Cisco UCS Server Configuration Utility, Release 2.1 User Guide
Using UCS-SCU
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Using UCS-Server Configuration Utility

Table Of Contents

Using UCS-Server Configuration Utility

UCS-SCU Interface

License Agreement

Home Page

Accessing Help

Server Inventory

Server Health

Server Configuration

Boot Order Configuration

RAID Configuration

Supported RAID Devices

UCS-SCU RAID Configuration

Automatic Setup With Redundancy

Automatic Setup Without Redundancy

Create Custom or Multiple RAID Arrays

OS Install

Windows Server 2003 and 2008 Operating System Installation

Windows 2003 Server Series

Windows 2008

Linux Server Series Operating System Installation

Diagnostic Tools

Features of Diagnostic Tools

Using Diagnostic Tools

Quick Test

Comprehensive Test

Quick Tasks

Tests Suite

Tests Log Summary

Tests Summary

Logs

System Logs

System Event Log


Using UCS-Server Configuration Utility


This chapter provides information on using the UCS-Server Configuration Utility and contains the following sections:

UCS-SCU Interface

Server Inventory

Server Health

Server Configuration

OS Install

Diagnostic Tools

Logs

UCS-SCU Interface

UCS-SCU is a bootable application that can be used to perform operations such as update server firmware, setup BIOS and CIMC, configure RAID logical volume, install operating systems, and perform diagnostics on Cisco Rack servers. It is designed to run on one server at a time. You can launch the application through physical or virtual media.

This section contains the following topics:

License Agreement

Home Page

Accessing Help

License Agreement

After UCS-SCU boots up, the first interface is the End User License Agreement. Select I Accept and click Next to agree to this license, or click Cancel to exit the application.

Home Page

The UCS-SCU home page consists of the following:

Navigation PaneThe navigation pane on the left hand provides a tree for easy navigation.

Content PaneThe content pane is the primary area for information and interaction.

Tests Summary Pane (for Diagnostic Tools)—Provides details of tests passed, tests in queue and tests failed.

ToolbarThe toolbar on the left hand top corner has a set of icons that allow you to access the following:

Network Configuration—Configures the IP address, DNS and Subnet mask and Cisco.com credentials. This configuration will be used to connect to Cisco.com or other network share locations to access the OS installation drivers or firmware. Click the icon to enter details of the network configuration, proxy server Cisco.com user credentials and click Configure.

Probe Server—Performs a server health check. Once complete, you can select the Server Health and check for the warning/failure/information.

Save Logs—Logs can be saved to a USB with this option.

Refresh—This will refresh the content area, if supported.

Reboot—Reboots the server.

Accessing Help

To access the Cisco UCS-SCU online help, click the Help tab in the right hand corner.

Server Inventory

You can use the server inventory functionality to perform an inventory of your server. You can view details like server summary, server properties and an inventory of subsystems on your server like CPU, memory, power supplies, fans, IO devices, storage, BIOS and CIMC.

To view the inventory of your server, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click the Server Inventory tab on the left navigation pane.

Step 2 Click the Server Information tab on the left navigation pane. The server properties and server summary appear.

Step 3 Click the Inventory tab to view an inventory of your server's subsystems, like CPU, memory, power supplies, fans, IO devices, storage, BIOS, and CIMC.


Table 3-1 explains the various subsystem details you can view.

Table 3-1 Server Inventory Properties

Subsystem
Description

CPU

View the socket name, status, number of cores, number of threads, vendor, version, cores enabled, and signature of the CPUs on your server.

Memory

View the size, data width, locator, speed, and serial number of the DIMMs on your server.

Power Supplies

View the input power, output power (in watts), part number, version, serial number, and product name of the power supply units on your server.

Fans

View the status, power state, and speed of the fans on your server.

IO Devices

View the type, vendor, description, and MAC address/serial number of the IO devices on your server.

Storage

View the type, description, vendor, size, BUS information, and serial number of the storage devices on your server.

BIOS

View the vendor, version, physical ID, size, capacity, and boot order of the BIOS on your server.

CIMC

View the IP address, MAC address, firmware version, and IPMI version of the CIMC on your server.


Server Health

Using this functionality you can view the health of all the subsystems of your server (like memory, processor, power supply, hard disk, fans, chipset and CIMC) along with the status and message of a specific subsystem.

To view the health of your server, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click the Server health tab in the left navigation pane. The server health displays in the right hand content pane, along with the status and message for a specific subsystem.

Step 2 To view the latest status of the subsystem, click Probe Server from the toolbar. Click on server health again to refresh the page after clicking on probe server

Step 3 Click the line corresponding to a subsystem to view details of your server health in the Server Health Details pane.



Note The message column in the server health pane displays the first issue corresponding to the subsystem. In case the subsystem has multiple issues, they will show up below in the Server Health Details pane.


Server Configuration

You can configure your server's BIOS boot order settings and perform RAID configuration using the Server Configuration function. To enter this function area, from the left navigation pane, click Server Configuration.

This section contains the following topics:

Boot Order Configuration

RAID Configuration

Supported RAID Devices

Boot Order Configuration

SCU displays a list of all bootable devices on the server. To set the BIOS boot order of your server, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Server Configuration in the left navigation pane, and then click Boot order Configuration. You will be able to choose the devices you want to participate in the boot order configuration using the arrow keys between the Device Types and Boot Order column.

Step 2 Highlight a device in the Boot Order column, click the up or down arrow keys to arrange the server boot order you prefer, and click Apply.

Step 3 Click Apply.

Step 4 The Boot Order is saved on this server.

Step 5 To reset the boot order click Reset.


Note If the system has multiple boot devices under each component, for example, if the system has multiple bootable hard disks under the same controller or CD drives, SCU will not display this information. You will have to enter the BIOS and configure the order of these subcomponents manually.



RAID Configuration

You can use RAID Configuration to configure your systems' on-board (Mezz or ICH10R RAID controller) or PCIe supported RAID controller cards.

If your system has multiple RAID controllers, UCS-SCU displays a list of all available RAID cards on the RAID Configuration page. The RAID levels supported by SCU are RAID 0, 1, 5 and 6.

Supported RAID Devices

The RAID devices supported by UCS-SCU are the following:

LSI 1068E controller on UCS C200 M2(SFF)

LSI 9280-4i4e (on C200 M1)

Intel I/O Controller Hub 10 RAID (ICH10R)/Embedded MegaRAID

LSI MegaRAID SAS 8708EM2

LSI 1064E Controller Based Mezzanine Adapter

LSI MegaRAID 9261-8i PCIe RAID Controller

LSI SAS3081E-R PCIe RAID Controller

LSI 9260-8i RAID Controller

LSI MegaRAID SAS 9260-4i

LSI MegaRAID SAS 9240-8i


Note The UCS-SCU RAID configuration utility detects the physical drivers only once when you enter this function area. Do not remove or add hard disk drivers while navigating within this function area.



Note Some LSI RAID controllers take time to complete the operation during RAID configuration. SCU does not have any control over this issue. As a workaround, you can either recreate the RAID or wait for the operation to complete.


UCS-SCU RAID Configuration

This section contains the following topics:

Automatic Setup With Redundancy

Automatic Setup Without Redundancy

Create Custom or Multiple RAID Arrays

UCS-SCU supports three types of RAID configurations:

Automatic Setup With Redundancy

Automatic setup with redundancy requires at least two hardware drives. If your server has two drives, UCS-SCU creates RAID 1. If it has more than two drives, UCS-SCU recommends creating RAID 5. If the controller does not support RAID 5, RAID 1 is created.


Note The common parameters, except for total size, are the default values for the controller.


Automatic Setup Without Redundancy

Automatic setup without redundancy requires one or more hard drives. UCS-SCU creates RAID 0 with this option. To configure RAID using the automatic setup with or without redundancy, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Server Configuration in the left navigation pane and then click RAID configuration. The RAID Configuration page displays.

Step 2 Click the Configure button displayed next to the device. The RAID Configuration page displays. You can also view properties of the device by clicking Show Details.

Step 3 On the RAID Configuration page, the following options appear:

Automatic Setup with Redundancy

Automatic Setup without Redundancy

Create Custom or multiple RAID arrays

Step 4 Select either the first or second option and click Create Array. A pop-up displays upon completion of this task.


Create Custom or Multiple RAID Arrays

When you select Create Custom or Multiple RAID arrays, UCS-SCU displays a window in which you can select physical hard disks. Only unconfigured good disks can be used for RAID configuration. Disks that are already part of RAID will not be available for RAID configuration. Clear the configuration to make all the disks' statuses Unconfigured Good. You can use the Clear configuration option to remove these disks from existing RAID, but be extra careful here as the data on the existing RAID will be lost if you clear the configuration.

To create custom or multiple RAID arrays, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Server Configuration in the left navigation pane and then click RAID configuration. The RAID Configuration page displays.

Step 2 Click the Configure button displayed next to the device. The RAID Configuration page appears. You can also view properties of the device by clicking Show Details.

Step 3 On the RAID Configuration page, the following options appear:

Automatic Setup with Redundancy

Automatic Setup without Redundancy

Create Custom or multiple RAID arrays

Step 4 Select the third option (Create Custom or multiple RAID arrays) and click Create Array. The Select Drives for Logical Drive page appears.

Step 5 Select the Unconfigured Good physical drives that you want to include in the RAID array. If you choose to clear configuration, all the old configurations applied to the list are lost.

Step 6 Check the Status column to verify that the drive is Unconfigured Good.

Step 7 Click Next. The Select Hotspare Drives page displays.

Step 8 Select the required physical drives to be used as global hot spare drives and click Next. The Define Array Attributes page displays.

Step 9 Select the required array attributes from the drop-down lists and click Next. The summary page displays.

Step 10 Click Create Array.


Table 3-2 explains the various disk status conditions.

Table 3-2 Disk Status Conditions

Status Condition
Description

Online

The drive is already used in another array.

Global Hotspare

The drive will be used to repair any array in the system that had a drive failure, if the failed drive is equal to, or smaller than the hot spare drive.

Unconfigured Good

The drive is unused or available.

Ready

The drive is online and operating correctly.

Offline

The drive is offline or absent. No actions can be performed on the drive until it is back online.

Unconfigured Bad

The drive is not operational and needs to be replaced.

Disks with a status of "Unconfigured bad" cannot be used for RAID configurations.

Foreign

The drive is part of an array created on a different controller, or created within one enclosure and moved to another on the same controller. It can be used to create a new array after clearing configuration.


Table 3-3 explains the RAID array attributes.

Table 3-3 RAID Array Attributes

Option
Description

RAID level

RAID 0 (Data striping), 1 (Disk Mirroring), 5 (Data Striping with Striped Parity), 6 (Distributed Parity and Disk Striping).

Stripe size

Size of the data stripe across all disks. Each physical disk has a smaller stripe of data. The sum of all the stripes equals the stripe size.

Read policy

No Read Ahead, Read Ahead, Adaptive. Read Ahead will read additional consecutive stripes. Adaptive will turn on Read Ahead for sequential reads and turn it off for random reads.

Write policy

Write Through or Write Back. With Write Through, I/O completion for write operations is signaled when the data is written to the disk. With Write Back, I/O completion is signaled when the data is transferred to cache.

Cache policy

Direct I/O or Cached I/O. Choose Direct I/O for uncached read and write operations. Choose Cached I/O to cache all write operations and check the cache first for read operations

Size

Logical drive size. The maximum value depends on RAID level selected and the physical disks size involved.


OS Install

The unattended operating system installation function helps you install the Microsoft Windows, SuSE Linux, and RedHat Linux operating system families. UCS-SCU has integrated device drivers including RAID drivers to seamlessly install operating systems on supported RAID logical arrays without additional load driver steps or devices such as the USB. UCS-SCU supports OS installation only on Virtual Disks. OS installation on Physical Disks is not supported. All UCS-SCU supported operating systems are organized into three groups: Windows, RHEL, and SUSE.

This section contains the following topics:

Windows Server 2003 and 2008 Operating System Installation

Linux Server Series Operating System Installation

Windows Server 2003 and 2008 Operating System Installation

For unattended Windows Server 2003 and 2008 OS installation, follow these steps:


Step 1 To enter the unattended OS installation function area, click OS Install in the left navigation pane. The OS Install page appears.

Step 2 Click the Windows radio button and choose an operating system from the drop-down list. For Windows 2008 operating system, an additional edition drop-down list displays.

Step 3 Click Next.

Step 4 On the Set Installation Partition page, select a disk from the Select Disk drop-down list to create a partition.

Step 5 If your server has more disk controllers such as SATA, SAS, or RAID, click Select Disk to choose an active disk. UCS-SCU switches to the corresponding disk that is under the selected disk controller.

To create a new partition on disk free space, click New.

To remove a partition, click Delete.

To change a partition size, click Edit.

Step 6 If you have multiple arrays created under the same controller, UCS-SCU marks the array chosen for OS installation as the primary bootable array.

Step 7 Click Next.

Step 8 Enter the following information in the subsequent screens:

Region and Location

Windows 2003 server series—UCS-SCU prompts you to select Time Zone, Windows Language and additional language

Windows 2008—You can select the Time Zone.

Personalization

Enter server owner name, organization, license information and license type.

Name and password

On Windows 2003 server series you must set the server computer name and administrator password.

On Windows 2008 server series you must set the server computer name. Because administrator password is reset when Windows 2008 installation completes, UCS-SCU does not request a Windows administrator password.

Network Settings—Enter the network configuration settings for the onboard network adapters that will be detected by the operating system during installation. You will be able to view the link status of available network interfaces along with the IP address, subnet mask, gateway, DNS, link status, vendor, type and MAC address on this page. You can also enter the Work Group or Network Domain information on this page and enable Remote Access (RDP). These settings will not affect the network settings for the CIMC. We recommend that you set different IP addresses for the OS and CIMC. The "network interface" column lists each network adapter detected by the UCS-SCU. Your operating system may have a different name after you install the operating system.

Get Updated Drivers—This section allows you to select the source from where UCS-SCU can download server driver packages. The selected drivers are installed to the operating system by UCS-SCU.

Choose one of the following options:

From www.cisco.com—To get the most recent drivers from the Cisco support website, select this option. Ensure that the server is only connected to one network during the download. You will have the option to setup a network connection for your server, configure proxy server to access internet and cisco.com user credentials.

From SCU boot media—Directly use the driver packages that are stored in the Tools and Drivers CD. UCS-SCU selects this option as default.

From my network—UCS-SCU can download a driver package stored on a network share folder. You must manually download the most recent drivers from http://www.cisco.com and copy them to your network share.

From USB Disk on Key or Hard Drive—UCS-SCU can get the drivers stored on a USB key or USB hard disk drive. You must manually download the most recent drivers from http://www.cisco.com and copy them to a USB key. To download drivers from http://www.cisco.com follow these steps:

1. Log on to http://www.cisco.com.

2. Click Support.

3. Click Download Software and then click Products.

4. Click Unified Computing and Servers.

5. Click Cisco UCS C-Series Rack-Mount Servers.

6. Select the required server type and then select Software on Chassis.

7. Select Unified Computing System (UCS) Server Configuration Utility Device Drivers Package and then select either VMWare, Linux, Windows and EFI.

8. Select the required release and click either Download Now or Add to cart.


Choose Drivers to Install—UCS-SCU displays all available drivers downloaded from the driver source. Uncheck the drivers that you do not want to install. If you want to install an operating system on a RAID volume, you can deselect the driver for the appropriate RAID controller. The path to the selected drivers will be stored and will then be used to download and install the drivers during the operating system installation.

Remove the UCS-SCU CD and insert the required operating system CD.


Windows 2003 Server Series

For unattended installation of the Windows 2003 operating system, follow these steps:


Step 1 Insert the Windows 2003 operating system CD, and click Next for UCS-SCU to apply all settings.

Step 2 After completing this process, UCS-SCU prompts you to reboot the server.

Step 3 Leave the operating system CD in the CD-ROM, while the system completes the OS installation after this reboot.


Windows 2008

For unattended installation of the Windows 2008 operating system, follow these steps:


Step 1 Insert the Windows 2008 OS DVD and a USB key with at least 10 MB free space on which UCS-SCU can store server drivers temporarily. The answer file unattended.xml is also stored in the USB during installation.

Step 2 Click Next to apply all settings.

Step 3 Click Restart to reboot the server.

Step 4 During server POST, press F2 to enter the server BIOS configuration interface.


Note You can use only virtual USB drives for OS installation on the C460 M1. Both physical and virtual are supported on all other platforms.



Linux Server Series Operating System Installation

For unattended Linux operating system installation, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click OS Install in the left navigation pane. The OS Install page appears.

Step 2 Click either the RHEL or SLES radio button, choose an operating system from the drop-down list and click Next.

Step 3 On the Set Installation Partition page, select a disk from the Select Disk drop-down list to create a partition.

Step 4 If the server has more disk controllers such as SATA, SAS, or RAID controller, click Select disk to choose active disk controller. UCS-SCU switches to the corresponding disk that is under the selected disk controller and displays a recommended default partition.

Step 5 Click New to create a new partition on disk free space. Click Delete to remove a partition, or click Edit to change partition size. Partition Root and Swap are necessary. If you miss them, SCU generates an alert message. SCU displays a suggested partition solution. Accept it if you are not familiar with Linux partition.

Step 6 If you have multiple arrays created under the same controller, UCS-SCU marks the array that is chosen for OS installation as primary bootable array.

Step 7 Enter the following information in the subsequent screens:

Basic configuration—Edit the following items on the Basic Configuration page:

Root Password

Default language

Keyboard

Time Zone

Additional Languages

Package Selection—Select all Linux packages that you want to install on your server.

Network Settings—Enter the network configuration settings for the onboard network adapters that will be detected by the operating system during installation. These settings do not affect the network settings for the CIMC. We recommend that you set different IP addresses for the operating system and CIMC. The network interface column lists each network adapter detected by the UCS-SCU. Your operating system may have a different name after you install the operating system.

Get Update Drivers—This section allows you to select the source from which the UCS-SCU can download server driver packages. Those drivers are installed to the operating system by UCS-SCU.

Choose one of the following options:

From www.cisco.com—You can get the most recent drivers from the Cisco support website by selecting this option. Please check that the server is only connected to one network during the download.

From SCU boot media—Directly use the driver packages stored in the Tools and Drivers CD. Although this CD may not contain the most recent driver packages, this option is the fastest. UCS-SCU selects this as a default option.

From my network—UCS-SCU can download a driver package stored on a network share folder. You must manually download the most recent drivers from http://www.cisco.com and copy it to your network share.

From USB stick on Key—UCS-SCU can get the drivers stored on a USB key or USB hard disk drive. You must manually download the most recent drivers from http://www.cisco.com and copy them to the USB key.

Network LocationEnter the login and location information for the network share where the update packages are located.

Choose Drivers to Install—UCS-SCU displays all available drivers that downloaded from the driver source. Uncheck the drivers that you do not want to install. If you want to install an operating system on a RAID volume, you can select the driver for the appropriate RAID controller. The path to the selected drivers will be stored and will then be used to download and install the drivers during the operating system installation.

Insert OS CD—Insert the Linux Server OS CD and click Next. UCS-SCU starts to apply all settings. Reboot the server after the process completes. You should leave the OS CD in the CD-ROM. The server will complete all the operating system installation steps after this reboot.


Diagnostic Tools

You can use diagnostics tools to diagnose hardware problems with your Cisco servers. The user interface displays the status of the test run and examines log files for troubleshooting hardware issues.

Features of Diagnostic Tools

These are the features of Diagnostic tools:

Allows you to run tests on various server components to find out hardware issues along with analysis of the test results in a tabular format.

Provides an easy interface to run all the tests using the Quick Tasks functionality, without browsing through available tests.

Runs tests serially, as running some tests in parallel may interfere with other tests.

Allows you to configure the test by entering different argument values other than the default ones.

Allows you to select tests you want to run using the Test Suite functionality.

Allows you to save all the tests logs such SEL logs to an external USB flash drive.

Provides a method to probe the current state of the server and displays hardware issues.

This section contains the following topics:

Quick Test

Comprehensive Test

Quick Tasks

Tests Suite

Tests Log Summary

Using Diagnostic Tools

The table below details when you should use a specific diagnostic functionality:

Table 3-4 Using Diagnostics

Diagnostic Component
Usage

Quick Test

Use this test when you want to quickly check the status of a sub-system within a stipulated period. The components that can be tested under the quick test are - processor, cache, memory, disk, video, network, QPI, CIMC, RAID and chipset.

Comprehensive Test

Use this test when you want to test a sub-system elaborately. These tests are designed to stress the sub-systems and report the error. The tests that can be run are - processor, memory, QPI, disk, and NUMA.

Quick Tasks

Allows for consolidated testing of both comprehensive and quick tests. You can run both types of tests using quick tasks.

Test Suite

All the tests available under the quick and comprehensive test are available here. The test suite gives you an option to pick as many tests as you like (using a check box) and running them together.

Tests Log Summary

Use the test log summary to view the log, error log and analysis of all the tests you have run. There are four filters you can use to sort the logs.

Tests Summary

This table on the left hand navigation gives you the results of the tests you have run in the form of either passed tests, tests in queue and failed tests.


Quick Test

You can run these tests quickly to determine any hardware issue. These tests usually take 20-30 minutes to run and test limited functionality for a few subsystems. The comprehensive test provides more exhaustive diagnostics.

To run the quick test follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Diagnostic Tools from the left navigation pane.

Step 2 Click Tests.

Step 3 Click the Quick Test collapsible button to view the types of quick tests available for you to run.

Step 4 Click a subsystem (like memory, video, or network).

Step 5 On the content pane, click Run Test.

Step 6 If you click Run Test, the test is run and the status displays in the Tests Status area.

The table below describes the sub-systems covered under quick tests:

Table 3-5 Quick Tests

Test
Description

Processor Test

Runs processor specific tests. This test performs arithmetic and floating point operations on all avaliable cores. You can also specify the duration of the tests

Cache Test

Runs test to excercise the CPU caches and checks for correctable/uncorrectable cache errors.

Memory Test

Tests DIMMs and memory controllers.

Disk Test

Tests the available disks in the system by reading each disk block-by-block.

Video Test

Test to stress the Video Memory.

Network Test

Tests the available network interfaces by running internal loopback test, register test, eeprom test and interrupt test.

QPI Test

Tests the Quick path interconnect fabric.

CIMC Test

Runs CIMC self test through the IPMI interface and also checks for SEL fullness.

Chipset Test

Runs a test to check the chipset for any erros logged in the chipset RAS registers.

RAID Adapter Test

Runs test to check the LSI MegaRAID 9260-8i and 8708 controller and battery backup unit diagnostics.


Comprehensive Test

The Comprehensive test can run for hours and usually runs when quick tests cannot diagnose the issue with your server. They are designed to test multiple hardware components and find issues that may be caused due to multiple components on your server.

The individual tests run can be customized to test some user-defined conditions. You can also select a group of tests to be run.

To run the comprehensive test, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Diagnostic Tools from the left navigation pane.

Step 2 Click Tests.

Step 3 Click the Comprehensive Test collapsible button to view the types of comprehensive tests available for you to run.

Step 4 Click a subsystem (like processor, memory, or network).

Step 5 On the content pane, click Run Tests.

Step 6 If you click Run Tests, the test is run and the status displays in the Tests Status area.

The table below describes the sub-systems covered under comprehensive tests:

 

Table 3-6 Comprehensive Tests

Test
Description

Processor Stress Test

Imposes maximum stress on CPU and memory on the system. You can set the time (in minutes) you want this test to run for.

Memory Pattern Test

Tests the available free memory by writing and reading various patterns to the memory.

QPI Stress Test

Runs test to stress the QPI interconnect by generating traffic between the NUMA nodes.

Smart Disk Test

Tests the available disks in the system by reading each disk block by block

NUMA Test

Runs test to stress the NUMA memory access patterns and check for errors.


Quick Tasks

Quick Tasks allow you to get started with diagnostic tools immediately. You can run all the tests (Quick/Comprehensive) from here and report the details to Cisco to troubleshoot the logs and provide information about problems with your system. To use this feature, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Diagnostic Tools from the left navigation pane.

Step 2 Click Quick Tasks.

Step 3 Click either Run Quick Tests or Run Comprehensive Test from the toolbar. The status appears in the Test Status pane. You can also view detailed test results under Tests log summary.

Tests Suite

The Test Suite allows you to run the quick test and comprehensive test in a batch. It lists the various tests available, along with the test type and description of the test. You can select any number of tests you want to run from the list and view the result in the Tests Status column.

To run the test suite, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Tests Suite from the left navigation pane.

Step 2 Select the tests you want to run by clicking the required checkboxes.

Step 3 Click Run Tests Suite to run the tests you added to the test suite. The status appears in the Tests Status pane along with the name, suite ID, Result, start time and end time. You can also view the Tests Log Summary to view the execution status of the tests in the test suite.


Tests Log Summary

Use the Tests Log Summary functionality to examine the test logs for troubleshooting. To view the Tests Log summary, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Diagnostic Tools on the left navigation pane.

Step 2 Click Tests Log Summary on the left navigation pane.

Step 3 Select a filter from the filter drop-down and click Go. The status, result, start time, and end time of the test displays.

Step 4 For more details, click a specific log entry (for example, click memory test). The Log, Error Log (if the test failed) and the analysis of the specific test displays in the content pane.

Tests Summary

The Test Summary table in the left navigation area provides you with a quick view of the tests that have passed, tests in queue and tests that have failed.

Logs

The Logs functionality allows you to take corrective action by examining your server's logs. UCS-SCU provides three types of logs:

System logs

System event logs

This section contains the following topics:

System Logs

System Event Log

System Logs

The system log file displays events that are logged by the operating system components. These events are often predetermined by the operating system itself. System log files display information about device changes, device drivers, system changes, events, operations, and more.

To view the system logs, follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Logs on the left navigation pane.

Step 2 Click System Logs.

Step 3 Select a filter from the filter drop-down list.

Step 4 Click Go. The system log displays.


System Event Log

The system event log file displays events that are logged by your server.

To view the system event logs follow these steps:


Step 1 Click Logs on the left navigation pane.

Step 2 Click System Event Log.

Step 3 Select from either the Description or Severity filter from the drop-down list.

If you select the Description filter and click Go, all the system event logs with a description and severity displays.

If you select the Severity filter, you can select the type of severity from the second dropdown and click Go. A list with the logs of the specified severity type displays.

Click Clear Filter to clear the filter you applied.