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Release Notes for Cisco Aironet Access Points for Cisco IOS Release 12.3(11)JA

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Release Notes for Cisco Aironet Access Points for Cisco IOS Release 12.3(11)JA

Table Of Contents

Release Notes for Cisco Aironet Access Points for Cisco IOS Release 12.3(11)JA

Contents

Introduction

System Requirements

Finding the IOS Software Version

Upgrading to a New Software Release

Disable Radios to Prevent Unexpected Reboot When Upgrading System Software

New Features

Dynamic Frequency Selection Support for Federal Communications Commission (FCC)

Cisco Network Admission Control for Multiple Basic Service Set Identifier Mode

Installation Notes

Installation in Environmental Air Space

Power Considerations

Use Only One Power Option

Configuring Power for 1130 and 1240 Series Access Points

Antenna Installation

Important Notes

CCKM and Fast Roaming on Cisco 7921/7925 IP Phones

DFS Not Supported on Certain 1130 Series Access Points

Layer 3 Not supported with NAC for MBSSID

DFS Enabled by Default on 5-GHz Radios in North America

Change to Default IP Address Behavior

Save Interface Level Configuration Before Upgrading to Releases 12.3(11)JA or Later

Changes to the Default Configuration—Radios Disabled and No Default SSID

Clients Using WPA/WPA2 and Power Save May Fail to Authenticate

Default Username and Password Are Cisco

Some Client Devices Cannot Associate When QoS Is Configured

Some Devices Disassociate When Multiple BSSIDs Are Added or Deleted

Enabling MBSSIDs Without VLANs Disables Radio Interface

Cannot Set Channel on DFS-Enabled Radios in Some Regulatory Domains

Cisco 7920 Phones Require Firmware Version 1.09 or Later When Multiple BSSIDs Are Enabled

GRE Tunnelling Through WLSM Sometimes Requires MTU Setting Adjustments

TACACS+ and DHCP IP Address Sometimes Locks Out Administrators

Access Points Do Not Support Loopback Interface

Non-Cisco Aironet 802.11g Clients Might Require Firmware Upgrade

Throughput Option for 802.11g Radio Blocks Association by 802.11b Clients

Use Auto for Ethernet Duplex and Speed Settings

Use force-reload Option with archive download-sw Command

Radio MAC Address Appears in ACU

Radio MAC Address Appears in Access Point Event Log

Mask Field on IP Filters Page Behaves the Same As in CLI

Repeater Access Points Cannot Be Configured as WDS Access Points

Cannot Perform Link Tests on Non-Cisco Aironet Client Devices and on Cisco Aironet 802.11g Client Devices

System Software Upgrade Sometimes Fails Using Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.01 SP2

Corrupt EAP Packet Sometimes Causes Error Message

When Cipher Is TKIP Only, Key Management Must Be Enabled

Cisco CKM Supports Spectralink Phones

Non-Cisco Aironet Clients Sometimes Fail 802.1x Authentication

Pings and Link Tests Sometimes Fail to Clients with Both Wired and Wireless Network Connections

Layer 3 Mobility Not Supported on Repeaters and Workgroup Bridges

WLSM Required for Layer 3 Mobility

Caveats

Open Caveats

Resolved Caveats

If You Need More Information

Troubleshooting

Documentation Updates

Changes

DFS Automatically Enabled on Some 5-GHz Radio Channels in North America

NAC Support for MBSSID

Configuring NAC for MBSSID

New IOS CLI Commands

write default-config

beacon privacy guest-mode

Omissions

Related Documentation

Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request


Release Notes for Cisco Aironet Access Points for Cisco IOS Release 12.3(11)JA


August 31, 2006

These release notes describe features, enhancements, and caveats for Cisco IOS Release 12.3(11)JA. They also provide important information about the Cisco Aironet 1130 and 1240 Series Access Points and 1300 Series Outdoor Access Point/Bridges.


Note Cisco IOS Release 12.3(11)JA supports autonomous 32 Mb platforms. 16 Mb platforms and platforms supported by Cisco IOS Release 12.3(8)JA and earlier (350, 1100, 1130, 1200, and 1230 series access points and 1300 series access point/bridge) are supported by Cisco IOS Release 12.3(8)JEA.


Contents

These release notes contain the following sections:

Introduction

System Requirements

New Features

Important Notes

Caveats

Troubleshooting

Documentation Updates

Related Documentation

Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request

Introduction

The Cisco Aironet Access Point is a wireless LAN transceiver that acts as the connection point between wireless and wired networks or as the center point of a standalone wireless network. In large installations, the roaming functionality provided by multiple access points enables wireless users to move freely throughout the facility while maintaining uninterrupted access to the network.

You can configure and monitor 1130, 1240, and the 1300 series outdoor access point/bridge using the command-line interface (CLI), the web-browser interface, or Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP).

System Requirements

You can install Cisco IOS Release 12.3(11)JA on all 1130, 1240 series access points, and 1300 series outdoor access point/bridges.

Finding the IOS Software Version

To find the version of IOS software running on your access point, use a Telnet session to log into the access point and enter the show version EXEC command. This example shows command output from an access point running Cisco IOS Release 12.3(8)JA:

ap1240AG>show version
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
IOS (tm) C1240 Software (C1240-K9W7-M), Version 12.3(8)JA
Copyright (c) 1986-2006 by Cisco Systems, Inc.
 
   

On access points running IOS software, you can also find the software version on the System Software Version page in the access point's web-browser interface. If your access point does not run IOS software, the software version appears at the top left of most pages in the web-browser interface.

Upgrading to a New Software Release

For instructions on installing access point software for your access point:


Step 1 Follow this link to the Cisco home page:

http://www.cisco.com

Step 2 Click Technical Support and Documentation. The Technical Support and Documentation page appears.

Step 3 Select the Documentation icon. The Technical Support and Documentation Documentation page appears.

Step 4 Click Wireless. The Wireless Support Resources page appears.

Step 5 Scroll down to the Wireless LAN Access section.

Step 6 Select the access point model for which you need the information. The Introduction page for the model you selected appears.

Step 7 Under the Configure section, click Configuration Guides. A list of configuration documents appears.

Step 8 Click Cisco IOS Software Configuration Guide for Cisco Aironet Access Points, 12.3(8)JA.


Note The software configuration guide has not been updated for Cisco IOS Release 12.3(11)JA.


Step 9 Navigate to the Managing Firmware and Software chapter.


For information on Cisco IOS software, click this link to browse to the Cisco Software Center on Cisco.com:

http://www.cisco.com/cisco/software/navigator.html

Disable Radios to Prevent Unexpected Reboot When Upgrading System Software

If your access point runs Cisco IOS Release 12.2(11)JA, 12.2(11)JA1, or 12.2(11)JA2, your access point might unexpectedly reboot after you upgrade to a later Cisco IOS Release. Because of a rare timing condition that affects the radios, the access point sometimes reboots immediately after the upgrade when the radios are enabled. However, after the access point reboots the upgrade is complete and the access point operates normally. To prevent the access point from rebooting unexpectedly, disable the radio interfaces before upgrading software.

Follow these steps to disable the radio interfaces using the web-browser interface:


Step 1 Browse to the Network Interfaces: Radio Settings page. Figure 1 shows the top portion of the Network Interfaces: Radio Settings page.

Figure 1 Network Interfaces: Radio Settings Page

Step 2 Select Disable to disable the radio.

Step 3 Click Apply at the bottom of the page.

Step 4 If your access point has two radios, repeat these steps for the second radio.


Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to disable the access point radios using the CLI:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

configure terminal

Enter global configuration mode.

Step 2 

interface dot11radio {0 | 1}

Enter interface configuration mode for the radio interface. The 2.4-GHz radio is radio 0, and the 5-GHz radio is radio 1.

Step 3 

shutdown

Disable the radio port.

Step 4 

end

Return to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 5 

copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Save your entries in the configuration file.

If your access point has two radios, repeat these steps for the second radio. Use the no form of the shutdown command to enable the radio.

New Features

The following new features are introduced in Cisco IOS Release 12.3(11)JA. Table 1 lists the features that are supported on the devices that support this release.

Table 1 New Features in Cisco IOS Release 12.3(11)JA

Feature
1130 Series
1240 Series
1300 Series in AP mode

Dynamic Frequency Selection Support for Federal Communications Commission (FCC)

x

x

-

Cisco Network Admission Control for Multiple Basic service Set Identifier Mode

x

x

x


Dynamic Frequency Selection Support for Federal Communications Commission (FCC)


Note Due to FCC regulations, existing Cisco Aironet 1130AG Access Points with the FCC Identification Number LDK102054 are not able to software-upgrade to support Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) for the FCC. Even if these access points are upgraded to Cisco IOS Software Release 12.3(11)JA, DFS for the FCC will not be enabled on the access point. New Cisco Aironet 1130AG Access Points that ship from the factory with Cisco IOS Software Release 12.3(11)JA and the FCC Identification Number LDK102054E will support Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) for the FCC.


Cisco Aironet autonomous access points operating in the 5-GHz band must support Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS), which detects and automatically adjusts channels to protect WLAN communications from interfering with military or weather radar systems. This feature enhances DFS support to include FCC regulations and expands the 5-GHz channels supported by Cisco autonomous access points to include 8 channels in the 5.47 to 5.725 GHz range.

For more details, see the FCC Regulations Update:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/wireless/ps5679/ps5861/prod_white_paper0900aecd801c4a88_ps469_Products_White_Paper.html

Cisco Network Admission Control for Multiple Basic Service Set Identifier Mode


Note Layer-3 is not supported with NAC for MBSSID in this release


This feature provides the ability for autonomous access points to support Cisco Network Admission Control (NAC) when operating in Multiple Basic Service Set Identifier (MBSSID) mode. More details on Cisco NAC can be found here: www.cisco.com/go/nac More details on MBSSID can be found in the Cisco IOS Software Release 12.3(4)JA product bulletin:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/wireless/ps5678/ps458/prod_bulletin0900aecd802700e6_ps5861_Products_Bulletin.html

Installation Notes

This section contains information you should keep in mind when installing 1130, 1240 series access points, and 1300 series outdoor access point/bridges.

Installation in Environmental Air Space

Cisco Aironet 1130 and 1240 Series Access Points provide adequate fire resistance and low smoke-producing characteristics suitable for operation in a building's environmental air space, such as above suspended ceilings, in accordance with Section 300-22(C) of the National Electrical Code (NEC) and Sections 2-128, 12-010(3) and 12-100 of the Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1, C22.1.


Caution The power injector does not provide fire resistance and low smoke-producing characteristics and is not intended for use in extremely high or low temperatures or in environmental air spaces such as above suspended ceilings.

Power Considerations

This section describes issues you should consider before applying power to an access point.


Caution Cisco Aironet power injectors are designed for use with Cisco Aironet access points and bridges only. Do not use the power injector with any other Ethernet-ready device. Using the power injector with other Ethernet-ready devices can damage the equipment.

Use Only One Power Option

You cannot provide redundant power to 1130 series access points with both DC power to its power port and inline power from a patch panel or powered switch to the access point's Ethernet port. If you apply power to the access point from both sources, the switch or power patch panel might shut down the port to which the access point is connected. Figure 2 shows the power configuration that can shut down the port on the patch panel or powered switch.

Figure 2 Improper Power Configuration Using Two Power Sources

Configuring Power for 1130 and 1240 Series Access Points

The 1130 and 1240 series access points disable the radio interfaces when the unit senses that the power source to which it is connected does not provide enough power. Depending on your power source, you might need to enter the power source type in the access point configuration. Use the System Software: System Configuration page on the web-browser interface to select a power option. Figure 3 shows the System Power Settings section of the System Configuration page.

Figure 3 Power Options on the System Software: System Configuration Page

Using the AC Power Adapter

If you use the AC power adapter to provide power to the access point, you do not need to adjust the access point configuration.

Using a Switch Capable of IEEE 802.3af Power Negotiation

If you use a switch to provide Power over Ethernet (PoE) to the access point and the switch supports the IEEE 802.3af power negotiation standard, select Power Negotiation on the System Software: System Configuration page.

Using a Switch That Does Not Support IEEE 802.3af Power Negotiation

If you use a switch to provide Power over Ethernet (PoE) to the access point and the switch does not support the IEEE 802.3af power negotiation standard, select Pre-Standard Compatibility on the System Software: System Configuration page.

Using a Power Injector

If you use a power injector to provide power to the access point, select Power Injector on the System Software: System Configuration page and enter the MAC address of the switch port to which the access point is connected.

Antenna Installation

For instructions on the proper installation and grounding of external antennas for 1240 series access points, refer to the National Fire Protection Association's NFPA 70, National Electrical Code, Article 810, and the Canadian Standards Association's Canadian Electrical Code, Section 54.


Warning Do not install the antenna near overhead power lines or other electric light or power circuits, or where it can come into contact with such circuits. When installing the antenna, take extreme care not to come into contact with such circuits, as they may cause serious injury or death.

Important Notes

This section describes important information about the access point.

CCKM and Fast Roaming on Cisco 7921/7925 IP Phones

When a 7921 or 7925 wireless associates to an access point in a WDS with CCKM, it cannot fast roam because call admission control is not enabled. To work around this issue you must enable admission control by issuing the admit-traffic command in the access point SSID configuration as shown in the following example:

dot11 ssid voice 
vlan 21 
authentication open eap eap_methods 
authentication network-eap eap_methods 
authentication key-managemenet wpa cckm 
admit-traffic

DFS Not Supported on Certain 1130 Series Access Points

Due to FCC regulations, existing Cisco Aironet 1130AG Access Points with the FCC Identification Number LDK102054 are not able to software-upgrade to support Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) for the FCC. Even if these access points are upgraded to Cisco IOS Software Release 12.3(11)JA, DFS for the FCC will not be enabled on the access point. New Cisco Aironet 1130AG Access Points that ship from the factory with Cisco IOS Software Release 12.3(11)JA and the FCC Identification Number LDK102054E will support Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) for the FCC.

Layer 3 Not supported with NAC for MBSSID

Layer 3 is not supported with NAC for MBSSID in this release.

DFS Enabled by Default on 5-GHz Radios in North America

In this release, Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) is automatically enabled on 5-GHz radios configured for use in North America. The 5-GHz radios use DFS to detect radar signals and avoid interfering with them. Radios configured for use in Europe and Singapore also use DFS. Other regulatory domains do not use DFS. Refer to the "DFS Automatically Enabled on Some 5-GHz Radio Channels in North America" section for detailed information.

Change to Default IP Address Behavior

Cisco IOS Releases 12.3(2)JA and later change the default behavior of access points requesting an IP address from a DHCP server:

When you connect a 1130 or 1240 series access point or a 1300 series outdoor access point/bridge with a default configuration to your LAN, the access point requests an IP address from your DHCP server and, if it does not receive an address, continues to send requests indefinitely.

Save Interface Level Configuration Before Upgrading to Releases 12.3(11)JA or Later

If the access points have SSIDs configured at the interface level (rather than at the global level), before upgrading to Cisco IOS Release 12.3(7)JA and above, upgrade to Cisco IOS Release 12.3(4)JA, save the configurations and then upgrade to Release 12.3(11)JA. This procedure must be followed to make sure that the SSID configurations are converted from the interface level to global level.

Changes to the Default Configuration—Radios Disabled and No Default SSID

In this release, the radio or radios are disabled by default, and there is no default SSID. You must create an SSID and enable the radio or radios before the access point will allow wireless associations from other devices. These changes to the default configuration improve the security of newly installed access points.

Clients Using WPA/WPA2 and Power Save May Fail to Authenticate

Certain clients using WPA/WPA2 key management and power save may take many attempts to authenticate or, in some cases, fail to authenticate. Any SSID defined to use authentication key-management wpa, coupled with clients using power save mode and authenticating using WPA/WPA2 may experience this problem.

A hidden configure level command, dot11 wpa handshake timeout, can be used to increase the timeout between sending the WPA key packets from the default value (100 ms) to a value between 101 and 2000 ms. The command stores its value in the configuration across device reloads.

Default Username and Password Are Cisco

When you open the access point interface, you must enter a username and password. The default username for administrator login is Cisco, and the default password is Cisco. Both the username and password are case sensitive.

Some Client Devices Cannot Associate When QoS Is Configured

Some wireless client devices, including Dell Axim handhelds and Hewlett-Packard iPaq HX4700 handhelds, cannot associate to an access point when the access point is configured for QoS. To allow these clients to associate, disable QoS on the access point. You can use the QoS Policies page on the access point GUI to disable QoS, or enter this command on the CLI:

ap(config-if)#no dot11 qos mode

Some Devices Disassociate When Multiple BSSIDs Are Added or Deleted

Devices on your wireless LAN that are configured to associate to a specific access point based on the access point MAC address (such as client devices, repeaters, hot standby units, or workgroup bridges) might lose their association when you add or delete a multiple BSSID. When you add or delete a multiple BSSID, check the association status of devices configured to associate to a specific access point. If necessary, reconfigure the disassociated device to use the BSSID's new MAC address.

Enabling MBSSIDs Without VLANs Disables Radio Interface

If you use the mbssid configuration interface command to enable multiple BSSIDs on a specific radio interface but VLANs are not configured on the access point, the access point disables the radio interface. To re-enable the radio, you must shut down the radio, disable multiple BSSIDs, and re-enable the radio. This example shows the commands you use to re-enable the radio:

AP1242AG(config)# interface d1
AP1242AG(config-if)# shut
AP1242AG(config-if)# no mbssid
AP1242AG(config-if)# no shut
 
   

After you re-enable the radio, you can enable VLANs on the access point and enable multiple BSSIDs.

Cannot Set Channel on DFS-Enabled Radios in Some Regulatory Domains

Access points with 5-GHz radios configured at the factory for use in Europe, Singapore, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and Israel now comply with regulations that require radio devices to use Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) to detect radar signals and avoid interfering with them. You cannot manually set the channel on DFS-enabled radios configured for these regulatory domains.

Cisco 7920 Phones Require Firmware Version 1.09 or Later When Multiple BSSIDs Are Enabled

When multiple BSSIDs are configured on the access point, Cisco 7920 wireless IP phones must run firmware version 1.09 or later.

GRE Tunnelling Through WLSM Sometimes Requires MTU Setting Adjustments

If client devices on your wireless LAN cannot use certain network applications or cannot browse to Internet sites, you might need to adjust the MTU setting on the client devices or other network devices. For more information, refer to the Tech Note at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk827/tk369/technologies_tech_note09186a0080093f1f.shtml

TACACS+ and DHCP IP Address Sometimes Locks Out Administrators

When you configure an access point for TACACS+ administration and to receive an IP address from the DHCP server, administrators might be locked out of the access point after it reboots if the administrator does not have a local username and password configured on the access point. This issue does not affect access points configured with a static IP address. Administrators who have been locked out must regain access by using the to reset the unit to default settings.

Access Points Do Not Support Loopback Interface

You must not configure a loopback interface on the access point.


Caution Configuring a loopback interface might generate an IAPP GENINFO storm on your network and disrupt network traffic.

Non-Cisco Aironet 802.11g Clients Might Require Firmware Upgrade

Some non-Cisco Aironet 802.11g client devices require a firmware upgrade before they can associate to the 802.11g radio in the access point. If your non-Cisco Aironet 802.11g client device does not associate to the access point, download and install the latest client firmware from the manufacturer's website.

Throughput Option for 802.11g Radio Blocks Association by 802.11b Clients

When you configure the 802.11g access point radio for best throughput, the access point sets all data rates to basic (required). This setting blocks association from 802.11b client devices. The best throughput option appears on the web-browser interface Express Setup and Radio Settings pages and in the speed CLI configuration interface command.

Use Auto for Ethernet Duplex and Speed Settings

Cisco recommends that you use auto, the default setting, for both the speed and duplex settings on the access point Ethernet port. When your access point receives inline power from a switch, any change in the speed or duplex settings that resets the Ethernet link reboots the access point. If the switch port to which the access point is connected is not set to auto, you can change the access point port to half or full to correct a duplex mismatch and the Ethernet link is not reset. However, if you change from half or full back to auto, the link is reset and, if your access point receives inline power from a switch, the access point reboots.


Note The speed and duplex settings on the access point Ethernet port must match the Ethernet settings on the port to which the access point is connected. If you change the settings on the port to which the access point is connected, change the settings on the access point Ethernet port to match.


Use force-reload Option with archive download-sw Command

When you upgrade access point or bridge system software by entering the archive download-sw command on the CLI, you must use the force-reload option. If the access point or bridge does not reload the Flash after the upgrade, the pages in the web-browser interface might not reflect the upgrade. This example shows how to upgrade system software successfully using the archive download-sw command:

AP# archive download-sw /force-reload /overwrite tftp://10.0.0.1/image-name

Radio MAC Address Appears in ACU

When a Cisco Aironet client device associates to an access point running IOS software, the access point MAC address that appears on the Status page in the Aironet Client Utility (ACU) is the MAC address for the access point radio. The MAC address for the access point Ethernet port is printed on the label on the back of the access point.

Radio MAC Address Appears in Access Point Event Log

When a client device roams from an access point (such as access point alpha) to another access point (access point bravo), a message appears in the event log on access point alpha stating that the client roamed to access point bravo. The MAC address that appears in the event message is the MAC address for the radio in access point bravo. The MAC address for the access point Ethernet port is printed on the label on the back of the access point.

Mask Field on IP Filters Page Behaves the Same As in CLI

In Cisco IOS Release 12.2(8)JA and later, the mask that you enter in the Mask field on the IP Filters page in the access point GUI behaves the same way as a mask that you enter in the CLI. If you enter 255.255.255.255 as the mask, the access point accepts any IP address. If you enter 0.0.0.0, the access point looks for an exact match with the IP address that you entered in the IP Address field.

Repeater Access Points Cannot Be Configured as WDS Access Points

Repeater access points can participate in WDS but they cannot provide WDS. You cannot configure a repeater access point as a main WDS access point, and if a root access point becomes a repeater in fallback mode, it cannot provide WDS.

Cannot Perform Link Tests on Non-Cisco Aironet Client Devices and on Cisco Aironet 802.11g Client Devices

The link test feature on the web-browser interface does not support non-Cisco Aironet client devices nor Cisco Aironet 802.11g client devices.

System Software Upgrade Sometimes Fails Using Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.01 SP2

A system software upgrade sometimes fails when you use Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.01 SP2 to upgrade system software using the TFTP Upgrade page in the web-browser interface. Use a later version of Microsoft Internet Explorer to perform HTTP system software upgrades, or use TFTP to upgrade system software. Click this URL to browse to the Cisco IOS Software Configuration Guide for Cisco Aironet Access Points for complete instructions on performing software upgrades:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps4570/tsd_products_support_configure.html

Corrupt EAP Packet Sometimes Causes Error Message

During client authentication, the access point sometimes receives a corrupt EAP packet and displays this error message:

Oct  1 09:00:51.642 R: %SYS-2-GETBUF: Bad getbuffer, bytes= 28165 
-Process= "Dot11 Dot1x process", ipl= 0, pid= 32 
-Traceback= A2F98 3C441C 3C7184 3C604C 3C5E14 3C5430 124DDC
 
   

You can ignore these messages.

When Cipher Is TKIP Only, Key Management Must Be Enabled

When you configure TKIP-only cipher encryption (not TKIP + WEP 128 or TKIP + WEP 40) on any radio interface or VLAN, every SSID on that radio or VLAN must be set to use WPA or CCKM key management. If you configure TKIP on a radio or VLAN but you do not configure key management on the SSIDs, client authentication fails on the SSIDs.

Cisco CKM Supports Spectralink Phones

Cisco CKM (CCKM) key management is designed to support voice clients that require minimal roaming times. To date, CCKM supports only Spectralink and Cisco 7920 Version 2.0 Wireless Phones. Other voice clients have not been tested with CCKM and are not supported.

Non-Cisco Aironet Clients Sometimes Fail 802.1x Authentication

Some non-Cisco Aironet client adapters do not perform 802.1x authentication to the access point unless you configure Open authentication with EAP. To allow both Cisco Aironet clients using LEAP and non-Cisco Aironet clients using LEAP to associate using the same SSID, you might need to configure the SSID for both Network EAP authentication and Open authentication with EAP.

Pings and Link Tests Sometimes Fail to Clients with Both Wired and Wireless Network Connections

When you ping or run a link test from an access point to a client device installed in a PC running Microsoft Windows 2000, the ping or link test sometimes fails when the client has both wired and wireless connections to the LAN. Microsoft does not recommend this configuration. For more information, refer to Microsoft Knowledge Base article 157025 at this URL:

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;157025&Product=win2000

Layer 3 Mobility Not Supported on Repeaters and Workgroup Bridges

Repeater access points and workgroup bridges cannot associate to an SSID configured for Layer 3 mobility. Layer 3 mobility is not supported on repeaters and workgroup bridges.

WLSM Required for Layer 3 Mobility

You must use a Wireless LAN Services Module (WLSM) as your WDS device in order to properly configure Layer 3 mobility. If you enable Layer 3 mobility for an SSID and your WDS device does not support Layer 3 mobility, client devices cannot associate using that SSID.

Caveats

This section lists open and resolved caveats for access points.

Open Caveats

These caveats are open in Cisco IOS Release JA12.3(11)JA:

CSCsa94560—GA: power save client deauthenticated before receiving EAP FAILURE message

A client that fails EAP authentication due to a bad username or password may show the reason to be EAP timeout instead. This occurs only for clients in power save mode that remain in power save mode when trying to authenticate. Also, either the username or password that the client is using to authenticate must be incorrect.

Workaround: To check if the EAP authentication failure is caused by this caveat, change the client configuration so it is no longer in power save mode. If the reason for the client failure is now an EAP failure, correct the username or password. Once the username or password is corrected the client can be reconfigured back to power save mode.

CSCsd99125— WDS may report an incorrect new channel to WLSE after a RADAR event

During DFS event testing, it was discovered that if a DFS event was triggered on a non-root device, the WLSE sometimes received an erroneous new channel report.

CSCsd90308—Large default beacon size causes blue screen on Conexant Wi-Fi station

The very large default beacon size on the 802.11a band with 12.3(11)JA firmware is causing a Conexant ISL39200C with the Wi-Fi test bed driver to blue screen under Windows XP.

The 802.11a beacon size of with TKIP, AES, and WMM enabled is approximately 285 bytes, depending on the size of the SSID. This is an enormous jump in size since Cisco's last version of firmware due to the Country IE 7 and the Power Constraint IE now being advertised by default.

The Conexant radio seems to blue screen at 235 bytes and larger. Conexant has reproduced the problem.

CSCse49232—1300 series access point configured as a root crashes when associated to a repeater/workgroup bridge/ workgroup bridge client configuration.

CSCse49342—DHCP_SERVER_FAILURE observed in 1300 series in WGB mode

CSCse48137—Nested repeater does not work

A nested 1130 access point configured for open authentication and root mode station role fails to associate with a repeater and displays the following console message:

*Mar  1 00:01:34.822: %DOT11-4-CANT_ASSOC: Interface Dot11Radio1, cannot associate: No 
Response 
*Mar  1 00:02:17.603: %DOT11-6-DFS_SCAN_COMPLETE: DFS scan complete on frequency 5560 
MHz
*Mar  1 00:02:31.821: %DOT11-4-CANT_ASSOC: Interface Dot11Radio1, cannot associate: 
Rcvd response from 0014.6956.5cda channel 149 801
 
   

CSCse36333—Workgroup bridge client fails to get a DHCP IP address when root link is configured for WPA v2 LEAP authentication

A root access point and workgroup bridge access point configured for WPAv2 LEAP authentication properly associate and authenticate, but the workgroup bridge client does not get an IP address from the DHCP server. The root access point does not show the workgroup bridge client details.

CSCse40389—Dot1x(LEAP) reauthentication occurs even though it is not enabled

A 3550 or 2950 switch continuously re-authenticates an access point on a specific interval though re-authentication is disabled on the switch side when the dot1x method is LEAP.

Continuous re-authentication does occur when the dot1x authentication method is FAST.

CSCse41589—Workgroup bridge fails to get a DHCP IP address after a successful EAP-FAST authentication to the root access point

The workgroup bridge is able to ping the root access point and wired host if BVI1 is assigned with a static IP address. Occasionally, the workgroup bridge is assigned a DHCP IP address after a long period of time (about 15 to 20 minutes).

The failure to obtain a DHCP IP address is not observed when the the workgroup bridge uses LEAP authentication.

CSCse42464—Access point fails to retrieve certificate from certificate authority server using GUI

Certificate is obtained correctly when using the CLI.

CSCse83763—Workgroup bridge is flooded with AES-CCMP TSC replay messages when no infrastructure-client command is issued in the root access point's radio interface

The following message displays on the console:

*Mar  1 20:34:46.918: %DOT11-4-CCMP_REPLAY: AES-CCMP TSC replay was detected on a 
packet (TSC 0x2000) received from 00d0.2bff.b8a0.
 
   

Adding the infrastructure-client command back to root access point radio stops the message.

CSCse48448—Workgroup bridge non-native VLAN configuration blocks switch native VLAN port

The workgroup bridge are associated to the root access point but the switch port (VLAN1) is blocked by spanning-tree with the following error message:

3750Switch#
3w2d: %SPANTREE-2-RECV_PVID_ERR: Received BPDU with inconsistent peer vlan id 2 on 
GigabitEthernet1/0/1 VLAN1.
3w2d: %SPANTREE-2-BLOCK_PVID_LOCAL: Blocking GigabitEthernet1/0/1 on VLAN0001. 
Inconsistent local vlan.
3750Switch#
 
   

CSCse09744—SSID config page for NAC for MBSSID on the GUI does not have the ability to tie a VLAN name to the VLAN in the SSID configuration page

On the SSID page, the VLAN fields exists but no fields exist to link the VLAN name. To add a VLAN name associated with the VLAN requires navigating to the Services VLAN page.

Resolved Caveats

These caveats are resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.3(11)JA:

CSCek26492

Symptoms: A router may crash if it receives a packet with a specific crafted IP option as detailed in Cisco Security Advisory: Crafted IP Option Vulnerability:

http://tools.cisco.com/security/center/content/CiscoSecurityAdvisory/cisco-sa-20070124-crafted-ip-option

Conditions: This DDTS resolves a symptom of CSCec71950. Cisco IOS with this specific DDTS are not at risk of crash if CSCec71950 has been resolved in the software.

Workaround: Cisco IOS versions with the fix for CSCec71950 are not at risk for this issue and no workaround is required. If CSCec71950 is not resolved, see the following Cisco Security Advisory: Crafted IP Option Vulnerability for workaround information:

http://tools.cisco.com/security/center/content/CiscoSecurityAdvisory/cisco-sa-20070124-crafted-ip-option

CSCsc01976—Serial number now shows correctly

CSCsc79121—Traceback and radio are no longer down after upgrading access point software

CSCsc82863—Laptop client no longer displays blue screen and reboots after associating with LWAPP access point running PEAP

CSCsc95298—Deauthentication reassociation messages are now displayed in event log

CSCsd02525—1200 Radio no longer sends operational up state when reset

CSCsd03934—Controller no longer logs access point power injector error on boot

CSCsd11774—1130 access point now sends the second fragment of large packets

CSCsd14669— 802.11d country information element power levels are correct

CSCsd17590—Access point using MBSSID no longer sends incorrect auth-response to client

CSCsd27901—RARP packets are now forwarded on non native VLANs

CSCsd32642—The max retry count from controller is no longer misinterpreted by the access point

CSCsd38260—WPA-PSK is no longer corrupted when entered in the GUI

CSCsd42555—WPAv2 EAP authentication is no longer bypassed when switching SSIDs and PMK is cached

CSCsd44753—Non root bridge no longer crashes when another non root bridge associates to a root bridge or unconfigured VLAN from root bridge

CSCsd47454—Radio tracebacks and failure on 1240 access points no longer occur when configuring some rate settings

CSCsd71438—dot11_mgmt_assoc_resp_msg_proc: null or zero len ssid message no longer appears in the syslog when no debug is turned on

CSCsd82624—WPA clients now reauthenticate when card is restarted

CSCse00415—1240 series access point FastEthernet interface no longer stops responding to traffic

CSCse02560—Access point no longer reloads unexpectedly crashes on Process WLCCP AP Traceback= 4DD1E0

CSCsb99881—DFS has been disabled for Taiwan until future release

An AP12xx device using an RM21 or RM22 radio configured for operation in Taiwan will automatically select the operational channel and will not allow manual channel configuration. Attempting to configure the channel will result in the following message being displayed on the console:

Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) requires automatic channel configuration on 
interface Dot11Radio1
 
   

This only applies to access points using an RM21 or RM22 radio configured for Taiwan, and with IOS version 12.3(7) or later. This operation is by design, and will be required by all 802.11a access points in Taiwan beginning sometime in 2006. However, it is not a current requirement, but was inadvertently enabled for Taiwan.

CSCsd38762—Scan period is now observed by mobile bridge client when rate shifts down

CSCsd41574—Irregular characters are no longer found in debug dot11 station connection failure

CSCsd45672—AAA server-private CLI command no longer crashes device

CSCsd58849—Erroneous error message %Warning: Source file is empty, copy aborted, no longer appears when access point boots

CSCsd62312—Signal-to-noise ratio now displays on GUI association pages

CSC90766—350 series access point no longer goes into crash cycle if booted under heavy multicast load

CSCse03352—CISCO-DOT11-QOS-MIB objects now agrees with default values

CSCsf04754

Multiple Cisco products contain either of two authentication vulnerabilities in the Simple Network Management Protocol version 3 (SNMPv3) feature. These vulnerabilities can be exploited when processing a malformed SNMPv3 message. These vulnerabilities could allow the disclosure of network information or may enable an attacker to perform configuration changes to vulnerable devices. The SNMP server is an optional service that is disabled by default. Only SNMPv3 is impacted by these vulnerabilities. Workarounds are available for mitigating the impact of the vulnerabilities described in this document.

The United States Computer Emergency Response Team (US-CERT) has assigned Vulnerability Note VU#878044 to these vulnerabilities.

Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) identifier CVE-2008-0960 has been assigned to these vulnerabilities.

This advisory is posted at http://tools.cisco.com/security/center/content/CiscoSecurityAdvisory/cisco-sa-20080610-snmpv3

CSCsf10580—LWAPP 1130 access point LEDs on DHCP failure is green just like joining to the controller successfully

If You Need More Information

If you need information about a specific caveat that does not appear in these release notes, you can use the Cisco Bug Toolkit to find select caveats of any severity. Click this URL to browse to the Bug Toolkit:

http://tools.cisco.com/Support/BugToolKit/

(If you request a defect that cannot be displayed, the defect number might not exist, the defect might not yet have a customer-visible description, or the defect might be marked Cisco Confidential.)

Troubleshooting

For the most up-to-date, detailed troubleshooting information, refer to the Cisco TAC website at http://www.cisco.com/cisco/web/support/index.html. Click Technology Support, choose Wireless from the menu on the left, and click Wireless LAN.

Documentation Updates

This section lists changes, errors, and omissions from user documentation for access points.

Changes

This section describes changes to access point and bridge documentation for this release.

DFS Automatically Enabled on Some 5-GHz Radio Channels in North America

Access points with 5-GHz radios configured at the factory for use in North America now comply with regulations that require radio devices to use Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) to detect radar signals and avoid interfering with them.

By default, the access point automatically uses DFS to set the operating frequency on 5-GHz radios. The access point randomly selects a frequency from among these frequencies:

Frequencies 5.150 to 5.250 GHz (also known as the UNII-1 band)

Frequencies 5.250 to 5.350 GHz (also known as the UNII-2 band)

Frequencies 5.470 to 5.725 GHz (also known as the UNII-3 band)

Frequencies 5.725 to 5.825 GHz (also known as the UNII-4 band)


Note By default, Band 3 (5.470 to 5.725 GHz) is disabled to allow backward compatibility with older clients. You must explicitly enable it in the Radio Settings page of the GUI or by using the dfs band block radio interface CLI command.


When DFS is enabled, the access point monitors its operating frequency for radar signals. If it detects radar signals on the channel, the access point takes these steps:

Blocks new transmissions on the channel.

Flushes the power-save client queues.

Broadcasts an 802.11h channel-switch announcement.

Disassociates remaining client devices.

If participating in WDS, sends a DFS notification to the active WDS device that it is leaving the frequency.

Randomly selects a different 5-GHz channel.

Scans the new channel for radar signals for 60 seconds.

If there are no radar signals on the new channel, enables beacons and accepts client associations.

If participating in WDS, sends a DFS notification of its new operating frequency to the active WDS device.

Blocking Channels from DFS Selection

You can block groups of channels to prevent the access point from selecting them when DFS is enabled. Use this configuration interface command to block groups of channels from DFS selection:

[no] dfs band [1] [2] [3] [4] block

The 1, 2, 3, and 4 options designate blocks of channels:

1—Specifies frequencies 5.150 to 5.250 GHz. This group of frequencies is also known as the UNII-1 band.

2—Specifies frequencies 5.250 to 5.350 GHz. This group of frequencies is also known as the UNII-2 band.

3—Specifies frequencies 5.470 to 5.725 GHz. By default, this group of channels is blocked from DFS selection.

4—Specifies frequencies 5.725 to 5.825 GHz. This group of frequencies is also known as the UNII-3 band.

This is the command that appears in a default configuration:

ap(config-if)# dfs band 3 block
 
   

This example shows how to prevent the access point from selecting frequencies 5.150 to 5.350 GHz during DFS:

ap(config-if)# dfs band 1 2 block
 
   

This example shows how to unblock frequencies 5.150 to 5.350 for DFS:

ap(config-if)# no dfs band 1 2 block
 
   

This example shows how to unblock all frequencies for DFS:

ap(config-if)# no dfs band block
 
   

NAC Support for MBSSID

Networks must be protected from security threats, such as viruses, worms, and spyware. These security threats disrupt business, causing downtime and continual patching. Endpoint visibility and control is needed to help ensure that all wired and wireless devices attempting to access a network meet corporate security policies. Infected or vulnerable endpoints need to be automatically detected, isolated, and cleaned.

NAC is designed specifically to help ensure that all wired and wireless endpoint devices (such as PCs, laptops, servers, and PDAs) accessing network resources are adequately protected from security threats. NAC allows organizations to analyze and control all devices coming into the network. By ensuring that every endpoint device complies with corporate security policy and is running the latest and most relevant security protections, organizations can significantly reduce or eliminate endpoint devices as a common source of infection or network compromise.

WLANs need to be protected from security threats such as viruses, worms, and spyware. Both the NAC Appliance and the NAC Framework provide security threat protection for WLANs by enforcing device security policy compliance when WLAN clients attempt to access the network. These solutions quarantine non-compliant WLAN clients and provide remediation services to help ensure compliance.

Release 12.3(11)JA provides NAC support for MBSSID. A client, based on its health (software version, virus version, and so on) is placed on a separate VLAN that is specified to download the required software to upgrade the client to the software versions required to access the network. Four VLANs are specified for NAC support, one of which is the normal VLAN where clients having the correct software version are placed. The other VLANs are reserved for specific quarantine action and all infected clients are placed on one of these VLANs until the client is upgraded.

Each SSID has up to 3 additional VLANs configured as "unhealthy" VLANs. Infected clients are placed on one of these VLANs, based on how the client is infected. When a client sends an association request, it includes its infected status in the request to the RADIUS server. The policy to place the client on a specific VLAN is provisioned on the RADIUS server.

When an infected client associates with an access point and sends its state to the RADIUS server, the RADIUS server puts it into one of the quarantine VLANs based on its health. This VLAN is sent in the RADIUS server Access Accept response during the dot1x client authentication process. If the client is healthy and NAC compliant, the RADIUS server returns a normal VLAN assignment for the SSID and the client is placed in the correct VLAN and BSSID.

Each SSID is assigned a normal VLAN, which is the VLAN on which healthy clients are placed. The SSID can also be configured to have up to 3 backup VLANs that correspond to the quarantine VLANs on which clients are placed based on their state of health. These VLANs for the SSID use the same BSSID as assigned by the MBSSID for the SSID.

The configured VLANs are different and no VLAN overlap within an SSID is allowed. Therefore, a VLAN can be specified once and cannot be part of 2 different SSIDs per interface.

Quarantine VLANs are automatically configured under the interface on which the normal VLAN is configured. A quarantine VLAN inherits the same encryption properties as that of the normal VLAN. VLANs have the same key/authentication type and the keys for the quarantine VLANs are derived automatically.

Dot11 sub-interfaces are generated and configured automatically along with the dot1q encapsulation VLAN (equal to the number of configured VLANs). The sub-interfaces on the wired side is also configured automatically along with the bridge-group configurations under the FastEthernet0 sub-interface.

When a client associates and the RADIUS server determines that it is unhealthy, the server returns one of the quarantine NAC VLANs in its RADIUS authentication response for dot1x authentication. This VLAN should be one of the configured backup VLANs under the client's SSID. If the VLAN is not one of the configured backup VLANs, the client is disassociated.

Data corresponding to the all the backup VLANs are sent and received using the BSSID that is assigned to the SSID. Therefore, all clients (healthy and unhealthy) listening to the BSSID corresponding the the SSID wake up. Based on the multicast key being used corresponding to the VLAN (healthy or unhealthy), packet decrypting takes place on the client. Wired side traffic is segregated because different VLANs are used, thereby ensuring that traffic from infected and uninfected clients do not mix.

A new keyword, backup, is added to the existing vlan <name> | <id> under dot11 ssid <ssid> as described below:

vlan <name>|<id> [backup <name>|<id>, <name>|<id>, <name>|<id>
 
   

Configuring NAC for MBSSID


Note This feature supports only Layer 2 mobility within VLANs. Layer 3 mobility using network ID is not supported in this feature.



Note Before you attempt to enable NAC for MBSSID on your access points, you should first have NAC working properly. Figure 4 shows a typical network setup.


Figure 4 Typical NAC Network Setup

For additional information, see the documentation for deploying NAC for Cisco wireless networks.

Follow these steps to configure NAC for MBSSID on your access point:


Step 1 Configure your network as shown in Figure 4.

Step 2 Configure standalone access points and NAC-enabled client-EAP authentication.

Step 3 Configure the local profiles on the ACS server for posture validation.

Step 4 Configure the client and access point to allow the client to successful authenticate using EAP-FAST.

Step 5 Ensure that the client posture is valid.

Step 6 Verify that the client associates to the access point and that the client is placed on the unrestricted VLAN after successful authentication and posture validation.


A sample configuration is shown below.

dot11 mbssid 
dot11 vlan-name engg-normal vlan 100 
dot11 vlan-name engg-infected vlan 102 
dot11 vlan-name mktg-normal vlan 101 
dot11 vlan-name mktg-infected1 vlan 103 
dot11 vlan-name mktg-infected2 vlan 104 
dot11 vlan-name mktg-infected3 vlan 105
! 
dot11 ssid engg 
	vlan engg-normal backup engg-infected 
	authentication open  
	authentication network-eap eap_methods  
!
dot11 ssid mktg
	vlan mktg-normal backup mktg-infected1, mktg-infected2, mktg-infected3 
	authentication open  
	authentication network-eap eap_methods 
! 
interface Dot11Radio0
!
encryption vlan engg-normal key 1 size 40bit 7 482CC74122FD transmit-key 
encryption vlan engg-normal mode ciphers wep40  
! 
encryption vlan mktg-normal key 1 size 40bit 7 9C3A6F2CBFBC transmit-key 
encryption vlan mktg-normal mode ciphers wep40  
! 
ssid engg 
! 
ssid mktg 
! 
speed basic-1.0 basic-2.0 basic-5.5 6.0 9.0 basic-11.0 12.0 18.0 24.0 36.0 48.0 54.0 
station-role root 
! 
interface Dot11Radio0.100 
encapsulation dot1Q 100 native 
no ip route-cache 
bridge-group 1 
bridge-group 1 subscriber-loop-control 
bridge-group 1 block-unknown-source 
no bridge-group 1 source-learning 
no bridge-group 1 unicast-flooding 
bridge-group 1 spanning-disabled
!
interface Dot11Radio0.102 
encapsulation dot1Q 102 
no ip route-cache 
bridge-group 102 
bridge-group 102 subscriber-loop-control 
bridge-group 102 block-unknown-source 
no bridge-group 102 source-learning 
no bridge-group 102 unicast-flooding 
bridge-group 102 spanning-disabled
!
interface FastEthernet0 
no ip address 
no ip route-cache 
duplex auto 
speed auto
!
interface FastEthernet0.100 
encapsulation dot1Q 100 native 
no ip route-cache
bridge-group 1
no bridge-group 1 source-learning
bridge-group 1 spanning-disabled
!
interface FastEthernet0.102
encapsulation dot1Q 102 
no ip route-cache
bridge-group 102
no bridge-group 102 source-learning
bridge-group 102 spanning-disabled
!

New IOS CLI Commands

This section identifies and describes new IOS CLI commands included in release 12.3(11)JA. They will be documented in a future revision of the Cisco IOS Software Configuration Guide for Cisco Aironet Access Points and Cisco IOS Command Reference for Access Points and Bridges.

write default-config

Some IOS CLI commands save values as environment variables. A well known example of this is the ip address <ipaddress> <mask> command which saves the static ip address and its mask as environment variables in nvram. These environment variables are not erased when a write erase command is executed. These environment variables must be manually erased by executing a no ip address or ip address dhcp command.

There is no easy way to remove these environment variables created by these commands other than manually performing a no command. Release 12.3(11)JA introduces the write default-config command. This command erases the following environment variables:

ip domain-name <name>

ip name-server <ip_addr>

ip default-gateway <ip_addr>

ip net-mask <ip_address> <subnet_mask>

ip address <ip_address> <subnet_mask>

The command performs an erase nvram internally and deletes the environment variables created by other IOS commands.


Note The write default-config command does not erase all the enviroment variables.


The complete syntax is [no] write default-config

beacon privacy guest-mode

This command must be configured if you wish the beacon frames to use the privacy settings of the guest-mode SSID. If there is no guest-mode SSID configured, the command has no effect. If there is a guest-mode SSID and the command is configured, the privacy bit present in the beacon frames are set to ON/OFF according to how the security (encryption) settings of the guest-mode SSID are configured.

The command has no effect in MBSSID mode.

The complete syntax is [no] beacon privacy guest-mode.

The following is a sample showing how the command is used.

ap#conf terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
ap(config)#int d0
ap(config-if)#bea
ap(config-if)#beacon ?
dtim-period  dtim period
period       beacon period
privacy      Privacy bit
 
   
ap(config-if)#beacon pr
ap(config-if)#beacon privacy ?
guest-mode  Use privacy bit setting of Guest ssid
 
   
ap(config-if)#beacon privacy g
ap(config-if)#beacon privacy guest-mode ?
 
   
ap(config-if)#beacon privacy guest-mode
ap(config-if)#end
ap#
*Mar  1 23:34:45.583: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by console
ap#sh run in d0
Building configuration...
 
   
Current configuration : 365 bytes
!
interface Dot11Radio0
no ip address
no ip route-cache
shutdown
speed basic-1.0 basic-2.0 basic-5.5 basic-11.0
station-role root
beacon privacy guest-mode
bridge-group 1
bridge-group 1 subscriber-loop-control
bridge-group 1 block-unknown-source
no bridge-group 1 source-learning
no bridge-group 1 unicast-flooding
bridge-group 1 spanning-disabled
end

Omissions

The command dot11 extension power native was omitted from the Cisco IOS Software Configuration Guide for Cisco Aironet Access Points 12.3(8)JA and Cisco IOS Command Reference for Cisco Aironet Access Points and Bridges 12.3(8)JA.

When enabled, the dot11 extension power native shifts the power tables the radio uses from the IEEE 802.11 tables to the native power tables. The radio derives the values for this table from the NativePowerTable and NativePowerSupportedTable of the CISCO-DOT11-1F-MIB. The Native Power tables were designed specifically to configure powers as low as -1dBm for Cisco Aironet radios that support these levels.

Related Documentation

This section lists documents related to Cisco IOS Release 12.3(11)JA and to 1130AG, 1240AG series access points, and 1300 series outdoor access point/bridges.

Quick Start Guide: Cisco Aironet 1130AG Series Access Points

Quick Start Guide: Cisco Aironet 1240AG Series Access Points

Quick Start Guide: Cisco Aironet 1300 Series Outdoor Access Point/Bridge

Cisco IOS Software Configuration Guide for Cisco Aironet Access Points

Cisco IOS Command Reference for Cisco Aironet Access Points and Bridges

Cisco Aironet 1130AG Series Access Point Hardware Installation Guide

Cisco Aironet 1240AG Series Access Point Hardware Installation Guide

Cisco Aironet 1300 Series Outdoor Access Point/Bridge Hardware Installation Guide

Installation Instructions for Cisco Aironet Power Injectors

Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request

For information on obtaining documentation, submitting a service request, and gathering additional information, see What's New in Cisco Product Documentation at: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/general/whatsnew/whatsnew.html.

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