for RPM-PR Cards in MGX 8000 Release 2.1 and Release 3 (PXM45 and PXM1E) Switches

The following sections describe how to upgrade boot and runtime software on RPM-PR cards in detail.

Upgrading RPM Boot Software

At the factory, a boot file is installed in the bootflash on the RPM-PR card and is used to boot the card. The runtime software is updated more frequently than the boot software. However, the boot software is updated occasionally. When you are updating runtime software, check Table 9 to see if a boot software upgrade is required.

The boot software is stored in bootflash memory on the RPM card. To manage the software in bootflash, you access it as if it were a hard disk. For example, in copy and delete file commands, files are identified as bootflash:filename (which is similar to e:filename).

The following example shows a directory of bootflash contents:

Router(boot)#show flash:
-#- ED --type-- --crc--- -seek-- nlen -length- -----date/time------ name
1   .D config   D4F7352A   40330   18      686 Jan 30 2001 18:18:41 auto_config_slot09
2   .D config   CBF007C1   40660    9      688 Feb 22 2001 15:33:11 slot9.cnf
3   .. image    F596869A  2973E8   27  2452744 Feb 28 2001 03:16:05 
rpm-boot-mz_002.001.070.202

Note Although you can display directory contents with the dir bootflash: command, the show flash: command provides more detail. Also, although bootflash and flash are separate entities on other Cisco Systems Routers, both terms refer to the same entity on the RPM.


In the example above, the numbers in the left column indicate the order in which the RPM-PR card will try to load software. The second column shows that the first two files are marked for deletion (D). The last column lists the names of the files stored in bootflash.

When managing the bootflash, you need to keep in mind the following:

When the RPM card is reset, it tries to load the first bootable image in bootflash.

Files are not removed from bootflash until the squeeze flash: command is entered.


Caution If all bootable images are deleted from bootflash, try to reinstall the bootflash file using the Xmodem download procedure found in Using XModem to Download Flash to RPM Cards. If this does not work, the card must be returned to the factory to be reprogrammed.

Upgrading RPM Runtime Software

The runtime software on the RPM can be loaded from the following sources:

The E:RPM directory on the PXM45 hard disk

Bootflash

A TFTP server on a LAN to which an RPM back card is connected.

Cisco Systems recommends that you configure the RPM card to load from the E:RPM directory on the PXM45 hard disk. Note that images will load much faster from bootflash, but if you are using multiple RPM cards, it takes longer to complete an upgrade because the runtime software must be copied to each RPM card's bootflash instead of to a single location.

At startup, the RPM card attempts to load the software in the order listed in the startup-config file. The following example shows an excerpt from a startup-config file:

!
boot system e:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T
boot system bootflash:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T
boot config c:auto_config_slot09
logging rate-limit console 10 except errors
enable password cisco
!

In the startup-config file example, the RPM card attempts to load the runtime software from the PXM45 card (E:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T) first, and if that fails, it attempts to load the image copy stored in bootflash. This configuration takes longer to upgrade, but it assures the card can reboot if someone accidentally removes the file on the PXM45 hard disk.


Note The convention is lowercase e for RPM-PR commands and uppercase E for switch commands.


To configure the RPM to load upgraded runtime software from the PXM45 hard disk, you need to do the following:

Copy the upgraded file to the PXM45 hard disk

Update the boot system variable in the router startup-config file to load the new file.

Reset the RPM card so that it loads the new file.

RPM-PR cards can be configured for 1:N redundancy as well as for non-redundant configurations. The procedures for both types of configuration are in the sections that follow.


Tip To simplify runtime software updates, copy the runtime file in the E:RPM directory and rename it to a generic name such as rpm-js-mz. The production runtime filenames have version numbers appended to them, but you can change this. This approach allows you to perform future upgrades by copying the file to the hard disk, renaming a copy of the file to your generic name, and resetting each card. The approach eliminates the need to reconfigure IOS on each card to recognize the new filename.


Upgrade Procedure for Boot Software and Runtime Software for Non-Redundant Cards

The following procedure describes how to upgrade boot software and runtime software.


Note The first part of this procedure describes boot software upgrade and the second part describes runtime software upgrade. RPM boot software can be upgraded either in boot mode or in runtime mode. The procedure described here shows an example for runtime mode. The same commands are applicable for upgrading boot software in boot mode.



Step 1 Copy the new boot software file for the RPM-PR card to the switch (E:RPM).

Step 2 Establish a configuration session using any valid user name.

Step 3 Use the cc command to select the RPM-PR card to update.

pop20two.7.PXM.a > cc 9

(session redirected)

Router>

The switch displays the IOS prompt for the router on the RPM-PR card. From this point on, all commands are Cisco IOS commands.


Note This procedure assumes that you are familiar with Cisco IOS, which is a topic that is beyond the scope of this book. This procedure details only those commands that are unique to setting up RPM-PR on the switch. For general Cisco IOS commands, examples are given to show how to complete the task.


Step 4 Enter Enable mode for the router.

Router>enable
Password: 
Router#

Step 5 To verify router access to the PXM45 hard disk and display the boot file name, enter dir e: command.

Router#dir e:
Directory of c:/

65539  -rw-         815   Sep 13 2001 23:51:10  auto_config_slot09
65540  -rw-     2588780   Mar 22 2001 19:06:54  rpm-boot-mz_002.001.070.201
84611  -rw-     2452768   Apr 05 2001 05:34:44  rpm-boot-mz.122-4.T
66805  -rw-     8529104   Mar 22 2001 19:09:00  rpm-js-mz_002.001.070.201
85809  -rw-     7936012   Apr 05 2001 06:28:54  rpm-js-mz.122-4.T

104857600 bytes total (83068928 bytes free)

Step 6 To display the files in the bootflash, enter the show flash: command.

Router#show flash:
-#- ED --type-- --crc--- -seek-- nlen -length- -----date/time------ name
1   .. image    F596869A  296D88   27  2452744 Feb 28 2001 03:16:05 
rpm-boot-mz_002.001.070.201

30315128 bytes available (2452872 bytes used)

Step 7 To copy new boot software to the bootflash, use the copy command.

Router#copy c:rpm-boot-mz.122-4T bootflash:
Destination filename [rpm-boot-mz.122-4T]? 
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
2334044 bytes copied in 35.768 secs (66686 bytes/sec)

Tip When prompted for the destination filename, press enter to use the source filename shown in the prompt. To change the destination filename, type a new filename after the prompt.


Step 8 To verify that the file was copied, enter the show flash: command.

Step 9 To mark an older boot file for deletion from the bootflash, use the del bootflash: command as shown in the following example:

Router#del bootflash:
Delete filename []? rpm-js-mz
Delete bootflash:rpm-js-mz? [confirm]
Router#

Tip To unmark a bootflash file so that it won't be deleted when the squeeze flash: command is run, enter the undelete <number> command, where number is the file number displayed in the left-most column of the show flash: command display.


Step 10 To delete all files that are marked for deletion from bootflash, enter the squeeze flash: command as shown in the following example:

Router(boot)#squeeze flash:
All deleted files will be removed. Continue? [confirm]y
Squeeze operation may take a while. Continue? [confirm]
Squeeze of bootflash complete

Step 11 Enter the show flash: command to verify that the bootflash files are as you want them.


Caution If all bootable images are deleted from bootflash, try to reinstall the bootflash file using the Xmodem download procedure found in Using XModem to Download Flash to RPM Cards and restart the RPM card. If this does not work, the card must be returned to the factory to be reprogrammed. When you are done managing the bootflash, the show flash: command should display at least one bootable image, and the image you want the card to boot from must be the first bootable image in the list.


Tip If the show flash: command does not display a bootable image, copy a bootable image to bootflash as described earlier in this procedure. You can continue to manage the bootflash, even when there are no files in bootflash, until the router is restarted.



Tip If the bootflash contains bootable images and the sequence is such that the card will not start, you can enter rommon mode and load the bootable image. To get into rommon mode, establish a console connection to the RPM card, reset the RPM card using the resetcd <slot> command from the active PXM45 card, then quickly enter the CTRL-[, Break sequence at the RPM console. The command to send a Break depends on the computer platform and software you are using. It may take a couple of attempts to successfully get into rommon mode. When you are in rommon mode, the RPM card displays the rommon 1 > prompt.

Once in rommon mode, you can enter the dir bootflash: command to display the images in bootflash. To boot one of the images, enter a boot command the following format: boot bootflash:filename.

See Using XModem to Download Flash to RPM Cards.



Note This ends the boot software upgrade procedure. The following steps are for upgrading the runtime software. If you do not want to upgrade the runtime software, you need to restart the RPM card by entering the reload command.


Step 12 Copy the new runtime software file for the RPM-PR card to the switch (E:RPM).

Step 13 Establish a configuration session using any valid user name.

Step 14 If you are using a generic filename for your runtime images, copy the file on the PXM45 hard disk and rename the copied file. For example:

8850_LA.8.PXM.a > copy rpm-js-mz.122-4.T rpm-js-mz

Step 15 If your RPM is already configured to use a file with a generic name, skip to Step 24.

Step 16 Use the cc command to select the RPM-PR card to update.

pop20two.7.PXM.a > cc 9

(session redirected)

Router>

The switch displays the IOS prompt for the router on the RPM-PR card. From this point on, all commands are Cisco IOS commands.


Note This procedure assumes that you are familiar with Cisco IOS, which is a topic that is beyond the scope of this release note. This procedure details only those commands that are unique to setting up RPM-PR on the switch. For general Cisco IOS commands, examples are given to show how to complete the task.


Step 17 Enter Enable mode for the router.

Router>enable
Password: 
Router#

Step 18 Configure the RPM card to store its configuration on the PXM45 hard disk by entering the following command:

Router# boot config e:auto_config_slot#

Step 19 Display the startup runtime software filename by entering the show bootvar command.

Router#show bootvar
BOOT variable = e:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T,12;
CONFIG_FILE variable = c:auto_config_slot09
BOOTLDR variable does not exist
Configuration register is 0x2

In the example above, the startup runtime software file is E:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T, and it has a version number attached to it. Another way to view the boot list is to enter the show startup-config command and look for the boot system commands.

Step 20 Enter the router global configuration mode.

Router#config terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.

Step 21 If you need to change the boot system filenames, remove the existing boot list using the boot system command as follows:

Router(config)# no boot system

Step 22 Create a new boot list by entering one or more boot system commands as follows:

Router(config)# boot system e:filename

Replace the filename variable with the name of the new runtime file that was previously transferred to the E:RPM directory on the switch. For example:

Router(config)# boot system e:rpm-js-mz

If you want to enter additional boot system commands, enter them in the order in which you want the RPM card to use them. The following example adds a statement to load from bootflash if the runtime file is not found on the PXM45 hard disk:

Router(config)# boot system bootflash:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T

Note Before the RPM card can load runtime software from bootflash, you must copy the runtime software to the bootflash. The procedure for copying files from the PXM45 hard disk to bootflash is described in a previous section.


Step 23 Exit global configuration mode and save the new configuration.

Router(config)#^Z
Router#copy run start
Destination filename [startup-config]? 
Building configuration...
[OK]

Step 24 To verify the change, enter the show bootvar or show run commands.

Step 25 Switch to the active PXM45 card and reset the RPM card. For example:

Router#cc 8

(session redirected)

8850_LA.8.PXM.a > resetcd 9
The card in slot number 9, will be reset. Please confirm action
resetcd: Do you want to proceed (Yes/No)? y


Upgrade Procedure for RPM-PR cards in MGX8000 Release 4 (PXM45 and PXM1E) Switches

Redundancy must be established before you use the procedure in this section. If redundancy has not been established, upgrade each RPM-PR card using the procedure in the next section, "Upgrading Without Redundancy".

To upgrade the RPM-PR runtime software for 1:N redundancy, use the following procedure. (Note that the directory on the PXM45 card uses (E:) and the directory within the router card uses (e:).)

The following procedure describes how to upgrade boot software and runtime software.


Note The first part of this procedure describes boot software upgrade and the second part describes runtime software upgrade. RPM boot software can be upgraded either in boot mode or in runtime mode. The procedure described here shows an example for runtime mode. The same commands are applicable for upgrading boot software in boot mode.



Step 1 Copy the new boot software file for the RPM-PR card to the switch (E:RPM).

Step 2 Establish a configuration session using any valid user name.

Step 3 Use the cc command to select the RPM-PR card to update.

pop20two.7.PXM.a > cc 9

(session redirected)

Router>

The switch displays the IOS prompt for the router on the RPM-PR card. From this point on, all commands are Cisco IOS commands.


Note This procedure assumes that you are familiar with Cisco IOS, which is a topic that is beyond the scope of this book. This procedure details only those commands that are unique to setting up RPM-PR on the switch. For general Cisco IOS commands, examples are given to show how to complete the task.


Step 4 Enter Enable mode for the router.

Router>enable
Password: 
Router#

Step 5 To verify router access to the PXM45 hard disk and display the boot file name, enter dir e: command.

Router#dir e:
Directory of c:/

65539  -rw-         815   Sep 13 2001 23:51:10  auto_config_slot09
65540  -rw-     2588780   Mar 22 2001 19:06:54  rpm-boot-mz_002.001.070.201
84611  -rw-     2452768   Apr 05 2001 05:34:44  rpm-boot-mz.122-4.T
66805  -rw-     8529104   Mar 22 2001 19:09:00  rpm-js-mz_002.001.070.201
85809  -rw-     7936012   Apr 05 2001 06:28:54  rpm-js-mz.122-4.T

104857600 bytes total (83068928 bytes free)

Step 6 To display the files in the bootflash, enter the show flash: command.

Router#show flash:
-#- ED --type-- --crc--- -seek-- nlen -length- -----date/time------ name
1   .. image    F596869A  296D88   27  2452744 Feb 28 2001 03:16:05 
rpm-boot-mz_002.001.070.201
30315128 bytes available (2452872 bytes used)

Step 7 To copy new boot software to the bootflash, use the copy command.

Router#copy c:rpm-boot-mz.122-4.T bootflash:
Destination filename [rpm-boot-mz.122-4.T]? 
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
2334044 bytes copied in 35.768 secs (66686 bytes/sec)

Tip When prompted for the destination filename, press enter to use the source filename shown in the prompt. To change the destination filename, type a new filename after the prompt.


Step 8 To verify that the file was copied, enter the show flash: command.

Step 9 To mark an older boot file for deletion from the bootflash, use the del bootflash: command as shown in the following example:

Router#del bootflash:
Delete filename []? rpm-js-mz
Delete bootflash:rpm-js-mz? [confirm]
Router#

Tip To unmark a bootflash file so that it won't be deleted when the squeeze flash: command is run, enter the undelete <number> command, where number is the file number displayed in the left-most column of the show flash: command display.


Step 10 To delete all files that are marked for deletion from bootflash, enter the squeeze flash: command as shown in the following example:

Router(boot)#squeeze flash:
All deleted files will be removed. Continue? [confirm]y
Squeeze operation may take a while. Continue? [confirm]
Squeeze of bootflash complete

Step 11 Enter the show flash: command to verify that the bootflash files are as you want them.


Caution If all bootable images are deleted from bootflash, try to reinstall the bootflash file using the Xmodem download procedure found in Using XModem to Download Flash to RPM Cards and restart the RPM card. If this does not work, the card must be returned to the factory to be reprogrammed. When you are done managing the bootflash, the show flash: command should display at least one bootable image, and the image you want the card to boot from must be the first bootable image in the list.


Tip If the show flash: command does not display a bootable image, copy a bootable image to bootflash as described earlier in this procedure. You can continue to manage the bootflash, even when there are no files in bootflash, until the router is restarted.



Tip If the bootflash contains bootable images and the sequence is such that the card will not start, you can enter rommon mode and load the bootable image. To get into rommon mode, establish a console connection to the RPM card, reset the RPM card using the resetcd <slot> command from the active PXM45 card, then quickly enter the CTRL-[, Break sequence at the RPM console. The command to send a Break depends on the computer platform and software you are using. It may take a couple of attempts to successfully get into rommon mode. When you are in rommon mode, the RPM card displays the rommon 1 > prompt.

Once in rommon mode, you can enter the dir bootflash: command to display the images in bootflash. To boot one of the images, enter a boot command the following format: boot bootflash:filename.

See Using XModem to Download Flash to RPM Cards.


This ends the boot software upgrade procedure for the primary card. The following steps are for upgrading the runtime software. If you do not want to upgrade the runtime software for the primary card, skip steps 12 through 24 and go to step 25 to upgrade the boot software on the secondary card.

Step 12 Copy the new runtime software file for the RPM-PR card to the switch (E:RPM).

Step 13 If you are using a generic filename for your runtime images, copy the file on the PXM45 hard disk and rename the copied file. For example:

8850_LA.8.PXM.a > copy rpm-js-mz.122-4.T rpm-js-mz

Step 14 Establish a configuration session using any valid user name.

Step 15 If your RPM is already configured to use a file with a generic name, skip to Step 25.

Step 16 Use the cc command to select the RPM-PR card to update.

pop20two.7.PXM.a > cc 9

(session redirected)

Router>

The switch displays the IOS prompt for the router on the RPM-PR card. From this point on, all commands are Cisco IOS commands.


Note This procedure assumes that you are familiar with Cisco IOS, which is a topic that is beyond the scope of this release note. This procedure details only those commands that are unique to setting up RPM-PR on the switch. For general Cisco IOS commands, examples are given to show how to complete the task.


Step 17 Enter Enable mode for the router.

Router>enable
Password: 
Router#

Step 18 Configure the RPM card to store its configuration on the PXM45 hard disk by entering the following command:

Router# boot config e:auto_config_slot#

Step 19 Display the startup runtime software filename by entering the show bootvar command.

Router#show bootvar
BOOT variable = e:rpm-js-mz,12;
CONFIG_FILE variable = c:auto_config_slot09
BOOTLDR variable does not exist
Configuration register is 0x2

In the example above, the startup runtime software file is e:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T, and it has a version number attached to it. Another way to view the boot list is to enter the show startup-config command and look for the boot system commands.

Step 20 Enter the router global configuration mode.

Router#config terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.

Step 21 If you need to change the boot system filenames, remove the existing boot list using the boot system command as follows:

Router(config)# no boot system

Step 22 Create a new boot list by entering one or more boot system commands as follows:

Router(config)# boot system e:filename

Replace the filename variable with the name of the new runtime file that was previously transferred to the E:RPM directory on the switch. For example:

Router(config)# boot system e:rpm-js-mz

If you want to enter additional boot system commands, enter them in the order in which you want the RPM card to use them. The following example adds a statement to load from bootflash if the runtime file is not found on the PXM45 hard disk:

Router(config)# boot system bootflash:rpm-js-mz.122-4.T

Note Before the RPM card can load runtime software from bootflash, you must copy the runtime software to the bootflash. The procedure for copying files from the PXM45 hard disk to bootflash is described in a previous section.


Step 23 Exit global configuration mode and save the new configuration.

Router(config)#^Z
Router#copy run start
Destination filename [startup-config]? 
Building configuration...
[OK]

Step 24 To verify the change, enter the show bootvar or show run commands.

Step 25 Switch to the active PXM45 card. For example:

Router#cc 8

(session redirected)

Step 26 Switch to the secondary card using the switchredcd command as follows:

8850_LA.8.PXM.a > switchredcd <fromSlot> <toSlot>

Replace <fromSlot> with the slot number of the primary card. Replace <toSlot> with the slot number of the secondary card.

This step makes the secondary card active and resets the primary RPM-PR card. When the Primary card resets, it loads the upgraded software.

Step 27 cc to the secondary slot.

Step 28 Repeat steps 1through 11.

This ends the boot software upgrade on the secondary card. If you do not want to upgrade the runtime software, go to step 30.

The following steps are for upgrading runtime software on the secondary card.

Step 29 Repeat steps 12through 24.

Step 30 Switch back to the primary card using the switchredcd command as follows:

8850_LA.8.PXM.a > switchredcd <fromSlot> <toSlot>

Replace <fromSlot> with the slot number of the secondary card. Replace <toSlot> with the slot number of the primary card.

This step makes the primary card active and resets the secondary RPM-PR card. When the reset is complete, the secondary card is ready to run the upgraded software.

Step 31 To verify that the router reboot is complete, enter the dspcds or dspcd <slot> commands. The reboot is complete when the card state displays as Active. Another way to verify router operation is to use the cc slot command. If you can access the router from the switch prompt, the router reboot is complete.

Step 32 If there are other primary cards with redundant (secondary) cards, repeat this procedure for each primary card.


Using XModem to Download Flash to RPM Cards

Use the xmodem feature to download the flash to an RPM/B or RPM-PR card. During this process, the card should be connected to a target machine through HyperTerminal with settings of 9600, n, 8, and 1.


Step 1 Put the node in monitor mode by entering the priv command to gain access to the privileged commands as follows:

rommon 1> priv
You now have access to the full set of monitor commands. Warning: 
some commands will allow you to destroy your configuration and/or  
system images and could render the machine unbootable.

Step 2 The xmodem command becomes available and the general syntax of this command and availability of this can be checked by giving xmodem command without any parameters on the CLI, as follows:

rommon 2 > xmodem
usage: xmodem [-cys]
-c  CRC-16
-y  ymodem-batch protocol
-s<speed> Set speed of download, where speed may be
          1200|2400|4800|9600|19200|38400
rommon 3 > 

The command line options for xmodem are as follows:

Option
Definition

-c

xmodem performs the download using CRC-16 error checking to validate packets. Default is 8-bit CRC.

-y

xmodem uses Ymodem-batch protocol for downloading, which uses CRC-16 error checking.

-s

Specifies the download speed. Default is 9600 bps.



Note If you do not find the xmodem commands, then the xmodem feature is not available on this rommom version. In that case, you must return the card to Cisco.



Note The rommon "xmodem/ymodem" transfer only works on the console port. You can only download files to the router. You cannot use "xmodem/ymodem" to get files from the router.


For example:

rommon 4> xmodem -cys 38400
Do not start sending the image yet... 
Invoke this application for disaster recovery. Do you wish to 
continue? y/n [n]: y 
Note, if the console port is attached to a modem, both the 
console port and the modem must be operating at the same baud 
rate. Use console speed 38400 bps for download [confirm]

Step 3 At this point, change the preferences in HyperTerminal and adjust the speed from 9600 to 38400.


Note You can continue at the speed of 9600 baud as well by either not specifying the -s option in the command, or by specifying 9600 baud explicitly, but it will take longer.


The console will display the following message:

Download will be performed at 38400. Make sure your terminal 
emulator is set to this speed before sending file. Ready to 
receive file ... 

Step 4 Use the Transfer-->Send File option in HyperTerminal to start the image transfer.

In the Filename box, browse and choose the image file to be downloaded. Also since we used the "y" option while invoking the xmodem, set the transfer protocol to ymodem or use Xmodem protocol by not specifying the -y option on the command line.

The transfer screen comes up and transfer starts. (The transfer may not start immediately; wait for some time and it should start.)

After the transfer is completed (it should typically take about 10-15 minutes), the following messages are displayed on HyperTerminal console:

Returning console speed to 9600. 

Please reset your terminal emulator to this speed... 

Step 5 Return the console speed back to 9600 through HyperTerminal's Preferences menu option.

Usually, due to time lag between changing HyperTerminal speed back to 9600, you might see a bunch of garbage. To avoid this, disconnect and reconnect the HyperTerminal to get the console back again.

The system will reset itself from here and will boot with new software image.


Related Documentation

Cisco documentation and additional literature are available in a CD-ROM package, which ships with your product. The Documentation CD-ROM, a member of the Cisco Connection Family, is updated monthly. Therefore, it might be more current than printed documentation. To order additional copies of the Documentation CD-ROM, contact your local sales representative or call customer service. The CD-ROM package is available as a single package or as an annual subscription.

Note that for this release, in addition to the RPM-PR user documentation (RPM-PR Configuration/Command Reference Guide, Release 2.1) at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/wanbu/8850px45/rel4/rpm/rpmpric/index.htm

use the MGX Release 4 or MGX Release 1.2 and Cisco IOS documents as well as this release note.

Product documentation for MGX 8850 is available at the following URL:

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/wanbu/8850px45/rel4/index.htm

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/wanbu/mgx8850/120/index.htm

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San Jose, CA 95134-9883

We appreciate your comments.

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