Cisco Wireless LAN Controller Configuration Guide, Release 7.2
Appendix A - Troubleshooting
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Troubleshooting

Table Of Contents

Troubleshooting

Information About Troubleshooting

Interpreting LEDs

Information About Interpreting LEDs

Interpreting Controller LEDs

Interpreting Lightweight Access Point LEDs

System Messages

Information About System Messages

Viewing System Resources

Information About Viewing System Resources

Guidelines and Limitations

Viewing System Resources (GUI)

Viewing System Resources (CLI)

Using the CLI to Troubleshoot Problems

Configuring System and Message Logging

Information About System and Message Logging

Configuring System and Message Logging (GUI)

Viewing Message Logs (GUI)

Configuring System and Message Logging (CLI)

Viewing System and Message Logs (CLI)

Viewing Access Point Event Logs

Information About Access Point Event Logs

Viewing Access Point Event Logs (CLI)

Uploading Logs and Crash Files

Prerequisites to Upload Logs and Crash Files

Uploading Logs and Crash Files (GUI)

Uploading Logs and Crash Files (CLI)

Uploading Core Dumps from the Controller

Information About Uploading Core Dumps from the Controller

Configuring the Controller to Automatically Upload Core Dumps to an FTP Server (GUI)

Configuring the Controller to Automatically Upload Core Dumps to an FTP Server (CLI)

Uploading Core Dumps from Controller to a TFTP or FTP Server (CLI)

Uploading Packet Capture Files

Information About Uploading Packet Capture Files

Guidelines and Limitations

Uploading Packet Capture Files (GUI)

Uploading Packet Capture Files (CLI)

Monitoring Memory Leaks

Monitoring Memory Leaks (CLI)

Troubleshooting CCXv5 Client Devices

Information About Troubleshooting CCXv5 Client Devices

Guidelines and Limitations

Configuring Diagnostic Channel

Configuring the Diagnostic Channel (GUI)

Configuring the Diagnostic Channel (CLI)

Configuring Client Reporting

Configuring Client Reporting (GUI)

Configuring Client Reporting (CLI)

Configuring Roaming and Real-Time Diagnostics

Configuring Roaming and Real-Time Diagnostics (CLI)

Using the Debug Facility

Information About Using the Debug Facility

Configuring the Debug Facility (CLI)

Configuring Wireless Sniffing

Information About Wireless Sniffing

Guidelines and Limitations

Prerequisites for Wireless Sniffing

Configuring Sniffing on an Access Point (GUI)

Configuring Sniffing on an Access Point (CLI)

Troubleshooting Access Points Using Telnet or SSH

Information About Troubleshooting Access Points Using Telnet or SSH

Guidelines and Limitations

Troubleshooting Access Points Using Telnet or SSH (GUI)

Troubleshooting Access Points Using Telnet or SSH (CLI)

Debugging the Access Point Monitor Service

Information About Debugging the Access Point Monitor Service

Debugging Access Point Monitor Service Issues (CLI)

Troubleshooting OfficeExtend Access Points

Information About Troubleshooting OfficeExtend Access Points

Interpreting OfficeExtend LEDs

Positioning OfficeExtend Access Points for Optimal RF Coverage

Troubleshooting Common Problems

Troubleshooting Mesh Access Points

Mesh MAP Backhaul Deselection on Ethernet Backhaul at Runtime


Troubleshooting


This appendix contains the following sections:

Information About Troubleshooting

Interpreting LEDs

System Messages

Viewing System Resources

Using the CLI to Troubleshoot Problems

Configuring System and Message Logging

Viewing Access Point Event Logs

Uploading Logs and Crash Files

Uploading Logs and Crash Files

Uploading Core Dumps from the Controller

Uploading Packet Capture Files

Monitoring Memory Leaks

Troubleshooting CCXv5 Client Devices

Using the Debug Facility

Configuring Wireless Sniffing

Troubleshooting Access Points Using Telnet or SSH

Debugging the Access Point Monitor Service

Troubleshooting OfficeExtend Access Points

Troubleshooting Mesh Access Points

Information About Troubleshooting

This appendix lists system messages that can appear on the Cisco UWN solution interfaces, describes the LED patterns on controllers and lightweight access points, and provides CLI commands that can be used to troubleshoot problems on the controller. It contains these sections:

Interpreting LEDs

Information About Interpreting LEDs

This section describes how to interpret controller LEDs and lightweight access point LEDs.

This section contains the following topics:

Interpreting Controller LEDs

Interpreting Lightweight Access Point LEDs

Interpreting OfficeExtend LEDs

Interpreting Controller LEDs

See the quick start guide for your specific controller for a description of the LED patterns. See the list of controllers and the respective documentation at http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/index.html.

Interpreting Lightweight Access Point LEDs

See the quick start guide or hardware installation guide for your specific access point for a description of the LED patterns. See the list of access points and the respective documentation at http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/index.html.

System Messages

Information About System Messages

Table A-1 lists some common system messages and their descriptions. For a complete list of system messages, see the Cisco Wireless LAN Controller System Message Guide.

Table A-1 System Messages and Descriptions 

Error Message
Description

apf_utils.c 680: Received a CIF field without the protected bit set from mobile xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx

A client is sending an association request on a security-enabled WLAN with the protected bit set to 0 (in the Capability field of the association request). As designed, the controller rejects the association request, and the client sees an association failure.

dtl_arp.c 480: Got an idle-timeout message from an unknown client xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx

The controller's network processing unit (NPU) sends a timeout message to the central processing unit (CPU) indicating that a particular client has timed out or aged out. This situation typically occurs when the CPU has removed a wireless client from its internal database but has not notified the NPU. Because the client remains in the NPU database, it ages out on the network processor and notifies the CPU. The CPU finds the client that is not present in its database and then sends this message.

STATION_DISASSOCIATE

The client may have intentionally terminated usage or may have experienced a service disruption.

STATION_DEAUTHENTICATE

The client may have intentionally terminated usage or this message could indicate an authentication issue.

STATION_AUTHENTICATION_FAIL

Check disable, key mismatch, or other configuration issues.

STATION_ASSOCIATE_FAIL

Check the load on the Cisco radio or signal quality issues.

LRAD_ASSOCIATED

The associated lightweight access point is now managed by this controller.

LRAD_DISASSOCIATED

The lightweight access point may have associated to a different controller or may have become completely unreachable.

LRAD_UP

The lightweight access point is operational; no action is required.

LRAD_DOWN

The lightweight access point may have a problem or is administratively disabled.

LRADIF_UP

The Cisco radio is UP.

LRADIF_DOWN

The Cisco radio may have a problem or is administratively disabled.

LRADIF_LOAD_PROFILE_FAILED

The client density may have exceeded the system capacity.

LRADIF_NOISE_PROFILE_FAILED

The non-802.11 noise has exceeded the configured threshold.

LRADIF_INTERFERENCE_PROFILE_FAILED

802.11 interference has exceeded the threshold limits on the channel; check channel assignments.

LRADIF_COVERAGE_PROFILE_FAILED

A possible coverage hole has been detected. Check the lightweight access point history to see if it is a common problem and add lightweight access points if necessary.

LRADIF_LOAD_PROFILE_PASSED

The load is now within threshold limits.

LRADIF_NOISE_PROFILE_PASSED

The detected noise is now less than threshold limits.

LRADIF_INTERFERENCE_PROFILE_PASSED

The detected interference is now less than threshold limit.

LRADIF_COVERAGE_PROFILE_PASSED

The number of clients receiving a poor signal are within threshold limit.

LRADIF_CURRENT_TXPOWER_CHANGED

Informational message.

LRADIF_CURRENT_CHANNEL_CHANGED

Informational message.

LRADIF_RTS_THRESHOLD_CHANGED

Informational message.

LRADIF_ED_THRESHOLD_CHANGED

Informational message.

LRADIF_FRAGMENTATION_THRESHOLD_ CHANGED

Informational message.

RRM_DOT11_A_GROUPING_DONE

Informational message.

RRM_DOT11_B_GROUPING_DONE

Informational message.

ROGUE_AP_DETECTED

May be a security issue. Use maps and trends to investigate.

ROGUE_AP_REMOVED

A detected rogue access point has timed out. The unit might have shut down or moved out of the coverage area.

AP_MAX_ROGUE_COUNT_EXCEEDED

The current number of active rogue access points has exceeded system threshold limit.

LINK_UP

Positive confirmation message.

LINK_DOWN

A port may have a problem or is administratively disabled.

LINK_FAILURE

A port may have a problem or is administratively disabled.

AUTHENTICATION_FAILURE

An attempted security breech has occurred. Investigate.

STP_NEWROOT

Informational message.

STP_TOPOLOGY_CHANGE

Informational message.

IPSEC_ESP_AUTH_FAILURE

Check WLAN IPsec configuration.

IPSEC_ESP_REPLAY_FAILURE

Check for an attempt to spoof an IP address.

IPSEC_ESP_POLICY_FAILURE

Check for an IPsec configuration mismatch between the WLAN and client.

IPSEC_ESP_INVALID_SPI

Informational message.

IPSEC_OTHER_POLICY_FAILURE

Check for an IPsec configuration mismatch between the WLAN and client.

IPSEC_IKE_NEG_FAILURE

Check for an IPsec IKE configuration mismatch between the WLAN and client.

IPSEC_SUITE_NEG_FAILURE

Check for an IPsec IKE configuration mismatch between the WLAN and client.

IPSEC_INVALID_COOKIE

Informational message.

RADIOS_EXCEEDED

The maximum number of supported Cisco radios has been exceeded. Check for a controller failure in the same Layer 2 network or add another controller.

SENSED_TEMPERATURE_HIGH

Check fan, air conditioning, and/or other cooling arrangements.

SENSED_TEMPERATURE_LOW

Check the room temperature and/or other reasons for low temperature.

TEMPERATURE_SENSOR_FAILURE

Replace the temperature sensor as soon as possible.

TEMPERATURE_SENSOR_CLEAR

The temperature sensor is operational.

POE_CONTROLLER_FAILURE

Check ports; a possible serious failure has been detected.

MAX_ROGUE_COUNT_EXCEEDED

The current number of active rogue access points has exceeded system threshold limit.

SWITCH_UP

The controller is responding to SNMP polls.

SWITCH_DOWN

The controller is not responding to SNMP polls; check controller and SNMP settings.

RADIUS_SERVERS_FAILED

Check the network connectivity between RADIUS and the controller.

CONFIG_SAVED

The running configuration has been saved to flash; it will be active after a reboot.

MULTIPLE_USERS

Another user with the same username has logged in.

FAN_FAILURE

Monitor the controller temperature to avoid overheating.

POWER_SUPPLY_CHANGE

Check for a power-supply malfunction.

COLD_START

The controller may have been rebooted.

WARM_START

The controller may have been rebooted.


Viewing System Resources

This section contains the following topics:

Information About Viewing System Resources

Guidelines and Limitations

Viewing System Resources (GUI)

Viewing System Resources (CLI)

Information About Viewing System Resources

You can determine the amount of system resources being used by the controller such as the current controller CPU usage, system buffers, and web server buffers.

Guidelines and Limitations

The Cisco 5500 Series Controllers have multiple CPUs, so you can view individual CPU usage. For each CPU, you can see the percentage of the CPU in use and the percentage of the CPU time spent at the interrupt level (for example, 0%/3%).

Viewing System Resources (GUI)

On the controller GUI, choose Management > Tech Support > System Resource Information. The System Resource Information page appears.

Figure A-1 System Resource Information Page

Viewing System Resources (CLI)

On the controller CLI, enter these commands:

show cpu

Information similar to the following appears:

Current CPU(s) load: 0%
ndividual CPU load: 0%/0%, 0%/0%, 0%/1%, 0%/0%, 0%/0%, 0%/0%, 0%/0%, 0%/0%, 0%/0%, 
0%/0%
 
   

Where the first number is the CPU percentage that the controller spent on the user application and the second number is the CPU percentage that the controller spent on the OS services.

show tech-support

Information similar to the following appears:

System Information
Manufacturer's Name.............................. Cisco Systems Inc.
Product Name..................................... Cisco Controller
Product Version............................... 6.0.165.0 
... 
---------------Show cpu--------------- 
Current CPU(s) Load.............................. 0%
Individual CPU Load.............................. 0%/3%, 0%/1%, 0%/1%, 0%/1%, 0%/0%, 
0%/1%
 
   
---------------Show system buffers---------------
 
   
System Buffers
   Max Free Buffers.............................. 4608
   Free Buffers.................................. 4596
   Buffers In Use................................ 12
 
   
Web Server Resources
   Descriptors Allocated......................... 259
   Descriptors Used.............................. 4
   Segments Allocated............................ 259
   Segments Used................................. 4
 
   
System Resources
   Uptime........................................ 595748 Secs
   Total Ram.................................. 907872 Kbytes 
...

Using the CLI to Troubleshoot Problems

If you experience any problems with your controller, you can use the commands in this section to gather information and debug issues.

1. show process cpu—Shows how various tasks in the system are using the CPU at that instant in time. This command is helpful in understanding if any single task is monopolizing the CPU and preventing other tasks from being performed.

Information similar to the following appears:

Name               		Priority   	 	 	 CPU Use			 	 	 	 	 Reaper
 reaperWatcher      	( 3/124)    	 0 %				 	 	 	 	 	 	(  0/  0)%   I
 osapiReaper        	 	(10/121)    			0 %	 	 	 	 	 	 	(  0/  0)%   I
 TempStatus         	(255/  1)    			0 %		 	 	 	 	 		(  0/  0)%   I
 emWeb              		(255/  1)    			0 %		 	 	 	 		(  0/  0)%   T 300
 cliWebTask        	 	(255/  1)    			0 %	 	 	 	 			(  0/  0)%   I
 UtilTask           	(255/  1)    		0 %				 	 	 	 	 	(  0/  0)%   T 300
 
   

In the example above, the following fields provide information:

The Name field shows the tasks that the CPU is to perform.

The Priority field shows two values: 1) the original priority of the task that was created by the actual function call and 2) the priority of the task divided by a range of system priorities.

The CPU Use field shows the CPU usage of a particular task.

The Reaper field shows three values: 1) the amount of time for which the task is scheduled in user mode operation, 2) the amount of time for which the task is scheduled in system mode operation, and 3) whether the task is being watched by the reaper task monitor (indicated by a "T"). If the task is being watched by the reaper task monitor, this field also shows the timeout value (in seconds) before which the task needs to alert the task monitor.


Note If you want to see the total CPU usage as a percentage, enter the show cpu command.


2. show process memory—Shows the allocation and deallocation of memory from various processes in the system at that instant in time.

Information similar to the following appears:

Name               		Priority   	  	BytesInUse  	BlocksInUse  			Reaper
 reaperWatcher      	( 3/124)    	 	0 		       			 	 			0       		 	(  0/  0)%   I
 osapiReaper        	 	(10/121)    		0 	 	 	 	 	 	 		0		 	(  0/  0)%   I
 TempStatus         	(255/  1)    		308 	 	 	 	 	 	 	 		1       		 	(  0/  0)%   I
 emWeb              		(255/  1)    		294440 	 	 	 	 	 	4910 		 			(  0/  0)% 	 	T 300
 cliWebTask        	 	(255/  1)    		738 	 	 	 	 	 	 	 	2 			(  0/  0)%   I
 UtilTask           		(255/  1)    		308 	 	 	 	 	 	 	 	1 			(  0/  0)% 	 	T 300 

In the example above, the following fields provide information:

The Name field shows the tasks that the CPU is to perform.

The Priority field shows two values: 1) the original priority of the task that was created by the actual function call and 2) the priority of the task divided by a range of system priorities.

The BytesInUse field shows the actual number of bytes used by dynamic memory allocation for a particular task.

The BlocksInUse field shows the chunks of memory that are assigned to perform a particular task.

The Reaper field shows three values: 1) the amount of time for which the task is scheduled in user mode operation, 2) the amount of time for which the task is scheduled in system mode operation, and 3) whether the task is being watched by the reaper task monitor (indicated by a "T"). If the task is being watched by the reaper task monitor, this field also shows the timeout value (in seconds) before which the task needs to alert the task monitor.

3. show tech-support—Shows information related to the state of the system, including the current configuration, last crash file, CPU utilization, and memory utilization.

4. show run-config—Shows the complete configuration of the controller. To exclude access point configuration settings, use the show run-config no-ap command.


Note If you want to see the passwords in clear text, enter the config passwd-cleartext enable command. To execute this command, you must enter an admin password. This command is valid only for this particular session. It is not saved following a reboot.


5. show run-config commands—Shows the list of configured commands on the controller. This command shows only values configured by the user. It does not show system-configured default values.

Configuring System and Message Logging

This section contains the following topics:

Information About System and Message Logging

Configuring System and Message Logging (GUI)

Viewing Message Logs (GUI)

Configuring System and Message Logging (CLI)

Information About System and Message Logging

System logging allows controllers to log their system events to up to three remote syslog servers. The controller sends a copy of each syslog message as it is logged to each syslog server configured on the controller. Being able to send the syslog messages to multiple servers ensures that the messages are not lost due to the temporary unavailability of one syslog server. Message logging allows system messages to be logged to the controller buffer or console.

Configuring System and Message Logging (GUI)


Step 1 Choose Management > Logs > Config. The Syslog Configuration page appears.

Figure A-2 Syslog Configuration Page

Step 2 In the Syslog Server IP Address text box, enter the IP address of the server to which to send the syslog messages and click Add. You can add up to three syslog servers to the controller. The list of syslog servers that have already been added to the controller appears below this text box.


Note If you want to remove a syslog server from the controller, click Remove to the right of the desired server.


Step 3 To set the severity level for filtering syslog messages to the syslog servers, choose one of the following options from the Syslog Level drop-down list:

Emergencies = Severity level 0— System is unusable

Alerts = Severity level 1 (default value)—Immediate action required

Critical = Severity level 2—Critical condition

Errors = Severity level 3—Error condition

Warnings = Severity level 4—Warning condition

Notifications = Severity level 5—Normal but significant condition

Informational = Severity level 6—Informational message

Debugging = Severity level 7—Message that appears during debugging

If you set a syslog level, only those messages whose severity is equal to or less than that level are sent to the syslog servers. For example, if you set the syslog level to Warnings (severity level 4), only those messages whose severity is between 0 and 4 are sent to the syslog servers.

Step 4 You can set the facility for outgoing syslog messages to the syslog servers. The facility level is used to specify what type of program is logging the message. Choose one of the following options from the Syslog Facility drop-down list:

Kernel = Facility level 0—Kernel messages

User Process = Facility level 1—User-level messages

Mail = Facility level 2—Mail System messages

System Daemons = Facility level 3—System Daemons messages

Authorization = Facility level 4—Security and Authorization messages

Syslog = Facility level 5 (default value)—Syslog Daemon messages

Line Printer = Facility level 6—Line Printer subsystem

USENET = Facility level 7—User-initiated processes or application messages

Unix-to-Unix Copy = Facility level 8—UNIX-to-UNIX Copy system messages

Cron = Facility level 9—Cron Daemon messages

FTP Daemon = Facility level 11—FTP Daemon messages

System Use 1 = Facility level 12—Reserved for system messages

System Use 2 = Facility level 13—Reserved for system messages

System Use 3 = Facility level 14—Reserved for system messages

System Use 4 = Facility level 15—Reserved for system messages

Local Use 0 = Facility level 16—Reserved for local use

Local Use 1 = Facility level 17—Reserved for local use

Local Use 2 = Facility level 18—Reserved for local use

Local Use 3 = Facility level 19—Reserved for local use

Local Use 4 = Facility level 20—Reserved for local use

Local Use 5 = Facility level 21—Reserved for local use

Local Use 6 = Facility level 22—Reserved for local use

Local Use 7 = Facility level 23—Reserved for local use

Step 5 Click Apply to commit your changes.

Step 6 To set the severity level for logging messages to the controller buffer and console, choose one of the following options from both the Buffered Log Level and Console Log Level drop-down lists:

Emergencies = Severity level 0

Alerts = Severity level 1

Critical = Severity level 2

Errors = Severity level 3 (default value)

Warnings = Severity level 4

Notifications = Severity level 5

Informational = Severity level 6

Debugging = Severity level 7

Disable— This option is available only for the Console Log level. Select this option to disable console logging.

If you set a logging level, only those messages whose severity is equal to or less than that level are logged by the controller. For example, if you set the logging level to Warnings (severity level 4), only those messages whose severity is between 0 and 4 are logged.

Step 7 Select the File Info check box if you want the message logs to include information about the source file. The default value is enabled.

Step 8 Select the Trace Info check box if you want the message logs to include traceback information. The default value is disabled.

Step 9 Click Apply to commit your changes.

Step 10 Click Save Configuration to save your changes.


Viewing Message Logs (GUI)

To view message logs using the controller GUI, choose Management > Logs > Message Logs. The Message Logs page appears.

Figure A-3 Message Logs Page


Note To clear the current message logs from the controller, click Clear.


Configuring System and Message Logging (CLI)

To configure system and message logging using the controller CLI, follow these steps:


Step 1 To enable system logging and set the IP address of the syslog server to which to send the syslog messages, enter this command:

config logging syslog host server_IP_address

You can add up to three syslog servers to the controller.


Note To remove a syslog server from the controller, enter this command:
config logging syslog host server_IP_address delete


Step 2 To set the severity level for filtering syslog messages to the syslog server, enter this command:

config logging syslog level severity_level

where severity_level is one of the following:

emergencies = Severity level 0

alerts = Severity level 1

critical = Severity level 2

errors = Severity level 3

warnings = Severity level 4

notifications = Severity level 5

informational = Severity level 6

debugging = Severity level 7


Note As an alternative, you can enter a number from 0 through 7 for the severity_level parameter.



Note If you set a syslog level, only those messages whose severity is equal to or less than that level are sent to the syslog server. For example, if you set the syslog level to Warnings (severity level 4), only those messages whose severity is between 0 and 4 are sent to the syslog server.


Step 3 To set the severity level for filtering syslog messages for a particular access point or for all access points, enter this command:

config ap logging syslog level severity_level {Cisco_AP | all}

where severity_level is one of the following:

emergencies = Severity level 0

alerts = Severity level 1

critical = Severity level 2

errors = Severity level 3

warnings = Severity level 4

notifications = Severity level 5

informational = Severity level 6

debugging = Severity level 7


Note If you set a syslog level, only those messages whose severity is equal to or less than that level are sent to the access point. For example, if you set the syslog level to Warnings (severity level 4), only those messages whose severity is between 0 and 4 are sent to the access point.


Step 4 To set the facility for outgoing syslog messages to the syslog server, enter this command:

config logging syslog facility facility_code

where facility_code is one of the following:

authorization = Authorization system. Facility level = 4.

auth-private = Authorization system (private). Facility level = 10.

cron = Cron/at facility. Facility level = 9.

daemon = System daemons. Facility level = 3.

ftp = FTP daemon. Facility level = 11.

kern = Kernel. Facility level = 0.

local0 = Local use. Facility level = 16.

local1 = Local use. Facility level = 17.

local2 = Local use. Facility level = 18.

local3 = Local use. Facility level = 19.

local4 = Local use. Facility level = 20.

local5 = Local use. Facility level = 21.

local6 = Local use. Facility level = 22.

local7 = Local use. Facility level = 23.

lpr = Line printer system. Facility level = 6.

mail = Mail system. Facility level = 2.

news = USENET news. Facility level = 7.

sys12 = System use. Facility level = 12.

sys13 = System use. Facility level = 13.

sys14 = System use. Facility level = 14.

sys15 = System use. Facility level = 15.

syslog = The syslog itself. Facility level = 5.

user = User process. Facility level = 1.

uucp = Unix-to-Unix copy system. Facility level = 8.

Step 5 To set the severity level for logging messages to the controller buffer and console, enter these commands:

config logging buffered severity_level

config logging console severity_level

where severity_level is one of the following:

emergencies = Severity level 0

alerts = Severity level 1

critical = Severity level 2

errors = Severity level 3

warnings = Severity level 4

notifications = Severity level 5

informational = Severity level 6

debugging = Severity level 7


Note As an alternative, you can enter a number from 0 through 7 for the severity_level parameter.



Note If you set a logging level, only those messages whose severity is equal to or less than that level are logged by the controller. For example, if you set the logging level to Warnings (severity level 4), only those messages whose severity is between 0 and 4 are logged.


Step 6 To save debug messages to the controller buffer, the controller console, or a syslog server, enter these commands:

config logging debug buffered {enable | disable}

config logging debug console {enable | disable}

config logging debug syslog {enable | disable}

By default, the console command is enabled, and the buffered and syslog commands are disabled.

Step 7 To cause the controller to include information about the source file in the message logs or to prevent the controller from displaying this information, enter this command:

config logging fileinfo {enable | disable}

The default value is enabled.

Step 8 To cause the controller to include process information in the message logs or to prevent the controller from displaying this information, enter this command:

config logging procinfo {enable | disable}

The default value is disabled.

Step 9 To cause the controller to include traceback information in the message logs or to prevent the controller from displaying this information, enter this command:

config logging traceinfo {enable | disable}

The default value is disabled.

Step 10 To enable or disable timestamps in log messages and debug messages, enter these commands:

config service timestamps log {datetime | disable}

config service timestamps debug {datetime | disable}

where

datetime = Messages are timestamped with the standard date and time. This is the default value.

disable = Messages are not timestamped.

Step 11 To save your changes, enter this command:

save config


Viewing System and Message Logs (CLI)

To see the logging parameters and buffer contents, enter this command:

show logging

Information similar to the following appears:

Logging to buffer :
- Logging of system messages to buffer :
 - Logging filter level.......................... errors
 - Number of system messages logged.............. 8716
 - Number of system messages dropped............. 2906
- Logging of debug messages to buffer ........... Disabled
 - Number of debug messages logged............... 0
 - Number of debug messages dropped.............. 0
Logging to console :
- Logging of system messages to console :
 - Logging filter level.......................... errors
 - Number of system messages logged.............. 0
 - Number of system messages dropped............. 11622
- Logging of debug messages to console .......... Enabled
 - Number of debug messages logged............... 0
 - Number of debug messages dropped.............. 0
Logging to syslog :
- Syslog facility................................ local0
- Logging of system messages to syslog :
 - Logging filter level.......................... errors
 - Number of system messages logged.............. 8716 
- Number of debug messages dropped............... 0
- Number of remote syslog hosts.................. 0
  - Host 0....................................... Not Configured
  - Host 1....................................... Not Configured
  - Host 2....................................... Not Configured
Logging of traceback............................. Disabled
Logging of process information................... Disabled
Logging of source file informational............. Enabled
Timestamping of messages.........................
- Timestamping of system messages................ Enabled
 - Timestamp format.............................. Date and Time
- Timestamping of debug messages................. Enabled
 - Timestamp format.............................. Date and Time
 
   
Logging buffer (8722 logged, 2910 dropped)
 
   
*Mar 26 09:23:13.574: %MM-3-INVALID_PKT_RECVD: mm_listen.c:5508 Received an invalid packet 
from 1.100.163.144. Source member:0.0.0.0. source member unknown.
*Mar 26 09:23:13.574: %MM-3-INVALID_PKT_RECVD: mm_listen.c:5508 Received an invalid packet 
from 1.100.163.144. Source member:0.0.0.0. source member unknown.
Previous message occurred 2 times.
*Mar 26 09:22:44.925: %MM-3-INVALID_PKT_RECVD: mm_listen.c:5508 Received an invalid packet 
from 1.100.163.144. Source member:0.0.0.0. source member unknown.
...

Viewing Access Point Event Logs

This section contains the following topics:

Information About Access Point Event Logs

Viewing Access Point Event Logs (CLI)

Information About Access Point Event Logs

Access points log all system messages (with a severity level greater than or equal to notifications) to the access point event log. The event log can contain up to 1024 lines of messages, with up to 128 characters per line. When the event log becomes filled, the oldest message is removed to accommodate a new event message. The event log is saved in a file on the access point flash, which ensures that it is saved through a reboot cycle. To minimize the number of writes to the access point flash, the contents of the event log are written to the event log file during normal reload and crash scenarios only.

Viewing Access Point Event Logs (CLI)

Use these CLI commands to view or clear the access point event log from the controller:

To see the contents of the event log file for an access point that is joined to the controller, enter this command:

show ap eventlog Cisco_AP

Information similar to the following appears:

AP event log download has been initiated
Waiting for download to complete
 
   
AP event log download completed.
 ======================= AP Event log Contents =====================
*Sep 22 11:44:00.573: %CAPWAP-5-CHANGED: CAPWAP changed state to IMAGE
*Sep 22 11:44:01.514: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Dot11Radio0, 
changed state to down
*Sep 22 11:44:01.519: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Dot11Radio1, 
changed state to down
*Sep 22 11:44:53.539: *** Access point reloading. Reason: NEW IMAGE DOWNLOAD ***
*Mar 1 00:00:39.078: %CAPWAP-3-ERRORLOG: Did not get log server settings from DHCP.
*Mar 1 00:00:42.142: %CDP_PD-4-POWER_OK: Full power - NEGOTIATED inline power source
*Mar 1 00:00:42.151: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Dot11Radio1, changed state to up
*Mar 1 00:00:42.158: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Dot11Radio0, changed state to up
*Mar 1 00:00:43.143: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Dot11Radio1, 
changed state to up
*Mar 1 00:00:43.151: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Dot11Radio0, 
changed state to up
*Mar 1 00:00:48.078: %CAPWAP-3-ERRORLOG: Could Not resolve CISCO-CAPWAP-CONTROLLER
*Mar 1 00:01:42.144: %CDP_PD-4-POWER_OK: Full power - NEGOTIATED inline power source
*Mar 1 00:01:48.121: %CAPWAP-3-CLIENTERRORLOG: Set Transport Address: no more AP 
manager IP addresses remain
*Mar 1 00:01:48.122: %CAPWAP-5-CHANGED: CAPWAP changed state to JOIN
*Mar 1 00:01:48.122: %LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface Dot11Radio0, changed state to 
administratively down
*Mar 1 00:01:48.122: %LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface Dot11Radio1, changed state to 
administratively down 

To delete the existing event log and create an empty event log file for a specific access point or for all access points joined to the controller, enter this command:

clear ap-eventlog {specific Cisco_AP | all}

Uploading Logs and Crash Files

This section contains the following topics:

Prerequisites to Upload Logs and Crash Files

Uploading Logs and Crash Files (GUI)

Uploading Logs and Crash Files (CLI)

Prerequisites to Upload Logs and Crash Files

Follow the instructions in this section to upload logs and crash files from the controller. However, before you begin, ensure you have a TFTP or FTP server available for the file upload. Follow these guidelines when setting up a TFTP or FTP server:

If you are uploading through the service port, the TFTP or FTP server must be on the same subnet as the service port because the service port is not routable, or you must create static routes on the controller.

If you are uploading through the distribution system network port, the TFTP or FTP server can be on the same or a different subnet because the distribution system port is routable.

A third-party TFTP or FTP server cannot run on the same computer as WCS because the WCS built-in TFTP or FTP server and the third-party TFTP or FTP server require the same communication port.

Uploading Logs and Crash Files (GUI)


Step 1 Choose Command > Upload File. The Upload File from Controller page appears.

Figure A-4 Upload File from Controller Page

Step 2 From the File Type drop-down list, choose one of the following:

Event Log

Message Log

Trap Log

Crash File

Step 3 From the Transfer Mode drop-down list, choose TFTP or FTP.

Step 4 In the IP Address text box, enter the IP address of the TFTP or FTP server.

Step 5 In the File Path text box, enter the directory path of the log or crash file.

Step 6 In the File Name text box, enter the name of the log or crash file.

Step 7 If you chose FTP as the Transfer Mode, follow these steps:

a. In the Server Login Username text box, enter the FTP server login name.

b. In the Server Login Password text box, enter the FTP server login password.

c. In the Server Port Number text box, enter the port number of the FTP server. The default value for the server port is 21.

Step 8 Click Upload to upload the log or crash file from the controller. A message appears indicating the status of the upload.


Uploading Logs and Crash Files (CLI)


Step 1 To transfer the file from the controller to a TFTP or FTP server, enter this command:

transfer upload mode {tftp | ftp}

Step 2 To specify the type of file to be uploaded, enter this command:

transfer upload datatype datatype

where datatype is one of the following options:

crashfile—Uploads the system's crash file.

errorlog—Uploads the system's error log.

panic-crash-file—Uploads the kernel panic information if a kernel panic occurs.

systemtrace—Uploads the system's trace file.

traplog—Uploads the system's trap log.

watchdog-crash-file—Uploads the console dump resulting from a software-watchdog-initiated reboot of the controller following a crash. The software watchdog module periodically checks the integrity of the internal software and makes sure that the system does not stay in an inconsistent or nonoperational state for a long period of time.

Step 3 To specify the path to the file, enter these commands:

transfer upload serverip server_ip_address

transfer upload path server_path_to_file

transfer upload filename filename

Step 4 If you are using an FTP server, also enter these commands:

transfer upload username username

transfer upload password password

transfer upload port port


Note The default value for the port parameter is 21.


Step 5 To see the updated settings, enter this command:

transfer upload start

Step 6 When prompted to confirm the current settings and start the software upload, answer y.


Uploading Core Dumps from the Controller

This section contains the following topics:

Information About Uploading Core Dumps from the Controller

Configuring the Controller to Automatically Upload Core Dumps to an FTP Server (GUI)

Configuring the Controller to Automatically Upload Core Dumps to an FTP Server (CLI)

Information About Uploading Core Dumps from the Controller

To help troubleshoot controller crashes, you can configure the controller to automatically upload its core dump file to an FTP server after experiencing a crash. You cannot upload the core dump file directly to an FTP or TFTP server but you can upload a crash file to an FTP or TFTP server. The controllers save the core dump file to flash memory following a crash.

Configuring the Controller to Automatically Upload Core Dumps to an FTP Server (GUI)


Step 1 Choose Management > Tech Support > Core Dump to open the Core Dump page.

Figure A-5 Core Dump Page

Step 2 To enable the controller to generate a core dump file following a crash, select the Core Dump Transfer check box.

Step 3 To specify the type of server to which the core dump file is uploaded, choose FTP from the Transfer Mode drop-down list.

Step 4 In the IP Address text box, enter the IP address of the FTP server.


Note The controller must be able to reach the FTP server.


Step 5 In the File Name text box, enter the name that the controller uses to label the core dump file.

Step 6 In the User Name text box, enter the username for FTP login.

Step 7 In the Password text box, enter the password for FTP login.

Step 8 Click Apply to commit your changes.

Step 9 Click Save Configuration to save your changes.


Configuring the Controller to Automatically Upload Core Dumps to an FTP Server (CLI)


Step 1 To enable or disable the controller to generate a core dump file following a crash, enter this command:

config coredump {enable | disable}

Step 2 To specify the FTP server to which the core dump file is uploaded, enter this command:

config coredump ftp server_ip_address filename

where

server_ip_address is the IP address of the FTP server to which the controller sends its core dump file.


Note The controller must be able to reach the FTP server.


filename is the name that the controller uses to label the core dump file.

Step 3 To specify the username and password for FTP login, enter this command:

config coredump username ftp_username password ftp_password

Step 4 To save your changes, enter this command:

save config

Step 5 To see a summary of the controller's core dump file, enter this command:

show coredump summary

Information similar to the following appears:

Core Dump is enabled 
 
   
FTP Server IP.................................... 10.10.10.17 
FTP Filename..................................... file1 
FTP Username..................................... ftpuser
FTP Password.................................. *********  


Uploading Core Dumps from Controller to a TFTP or FTP Server (CLI)


Note This procedure is not applicable for Cisco 2106 and 4400 controllers.



Step 1 To see information about the core dump file in flash memory, enter this command:

show coredump summary

Information similar to the following appears:

Core Dump is disabled
 
   
Core Dump file is saved on flash
 
   
Sw Version.................................... 6.0.83.0
Time Stamp.................................... Wed Feb  4 13:23:11 2009
File Size..................................... 9081788
File Name Suffix........................... filename.gz 

Step 2 To transfer the file from the controller to a TFTP or FTP server, enter these commands:

transfer upload mode {tftp | ftp}

transfer upload datatype coredump

transfer upload serverip server_ip_address

transfer upload path server_path_to_file

transfer upload filename filename


Note After the file is uploaded, it ends with a .gz suffix. If desired, you can upload the same core dump file multiple times with different names to different servers.


Step 3 If you are using an FTP server, also enter these commands:

transfer upload username username

transfer upload password password

transfer upload port port


Note The default value for the port parameter is 21.


Step 4 To view the updated settings, enter this command:

transfer upload start

Step 5 When prompted to confirm the current settings and start the software upload, answer y.


Uploading Packet Capture Files

This section contains the following topics:

Information About Uploading Packet Capture Files

Guidelines and Limitations

Uploading Packet Capture Files (GUI)

Uploading Packet Capture Files (CLI)

Information About Uploading Packet Capture Files

When a Cisco 5500 Series Controller's data plane crashes, it stores the last 50 packets that the controller received in flash memory. This information can be useful in troubleshooting the crash.

When a crash occurs, the controller generates a new packet capture file (*.pcap) file, and a message similar to the following appears in the controller crash file:

Last 5 packets processed at each core are stored in
 "last_received_pkts.pcap" captured file.
   - Frame 36,38,43,47,49, processed at core #0.
   - Frame 14,27,30,42,45, processed at core #1.
   - Frame 15,18,20,32,48, processed at core #2.
   - Frame 11,29,34,37,46, processed at core #3.
   - Frame 7,8,12,31,35, processed at core #4.
   - Frame 21,25,39,41,50, processed at core #5.
   - Frame 16,17,19,22,33, processed at core #6.
   - Frame 6,10,13,23,26, processed at core #7.
   - Frame 9,24,28,40,44, processed at core #8.
   - Frame 1,2,3,4,5, processed at core #9. 

You can use the controller GUI or CLI to upload the packet capture file from the controller. You can then use Wireshark or another standard packet capture tool to view and analyze the contents of the file. Figure A-6 shows a sample output of a packet capture file in Wireshark.

Figure A-6 Sample Output of Packet Capture File in Wireshark

Guidelines and Limitations

Only Cisco 5500 Series Controllers generate packet capture files. This feature is not available on other controller platforms.

Ensure that you have a TFTP or FTP server available for the file upload. Follow these guidelines when setting up a TFTP or FTP server:

If you are uploading through the service port, the TFTP or FTP server must be on the same subnet as the service port because the service port is not routable, or you must create static routes on the controller.

If you are uploading through the distribution system network port, the TFTP or FTP server can be on the same or a different subnet because the distribution system port is routable.

A third-party TFTP or FTP server cannot run on the same computer as WCS because the WCS built-in TFTP or FTP server and the third-party TFTP or FTP server require the same communication port.

Uploading Packet Capture Files (GUI)


Step 1 Choose Commands > Upload File to open the Upload File from Controller page.

Figure A-7 Upload File from Controller Page

Step 2 From the File Type drop-down list, choose Packet Capture.

Step 3 From the Transfer Mode drop-down list, choose TFTP or FTP.

Step 4 In the IP Address text box, enter the IP address of the TFTP or FTP server.

Step 5 In the File Path text box, enter the directory path of the packet capture file.

Step 6 In the File Name text box, enter the name of the packet capture file. These files have a .pcap extension.

Step 7 If you are using an FTP server, follow these steps:

a. In the Server Login Username text box, enter the username to log into the FTP server.

b. In the Server Login Password text box, enter the password to log into the FTP server.

c. In the Server Port Number text box, enter the port number on the FTP server through which the upload occurs. The default value is 21.

Step 8 Click Upload to upload the packet capture file from the controller. A message appears indicating the status of the upload.

Step 9 Use Wireshark or another standard packet capture tool to open the packet capture file and see the last 50 packets that were received by the controller.


Uploading Packet Capture Files (CLI)


Step 1 Log on to the controller CLI.

Step 2 Enter the transfer upload mode {tftp | ftp} command.

Step 3 Enter the transfer upload datatype packet-capture command.

Step 4 Enter the transfer upload serverip server-ip-address command.

Step 5 Enter the transfer upload path server-path-to-file command.

Step 6 Enter the transfer upload filename last_received_pkts.pcap command.

Step 7 If you are using an FTP server, enter these commands:

transfer upload username username

transfer upload password password

transfer upload port port


Note The default value for the port parameter is 21.


Step 8 Enter the transfer upload start command to see the updated settings and then answer y when prompted to confirm the current settings and start the upload process. This example shows the upload command output:

Mode........................................... TFTP 
TFTP Server IP................................. 209.165.200.224 
TFTP Path...................................... /tftp/user/ 
TFTP Filename..................................... last_received_pkts.pcap
Data Type...................................... Packet capture 
 
Are you sure you want to start? (y/N) y
 
   
TFTP Packet Capture Dump starting.
 
   
File transfer operation completed successfully. 

Step 9 Use Wireshark or another standard packet capture tool to open the packet capture file and see the last 50 packets that were received by the controller.


Monitoring Memory Leaks

This section provides instructions for troubleshooting hard-to-solve or hard-to-reproduce memory problems.


Caution The commands in this section can be disruptive to your system and should be run only when you are advised to do so by the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC).

Monitoring Memory Leaks (CLI)


Step 1 To enable or disable monitoring for memory errors and leaks, enter this command:

config memory monitor errors {enable | disable}

The default value is disabled.


Note Your changes are not saved across reboots. After the controller reboots, it uses the default setting for this feature.


Step 2 If you suspect that a memory leak has occurred, enter this command to configure the controller to perform an auto-leak analysis between two memory thresholds (in kilobytes):

config memory monitor leaks low_thresh high_thresh

If the free memory is lower than the low_thresh threshold, the system crashes, generating a crash file. The default value for this parameter is 10000 kilobytes, and you cannot set it below this value.

Set the high_thresh threshold to the current free memory level or higher so that the system enters auto-leak-analysis mode. After the free memory reaches a level lower than the specified high_thresh threshold, the process of tracking and freeing memory allocation begins. As a result, the debug memory events enable command shows all allocations and frees, and the show memory monitor detail command starts to detect any suspected memory leaks. The default value for this parameter is 30000 kilobytes.

Step 3 To see a summary of any discovered memory issues, enter this command:

show memory monitor

Information similar to the following appears:

Memory Leak Monitor Status:
low_threshold(10000), high_threshold(30000), current status(disabled)
 
   
-------------------------------------------
 
   
Memory Error Monitor Status:
Crash-on-error flag currently set to (disabled)
No memory error detected. 

Step 4 To see the details of any memory leaks or corruption, enter this command:

show memory monitor detail

Information similar to the following appears:

Memory error detected. Details:
------------------------------------------------
-  Corruption detected at pmalloc entry address:        (0x179a7ec0)
-  Corrupt entry:headerMagic(0xdeadf00d),trailer(0xabcd),poison(0xreadceef),
entrysize(128),bytes(100),thread(Unknown task name, task id = (332096592)),
file(pmalloc.c),line(1736),time(1027)
 
   
Previous 1K memory dump from error location.
------------------------------------------------
(179a7ac0): 00000000 00000000 00000000 ceeff00d readf00d 00000080 00000000 00000000
(179a7ae0): 17958b20 00000000 1175608c 00000078 00000000 readceef 179a7afc 00000001
(179a7b00): 00000003 00000006 00000001 00000004 00000001 00000009 00000009 0000020d
(179a7b20): 00000001 00000002 00000002 00000001 00000004 00000000 00000000 5d7b9aba
(179a7b40): cbddf004 192f465e 7791acc8 e5032242 5365788c a1b7cee6 00000000 00000000
(179a7b60): 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 ceeff00d readf00d 00000080
(179a7b80): 00000000 00000000 17958dc0 00000000 1175608c 00000078 00000000 readceef
(179a7ba0): 179a7ba4 00000001 00000003 00000006 00000001 00000004 00000001 00003763
(179a7bc0): 00000002 00000002 00000010 00000001 00000002 00000000 0000001e 00000013
(179a7be0): 0000001a 00000089 00000000 00000000 000000d8 00000000 00000000 17222194
(179a7c00): 1722246c 1722246c 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 ceeff00d
(179a7c20): readf00d 00000080 00000000 00000000 179a7b78 00000000 1175608c 00000078 

Step 5 If a memory leak occurs, enter this command to enable debugging of errors or events during memory allocation:

debug memory {errors | events} {enable | disable}


Troubleshooting CCXv5 Client Devices

This section contains the following topics:

Information About Troubleshooting CCXv5 Client Devices

Guidelines and Limitations

Configuring Diagnostic Channel

Configuring Roaming and Real-Time Diagnostics

Information About Troubleshooting CCXv5 Client Devices

The controller supports three features designed to help troubleshoot communication problems with CCXv5 clients: diagnostic channel, client reporting, and roaming and real-time diagnostics. See the "Configuring Cisco Client Extensions" section for more information on CCX.

Guidelines and Limitations

These features are supported only on CCXv5 clients. They are not supported for use with non-CCX clients or with clients running an earlier version of CCX.

Configuring Diagnostic Channel

The diagnostic channel feature enables you to troubleshoot problems regarding client communication with a WLAN. The client and access points can be put through a defined set of tests in an attempt to identify the cause of communication difficulties the client is experiencing and then allow corrective measures to be taken to make the client operational on the network. You can use the controller GUI or CLI to enable the diagnostic channel, and you can use the controller CLI or WCS to run the diagnostic tests.


Note We recommend that you enable the diagnostic channel feature only for nonanchored SSIDs that use the management interface.


Configuring the Diagnostic Channel (GUI)


Step 1 Choose WLANs to open the WLANs page.

Step 2 Create a new WLAN or click the ID number of an existing WLAN.


Note We recommend that you create a new WLAN on which to run the diagnostic tests.


Step 3 When the WLANs > Edit page appears, choose the Advanced tab to open the WLANs > Edit (Advanced) page.

Figure A-8 WLANs > Edit (Advanced) Page

Step 4 If you want to enable diagnostic channel troubleshooting on this WLAN, select the Diagnostic Channel check box. Otherwise, leave this check box unselected, which is the default value.


Note You can use the CLI to initiate diagnostic tests on the client. See the "Configuring the Diagnostic Channel (CLI)" section for details.


Step 5 Click Apply to commit your changes.

Step 6 Click Save Configuration to save your changes.


Configuring the Diagnostic Channel (CLI)


Step 1 To enable diagnostic channel troubleshooting on a particular WLAN, enter this command:

config wlan diag-channel {enable | disable} wlan_id

Step 2 To verify that your change has been made, enter this command:

show wlan wlan_id

Information similar to the following appears:

WLAN Identifier.................................. 1
Profile Name..................................... employee1
Network Name (SSID).............................. employee
Status........................................... Disabled
MAC Filtering.................................... Disabled
Broadcast SSID................................... Enabled
AAA Policy Override.............................. Disabled
Number of Active Clients......................... 0
Exclusionlist Timeout............................ 60 seconds
Session Timeout.................................. Infinity
Interface........................................ virtual
WLAN ACL......................................... unconfigured
DHCP Server...................................... Default
DHCP Address Assignment Required................. Disabled
Quality of Service............................... Silver (best effort)
WMM.............................................. Disabled
CCX - AironetIe Support.......................... Enabled
CCX - Gratuitous ProbeResponse (GPR)............. Disabled
CCX - Diagnostics Channel Capability............. Enabled
... 

Step 3 To send a request to the client to perform the DHCP test, enter this command:

config client ccx dhcp-test client_mac_address


Note This test does not require the client to use the diagnostic channel.


Step 4 To send a request to the client to perform the default gateway ping test, enter this command:

config client ccx default-gw-ping client_mac_address


Note This test does not require the client to use the diagnostic channel.


Step 5 To send a request to the client to perform the DNS server IP address ping test, enter this command:

config client ccx dns-ping client_mac_address


Note This test does not require the client to use the diagnostic channel.


Step 6 To send a request to the client to perform the DNS name resolution test to the specified hostname, enter this command:

config client ccx dns-resolve client_mac_address host_name


Note This test does not require the client to use the diagnostic channel.


Step 7 To send a request to the client to perform the association test, enter this command:

config client ccx test-association client_mac_address ssid bssid {802.11a | 802.11b | 802.11g} channel

Step 8 To send a request to the client to perform the 802.1X test, enter this command:

config client ccx test-dot1x client_mac_address profile_id bssid {802.11a | 802.11b | 802.11g} channel

Step 9 To send a request to the client to perform the profile redirect test, enter this command:

config client ccx test-profile client_mac_address profile_id

The profile_id should be from one of the client profiles for which client reporting is enabled.


Note Users are redirected back to the parent WLAN, not to any other profile. The only profile shown is the user's parent profile. However, parent WLAN profiles can have one child diagnostic WLAN.


Step 10 Use these commands if necessary to abort or clear a test:

To send a request to the client to abort the current test, enter this command:

config client ccx test-abort client_mac_address

Only one test can be pending at a time, so this command aborts the current pending test.

To clear the test results on the controller, enter this command:

config client ccx clear-results client_mac_address

Step 11 To send a message to the client, enter this command:

config client ccx send-message client_mac_address message_id

where message_id is one of the following:

1 = The SSID is invalid.

2 = The network settings are invalid.

3 = There is a WLAN credibility mismatch.

4 = The user credentials are incorrect.

5 = Please call support.

6 = The problem is resolved.

7 = The problem has not been resolved.

8 = Please try again later.

9 = Please correct the indicated problem.

10 = Troubleshooting is refused by the network.

11 = Retrieving client reports.

12 = Retrieving client logs.

13 = Retrieval complete.

14 = Beginning association test.

15 = Beginning DHCP test.

16 = Beginning network connectivity test.

17 = Beginning DNS ping test.

18 = Beginning name resolution test.

19 = Beginning 802.1X authentication test.

20 = Redirecting client to a specific profile.

21 = Test complete.

22 = Test passed.

23 = Test failed.

24 = Cancel diagnostic channel operation or select a WLAN profile to resume normal operation.

25 = Log retrieval refused by the client.

26 = Client report retrieval refused by the client.

27 = Test request refused by the client.

28 = Invalid network (IP) setting.

29 = There is a known outage or problem with the network.

30 = Scheduled maintenance period.

31 = The WLAN security method is not correct.

32 = The WLAN encryption method is not correct.

33 = The WLAN authentication method is not correct.

Step 12 To see the status of the last test, enter this command:

show client ccx last-test-status client_mac_address

Information similar to the following appears for the default gateway ping test:

Test Type........................................ Gateway Ping Test
Test Status...................................... Pending/Success/Timeout
 
   
Dialog Token..................................... 15
Timeout.......................................... 15000 ms
Request Time..................................... 1329 seconds since system boot
 
   

Step 13 To see the status of the last test response, enter this command:

show client ccx last-response-status client_mac_address

Information similar to the following appears for the 802.1X authentication test:

Test Status...................................... Success
 
   
Response Dialog Token............................ 87
Response Status.................................. Successful
Response Test Type............................... 802.1x Authentication Test
Response Time.................................... 3476 seconds since system boot
 
   

Step 14 To see the results from the last successful diagnostics test, enter this command:

show client ccx results client_mac_address

Information similar to the following appears for the 802.1X authentication test:

dot1x Complete................................... Success
EAP Method....................................... *1,Host OS Login Credentials
dot1x Status.................................. 255  

Step 15 To see the relevant data frames captured by the client during the previous test, enter this command:

show client ccx frame-data client_mac_address

Information similar to the following appears:

LOG Frames:
 
   
Frame Number:.................................... 1
Last Frame Number:............................... 1120
Direction:....................................... 1
Timestamp:....................................... 0d 00h 50m 39s 863954us
Frame Length:.................................... 197
Frame Data:
00000000: 80 00 00 00 ff ff ff ff  ff ff 00 12 44 bd bd b0  ............D...
00000010: 00 12 44 bd bd b0 f0 af  43 70 00 f2 82 01 00 00  ..D.....Cp......
00000020: 64 00 11 08 00 01 00 01  08 8c 12 98 24 b0 48 60  d...........$.H`
00000030: 6c 05 04 01 02 00 00 85  1e 00 00 89 00 0f 00 ff  l...............
00000040: 03 19 00 41 50 32 33 2d  31 30 00 00 00 00 00 00  ...AP23-10......
00000050: 00 00 00 00 00 00 26 96  06 00 40 96 00 ff ff dd  ......&...@.....
00000060: 18 00 50 f2 01 01 00 00  50 f2 05 01 00 00 50 f2  ..P.....P.....P.
00000070: 05 01 00 00 40 96 00 28  00 dd 06 00 40 96 01 01  ....@..(....@...
 
   
00000080: 00 dd 05 00 40 96 03 04  dd 16 00 40 96 04 00 02  ....@......@....
00000090: 07 a4 00 00 23 a4 00 00  42 43 00 00 62 32 00 00  ....#...BC..b2..
000000a0: dd 05 00 40 96 0b 01 dd  18 00 50 f2 02 01 01 82  ...@......P.....
000000b0: 00 03 a4 00 00 27 a4 00  00 42 43 5e 00 62 32 2f  .....'...BC^.b2/
 
   
LOG Frames:
 
   
Frame Number:.................................... 2
Last Frame Number:............................... 1120
Direction:....................................... 1
Timestamp:....................................... 0d 00h 50m 39s 878289us
Frame Length:.................................... 147
Frame Data:
00000000: 80 00 00 00 ff ff ff ff  ff ff 00 0d ed c3 a0 22  ..............."
00000010: 00 0d ed c3 a0 22 00 bd  4d 50 a5 f7 78 08 00 00  ....."..MP..x...
00000020: 64 00 01 00 00 01 00 01  08 8c 12 98 24 b0 48 60  d...........$.H`
00000030: 6c 05 04 01 02 00 00 85  1e 00 00 84 00 0f 00 ff  l...............
00000040: 03 19 00 72 6f 67 75 65  2d 74 65 73 74 31 00 00  ...rogue-test1..
00000050: 00 00 00 00 00 00 23 96  06 00 40 96 00 10 00 dd  ......#...@.....
00000060: 06 00 40 96 01 01 00 dd  05 00 40 96 03 04 dd 05  ..@.......@.....
00000070: 00 40 96 0b 01 dd 18 00  50 f2 02 01 01 81 00 03  .@......P.......
 
   
00000080: a4 00 00 27 a4 00 00 42  43 5e 00 62 32 2f 00 d2  ...'...BC^.b2/..
00000090: b4 ab 84                                          ...
 
   
LOG Frames:
 
   
Frame Number:.................................... 3
Last Frame Number:............................... 1120
Direction:....................................... 1
Timestamp:....................................... 0d 00h 50m 39s 881513us
Frame Length:.................................... 189
Frame Data:
00000000: 80 00 00 00 ff ff ff ff  ff ff 00 12 44 bd 80 30  ............D..0
00000010: 00 12 44 bd 80 30 60 f7  46 c0 8b 4b d1 05 00 00  ..D..0`.F..K....
00000020: 64 00 11 08 00 01 00 01  08 8c 12 98 24 b0 48 60  d...........$.H`
00000030: 6c 05 04 00 02 00 00 85  1e 00 00 89 00 0f 00 ff  l...............
00000040: 03 19 00 41 50 34 30 2d  31 37 00 00 00 00 00 00  ...AP40-17......
00000050: 00 00 00 00 00 00 26 dd  18 00 50 f2 01 01 00 00  ......&...P.....
00000060: 50 f2 05 01 00 00 50 f2  05 01 00 00 40 96 00 28  P.....P.....@..(
00000070: 00 dd 06 00 40 96 01 01  00 dd 05 00 40 96 03 04  ....@.......@...
 
   
00000080: dd 16 00 40 96 04 00 05  07 a4 00 00 23 a4 00 00  ...@........#...
00000090: 42 43 00 00 62 32 00 00  dd 05 00 40 96 0b 01 dd  BC..b2.....@....
000000a0: 18 00 50 f2 02 01 01 85  00 03 a4 00 00 27 a4 00  ..P..........'..
000000b0: 00 42 43 5e 00 62 32 2f  00 0b 9a 1d 6f           .BC^.b2/....o
...

Configuring Client Reporting

The client reporting protocol is used by the client and the access point to exchange client information. Client reports are collected automatically when the client associates. You can use the controller GUI or CLI to send a client report request to any CCXv5 client any time after the client associates. There are four types of client reports:

Client profile—Provides information about the configuration of the client.

Operating parameters—Provides the details of the client's current operational modes.

Manufacturers' information—Provides data about the wireless LAN client adapter in use.

Client capabilities—Provides information about the client's capabilities.

Configuring Client Reporting (GUI)


Step 1 Choose Monitor > Clients to open the Clients page.

Step 2 Click the MAC address of the desired client. The Clients > Detail page appears.

Figure A-9 Clients > Detail Page

Step 3 Click Send CCXV5 Req to send a report request to the client.


Note You must create a Trusted Profile using ACAU for Cisco CB21AG or equivalent software from your CCXv5 vendor.


Step 4 Click Display to view the parameters from the client. The Client Reporting page appears.

Figure A-10 Client Reporting Page

This page lists the client profiles and indicates if they are currently in use. It also provides information on the client's operating parameters, manufacturer, and capabilities.

Step 5 Click the link for the desired client profile. The Profile Details page appears.

Figure A-11 Profile Details Page

This page shows the client profile details, including the SSID, power save mode, radio channel, data rates, and 802.11 security settings.


Configuring Client Reporting (CLI)


Step 1 To send a request to the client to send its profiles, enter this command:

config client ccx get-profiles client_mac_address

Step 2 To send a request to the client to send its current operating parameters, enter this command:

config client ccx get-operating-parameters client_mac_address

Step 3 To send a request to the client to send the manufacturer's information, enter this command:

config client ccx get-manufacturer-info client_mac_address

Step 4 To send a request to the client to send its capability information, enter this command:

config client ccx get-client-capability client_mac_address

Step 5 To clear the client reporting information, enter this command:

config client ccx clear-reports client_mac_address

Step 6 To see the client profiles, enter this command:

show client ccx profiles client_mac_address

Information similar to the following appears:

Number of Profiles............................... 1
Current Profile.................................. 1
 
   
Profile ID....................................... 1
Profile Name..................................... wifiEAP
SSID............................................. wifiEAP
Security Parameters[EAP Method,Credential]....... EAP-TLS,Host OS Login Credentials
Auth Method...................................... EAP
Key Management................................... WPA2+CCKM
Encryption....................................... AES-CCMP
Power Save Mode.................................. Constantly Awake
Radio Configuration:
Radio Type....................................... DSSS 
  Preamble Type.................................. Long preamble
  CCA Method..................................... Energy Detect + Carrier 
Detect/Correlation
  Data Retries................................... 6
  Fragment Threshold............................. 2342
  Radio Channels................................. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
  Tx Power Mode.................................. Automatic
  Rate List(MB).................................. 1.0 2.0 
 
   
Radio Type....................................... HRDSSS(802.11b) 
  Preamble Type.................................. Long preamble
  CCA Method..................................... Energy Detect + Carrier 
Detect/Correlation
  Data Retries................................... 6
  Fragment Threshold............................. 2342
  Radio Channels................................. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
  Tx Power Mode.................................. Automatic
  Rate List(MB).................................. 5.5 11.0 
 
   
Radio Type....................................... ERP(802.11g) 
  Preamble Type.................................. Long preamble
  CCA Method..................................... Energy Detect + Carrier 
Detect/Correlation
  Data Retries................................... 6
  Fragment Threshold............................. 2342
  Radio Channels................................. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
  Tx Power Mode.................................. Automatic
  Rate List(MB).................................. 6.0 9.0 12.0 18.0 24.0 36.0 48.0 54.0 
 
   
Radio Type....................................... OFDM(802.11a) 
  Preamble Type.................................. Long preamble
  CCA Method..................................... Energy Detect + Carrier 
Detect/Correlation
  Data Retries................................... 6
  Fragment Threshold............................. 2342
Radio Channels................................. 36 40 44 48 52 56 60 64 149 153 157 161 
165 
  Tx Power Mode.................................. Automatic
  Rate List(MB).................................. 6.0 9.0 12.0 18.0 24.0 36.0 48.0 54.0
 
   

Step 7 To see the client operating parameters, enter this command:

show client ccx operating-parameters client_mac_address

Information similar to the following appears:

Client Mac....................................... 00:40:96:b2:8d:5e
Radio Type....................................... OFDM(802.11a) 
 
   
Radio Type....................................... OFDM(802.11a) 
  Radio Channels................................. 36 40 44 48 52 56 60 64 100 104 108 112 
116 120 124 128 132 136 140 149 153 157 161 165 
  Tx Power Mode.................................. Automatic
  Rate List(MB).................................. 6.0 9.0 12.0 18.0 24.0 36.0 48.0 54.0 
 
   
Power Save Mode.................................. Normal Power Save
SSID............................................. wifi
Security Parameters[EAP Method,Credential]....... None
Auth Method...................................... None
Key Management................................... None
Encryption....................................... None
Device Name...................................... Wireless Network Connection 15
Device Type...................................... 0
OS Id............................................ Windows XP
OS Version....................................... 5.1.2600 Service Pack 2
IP Type.......................................... DHCP address
IPv4 Address..................................... Available
IP Address....................................... 70.0.4.66
Subnet Mask...................................... 255.0.0.0
Default Gateway.................................. 70.1.0.1
IPv6 Address..................................... Not Available
IPv6 Address.....................................  0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 
0: 0: 0:
IPv6 Subnet Mask.................................  0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 
0: 0: 0:
DNS Servers...................................... 103.0.48.0
WINS Servers..................................... 
System Name...................................... URAVAL3777
Firmware Version................................. 4.0.0.187
Driver Version................................... 4.0.0.187
 
   

Step 8 To see the client manufacturer information, enter this command:

show client ccx manufacturer-info client_mac_address

Information similar to the following appears:

Manufacturer OUI................................. 00:40:96 
Manufacturer ID.................................. Cisco 
Manufacturer Model............................... Cisco Aironet 802.11a/b/g Wireless 
Adapter 
Manufacturer Serial.............................. FOC1046N3SX 
Mac Address...................................... 00:40:96:b2:8d:5e
Radio Type....................................... DSSS OFDM(802.11a) HRDSSS(802.11b) 
ERP(802.11g) 
Antenna Type..................................... Omni-directional diversity
Antenna Gain..................................... 2 dBi
 
   
Rx Sensitivity:
Radio Type....................................... DSSS 
Rx Sensitivity .................................. Rate:1.0 Mbps, MinRssi:-95, MaxRssi:-30
Rx Sensitivity .................................. Rate:2.0 Mbps, MinRssi:-95, MaxRssi:-30
Radio Type....................................... HRDSSS(802.11b) 
Rx Sensitivity .................................. Rate:5.5 Mbps, MinRssi:-95, MaxRssi:-30
Rx Sensitivity .................................. Rate:11.0 Mbps, MinRssi:-95, MaxRssi:-30
Radio Type....................................... ERP(802.11g) 
Rx Sensitivity .................................. Rate:6.0 Mbps, MinRssi:-95, MaxRssi:-30
Rx Sensitivity .................................. Rate:9.0 Mbps, MinRssi:-95, MaxRssi:-30
Rx Sensitivity .................................. Rate:12.0 Mbps, MinRssi:-95, MaxRssi:-30
Rx Sensitivity .................................. Rate:18.0 Mbps, MinRssi:-95, MaxRssi:-30
 
   

Step 9 To see the client's capability information, enter this command:

show client ccx client-capability client_mac_address


Note This command displays the client's available capabilities, not current settings for the capabilities.


Information similar to the following appears:

Service Capability............................... Voice, Streaming(uni-directional) Video, 
Interactive(bi-directional) Video
Radio Type....................................... DSSS OFDM(802.11a) HRDSSS(802.11b) 
ERP(802.11g) 
 
   
Radio Type....................................... DSSS 
  Radio Channels................................. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
  Tx Power Mode.................................. Automatic
  Rate List(MB).................................. 1.0 2.0 
 
   
Radio Type....................................... HRDSSS(802.11b) 
  Radio Channels................................. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
  Tx Power Mode.................................. Automatic
  Rate List(MB).................................. 5.5 11.0 
 
   
Radio Type....................................... ERP(802.11g) 
  Radio Channels................................. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
  Tx Power Mode.................................. Automatic
  Rate List(MB).................................. 6.0 9.0 12.0 18.0 24.0 36.0 48.0 54.0 
 
   
Radio Type....................................... OFDM(802.11a) 
  Radio Channels................................. 36 40 44 48 52 56 60 64 100 104 108 112 
116 120 124 128 132 136 140 149 153 157 161 165 
  Tx Power Mode.................................. Automatic
  Rate List(MB).................................. 6.0 9.0 12.0 18.0 24.0 36.0 48.0 54.0 
 
   

Configuring Roaming and Real-Time Diagnostics

You can use roaming and real-time logs and statistics to solve system problems. The event log enables you to identify and track the behavior of a client device. It is especially useful when attempting to diagnose difficulties that a user may be having on a WLAN. The event log provides a log of events and reports them to the access point. There are three categories of event logs:

Roaming log—This log provides a historical view of the roaming events for a given client. The client maintains a minimum of five previous roaming events including failed attempts and successful roams.

Robust Security Network Association ( RSNA) log—This log provides a historical view of the authentication events for a given client. The client maintains a minimum of five previous authentication attempts including failed attempts and successful ones.

Syslog—This log provides internal system information from the client. For example, it may indicate problems with 802.11 operation, system operation, and so on.

The statistics report provides 802.1X and security information for the client. You can use the controller CLI to send the event log and statistics request to any CCXv5 client any time after the client associates.

Configuring Roaming and Real-Time Diagnostics (CLI)


Step 1 To send a log request, enter this command:

config client ccx log-request log_type client_mac_address

where log_type is roam, rsna, or syslog.

Step 2 To view a log response, enter this command:

show client ccx log-response log_type client_mac_address

where log_type is roam, rsna, or syslog.

Information similar to the following appears for a log response with a log_type of roam:

Tue Jun 26 18:28:48 2007  Roaming Response LogID=133: Status=Successful
                          Event Timestamp=0d 00h 00m 13s 322396us
                          Source BSSID=00:0b:85:81:06:c2, Target BSSID=00:0b:85:81:06:c2, 
Transition Time=3125(ms) 
                          Transition Reason: Normal roam, poor link 
                          Transition Result: Success
Tue Jun 26 18:28:48 2007  Roaming Response LogID=133: Status=Successful
                          Event Timestamp=0d 00h 00m 16s 599006us
                          Source BSSID=00:0b:85:81:06:c2, Target BSSID=00:0b:85:81:06:c2, 
Transition Time=3235(ms) 
                          Transition Reason: Normal roam, poor link 
                          Transition Result: Success
                          Event Timestamp=0d 00h 00m 19s 882921us
                          Source BSSID=00:0b:85:81:06:c2, Target BSSID=00:0b:85:81:06:c2, 
Transition Time=3234(ms) 
                          Transition Reason: Normal roam, poor link 
                          Transition Result: Success
Tue Jun 26 18:28:48 2007  Roaming Response LogID=133: Status=Successful
                          Event Timestamp=0d 00h 00m 08s 815477us
                          Source BSSID=00:0b:85:81:06:c2, Target BSSID=00:0b:85:81:06:d2, 
Transition Time=3281(ms) 
                          Transition Reason: First association to WLAN 
                          Transition Result: Success
                          Event Timestamp=0d 00h 00m 26s 637084us
                          Source BSSID=00:0b:85:81:06:d2, Target BSSID=00:0b:85:81:06:c2, 
Transition Time=3313(ms) 

 
   

Information similar to the following appears for a log response with a log_type of rsna:

Tue Jun 26 18:24:09 2007  RSNA Response LogID=132: Status=Successful
                          Event Timestamp=0d 00h 00m 00s 246578us
                          Target BSSID=00:14:1b:58:86:cd
                          RSNA Version=1
                          Group Cipher Suite=00-0f-ac-02 
                          Pairwise Cipher Suite Count = 1 
                              Pairwise Cipher Suite 0 = 00-0f-ac-04 
                          AKM Suite Count = 1 
                              AKM Suite 0 = 00-0f-ac-01 
                          RSN Capability = 0x0 
                          RSNA Result: Success
Tue Jun 26 18:24:09 2007  RSNA Response LogID=132: Status=Successful
                          Event Timestamp=0d 00h 00m 00s 246625us
                          Target BSSID=00:14:1b:58:86:cd
                          RSNA Version=1
                          Group Cipher Suite=00-0f-ac-02 
                          Pairwise Cipher Suite Count = 1 
                              Pairwise Cipher Suite 0 = 00-0f-ac-04 
                          AKM Suite Count = 1 
                              AKM Suite 0 = 00-0f-ac-01 
                          RSN Capability = 0x0
                          RSNA Result: Success
Tue Jun 26 18:24:09 2007  RSNA Response LogID=132: Status=Successful
                          Event Timestamp=0d 00h 00m 01s 624375us
                          Target BSSID=00:14:1b:58:86:cd
                          RSNA Version=1
                          Group Cipher Suite=00-0f-ac-02 
                          Pairwise Cipher Suite Count = 1 
                              Pairwise Cipher Suite 0 = 00-0f-ac-04 
                          AKM Suite Count = 1 
                              AKM Suite 0 = 00-0f-ac-01 
                          RSN Capability = 0x0 
	 	 	 	 	 	 RSNA Result: Success 

Information similar to the following appears for a log response with a log_type of syslog:

Tue Jun 26 18:07:48 2007  SysLog Response LogID=131: Status=Successful
                          Event Timestamp=0d 00h 19m 42s 278987us
                          Client SysLog = '<11> Jun 19 11:49:47 uraval3777 Mandatory 
elements missing in the OID response'
                          Event Timestamp=0d 00h 19m 42s 278990us
                          Client SysLog = '<11> Jun 19 11:49:50 uraval3777 Mandatory 
elements missing in the OID response'
Tue Jun 26 18:07:48 2007  SysLog Response LogID=131: Status=Successful
                          Event Timestamp=0d 00h 19m 42s 278993us
                          Client SysLog = '<11> Jun 19 11:49:53 uraval3777 Mandatory 
elements missing in the OID response'
                          Event Timestamp=0d 00h 19m 42s 278996us
                          Client SysLog = '<11> Jun 19 11:49:56 uraval3777 Mandatory 
elements missing in the OID response'
Tue Jun 26 18:07:48 2007  SysLog Response LogID=131: Status=Successful
                          Event Timestamp=0d 00h 19m 42s 279000us
                          Client SysLog = '<11> Jun 19 11:50:00 uraval3777 Mandatory 
elements missing in the OID response'
                          Event Timestamp=0d 00h 19m 42s 279003us
                          Client SysLog = '<11> Jun 19 11:50:03 uraval3777 Mandatory 
elements missing in the OID response'
Tue Jun 26 18:07:48 2007  SysLog Response LogID=131: Status=Successful
                          Event Timestamp=0d 00h 19m 42s 279009us
                          Client SysLog = '<11> Jun 19 11:50:09 uraval3777 Mandatory 
elements missing in the OID response'
                          Event Timestamp=0d 00h 19m 42s 279012us
                          Client SysLog = '<11> Jun 19 11:50:12 uraval3777 Mandatory 
elements missing in the OID response'
 
   

Step 3 To send a request for statistics, enter this command:

config client ccx stats-request measurement_duration stats_name client_mac_address

where stats_name is dot11 or security.

Step 4 To view the statistics response, enter this command:

show client ccx stats-report client_mac_address

Information similar to the following appears:

Measurement duration = 1
 
   
     dot11TransmittedFragmentCount       = 1
     dot11MulticastTransmittedFrameCount = 2
     dot11FailedCount                    = 3
     dot11RetryCount                     = 4
     dot11MultipleRetryCount             = 5
     dot11FrameDuplicateCount            = 6
     dot11RTSSuccessCount                = 7
     dot11RTSFailureCount                = 8
     dot11ACKFailureCount                = 9
     dot11ReceivedFragmentCount          = 10
     dot11MulticastReceivedFrameCount    = 11
     dot11FCSErrorCount                  = 12
     dot11TransmittedFrameCount 	 	 	 	 	 	 	 = 13 


Using the Debug Facility

This section contains the following topics:

Information About Using the Debug Facility

Configuring the Debug Facility (CLI)

Information About Using the Debug Facility

The debug facility enables you to display all packets going to and from the controller CPU. You can enable it for received packets, transmitted packets, or both. By default, all packets received by the debug facility are displayed. However, you can define access control lists (ACLs) to filter packets before they are displayed. Packets not passing the ACLs are discarded without being displayed.

Each ACL includes an action (permit, deny, or disable) and one or more fields that can be used to match the packet. The debug facility provides ACLs that operate at the following levels and on the following values:

Driver ACL

NPU encapsulation type

Port

Ethernet header ACL

Destination address

Source address

Ethernet type

VLAN ID

IP header ACL

Source address

Destination address

Protocol

Source port (if applicable)

Destination port (if applicable)

EoIP payload Ethernet header ACL

Destination address

Source address

Ethernet type

VLAN ID

EoIP payload IP header ACL

Source address

Destination address

Protocol

Source port (if applicable)

Destination port (if applicable)

CAPWAP payload 802.11 header ACL

Destination address

Source address

BSSID

SNAP header type

CAPWAP payload IP header ACL

Source address

Destination address

Protocol

Source port (if applicable)

Destination port (if applicable)

At each level, you can define multiple ACLs. The first ACL that matches the packet is the one that is selected.

Configuring the Debug Facility (CLI)


Step 1 To enable the debug facility, enter this command:

debug packet logging enable {rx | tx | all} packet_count display_size

where

rx displays all received packets, tx displays all transmitted packets, and all displays both transmitted and received packets.

packet_count is the maximum number of packets to log. You can enter a value between 1 and 65535 packets, and the default value is 25 packets.

display_size is the number of bytes to display when printing a packet. By default, the entire packet is displayed.


Note To disable the debug facility, enter debug packet logging disable command.


Step 2 Configure packet-logging ACLs by entering these commands:

debug packet logging acl driver rule_index action npu_encap port

where

rule_index is a value between 1 and 6 (inclusive).

action is permit, deny, or disable.

npu_encap specifies the NPU encapsulation type, which determines how packets are filtered. The possible values include dhcp, dot11-mgmt, dot11-probe, dot1x, eoip-ping, iapp, ip, lwapp, multicast, orphan-from-sta, orphan-to-sta, rbcp, wired-guest, or any.

port is the physical port for packet transmission or reception.

debug packet logging acl eth rule_index action dst src type vlan

where

rule_index is a value between 1 and 6 (inclusive).

action is permit, deny, or disable.

dst is the destination MAC address.

src is the source MAC address.

type is the two-byte type code (such as 0x800 for IP, 0x806 for ARP). This parameter also accepts a few common string values such as "ip" (for 0x800) or "arp" (for 0x806).

vlan is the two-byte VLAN ID.

debug packet logging acl ip rule_index action src dst proto src_port dst_port

where

proto is a numeric or any string recognized by getprotobyname(). The controller supports the following strings: ip, icmp, igmp, ggp, ipencap, st, tcp, egp, pup, udp, hmp, xns-idp, rdp, iso-tp4, xtp, ddp, idpr-cmtp, rspf, vmtp, ospf, ipip, and encap.

src_port is the UDP/TCP two-byte source port (for example, telnet, 23) or "any." The controller accepts a numeric or any string recognized by getservbyname(). The controller supports the following strings: tcpmux, echo, discard, systat, daytime, netstat, qotd, msp, chargen, ftp-data, ftp, fsp, ssh, telnet, smtp, time, rlp, nameserver, whois, re-mail-ck, domain, mtp, bootps, bootpc, tftp, gopher, rje, finger, www, link, kerberos, supdup, hostnames, iso-tsap, csnet-ns, 3com-tsmux, rtelnet, pop-2, pop-3, sunrpc, auth, sftp, uucp-path, nntp, ntp, netbios-ns, netbios-dgm, netbios-ssn, imap2, snmp, snmp-trap, cmip-man, cmip-agent, xdmcp, nextstep, bgp, prospero, irc, smux, at-rtmp, at-nbp, at-echo, at-zis, qmtp, z3950, ipx, imap3, ulistserv, https, snpp, saft, npmp-local, npmp-gui, and hmmp-ind.

dst_port is the UDP/TCP two-byte destination port (for example, telnet, 23) or "any." The controller accepts a numeric or any string recognized by getservbyname(). The controller supports the same strings as those for the src_port.

debug packet logging acl eoip-eth rule_index action dst src type vlan

debug packet logging acl eoip-ip rule_index action src dst proto src_port dst_port

debug packet logging acl lwapp-dot11 rule_index action dst src bssid snap_type

where

bssid is the Basic Service Set Identifier.

snap_type is the Ethernet type.

debug packet logging acl lwapp-ip rule_index action src dst proto src_port dst_port


Note To remove all configured ACLs, enter debug packet logging acl clear-all command.


Step 3 To configure the format of the debug output, enter this command:

debug packet logging format {hex2pcap | text2pcap}

The debug facility supports two output formats: hex2pcap and text2pcap. The standard format used by IOS supports the use of hex2pcap and can be decoded using an HTML front end. The text2pcap option is provided as an alternative so that a sequence of packets can be decoded from the same console log file. Figure A-12 shows an example of hex2pcap output, and Figure A-13 shows an example of text2pcap output.

Figure A-12 Sample Hex2pcap Output

Figure A-13 Sample Text2pcap Output

Step 4 To determine why packets might not be displayed, enter this command:

debug packet error {enable | disable}

Step 5 To display the status of packet debugging, enter this command:

show debug packet

Information similar to the following appears:

Status........................................... disabled
Number of packets to display..................... 25
Bytes/packet to display.......................... 0
Packet display format............................ text2pcap
 
   
Driver ACL:              
      [1]: disabled                   
      [2]: disabled                   
      [3]: disabled                   
      [4]: disabled                   
      [5]: disabled                   
      [6]: disabled                   
   Ethernet ACL:                
      [1]: disabled                   
      [2]: disabled                   
      [3]: disabled                   
      [4]: disabled                   
      [5]: disabled                   
      [6]: disabled                   
   IP ACL:          
      [1]: disabled 
      [2]: disabled                   
      [3]: disabled                   
      [4]: disabled                   
      [5]: disabled                   
      [6]: disabled                   
   EoIP-Ethernet ACL:                     
      [1]: disabled                   
      [2]: disabled                   
      [3]: disabled                   
      [4]: disabled                   
      [5]: disabled                   
      [6]: disabled                   
   EoIP-IP ACL:
      [1]: disabled
      [2]: disabled
      [3]: disabled
      [4]: disabled
      [5]: disabled
      [6]: disabled
   LWAPP-Dot11 ACL:
      [1]: disabled
      [2]: disabled
      [3]: disabled
      [4]: disabled
      [5]: disabled
      [6]: disabled
   LWAPP-IP ACL:
      [1]: disabled
      [2]: disabled
      [3]: disabled
      [4]: disabled
      [5]: disabled
      [6]: disabled 


Configuring Wireless Sniffing

This section contains the following topics:

Information About Wireless Sniffing

Guidelines and Limitations

Prerequisites for Wireless Sniffing

Configuring Sniffing on an Access Point (GUI)

Configuring Sniffing on an Access Point (CLI)

Information About Wireless Sniffing

The controller enables you to configure an access point as a network "sniffer," which captures and forwards all the packets on a particular channel to a remote machine that runs packet analyzer software. These packets contain information on time stamps, signal strength, packet sizes, and so on. Sniffers allow you to monitor and record network activity and to detect problems.

Guidelines and Limitations

Supported third-party network analyzer software applications are as follows:

Wildpackets Omnipeek or Airopeek

AirMagnet Enterprise Analyzer

Wireshark

The latest version of Wireshark can decode the packets by going to the Anaylze mode. Select decode as, and switch UDP5555 to decode as AIROPEEK.

You must disable IP-MAC address binding in order to use an access point in sniffer mode if the access point is joined to a Cisco 5500 Series Controller, or a controller network module that runs software release 6.0 or later releases. To disable IP-MAC address binding, enter the config network ip-mac-binding disable command in the controller CLI. For more information, see the "Configuring IP-MAC Address Binding" section.

You must enable WLAN 1 in order to use an access point in sniffer mode if the access point is joined to a Cisco 5500 Series Controller, or a controller network module that runs software release 6.0 or later releases. If WLAN 1 is disabled, the access point cannot send packets.

Prerequisites for Wireless Sniffing

To perform wireless sniffing, you need the following hardware and software:

A dedicated access point—An access point configured as a sniffer cannot simultaneously provide wireless access service on the network. To avoid disrupting coverage, use an access point that is not part of your existing wireless network.

A remote monitoring device—A computer capable of running the analyzer software.

Windows XP or Linux operating system—The controller supports sniffing on both Windows XP and Linux machines.

Software and supporting files, plug-ins, or adapters—Your analyzer software may require specialized files before you can successfully enable

Configuring Sniffing on an Access Point (GUI)


Step 1 Choose Wireless > Access Points > All APs to open the All APs page.

Step 2 Click the name of the access point that you want to configure as the sniffer. The All APs > Details for page appears.

Figure A-14 All APs > Details for Page

Step 3 From the AP Mode drop-down list, choose Sniffer.

Step 4 Click Apply to commit your changes.

Step 5 Click OK when warned that the access point will be rebooted.

Step 6 Choose Wireless > Access Points > Radios > 802.11a/n (or 802.11b/g/n) to open the 802.11a/n (or 802.11b/g/n) Radios page.

Step 7 Hover your cursor over the blue drop-down arrow for the desired access point and choose Configure. The 802.11a/n (or 802.11b/g/n) Cisco APs > Configure page appears.

Step 8 Select the Sniff check box to enable sniffing on this access point, or leave it unselected to disable sniffing. The default value is unchecked.

Step 9 If you enabled sniffing in Step 8, follow these steps:

a. From the Channel drop-down list, choose the channel on which the access point sniffs for packets.

b. In the Server IP Address text box, enter the IP address of the remote machine running Omnipeek, Airopeek, AirMagnet, or Wireshark.

Step 10 Click Apply to commit your changes.

Step 11 Click Save Configuration to save your changes.


Configuring Sniffing on an Access Point (CLI)


Step 1 To configure the access point as a sniffer, enter this command:

config ap mode sniffer Cisco_AP

where Cisco_AP is the access point configured as the sniffer.

Step 2 When warned that the access point will be rebooted and asked if you want to continue, enter Y. The access point reboots in sniffer mode.

Step 3 To enable sniffing on the access point, enter this command:

config ap sniff {802.11a | 802.11b} enable channel server_IP_address Cisco_AP

where

channel is the radio channel on which the access point sniffs for packets. The default values are 36 (802.11a/n) and 1 (802.11b/g/n).

server_IP_address is the IP address of the remote machine running Omnipeek, Airopeek, AirMagnet, or Wireshark.

Cisco_AP is the access point configured as the sniffer.


Note To disable sniffing on the access point, enter the config ap sniff {802.11a | 802.11b} disable Cisco_AP command.


Step 4 To save your changes, enter this command:

save config

Step 5 To view the sniffer configuration settings for an access point, enter this command:

show ap config {802.11a | 802.11b} Cisco_AP

Information similar to the following appears:

Cisco AP Identifier................................ 17 
Cisco AP Name.......................................... AP1131:46f2.98ac
... 
AP Mode ........................................... Sniffer 
Public Safety ..................................... Global: Disabled, Local: Disabled 
Sniffing .............................................. No 
... 


Troubleshooting Access Points Using Telnet or SSH

This section contains the following topics:

Information About Troubleshooting Access Points Using Telnet or SSH

Guidelines and Limitations

Troubleshooting Access Points Using Telnet or SSH (GUI)

Troubleshooting Access Points Using Telnet or SSH (CLI)

Information About Troubleshooting Access Points Using Telnet or SSH

The controller supports the use of the Telnet and Secure Shell (SSH) protocols to troubleshoot lightweight access points. Using these protocols makes debugging easier, especially when the access point is unable to connect to the controller.

To avoid potential conflicts and security threats to the network, the following commands are unavailable while a Telnet or SSH session is enabled: config terminal, telnet, ssh, rsh, ping, traceroute, clear, clock, crypto, delete, fsck, lwapp, mkdir, radius, release, reload, rename, renew, rmdir, save, set, test, upgrade.

Commands available during a Telnet or SSH session include debug, disable, enable, help, led, login, logout, more, no debug, show, systat, undebug, and where.


Note For instructions on configuring Telnet or SSH SSH sessions on the controller, see the "Configuring Telnet and SSH Sessions" section.


Guidelines and Limitations

You can configure Telnet or SSH by using the controller CLI in software release 5.0 or later releases or using the controller GUI in software release 6.0 or later releases.

Troubleshooting Access Points Using Telnet or SSH (GUI)


Step 1 Choose Wireless > Access Points > All APs to open the All APs page.

Step 2 Click the name of the access point for which you want to enable Telnet or SSH.

Step 3 Choose the Advanced tab to open the All APs > Details for (Advanced) page.

Figure A-15 All APs > Details for (Advanced) Page

Step 4 Select the Telnet check box to enable Telnet connectivity on this access point, . The default value is unchecked.

Step 5 Select the SSH check box to enable SSH connectivity on this access point. The default value is unchecked.

Step 6 Click Apply to commit your changes.

Step 7 Click Save Configuration to save your changes.


Troubleshooting Access Points Using Telnet or SSH (CLI)


Step 1 To enable Telnet or SSH connectivity on an access point, enter this command:

config ap {telnet | ssh} enable Cisco_AP

The default value is disabled.


Note To disable Telnet or SSH connectivity on an access point, enter the config ap {telnet | ssh} disable Cisco_AP command.


Step 2 To save your changes, enter this command:

save config

Step 3 To see whether Telnet or SSH is enabled on an access point, enter this command:

show ap config general Cisco_AP

Information similar to the following appears:

Cisco AP Identifier.............................. 5
Cisco AP Name.................................... AP33
Country code..................................... Multiple Countries:US,AE,AR,AT,AU,BH
Reg. Domain allowed by Country................... 802.11bg:-ABCENR 802.11a:-ABCEN
AP Country code.................................. US - United States
AP Regulatory Domain............................. 802.11bg:-A 802.11a:-A 
Switch Port Number .............................. 2
MAC Address...................................... 00:19:2f:11:16:7a
IP Address Configuration......................... Static IP assigned
IP Address....................................... 10.22.8.133
IP NetMask....................................... 255.255.248.0
Gateway IP Addr.................................. 10.22.8.1
Domain........................................... 
Name Server...................................... 
Telnet State..................................... Enabled
Ssh State........................................ Enabled
... 


Debugging the Access Point Monitor Service

This section contains the following topics:

Information About Debugging the Access Point Monitor Service

Debugging Access Point Monitor Service Issues (CLI)

Information About Debugging the Access Point Monitor Service

The controller sends access point status information to the Cisco 3300 Series Mobility Services Engine (MSE) using the access point monitor service.

The MSE sends a service subscription and an access point monitor service request to get the status of all access points currently known to the controller. When any change is made in the status of an access point, a notification is sent to the MSE.

Debugging Access Point Monitor Service Issues (CLI)

If you experience any problems with the access point monitor service, enter this command:

debug service ap-monitor {all | error | event | nmsp | packet} {enable | disable}

where

all configures debugging of all access point status messages.

error configures debugging of access point monitor error events.

event configures debugging of access point monitor events.

nmsp configures debugging of access point monitor NMSP events.

packet configures debugging of access point monitor packets.

enable enables the debub service ap-monitor mode.

disable disables the debug service ap-monitor mode.

Troubleshooting OfficeExtend Access Points

This section contains the following topics:

Information About Troubleshooting OfficeExtend Access Points

Troubleshooting Common Problems

Information About Troubleshooting OfficeExtend Access Points

This section provides troubleshooting information if you experience any problems with your OfficeExtend access points.

Interpreting OfficeExtend LEDs

The LED patterns are different for 1130 series and 1140 series OfficeExtend access points. See the Cisco OfficeExtend Access Point Quick Start Guide for a description of the LED patterns. You can find this guide at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/index.html

Positioning OfficeExtend Access Points for Optimal RF Coverage

When positioning your OfficeExtend access point, consider that its RF signals are emitted in a cone shape spreading outward from the LED side of the access point. Be sure to mount the access point so that air can flow behind the metal back plate and prevent the access point from overheating.

Figure A-16 OfficeExtend Access Point Radiation Patterns

Troubleshooting Common Problems

Most of the problems experienced with OfficeExtend access points are one of the following:

The access point cannot join the controller because of network or firewall issues.

Resolution: Follow the instructions in the "Viewing Access Point Join Information (GUI)" section to view join statistics for the OfficeExtend access point, or find the access point's public IP address and perform pings of different packet sizes from inside the company.

The access point joins but keeps dropping off. This behavior usually occurs because of network problems or when the network address translation (NAT) or firewall ports close because of short timeouts.

Resolution: Ask the teleworker for the LED status.

Clients cannot associate because of NAT issues.

Resolution: Ask the teleworker to perform a speed test and a ping test. Some servers do not return big packet pings.

Clients keep dropping data. This behavior usually occurs because the home router closes the port because of short timeouts.

Resolution: Perform client troubleshooting in WCS to determine if the problem is related to the OfficeExtend access point or the client.

The access point is not broadcasting the enterprise WLAN.

Resolution: Ask the teleworker to check the cables, power supply, and LED status. If you still cannot identify the problem, ask the teleworker to try the following:

Connect to the home router directly and see if the PC is able to connect to an Internet website such as http://www.cisco.com/. If the PC cannot connect to the Internet, check the router or modem. If the PC can connect to the Internet, check the home router configuration to see if a firewall or MAC-based filter is enabled that is blocking the access point from reaching the Internet.

Log on to the home router and check to see if the access point has obtained an IP address. If it has, the access point's LED normally blinks orange.

The access point cannot join the controller, and you cannot identify the problem.

Resolution: A problem could exist with the home router. Ask the teleworker to check the router manual and try the following:

Assign the access point a static IP address based on the access point's MAC address.

Put the access point in a demilitarized zone (DMZ), which is a small network inserted as a neutral zone between a company's private network and the outside public network. It prevents outside users from getting direct access to a server that has company data.

If problems still occur, contact your company's IT department for assistance.

The teleworker experiences problems while configuring a personal SSID on the access point.

Resolution: Clear the access point configuration and return it to the factory-default settings by clicking Clear Config on the access point GUI or by entering the clear ap config Cisco_AP command and then follow the steps in the "Configuring a Personal SSID on an OfficeExtend Access Point" section to try again. If problems still occur, contact your company's IT department for assistance.

The home network needs to be rebooted.

Resolution: Ask the teleworker to follow these steps:

a. Leave all devices networked and connected, and then power down all the devices.

b. Turn on the cable or DSL modem, and then wait for 2 minutes. (Check the LED status.)

c. Turn on the home router, and then wait for 2 minutes. (Check the LED status.)

d. Turn on the access point, and then wait for 5 minutes. (Check the LED status.)

e. Turn on the client.

Troubleshooting Mesh Access Points

Mesh MAP Backhaul Deselection on Ethernet Backhaul at Runtime

When a mesh access point that joined the controller uses radio backhaul with the intent to use Ethernet as mesh backhaul, an inappropriate operation sequence could occur, when you enter the flapping mac-address.


Note This troubleshooting tip is not applicable if Ethernet is not used for mesh AP backhaul,


To configure a mesh map Ethernet port (on the same subnet or VLAN of the Mesh RAP) as the mesh backhaul at runtime, follow these steps:


Step 1 Choose Configure > Access Points > All APs > select the AP name, click on Reset AP Now to reset mesh AP.

Step 2 Connect the Ethernet cable between the switch and the mesh AP.