MGX 8850 (PXM1E/PXM45), MGX 8950, and MGX 8830 Command Reference, Release 4
cnfabr-
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cnfabr

Table Of Contents

cnfabr

cnfabrtparmdft

cnfaddrcug

cnfaddrreg

cnfainihopcount

cnfaisdelaytimer

cnfalm

cnfapsln

cnfatmimagrp

cnfatmln

cnfautocnf

cnfbert

cnfcbclk

cnfcdmode

cnfcdstat

cnfcdvtdft

cnfcli

cnfclkparms

cnfclksrc

cnfcmdabbr

cnfcon

cnfconsegep

cnfcug

cnfdate

cnfdiag

cnfdiagall

cnfe164justify

cnfenhiisp

cnfetherif

cnffltset

cnfilmi

cnfilmienable

cnfilmiproto

cnfimagrp

cnfimalnk

cnfimalnktst

cnfintfcongth

cnfintfvsvd

cnflink

cnfln

cnfloginmsg

cnfmbsdft

cnfname

cnfncdp

cnfncdpclksrc

cnfncdpport

cnfndidrtes

cnfndparms (PXM45)

cnfndparms (PXM1E)

cnfnodalcongth

cnfnodalfd

cnfnodecug

cnfoamsegep

cnfpart

cnfpasswd

cnfpasswdreset


cnfabr

Configure ABR—PXM1E

In general, the cnfabr command configures the VS/VD-specific parameters for an existing ABR connection. The connection must be of service type ABR (in the addcon command, service type=10).


Note The only ABR parameters that the PXM1E supports are MCR and PCR.


Syntax

cnfabr <ifNum> <vpi <vci> -icr <Initial cell rate>] -adtf <ACR decr. factor>] -rdf <Rate decr. factor>] -rif <Rate incr. factor>] -nrm <Cells per fwd RM>] -trm <Time between fwd RMs>] -cdf <cutoff decrease factor>] -frtt <fix round trip delay>] -tbe <transient buffer exposure>] -intvsvd <internal vsvd config>] -extvsvd <external vsvd config>]

Syntax Description

ifNum

The port number of the connection.

vpi

The VPI range for a UNI port endpoint is 0-255. The VPI range for an NNI or VNNI port endpoint is 0-4095.

vci

The VCI range for a UNI port endpoint is 1-4095. The VCI range for a NNI port endpoint is 1-65535. For MPLS, the recommended minimum VCI is 35.

-icr

Initial Cell Rate (ICR) in cells per second. This is the rate at which the source should begin transmitting, and is also the rate at which the source should resume transmitting after an idle period. The range is 0-4294967295 cells per second.

-adtf

ACR Decrease Time Factor (ADTF). This is the time permitted to decrease the cell rate from the RM-cell rate to the Allowed Cell Rate (ACR) for normal traffic. The range is 1-1023 milliseconds.

-rdf

Rate Decrease Factor (RDF). This is the factor by which to decrease the Allowed Cell Rate (ACR). RDF is a power of 2 in the range 1/32768 to 1.

-rif

Rate Increase Factor (RIF). This is the factor by which to increase the Allowed Cell Rate (ACR). RIF is a power of 2 in the range 1/32768 to 1.

-nrm

Maximum number of cells that the source can send for each forward RM-cell. Nrm is a power of 2 in the range 2-256.

-trm

The maximum number of milliseconds for one RM-cell to travel from source to endpoint. The range is 100 x 2-7 to 100 x 20 milliseconds.

-cdf

Cutoff Decrease Factor (CDF). This controls the decrease in Allowed Cell Rate (ACR) associated with Missing RM-cell count (CRM). CDF can be either or the following:

Zero

A power of 2 in the range 1/64 to 1

CRM limits the number of forward RM-cells that may be sent in the absence of received backward RM-cells. CRM is an integer. Its size is implementation specific.

-frtt

Fixed Round-Trip Time (FRTT). This is the sum of the fixed delays plus the propagation delays from the source to the destination and back. The range is 0- 16.7 seconds.

-tbe

Transient Buffer Exposure (TBE). This is the negotiated number of cells that the network would like to limit the source to sending during startup periods, before the first RM-cell returns. The range is 0-16,777,215 cells.

-intvsvd

This parameter enables or disables VS/VD on the internal loop.

1=Off

2=On

3=Unspecified (Unspecified means that the connection takes the on or off status of VS/VD from the VS/VD specification in the SCT file.) See description of the cnfintfvsvd command to enable VS/VD at the PNNI port level.

Default: off

-extvsvd

This parameter enables or disables VS/VD on the external loop.

1=Off

2=On

3=Unspecified (Unspecified means that the connection takes the on or off status of VS/VD from the VS/VD specification in the SCT file.) See description of the cnfintfvsvd command to enable VS/VD at the PNNI port level.

Default: off


Related Commands

addcon, cnfabrtparmdft, dspabrtparmdft, cnfintfvsvd

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


cnfabrtparmdft

Configure ABR Traffic Parameter Defaults—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfabrtparmdft command lets you configure default, ABR-specific parameters for all ABR SPVCs on a PNNI port. These parameters apply to SPVCs only.


Note Although the PXM1E shows elements related to ABR VS/VD, it does not support ABR VS/VD.


When you add an ABR connection, the controller provides the default ABR traffic parameters before the connection is committed. The default ABR traffic parameters are used in the SETUP message at the source when an SPVC with ABR service is set up. (Note also that you can change VS/VD-specific parameters for an individual ABR connection by using the cnfabr command on the AXSM-E.)

Syntax

cnfabrtparmdft <portid> [-rif RIF-value] [-rdf RDF-value] [-tbe TBE-value] [-nrm NRM-value] [-trm TRM-value] [-adtf ADTF-value] [-cdf CDF-value] [-fsd FSD-value]

Syntax Description

portid

The format of the PNNI physical port identifier can vary, as follows:

On a PXM45: slot:subslot.port:subport

On a PXM1E for UNI/NNI back card: slot:subslot.port:subport. On the UNI/NNI back card, the subslot is always 2, but the slot depends on the chassis, as follows:

In an MGX 8850 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 7.

In an MGX 8830 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 1.

On a PXM1E for a narrowband service module (NBSM): slot.port.

For more details, see the section, "PNNI Format," in "Introduction."

-rif

Keyword that specifies the Rate Increase Factor (RIF). This is the factor by which to increase the Allowed Cell Rate (ACR). RIF is a power of 2 in the range 1/32768 to 1.

Default: 7

-rdf

Keyword that specifies the Rate Decrease Factor (RDF). This is the factor by which to decrease the Allowed Cell Rate (ACR). RDF is a power of 2 in the range 1/32768 to 1.

Default: 4

-tbe

Keyword that specifies the Transient Buffer Exposure (TBE). This is the negotiated number of cells that the network would like to limit the source to sending during startup periods, before the first RM-cell returns. The range is 0-16,777,215 cells.

Default: 1048320

-nrm

Keyword that specifies the maximum number of cells that the source can send for each forward RM-cell. Nrm is a power of 2 in the range 2-256.

Default: 5

-trm

Keyword that specifies the maximum number of milliseconds for one RM-cell to travel from source to endpoint. The range is 100 x 2-7 to 100 x 20 milliseconds.

Default: 8

-adtf

Keyword that specifies the ACR Decrease Time Factor (ADTF). This is the time permitted to decrease the cell rate from the RM-cell rate to the Allowed Cell Rate (ACR) for normal traffic. The range is 1 to 1023 milliseconds.

Default: 50

-cdf

Keyword that specifies the Cutoff Decrease Factor (CDF). This controls the decrease in Allowed Cell Rate (ACR) associated with Missing RM-cell count (CRM). CDF can be either or the following:

Zero

A power of 2 in the range 1/64 to 1

CRM limits the number of forward RM-cells that may be sent in the absence of received backward RM-cells. CRM is an integer. Its size is implementation-specific.

Default: 7

-fsd

Keyword that specifies the Fixed-source-delay.

Default: 0


Related Commands

addcon, cnfabr, dspabrtparmdft, cnfintfvsvd

Attributes

Log: no

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


cnfaddrcug

Configure Address CUG—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfaddrcug command lets you configure the following attributes for an existing CUG member (a CUG member is an ATM address):

Preferential CUG

Incoming access

Outgoing access

After you add the first CUG member with the addcug command, its ATM address becomes a CUG member (or user), and only after that addition can you modify these CUG's attributes with the cnfaddrcug command. This command applies to an individual CUG member, whereas the addcug and cnfcug commands apply to a CUG. The paragraphs that follow describe the member attributes.

Preferential CUG

A preferential CUG serves as a default CUG. It applies when a calling party does not signal a specific CUG. For example, if CPE does not support CUGs, so that no CUG index is signalled by the calling party, the called party uses the preferential CUG to validate the call. You can designate one of the CUG's associated with a calling address to be the preferential CUG. To indicate which CUG is the preferential CUG, you must provide that CUG's index. Note that a CUG cannot be preferential if outgoing calls for that CUG are barred (see the addcug description for the calls-barred information).

Controlling Access for CUG Members

The incoming and outgoing access parameters let you specify access between CUGs for an individual CUG member.

CUG validation takes place at the source and destination of a call. The switch performs CUG validation on CUG calls (calls that contain CUG signaling) and non-CUG (or "normal") calls. This feature complies with source and destination validation as described in Table 3 and Table 4 (respectively) of the ITU-T Q.2955.1 specification. The outgoing and incoming access parameters of this command let you set up a CUG member for source and destination validation.

Outgoing Access

The outgoing access option regulates calls that a CUG member might initiate to members that are outside the CUG. The choices for outgoing access are as follows:

The default is disallowed: no calls can be made to outside the list of CUG memberships. All calls must be between members of the same CUG.

The percall option lets this user make calls outside the CUG when this user explicitly signals the outgoing access request on a per-call basis. Thus, only calls with OA signaled are allowed.

The permanent option lets this user make calls outside of the CUGs to which this user belongs without explicitly signaling an outgoing access request.

The following example illustrates the role of outgoing access control for CUGs:

1. If user A has outgoing calls disallowed, user A cannot call any user.

2. If user A has outgoing access on a per-call basis, user A can call B if a request for outgoing access is included in the SETUP message.

3. If user A has permanent outgoing access, user A can place any call.

Incoming Access

The incoming access option regulates calls that a CUG member might receive from outside the CUG. The choices for incoming access are as follows:

The default is disallowed: no calls can come from outside the list of CUG memberships. All calls must be between members of the same CUG.

The allowed option lets the CUG member receive calls from outside the list of CUG memberships.

The following example illustrates the role of incoming access control for CUGs:

1. User A is a member of CUGs 1, 2, and 3.

2. User B is not a member of any CUGs.

3. If user A has incoming access disallowed, user A cannot receive a call from user B.

4. If user A has incoming access allowed, user A can receive a call from user B.

Syntax

cnfaddrcug <atm-address> <length> <plan> [-pref <cug-index>]
[-oa {disallowed | percall | permanent}] [-ia {disallowed | allowed}]

Syntax Description

atm-address

The NSAP or E.164 address on the local UNI interface is 20 bytes.

length

Address length. The units of measure differ for each address plan. The -plan option lets you specify E.164 or NSAP.

For an NSAP address plan, the units of measure are bits. The range is 0-160. Using the maximum of a 20-byte ATM address:

20 bytes x 8 bits per byte = 160 bits

For an E.164 address plan, the value is the number of decimal digits. If the ATM address consists of 15 digits, the value for this parameter is also 15.

plan

The plan is either NSAP or E.164 and is set when you added the address by using the addaddr command.

-pref

The cug-index uniquely identifies a CUG at an ATM address. The range for the CUG index is 0-65535. A 0 means "no preferential CUG."

Default: 0

-oa

For outgoing access, type one of the following words as needed:

disallowed

percall

permanent

Default: disallowed

-ia

For incoming access, type one of the following words as needed:

disallowed

allowed

Default: disallowed


Related Commands

addcug, delcug, dspcug, clrcugdefaddr, cnfnodecug, dspaddrcug, dspcugdefaddr, dspnodecug, setcugdefaddr

Attributes

log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SUPER_GP


Examples

Note that you may have to adjust the display on your terminal to accommodate command entry. Configure the following for NSAP ATM address 47.0091.8100.0000.0001.4444.7777 (length 104):

Outgoing access is disallowed

Incoming access is allowed

Geneva.7.PXM.a > cnfaddrcug 47.0091.8100.0000.0001.4444.7777 104 12 nsap -oa disallowed 
-ia allowed

cnfaddrreg

Configure Address Registration—PXM45, PXM1E

This command lets you enable or disable ILMI address registration for a port. Before you can run cnfaddrreg, the following must have occurred:

1. The applicable port must have been created by executing addpnport.

2. The port must be downed by executing dnpnport.

The cnfaddrreg command can also enable (or disable) the address registration for backward compatibility.

The peer must support address registration table and procedure, so you must confirm that address registration is enabled on all three places.

Syntax

cnfaddrreg <portid> [{yes | no}]

Syntax Description

In addition to typing a port ID, you must also type either "yes" pr "no."

portid

The format of the PNNI physical port identifier can vary, as follows:

On a PXM45: slot:subslot.port:subport

On a PXM1E for UNI/NNI back card: slot:subslot.port:subport. On the UNI/NNI back card, the subslot is always 2, but the slot depends on the chassis, as follows:

In an MGX 8850 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 7.

In an MGX 8830 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 1.

On a PXM1E for a narrowband service module (NBSM): slot.port.

For more details, see the section, "PNNI Format," in "Introduction."

yes

Enable ILMI address registration on the port. The default is "yes" (enabled).

no

Disable ILMI address registration on the port.


Related Commands

None

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example

Disable ILMI address registration on port 4:1.1:11.

Geneva.7.PXM45.a > cnfaddrreg 4:1.1:11 no

cnfainihopcount

Configure AINI Hop Count—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfainihopcount command lets you determine the maximum number of AINI links that a call can traverse. The specification applies to any call originating on the local node, and the area to which the setting applies is the entire network. With cnfainihopcount, you can:

Enable or disable the counter. This counter generates the Hop Counter Information Element (IE).

Specify the maximum number of AINI hops. The hop counter (IE) is initialized to this value in the setup message. With each AINI link that the setup message traverses, the counter is decremented. This hop count applies to only AINI interfaces (see also the description of cnfpnportsig.)


Note To enable AINI hop count, you must also enable it at each port that should have it by using the cnfpnportsig command and typing "enable" for the -hopcntgen parameter.


Syntax

cnfainihopcount [-hopcntgen {enable | disable}] [-maxhops <value>]

Syntax Description

-hopcntgen

The enable for counting AINI hops. Type the entire word "enable" or "disable." Enabling hop count generation initializes the counter to the value for maxhops.

Default: enable

-maxhops

The maximum number of AINI hops that a connection can take. The range is 1-31.

Default: 31


Related Commands

dspainihopcount

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active, standby

Privilege: SUPER_GP


Example

Enable AINI hop counting and specify a maximum of 20 hops. No response appears unless an error occurs, so follow up by displaying the configuration.

8850_NY.8.PXM.a > cnfainihopcount -hopcntgen enable -maxhops 20

8850_NY.8.PXM.a > dspainihopcount
AINI Hop Counter Generation: enable
Max AINI Hops: 20

8850_NY.8.PXM.a >

cnfaisdelaytimer

Configure AIS Delay Timer—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfaisdelaytimer command lets you configure the number of seconds that the node waits to send AIS/Abit toward CPE during user-scheduled SPVC/SPVP grooming. (Re-routing sends AIS/Abit from both ends of a connection when the connection is derouted.) This feature provides a configurable, node-level timer that regulates the time from the moment a connection is intentionally (not accidentally) de-routed to the point when the connection is declared to have failed. If PNNI has not routed the connection when the timer expires, the port sends AIS/Abit.

Route optimization (also called connection grooming) briefly de-routes a connection. On the CLI, the planned route optimization results from either optrte or cnfrteopt operation. To prevent CPE from reverting to back-up facilities, you can delay the transmission of AIS/Abit.

Note the following characteristics of this feature:

The value of the AIS delay timer should be the same throughout the network.

Typically, connection grooming is done in batches during a maintenance window. If you try to groom a large number of connections—particularly if the network becomes busy—the system may not be able to commit all the connections within the desired time limit.

Until all nodes in the network are upgraded to a release that supports this feature, Cisco recommends that you leave the timer at 0 (the default).

This feature applies to persistent, dual-ended, point-to-point SPVCs of SPVPs only.

During controller switch-over, the AIS delay timer is re-triggered when the standby becomes active. In this situation, the AIS delay may continue to twice the configured value. This situation has no impact on service module switch-overs.

For a connection with CC enabled, a non-zero timer means the node turns off CC from the moment the connection is de-routed until the connection is re-routed.

Syntax

cnfaisdelaytimer <timer_value>

Syntax Description

timer_value

The delay timer is 0-60 seconds (default is 0). A 0 means the feature is disabled.


Related Commands

dspaisdelaytimer

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SUPER_GP


Example

Configure the AIS delay timer for 60 seconds.

spvc14.8.PXM.a > cnfaisdelaytimer 60

cnfalm

Configure Alarm—PXM45, PXM1E

Configures statistical alarm thresholds for a line. The configurable items for SONET and PLCP are defined in RFC 2258. The configurable items for DS3 and E3 are defined in RFC 2496. The items that constitute a configuration are:

Line type: SONET, DS3, E3, or PLCP

Tested layer: section, line, or path (for example, SONET line)

Test periods of 15 minutes and 24 hours

Degrees of error-time: errored seconds and severely errored seconds

Types of errors, including framing errors, code violations, and unavailable

Severity of alarm triggered when a threshold is crossed: minor or major

A keyword identifies the alarm criteria. Each keyword identifies the tested layer (line, and so on), the type of threshold (errored seconds, and so on), and the test period of 15 minutes or 24 hours. For example, -lnes15 indicates the number of errored seconds on the line layer during any 15 minute period. See the Syntax Description for a list and definitions of all keywords.


Note For information about the cnfalm command on the AXSM cards, see the AXSM documentation.


Syntax

Due to the variety of line types and formats for line identifiers, the information is presented as generic syntax information and details for specific line types.

The required parameters are as follows:

Line type

Line identifier

Severity of the alarm (minor or major).

Other parameters are optional and must be preceded by the keyword that identifies the type of parameter.

Generic Syntax Description

The generic syntax is.

cnfalm <line type> <X.line> <alarm severity> <thresholds>

The meaning of the generic syntax appears in the following list. Refer to subsequent lists for the descriptions of alarm severities and thresholds for each line type.

lineType

The possible line types depend on what X.line identifies, as follows:

For X = 2, possible line types for PXM1E back card are as follows:

-sonetsec - Displays the section alarms for the given sonet line.

-sonetline - Displays the line alarms for the given sonet line.

-sonetpath -Displays the path alarms for the given sonet line.

-ds3 - Displays the statistical alarms for the given DS3 line.

-plcp - Displays alarms for Physical Layer Convergence Procedure (PLCP).

For X = 7, 15, or 31, possible line types for SRMs are as follows:

-sonetsec - Displays the section alarms for the given SONET line.

-sonetline - Displays the line alarms for the given SONET line.

-sonetpath -Displays the path alarms for the given SONET line.

-ds3 - Displays the statistical alarms for the given DS3 line.

X.line

The X field identifies either of the following:

The UNI/NNI back card in bay 2 of the PXM1E

The logical slot of the SRM under the control of a PXM1E

The value for X can be one of the following:

X=2 identifies the UNI/NNI back card attached to a PXM1E.

X=15 or 31 in an MGX 8850 chassis identifies the logical slot number of the active SRM (regardless of physical slot number).

X=7 in an MGX 8830 chassis identifies the logical slot number of the active SRM (regardless of physical slot number).

The values for line depends on the type of card. Possible values are as follows:

SRME: 1

SRM-3T3: 1-3

PXM1E back card: 1-16 (whatever is the highest line number on the card)

alarm severity

A keyword and number to identify the severity of the alarm that is triggered when any of the specified thresholds is crossed: 1 = minor alarm, and 2 = major alarm. Precede the alarm severity with the appropriate keyword. For the alarm severity keyword for each line type, see the first item in each of the lists follows. (For example, -secsev refers to the severity of the section alarm on a SONET line.)

thresholds

The number of instances of whatever the keyword identifies. The range for each threshold is 1 to 2^32-1. The keyword precedes each threshold. For example, -lnsesf15 10 means 10 instances of severely errored framing seconds on a line during a 15-minute period.


Thresholds for SONET Section

-secsev Severity

Severity of the alarm (1 = minor, 2 = major) for SONET section.

-seces15 ES15min

Errored seconds during a 15-minute period.

-seces24 ES24Hr

Errored seconds during a 24-hour period.

-secses15 SES15min

Severely errored seconds during a 15-minute period.

-secses24 SES24Hr

Severely errored seconds during a 24-hour period.

-secsefs15 SEFS15min

Severely errored frame seconds during a 15-minute period.

-secsefs24 SEFS24Hr

Severely errored frame seconds during a 24-hour period.

-seccv15 UAS15min

Unavailable seconds during a 15-minute period.

-seccv24 UAS24Hr

Unavailable seconds during a 24-hour period.


Thresholds for SONET Line

-lnsev Severity

Severity of the alarm (1 = minor, 2 = major) for SONET line.

-lnes15 ES15min

Errored seconds during a 15-minute period.

-lnes24 ES24Hr

Errored seconds during a 24-hour period.

-lnses15 SES15min

Severely errored seconds during a 15-minute period.

-lnses24 SES24Hr

Severely errored seconds during a 24-hour period.

-lncv15 CV15min

Code violations during a 15-minute period.

-lncv24 CV24Hr

Code violations seconds during a 24-hour period.

-lnuas15 UAS15min

Unavailable seconds during a 15-minute period.

-lnuas24 UAS24Hr

Unavailable seconds during a 24-hour period.


Thresholds for SONET Path

-sev

Severity of the alarm (1 = minor, 2 = major) for SONET path.

-es15 ES15min

Errored seconds during a 15-minute period.

-es24 ES24Hr

Errored seconds during a 24-hour period.

-ses15 SES15min

Severely errored seconds during a 15-minute period.

-ses24 SES24Hr

Severely errored seconds during a 24-hour period.

-cv15 CV15min

Code violations during a 15-minute period.

-cv24 CV24Hr

Code violations seconds during a 24-hour period.

-uas15 UAS15min

Unavailable seconds during a 15-minute period.

-uas24 UAS24Hr

Unavailable seconds during a 24-hour period.


Thresholds for DS3

-dsev severity

Severity of the alarm (1 = minor, 2 = major) for DS3.

-lcv15 LCV15min

Code violations for a line during a 15-minute period.

-lcv24 LCV24Hr

Code violations for a line seconds during a 24-hour period.

-les15 LES15min

Line errored seconds during a 15-minute period.

-les24 LES24Hr

Line errored seconds during a 24-hour period.

-pcv15 PCV15min

P-bit coding violations for a line during a 15-minute period.

-pcv24 PCV24Hr

P-bit coding violations for a line during a 24-hour period.

-pes15 PES15min

P-bit errored seconds during a 15-minute period.

-pes24 PES24Hr

P-bit errored seconds during a 24-hour period.

-pses15 PSES15min

P-bit severely errored seconds during a 15-minute period.

-pses24 PSES24Hr

P-bit severely errored seconds during a 24-hour period.

-sefs15 SEFS15min

Severely errored frame seconds during a 15-minute period.

-sefs24 SEFS24Hr

Severely errored frame seconds during a 24-hour period.

-uas15 UAS15min

Unavailable seconds during a 15-minute period.

-uas24 UAS24Hr

Unavailable seconds during a 24-hour period.


Thresholds for E3

-dsev severity

Severity of the alarm (1 = minor, 2 = major) for DS3.

-lcv15 LCV15min

Code violations for a line during a 15-minute period.

-lcv24 LCV24Hr

Code violations for a line seconds during a 24-hour period.

-les15 LES15min

Line errored seconds during a 15-minute period.

-les24 LES24Hr

Line errored seconds during a 24-hour period.

-sefs15 SEFS15min

Severely errored frame seconds during a 15-minute period.

-efs24 SEFS24Hr

Severely errored frame seconds during a 24-hour period.

-duas15 UAS15min

Unavailable seconds during a 15-minute period.

-duast24 UAS24Hr

Unavailable seconds during a 24-hour period.


Thresholds for PLCP

-psev severity

Severity of the alarm (1 = minor, 2 = major) for PLCP.

-bcv15 CV15min

Bipolar violation code violations during a 15-minute period.

-bcv24 CV24Hr

Bipolar violation code violations during a 24-hour period.

-bes15 ES15min

Bipolar violation errored seconds during a 15-minute period.

-bes24 ES24Hr

Bipolar violation errored seconds during a 24-hour period.

-bses15 SES15min

Bipolar violation severely errored seconds during a 15-minute period.

-bses24 SES24Hr

Bipolar violation severely errored seconds during a 24-hour period.

-psefs15 SEFS15min

PLCP severely errored frame seconds during a 15-minute period.

-psefs24 SEFS24Hr

PLCP severely errored frame seconds during a 24-hour period.

-puas15 UAS15min

PLCP unavailable seconds during a 15-minute period.

-puas24 UAS24Hr

PLCP unavailable seconds during a 24-hour period.


Related Commands

dspalmcnf

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example

Configure the following thresholds for triggering a major line-level alarm on line 9 in bay 2:

The line type is SONET line.

The bay is 2, and the line number is 9.

The severity of the triggered alarm is major.

The errored seconds for a 15-minutes period and a 24-hour period are 60 and 600, respectively.

The severely errored seconds for a 15-minutes period and a 24-hour period are 3 and 7, respectively.

The code violations for a 15-minutes period and a 24-hour period are 75 and 750, respectively.

The unavailable seconds for a 15-minutes period and a 24-hour period are 10 and 10, respectively

node4.7.PXM1E.a > cnfalm -sonetline 2.9 -lnsev 2 -lnes15 60 -lnes24 600 -lnses15 3 
-lnses24 7 -lncv15 75 -lncv24 750 -lnuas15 10 -lnuas24 10

Check the configuration by running dspalmcnf for the line number and line type in this example.

node4.7.PXM1E.a > dspalmcnf -sonetline 2.9
  LineNum: 2.9
  Line Stat Alarm Severity: No Alarm
               15min Threshold    24hr Threshold
  Line  ESs :  60                 600
  Line  SESs:  3                  7
  Line  CVs :  75                 750
  Line  UASs:  10                 10

cnfapsln

Configure APS Line—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfapsln command lets you configure parameters for automatic protection switching (APS). Use this command after you add APS to a pair of lines. See the addapsln description for details of APS.

Syntax

cnfapsln -w <working line> -sf <SignalFaultBER> -sd <SignalDegradeBER> -wtr <Wait To Restore> -dr <direction> -rv <revertive> -proto <protocol>

Syntax Description


Note The 1+1 Annex B operational mode is bi-directional, non-revertive, ITU protocol only.

If the architecture mode configured by the addapsln command is 1+1 Annex B, only WTR (-wtr), SF BER (-sf), and SD BER (-sd) are configurable with the cnfapsln command.


workingLine

The working line has the following format:

slot.bay.line

The slot number depends on both the chassis and the card type, as follows:

For PXM45 in an MGX 8850 chassis, slot is 15 or 31.

For PXM1E in an MGX 8850 chassis:

For the UNI/NNI back card, slot is 7.

For the SRME, slot is 15 or 31.

For PXM1E in an MGX 8830 chassis:

For the UNI/NNI back card, slot is 1.

For the SRME, slot is 7.

The bay number is present only for consistency with legacy purposes (the slot number uniquely identifies the location of the card) The bay is a fixed logical number that depends on the card, as follows:

For SRME, bay always is 1.

For the PXM1E interface, bay always is 2.

The line number on the PXM1E OC3c/STM1 back card depends on the card type, as follows:

9-12 on the combo card

1-4 on the regular, 4-line card

1-8 on the regular, 8-line card

For an SRME, the line number always is 1.


Syntax Description

SignalFaultBER

A number between 3 and 5 indicating the Signal Fault Bit Error Rate (BER), in negative powers of ten:

3 = 10-3

4 = 10-4

5 = 10-5

SignalDegradeBER

A negative power of 10 in the range 5-9 that indicates the Signal Degrade Bit Error Rate (BER):

5 = 10-5

6 = 10-6

7 = 10-7

8 = 10-8

9 = 10-9

Wait To Restore

This value is the number of minutes to wait before service switches back to the working line from the protection line after the working line returns to operation.

Range: 5-12 minutes

direction

Specifies the direction, as follows:

1: unidirectional

2: bidirectional

Bidirectional means that both the receiving and transmitting paths are switched. Unidirectional means that only the damaged path, receiving or transmitting, is switched.

Default: unidirectional

revertive

Enables revertive capability.

1: non-revertive

2: revertive

-proto

You can specify either Bellcore or ITU-T protocol by following -proto with either a "1" or a "2" to signify the following standard:

1: Bellcore GR-253

2: ITU-T G.783

Default: Bellcore GR-253


Related Commands

addapsln, delapsln, dspapsln, dspapslns, switchapsln, dspapsbkplane, dspbecnt

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SUPER_GP


Example

cnfapsln -w 7.2.1 -sf 3 -sd 5 -wtr 5 -dr 2 -rv 1

cnfatmimagrp

Configure ATM IMA Group—PXM1E

The cnfatmimagrp command lets you enable or disable the following characteristics:

Payload scrambling for an IMA group

AIS in the transmit direction after line failure

The default for both these parameters is enabled.

Syntax

cnfatmimagrp -grp <group> -sps <PayloadScramble> -ais <aisMODE>

Syntax Description

-grp group

The group has the format bay.group and the following possible values:

bay: always 2 on the PXM1E

group: 1-16

-sps

This parameter enables or disables payload scrambling. Enter a 1 or a 2.

1 = enable

2 = disable

Default: enabled

-ais

This parameter enables or disables AIS in the transmit direction after line failure.

1 = enable

2 = disable

Default: enabled


Related Commands

dspatmimagrp

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example

Disable payload scrambling in IMA group 2.

PXM1E.7.PXM.a > cnfatmimagrp -gps 2.2 -sps 2

cnfatmln

Configure ATM Line—PXM1E

The cnfatmln command configures ATM layer cell header characteristics and the AIS mode for a line.

You must configure the ATM layer cell header for a line before you activate the line using upln or before you add a logical port to the line using addport.

Syntax

cnfatmln -ln <bay.line> -sps <PayloadScramble> -nch <cellhdr> -ncp <NullCell payload>
-hcs <hcs> -ais <aisMode>

Syntax Description

-ln

This parameter specifies the bay and line number. The format for this value slightly differs on the PXM1E and AXSMs.

On the PXM1E, the format X.line applies to an SRM or the UNI/NNI back card.

For the UNI/NNI back card, X is always 2.

For an SRM in an MGX 8850 chassis, X can be 15 or 31.

For an SRM in an MGX 8830 chassis, X is always 7.

On any AXSM model, the format is bay.line. On an AXSM, bay is 1 or 2.

In all cases, line can be from 1 to the highest numbered line on the back card.

-hcs

Specifies the number to disable (1) or enable (2) HCS coset. The default is enabled.

-sps

Specifies the number that enables (1) or disables (2) payload scrambling. The default value for PayloadScramble is enabled. The setting must be the same at both ends of the line and throughout the path.

-nch

Specifies the four-byte hexadecimal number to serve as the null cell header (cellhdr). The range for cellhdr is all 0s through ffffffff.

-ncp

Specifies a 8-bit hexadecimal byte to serve as the null cell header. The range for cellpayload is 1-ff. The default is 6a.

-ais

Enables or disables alarm indication signaling (AIS). The AIS is an all-ones signal that is transmitted instead of the normal signal to maintain transmission continuity and to indicate to the receiving terminal that a transmission failure occurred at either the transmitting terminal or other upstream point.

See the cnfpnportloscallrel description for more details on AIS,

1 - Enable AIS upon line failure.

2 - Disable AIS upon line failure.

Default: enabled


Related Commands

dspatmln

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example

For line 1 disable payload scrambling and specify a null cell header.

MGX8850.7.PXM1E.a > cnfatmln -ln 2.1 -sps 2 -nch ab12abab

For line 1, enable payload scrambling and specify null cell headers.

MGX8850.1.PXM1E.a > cnfatmln -ln 2.1 -sps 1 -nch 1a1a1a1a -ncp aa 

For line 1, disable payload scrambling and specify a null cell header.

MGX8850.1.9.PXM1E.a > cnfatmln -ln 2.1 -sps 2 -nch ab12abab

cnfautocnf

Configure Auto Configuration—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfautocnf command enables or disables ILMI auto configuration for a port. To use this command, the port must be added but administratively down (via dnpnnport).

With auto-configuration enabled, the ILMI slave side starts ILMI auto configuration to negotiate the ATM layer parameters with its peer while ports come up. With auto-configuration disabled, the ILMI slave does not start ATM layer parameter-negotiation while ports come up. Instead, the ILMI slave uses the local configuration parameters. The default state for auto-configuration is enabled.

Syntax

cnfautocnf <portid> [yes | no]

Syntax Description

portid

The format of the PNNI physical port identifier can vary, as follows:

On a PXM45: slot:subslot.port:subport

On a PXM1E for UNI/NNI back card: slot:subslot.port:subport. On the UNI/NNI back card, the subslot is always 2, but the slot depends on the chassis, as follows:

In an MGX 8850 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 7.

In an MGX 8830 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 1.

On a PXM1E for a narrowband service module (NBSM): slot.port.

For more details, see the section, "PNNI Format," in "Introduction."

yes | no

Enable of disable ILMI automatic configuration on the port by typing "yes" or "no."

Default: yes


Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Examples

Enable ILMI auto-configuration on port 7:2.1:11.

Geneva.7.PXM1E.a > cnfautocnf 7:2.1:1 yes

cnfbert

Configure Bit Error Rate Testing—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfbert command lets you configure, start, or stop a bit error rate test (BERT) on a legacy service module. This BERT requires a Service Resource Module (SRM-3T3/C or SRME). The SRME does not support all patterns or all loopbacks on all service module lines, so use the dspbertcap command to see the capability for a specific service module.


Note The current release does not support DDS patterns.


One BERT session at a time can run in a bay. If you attempt to configure a session while one is running, the controller blocks the second test.


Note Configure error bit injection with a second iteration of the cnfbert command—after you complete the initial BERT or loopback configuration.


Syntax

cnfbert -cbif <LSMNum> -pat <bertPattern> -lpbk <loopback> -sbe <singleBitErr>
-cir <dropIteration> -en <enable>

Syntax Description

The mandatory parameters are -cbif <LSMNum> -pat <bertPattern> -lpbk <loopback> -en <enable>. Also, you can terminate the BERT session by either using the delbert command or using the cnfbert mandatory parameters and specifying the enable as -en 6.

-cbif

This parameter identifies the line or port to receive BERT or a loopback. The format is:

LSMslot.Line.Port

LSMslot can be a value in the following ranges according to the chassis:

MGX 8850: 1-6, 9-14, 17-22, or 25-30

MGX 8830: 2-6 or 9-13

Line as a range of 1 through the maximum number of lines on the service module.

Port has a range of 1 through the maximum number of ports on the service module or 0 to select no port and have only a line test.


-pat

Type a number in the range 1-32 to select a pattern (see also dspbertcap):

1 = all-zeros: All 0s (Continuous spaces).

2 = all-ones: All 1s (Continuous Marks).

3 = alt-One-Zero: Alternate 1/0 pattern (..1010..).

4 = doubleAltOnesZeros: Double alternate 1/0 (..1100..).

5 = oneIn4: Standard loop up remote code.

6 = oneIn8: An eight-bit pattern which contains single 1.

7 = oneIn16: N repetitive pattern, 1 in 16.

8 = threeIn24: A 24-bit pattern that contains three 1s.

9 = inbandLoopup: D4/SF Loopback activate.

10 = inbandLoopdown: D4/SF Loopback deactivate.

11 = twoE3MinusOne: This is a 23-1 pattern (7 bits in length).

12 = twoE4MinusOne: This is a 24-1 pattern (15 bits in length).

13 = twoE5MinusOne: This is a 25-1 pattern (31 bits in length).

14 = twoE6MinusOne: This is a 26-1 pattern (63 bits in length).

15 = twoE7MinusOne: This is a 27-1 pattern (127 bits in length).

16 = twoE7MinusOneFT1Loopup: 27-1 Fractional T1 Loop Back Activate.

18 = twoE9MinusOne: 29-1 (511 bits in length). It has the maximum of 8 (non-inverted) sequential 0s and 9 sequential 1s.

19 = twoE10MinusOne: 210-1 (1023 bits in length).

20 = twoE11MinusOne: 211-1 (2047 bits). Maximum of 15 (inverted) sequential 0s.

21 = twoE15MinusOne: 215-1 (32767 bits long). Max. of 15 (inverted) sequential 0s.

22 = twoE17MinusOne: 217-1 (131071 bits in length).

23 = twoE18MinusOne: 2 18-1 (262144 bits in length).

24 = twoE20MinusOne: 220-1 (1048575 bits long). Max. 19 (non-inverted), sequential 0s.

25 = twoE20MinusOneQRSS: 220-1 (1048575 bits). This pattern has zero-suppression (Quasi-random Signal Source).

26 = twoE21MinusOne: 221-1 (2097151-bit length).

27 = twoE22MinusOne: 222-1 (4194303-bit length).

28 = twoE23MinusOne: 223-1 (8388607-bit length). Highest stress, pseudo-random pattern, with a maximum of 23 (inverted) sequential 0s and 23 sequential 1s.

29 = twoE25MinusOne: 221-1 (33554431 bits long).

30 = twoE28MinusOne: 228-1 (268435455 bits long).

31 = twoE29MinusOne: Highest stress pseudo-random pattern, with a maximum of 29 (inverted) sequential 0s.

32 = twoE31MinusOne: Maximum 31 sequential 0s.

-lpbk

Type a number to select a loopback (use dspbertcap as needed for supported loopbacks):

-sbe

The single-bit error insertion should be selected after initial configuration with the cnfbert command. Enter one of the following numbers:

1: No error

2: Insert a single-bit error

-cir

The drop iteration applies only if the loopback is 5:latchDS0Drop.

Range for drop iteration is: 1-32

-en

To start or stop a BERT session, type one of the following:

4: Create (start) BERT

6: Destroy (stop) BERT

You can start a BERT session when you configure all the parameters. To stop a session, you need to enter only cnfbert -cbif <LSMNum> and the string -en 6.


Related Commands

dspbert, delbert, dspbertcap

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example

Configure a BERT session, as follows (after using the dspbertcap command, as needed), then display the test after about a half hour by using the dspbert command:

Card: FRSM

Slot: 25 (lower bay, so an SRM must reside in the lower bay)

Line: 1

Pattern: all zeroes

Loopback: local

Enable: (start the test)

JANUS1.7.PXM.a > dspbertcap 25.1 1

Pattern List:
-------------
         1: allZeros,           2: allOnes,            3: altOneZero,
         4: doubleAltOnesZeros  6: oneIn8,             8: threeIn24,
        18: twoE9MinusOne,     20: twoE11MinusOne     21: twoE15MinusOne,
        24: twoE20MinusOne,    25: twoE20MinusOneQRSS 28: twoE23MinusOne 

Device to loop options supported:
---------------------------------

         FarEnd Loopback: All listed patterns supported
                 12: lineInband,     13: lineLoopbackESF
                 18: smartJackInband  -Supported only on SRME

         Local Loopback: All listed patterns supported
                 14: localLoopback

         No Loopback: All listed patterns supported
                 15: noLoopbackCode

Use cnfbert and delbert cli to configure and delete bert

JANUS1.7.PXM.a > cnfbert -cbif 25.1.0 -pat 1 -lpbk 14 -en 4

        Successfully configured. 

JANUS1.7.PXM.a > dspbert 1

        Start Date                      : 05/07/2002
        Current Date                    : 05/07/2002
        Start Time                      : 15:41:11
        Current Time                    : 16:15:00
        Physical Slot Number            : 25
        Logical Slot Number             : 25
        Line Number                     : 1 (Line test)
        Device To Loop                  : Local Loopback
        BERT Pattern                    : All Zeroes Pattern
        Error Inject Count              : 0
        Bit Count                       : 3107466159
        Bit Count Received              : 3107466159
        Bit Error Count                 : 0
        Bit Error Rate (BER)            : 0

BERT is in sync.

cnfcbclk

Configure Cellbus Clock—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfcbclk command lets you specify whether a Cellbus runs at the default of 21 MHz or the double-speed rate of 42 MHz. Not every Cellbus (and the card slots it supports) can receive the double-speed clock, so use the dspcbclk to see whether a particular Cellbus can run at 42 MHz. The application of dspcbclk and cnfcbclk is the clocking for the Route Processor Module (RPM). The RPM runs much more efficiently at 42 Mhz.

The backplane has 8 Cellbuses: 6 Cellbuses support 2 card slots and can support 21 MHz or 42 MHz clocking. Two of the Cellbuses (CB4 and CB8) support 6 cards slots and can receive only the 21 MHz clock. See the dspcbclk output in the Example section.


Note If you use the cnfndparms command to enable automatic setting of the Cellbus clock rate, the switch blocks you from setting it with the cnfcbclk command.


Syntax

cnfcbclk <cellBus> <clockRate>

Syntax Description

cellBus

Specifies the Cellbus. Enter a string in the range CB1-CB8. The string is not case-sensitive.

clockRate

Specifies a clock rate of 21 MHz or 42 MHz. Enter either "21" or "42."


Related Commands

dspcbclk

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SUPER_GP


Example

To determine which slots can run at a higher rate, display the current Cellbus clock configuration. The display shows that all Cellbuses currently have the default speed of 21 Mhz.

pop20two.8.PXM.a > dspcbclk

     CellBus    Rate (MHz)    Slots     Allowable Rates (MHz)
    ----------------------------------------------------------
       CB1         21        1, 2            21, 42
       CB2         21        3, 4            21, 42
       CB3         21        5, 6            21, 42
       CB4         21        17 - 22         21
       CB5         21        9, 10           21, 42
       CB6         21        11, 12          21, 42
       CB7         21        13, 14          21, 42
       CB8         21        25 - 30         21

Configure a double-speed clock for Cellbus 5, then check the configuration.

pop20two.8.PXM.a > cnfcbclk cb5 42

pop20two.8.PXM.a > dspcbclk

     CellBus    Rate (MHz)    Slots     Allowable Rates (MHz)
    ----------------------------------------------------------
       CB1         21        1, 2            21, 42
       CB2         21        3, 4            21, 42
       CB3         21        5, 6            21, 42
       CB4         21        17 - 22         21
       CB5         42        9, 10           21, 42
       CB6         21        11, 12          21, 42
       CB7         21        13, 14          21, 42

CB8 21 25 - 30 21

cnfcdmode

Configure Card Mode—PXM1E

The cnfcdmode command lets you specify the mode of the lower-speed lines on the PXM1E UNI/NNI back card. (It does not apply to the OC3c/SDH or higher speed lines.)


Note Use this command only before the applicable card is provisioned.


On the combination back card (FRU-T3E3-OC3), you can specify whether all lower-bandwidth lines operate as one of the following:

T3

E3

On the T1/E1 back card (RBBN-16-T1E1), you can specify whether all lower-bandwidth lines operate as one of the following:

T1 (the default)

E1


Note To see the back card type, use the dspcd or dspcds command. To see the current line type, use the dsplns command.


Syntax

cnfcdmode <mode>

Syntax Description

mode

The mode is a number in the range 1-4.

1 for T1

2 for E1

3 for T3

4 for E3


Related Commands

dsplns, dspcd, dspcds

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active, standby

Privilege: GROUP1


cnfcdstat

Configure Card Statistics—PXM1E

The cnfcdstat command lets you configure the TFTP bucket statistics for the entire UNI/NNI back card. Parts of the configuration control the bucket interval and the collection interval. These parameters affect the generation of the files that contain statistics and that are transferred to the Cisco WAN Manager (CWM) via FTP.

The card statistics level (stats level) cannot be set if a configuration exists on the lines, such as logical ports. You must set the stats level before you can add any logical ports. However, you can set the bucket interval and the collection interval after you have added logical ports.

Enabling statistics effects performance. Statistical counters use up bandwidth, which reduces the amount of bandwidth available for connections. The PXM1E provides statistical alarms to help control the amount of bandwidth used for statistics.

Statistical alarms are different than integrated alarms. An integrated alarm indicates a persistent traffic loss at either the local end, such as the LOS and LOF alarms, or at the remote end, such as the RDI alarm.

A statistical alarm indicates that a statistical counter has exceeded the threshold for alarm indication. For instance, the Severely Errored Seconds (SES) counter might exceed the corresponding 15-minute threshold. For this condition, a statistical alarm is raised, which indicates a degraded performance that is not due to persistent traffic loss.

Statistical alarms are based on fixed statistics collection intervals. There are two types of fixed statistics collection intervals:

15-minute

24-hour

The start of an interval is aligned to the time of day. For instance, 11:15, 11:30, 11:45, etc. At the end of the interval, the corresponding statistical alarms are cleared. An alarm is raised again if a counter exceeds the threshold during the new interval.

Types of Card Statistics

The types of card statistics that are reported, and at which levels, are shown in the following tables.

Table 2-8 Statistics Port To Backplane Ingress Per Connection 

Statistic
Level 2
Level 3

All Cells from the port (before policer)

yes

yes

CLP0 cells from port (before policer)

yes

yes

CLP1 cells from port (before policer)

yes

yes

CLP0 non compliant cells

yes

yes

CLP1 non compliant cells

yes

yes

Total non compliant cells

yes

yes

VC queue depth (scheduled conns only)

yes

yes

VS/VD ACR (scheduled conns only)

yes

yes

EFCI=1 cells from the port

yes

yes

EOF=1 cells from the port

yes

yes

Rm cells from the port (RM cells after the policer stats level3, RM cells queued for stats level2)

yes

yes

OAM cells from port

no

yes

All cells to the backplane

yes

yes

CLP0 cells to the backplane

yes

yes

CLP1 cells to the backplane

yes

yes

EFCI=1 cells to the backplane

yes

yes

Rm cells to the backplane

no

yes

OAM cells to the backplane

no

yes

All cells discarded due to queue overflow

yes

yes

CLP0 cells discarded due to queue overflow

yes

yes

CLP1 cells discarded due to queue overflow

yes

yes

EOF=1 cells discarded due to queue overflow

yes

yes

EFCI=1 cells discarded due to queue overflow

yes

yes

RM cells discarded due to queue overflow

no

yes

OAM cells discarded due to queue overflow

no

yes


Table 2-9 Statistics Backplane To Port Egress Per Connection 

Statistic
Level 2
Level 3

All cells to the port

yes

yes

CLP0 Cells to Port

yes

yes

CLP1 Cells to Port

yes

yes

VC queue depth (scheduled conns only)

yes

yes

VS/VD ACR (scheduled conns only)

yes

yes

EFCI=1 cells to the port

yes

yes

EOF=1 cells to the port

yes

yes

Rm cells to the port

yes

yes

OAM cells to the port

no

yes

All cells from the bus

yes

yes

CLP0 cells from the bus

yes

yes

CLP1 cells from the bus

yes

yes

EFCI=1 cells from the bus

yes

yes

Rm cells from the bus

no

yes

OAM cells from the bus

no

yes

All cells discarded due to queue overflow

yes

yes

CLP0 cells discarded due to queue overflow

yes

yes

CLP1 cells discarded due to queue overflow

yes

yes

EOF=1 cells discarded due to queue overflow

no

no

EFCI=1 cells discarded due to queue overflow

yes

yes

RM cells discarded due to queue overflow

no

yes

OAM cells discarded due to queue overflow

no

yes


Syntax

cnfcdstat -i <bucket interval> -ci <collection interval> -sl <stats level> -ed <1 | 2>

Syntax Description

-i

For the bucket interval, type the whole word "five," "ten," and so on to select the number of minutes to wait before starting the next bucket.

five: 5 minutes

ten:10 minutes

fifteen: 15 minutes

twenty: 20 minutes

thirty: 30 minutes

sixty: 60 minutes

-ci

For the collection interval, type the entire word "one" or "five."

one: 1 minute

five: 5 minutes

Default: 0

-sl

For card stats level, type a "1," "2," or "3."

enable/disable

Type the entire word "enable" or "disable."

Default: disable


Related Commands

dspcdstatcnf

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example

PXM1E_SJ.7.PXM.a > cnfcdstat -i ten -ci one -sl 1 -ed enable

cnfcdvtdft

Configure Cell Delay Variation Tolerance Default—PXM45, PXM1E

For all connections of a particular service type on a PNNI logical port, cnfcdvtdft configures the default number of microseconds for the cell delay variation tolerance (CDVT). The direction is ingress. The new configuration applies to new incoming calls but not existing calls. You can execute cnfcdvtdft whether the port is in the provisioning state (prior to addport on the service module) or administratively up.

Syntax

cnfcdvtdft <portid> <service_category> [microseconds]

Syntax Description

portid

The format of the PNNI physical port identifier can vary, as follows:

On a PXM45: slot:subslot.port:subport

On a PXM1E for UNI/NNI back card: slot:subslot.port:subport. On the UNI/NNI back card, the subslot is always 2, but the slot depends on the chassis, as follows:

In an MGX 8850 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 7.

In an MGX 8830 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 1.

On a PXM1E for a narrowband service module (NBSM): slot.port.

For more details, see the section, "PNNI Format," in "Introduction."

service_category

Service type: cbr, rtvbr, nrtvbr, ubr, or abr.

micro seconds

The number of microseconds for CDVT.

Range: 0-2147483647

Default: 250,000


Related Commands

dspcdvtdft

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Examples

Specify a CDVT of 125000 microseconds for ABR connections on port 4:1.1:11. Check the results by executing dspcdvtdft for the port.

Geneva.7.PXM.a >   cnfcdvtdft 4:1.1:11 abr 125000

Geneva.7.PXM.a > dspcdvtdft 4:1.1:11 

              cbr:     rt-vbr:    nrt-vbr:        ubr:        abr:
CDVT:       250000      250000      250000      250000     125000

Geneva.7.PXM.a >

cnfcli

Configure CLI—PXM45. PXM1E

The cnfcli command is the CLI portion of a feature that lets you modify the user privilege (or access) level of one or more commands. The other portions of the feature involve text file creation on a workstation and transferring that file to the switch. For a significant number of commands, you cannot modify the privilege. A list of these commands appears in the section, "Restrictions."

The cnfcli command converts an ASCII text file containing privilege changes to a binary file and applies it to the commands whose privilege you have changed. The ASCII file is created on a workstation by using "vi" or any other text editor. Subsequently, you FTP the file to a TEMP directory on the node.

On the active PXM, the cnfcli command can do one of the following tasks according to the parameters:

It can convert the ASCII file to a binary file then install the new access levels on that PXM.

It can cause all changed privilege levels to revert to the default privilege levels.

It can uninstall modified privileges from all slots in the switch.


Note Although the cnfcli command runs on the AXSM, it does so for debugging purposes only. Therefore, only its operation on the PXM is documented.


Feature Details

The following list describes details for this feature.

The feature supports one ASCII file per switch. This file contains commands for the whole node and all card types and any changed privileges. Use FTP to copy this file to the switch.

When you modify a command privilege, commands of the same name across all card types receive the same access level.

For all standby cards redundant pairs, the privilege changes apply.

The binary file is protected by an authentication signature generated from the binary file through a 64-bit key DES authentication encryption algorithm.

The installed changes are persistent. The binary file is saved on the active PXM hard disk and replicated on the standby hard disk during installation.

If you cause privileges to revert to the original, default privileges, this change is not persistent.

If you add a PXM or service module after modifying command privileges, the installed card automatically takes the privileges from the binary file on disk when the card comes up.

For privilege changes to become effective when a card comes up, the binary modification file must reside on disk. If the file does not exist on the disk or the computed authentication signature does not match that of the file when you run cnfcli, the switch uses the default command access levels.

The dspcli command shows privilege changes for commands on the card where you run dspcli. For example, using the dspcli command on a PXM shows only the affected commands that are available on the PXM. To see affected commands on an AXSM, use dspcli on that AXSM.

The following commands are also relevant to this feature:

The saveallcnf command saves the binary file.

The restoreallcnf command restores the saved binary file.

The clrallcnf command deletes the binary file.

Restrictions

This section lists the restrictions on the use of the cnfcli command.

You cannot change a command's privilege level to CISCO_GP.

Only the switch software can generate the binary file. Any manual changes invalidate the file.

If the binary file becomes corrupt, the command access levels revert back to the defaults during card bring-up. To recover, repeat the installation process.

The switch verifies command names in the ASCII file against the unchangeable commands listed in this section, but an invalid command name you enter in the ASCII file could be parsed and added to the binary file. The switch would ignore this invalid name.

If replication to the hard drive on the standby PXM fails, the whole installation process fails.

The following list shows the commands whose privilege you cannot change.

?

clrdisk

cnfuser

dbgswover

dsplmilink

loadrev

abortoffline-
diag

clrlmitrace

commitrev

dbxclierrcode

dsplmitrace

logout

abortrev

clrlncnt

copychans

delallcon

dspmempart

memShow

addtrapmgr

clrsmcnf

copycons

delallusers

dspmsgq

offdiagcstat

adduser

clrsmcnf

core

delcons

dspmsgqs

offdiagstat

bootChange

cnfatlasln-
diagstat

dbgaddilmi-
addr

delsigdiag

dspportdbgcnf

ondiagcstat

burnboot

cnfcli

dbgcon

deltrapmgr

dspportdbgcnt

ondiagstat

bye

cnfcmdabbr

dbgdelilmi-
addr

deluser

dspsem

resetcsrsem

cc

cnfcosbdbg

dbgfailspvc

diagdebug

dspsems

resetevtlogsem

ccc

cnfdiag

dbgfa

downloadflash

dspsnmp

restoreallcnf

clidbxlevel

cnfdiagall

dbgifm

dspatlasdiag-
cnfcstat

dsptask

runrev

clrallcnf

cnflmitrace

dbgilmi

dspatlasdiag-
statcnf

dsptasks

saveallcnf

clrbucketcstat

cnfpasswd

dbgpncli

dspchandbgcnf

dspudpdiag-
cstat

setipconn-
debug

clrchandbgcnt

cnfportdbg

dbgpnni

dspchandbgcnt

dspudpdiag-
stat

setrev

clrcnf

cnfpswdreset

dbgpnsnmp

dspcosbdbg

exit

verifydiskdb

clrcosbdbgcnt

cnfsigdiag

dbgredman

dspcosbdbgcnf

help

 

clrdiagerr

cnfsnmp

dbgsig

dspcosbdbgcnt

lkAddr

 

clrdiagstat

cnftrapip

dbgsscop

dspdiagcnf

lkup

 

ASCII File Format

You can use any text editor to create the ASCII file. The format is one command followed by the group access level name on a line, as the following indicates:

<command name><space(s)><group access level name><carriage return>

<command name><space(s)><group access level name><carriage return>

...

<command name><space(s)><group access level name><carriage return>

The requirements and characteristics of the ASCII file are as follows:

A line must be less than 80 characters long. otherwise that command is ignored.

The access level for a command in the list of unchangeable commands does not change.

Command names and group access level names are case sensitive.

The valid access level names are SERVICE_GP, SUPER_GP, GROUP1, and ANYUSER. Commands with invalid group names are rejected.

Lines that contain a pound (#) character are processed as comments and are ignored.

The number of comments configured is logged.

The maximum number of commands in a file is 1000.

Activating This Feature

The steps for using this feature are as follows:

1. Create an ASCII text file on a workstation.

2. FTP the ASCII file (filename.txt) to the node to a temporary directory (for example, C:/TMP).

3. On the CLI of the active PXM, enter the following:

cnfcli accesslevel install
C:/TMP/filename.txt

The following events occur:

The system parses and converts file filename.txt to binary file F:/CLI/CNF/clicnf.bin, for example. (The location and name of the binary file is subject to change.)

The binary file is replicated on the standby PXM, if it exists. If no standby PXM initially exists in the switch, the file is synchronized from the active PXM when a new standby is installed.

The command access level changes go into effect on the active PXM.

The command access level changes go into effect on the standby PXM.

The command access level changes go into effect on the active and standby service modules.

4. Verify that the installation process was successful by doing the following:

The binary file exists on the active PXM disk and is replicated on the standby PXM disk.

Display the changes on each slot by entering the following at the CLI prompt:

cnfcli accesslevel display

The event log shows the number of command access levels changed for a slot.

File Locations

The binary file resides in a directory named F:/CLI/CNF/ after the installation finishes. If you do not create a binary file through the cnfcli command, no file resides in this directory.

Errors and Failure Conditions

This section lists possible errors, failures, and solutions.

If a card is unable to read the file from the disk while the card comes up, it uses the default access levels. Use the sequence cnfcli accesslevel install on the PXM to recover.

If a file has a command name that is not recognized by the run-time image, the command is ignored, and the installation continues.

If a service module does not respond back to the active PXM within a certain amount of time during the installation, the PXM logs it as a failure or time-out. In the latter case, use the sequence dspcli accesslevel to check the installation outcome and cnfcli accesslevel install to recover.

An event of minor severity is logged if installation fails during card bring-up.

CLI is a low-priority application. Thus, during the installation process initiated by the active PXM, some service modules may fail the installation. An example is when the standby PXM is coming up, where much of the CPU is used for synchronization between the active and standby PXMs.

If the binary file becomes corrupt, the command access levels revert back to the defaults during card bring-up. To recover, repeat the installation process.

Syntax

With a single iteration of the cnfcli command, you can either install the file with modified privilege levels or direct the switch to revert to the default privilege levels. The possible sequences of this command and its parameters are as follows:

cnfcli <accesslevel> <install> [full path file name]

cnfcli <accesslevel> <uninstall>

cnfcli <accesslevel> <default>

Syntax Description

accesslevel

The string "accesslevel" is a subcommand,

install

The keyword install is followed by the full path to the ASCII file.

uninstall

To uninstall the ASCII file, type the keyword uninstall.

full path
file name

The full path file name follows the keyword.

default

The string "default" is a keyword that causes the system to revert to the default access levels. Do not enter default with the install keyword or the path name.


Related Commands

ftp, dspcli

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: CISCO_GP


Example

This example consists of the following tasks:

1. Create an ASCII file named "clicnf.txt" with the privilege changes shown in the example, below. Note that some commands have associated garbage characters or no privilege, and some commands cannot take a change of privilege. The system flags these problems during cnfcli operation.

2. FTP the file to C:/TMP on the switch.

3. Apply the changed privileges by using the cnfcli command.

4. On the PXM, use the dspcli command to see the commands with modified privileges.

5. On the AXSM, use the dspcli command to see the commands with modified privileges.

6. Return to the PXM CLI and uninstall the modified privileges.

7. Go to the AXSM and run dspcli accesslevel.


clicnf.txt
***********************
cnfsct SERVICE_GP adfjafkd
cnfserialif SERVICE_GP
cnfsig SERVICE_GP
cnfsigdiag SERVICE_GP
 cnfsnmp SERVICE_GP
 cnfsntp
 cnfsntprmtsvr SERVICE_GP
cnfspvcprfx SERVICE_GP
cnfspvcres i
cnfsrmclksrc;
cnfsscop SERVICE_GP



cnfstatsmgr SERVICE_GP
cnfsvcoverride SERVICE_GP
cnftmzn SERVICE_GP
  addapsln SERVICE_GP
    addchanloop SERVICE_GP
    addcon SERVICE_GP
    addfdr SERVICE_GP
    addlmi SERVICE_GP
    addlnloop SERVICE_GP
    addpart SERVICE_GP
    addport SERVICE_GP
    addrscprtn SERVICE_GP
    arpFlush SERVICE_GP
    arpShow SERVICE_GP
    bootChange SERVICE_GP
    bye SERVICE_GP
    cc SERVICE_GP
***************************

FTP the file to C:/TMP, for example, then use that whole path name with the cnfcli command.


jeff.8.PXM.a > cnfcli accesslevel install C:/TMP/clicnf.txt
Reading input file C:/TMP/clicnf.txt...

Total of 35 lines in file:
 - 24 commands accepted
 - 5 commands found not allowed
 - 6 commands with invalid access level name
 - 0 comment lines

Converting input file to binary file...done
Writing binary file to disk...done
Updating command access levels for this slot...done
Send request to slot 7 to install...done
Send request to slot 2 to install...done
Send request to slot 6 to install...done
Send request to slot 9 to install...done
Send request to slot 10 to install...done


jeff.8.PXM.a > dspcli accesslevel
Command Name                        Current      Default     
-----------------------------------------------------------
addapsln                            SERVICE_GP   GROUP1      
addlnloop                           SERVICE_GP   GROUP1 
arpFlush                            SERVICE_GP   SUPER_GP    
arpShow                             SERVICE_GP   ANYUSER     
cnfsct                              SERVICE_GP   GROUP1      
cnfserialif                         SERVICE_GP   SUPER_GP    
cnfsig                              SERVICE_GP   GROUP1      
cnfsntprmtsvr                       SERVICE_GP   GROUP1      
cnfspvcprfx                         SERVICE_GP   SUPER_GP    
cnfsscop                            SERVICE_GP   GROUP1      
cnfsvcoverride                      SERVICE_GP   SUPER_GP    
cnftmzn                             SERVICE_GP   SUPER_GP    

12 command access levels changed.

jeff.8.PXM.a > cc 2                                         

(session redirected)

jeff.2.AXSM.a > dspcli accesslevel
Command Name                        Current      Default     
-----------------------------------------------------------
addapsln                            SERVICE_GP   GROUP1      
addcon                              SERVICE_GP   GROUP1      
addfdr                              SERVICE_GP   GROUP1      
addlmi                              SERVICE_GP   GROUP1      
addlnloop                           SERVICE_GP   GROUP1 
addpart                             SERVICE_GP   GROUP1      
addport                             SERVICE_GP   GROUP1      
addrscprtn                          SERVICE_GP   GROUP1 
arpFlush                            SERVICE_GP   SUPER_GP    
arpShow                             SERVICE_GP   ANYUSER     

10 command access levels changed.

jeff.2.AXSM.a > cc 8

(session redirected)

jeff.8.PXM.a > cnfcli accesslevel uninstall                 
Uninstall command access levels for this slot...done
Send request to slot 7 to uninstall...done
Send request to slot 2 to uninstall...done
Send request to slot 6 to uninstall...done
Send request to slot 9 to uninstall...done
Send request to slot 10 to uninstall...done

jeff.8.PXM.a > cc 2

(session redirected)


jeff.2.AXSM.a > dspcli accesslevel
Command Name                        Current      Default     
-----------------------------------------------------------

0 command access levels changed.

cnfclkparms

Configure Clock Parameters—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfclkparms command lets you configure the signal type and cable type for E1 BITS sources. The configuration applies to both (upper and lower) lines. This command applies to manual clock distribution but not Network Clock Distribution Protocol (NCDP—see cnfncdp description).


Note In the current release, you can specify only the cable type.


Syntax

cnfclkparms <signal type> <cable type>

Syntax Description

signal type

Specifies whether the signal type for the clock is data or a synchronization signal. Enter a 1 for data or a 2 for synchronization.

Note In the current release, the synchronization type is not supported.

cable type

Specifies whether the cable is a twisted pair or a coaxial cable. Enter a 1 for twisted pair or 2 for coaxial.

Default: 1 (twisted pair)


Related Commands

None

Attributes

Log: no

State: active

Privilege: ANYUSER


Example

Set the cable type to coaxial then check it.

Unknown.8.PXM.a > cnfclkparms 1 2

Unknown.8.PXM.a > dspclkparms
BITS Cable Type:        Coaxial

BITS Signal Type: Data Mode

cnfclksrc

Configure Clock Source—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfclksrc command lets you configure a primary or secondary clock source for the node. This command supports the manual clock distribution mode—where the primary and secondary clock sources must be configured at each switch. To enable the automatic clock distribution provided by the Network Clock Distribution Protocol (NCDP), use the cnfncdp command.


Note This clock configuration does not apply to the transmit clock for the lines on a Service Resource Module (if the SRM if configured with physical lines). Use the cnfsrmclksrc command for SRM lines,


A clock source can be:

An external device that connects to the PXM-UI S3 card

An NNI port on the PXM1E UNI/NNI back card

An NNI port on an active service module

Clock Operation

When a switch first powers up, the internal oscillator on the PXM provides the clock to the node. Thereafter, you can configure the clock sources at each node according to a well-designed plan for network synchronization.

A typical configuration for a network starts with a Building Integrated Timing System (BITS) clock source of stratum 3 or higher on one of the switches. Therefore, the node with the BITS clock becomes the master clock source for the network. The active clock drives the clock line on the backplane, and each service module takes its clock from this line. Thereafter, the clock goes out through every line to other switches in the network. At the other switches, you can configure one of the lines to be the primary or secondary clock source for that switch.

(For a description of line-level looped timing, refer to the cnfln description. With looped timing, a clock arrives on a line and is redirected to become the transmit clock for only that line.)

Prerequisites to Clock Configuration

Whether it uses BITS or an NNI line for a clock source, the node first must have a network controller. See the addcontroller description. For an NNI-sourced clock, the additional prerequisites are:

Activating the applicable line through upln

Creating logical ports through addport

Creating resource partitions through addrscprtn

Database Updates and Clock Configuration

If the node has a redundant PXM, it automatically receives changes you make to the clock configuration as well as automated clock changes that occur under node management. For example, if you delete a clock source (delclksrc), the standby card automatically implements this configuration change. Also, any switch from primary to secondary source is recorded by the standby PXM.

Syntax

The syntax for cnfclksrc depends on the clock source.

For the external BITS clock:

cnfclksrc <priority> <portid>

portid has the format [shelf.]slot.port -bits e1 | t1 [-revertive <enable | disable>]

For AXSM-sourced clock (note the positions of the periods and colons):

cnfclksrc <priority> <portid>

portid has the format [shelf.]slot:subslot.port:subport or slot.port on a PXM1E

Syntax Description

priority

The priority of the clock source is either primary or secondary. The default is primary.

portid for BITS

shelf is always 1 and is purely optional.

slot is the logical slot number 7 for a BITS circuit on the PXM UI S3 (regardless of where the active PXM resides).

port is a logical number that indicates the upper or lower external clock connector on the UI S3 back card. The logical port number for the upper connector is 35. The lower connector is 36.

bits This keyword is required once you specify slot number 7 (or 1 in an
MGX 8830 chassis) and a port number of 35 or 36 because you have identified a BITS clock source. Type the string "-bits" followed by a space then either "e1" or "t1." See "Usage Guidelines" for details.

revertive—an option that applies to only the BITS clock. Type the string "-revertive" followed by the complete word "enable" or "disable." The default is disable. See "Usage Guidelines for cnfclksrc" for important details.

portid on service module or PXM1E UNI or NNI

shelf is always 1 and is purely optional.

slot is the slot number of the service module or active PXM1E (if an NNI port on the back card is used).

subslot identifies the upper or lower bay of the back card—either a 1 for the upper bay or 2 for the lower bay (default is 1).

port is the line number on the AXSM or PXM1E UNI/NNI back card. (The specified line must already be active (see upln).

subport is the logical port number. This value is the logical port (or ifNum) that you must have assigned through addport. Also, the logical port must be known to PNNI (see dsppnports). The ranges depend on the card and model, as follows:

PXM1E: 1-31

AXSM: 1-60

AXSM-E: 1-32

For other service modules, see individual card descriptions


Usage Guidelines for cnfclksrc

The following sections contain relevant information for cnfclksrc and details about its parameters.

Specifying Primary and Secondary Clock Sources

Before using the cnfclksrc command, note the following:

The controller must have been specified by using addcontoller.

Line-sourced clocks require that the lines, ports, and resource partitioning have been configured.

A switch can have one primary source and one secondary source.

For each execution of cnfclksrc, you can specify only one clock source (either but not both primary and secondary). Therefore, you must repeat cnfclksrc to specify the other clock source.

If you do not specify a secondary source, the internal oscillator serves as the secondary source.

For clock sources on the PXM1E UNI/NNI back card or AXSM, Cisco recommends that primary and secondary sources be on separate cards or at least on separate lines. (On the PXM1E, separate cards are not possible, but separate lines are possible.)

Revertive mode applies to only a primary BITS clock. For more details on the revertive option, see the section, "Configuring a BITS Clock."

The switch constantly monitors the state of the clocks. For information on clock alarms, see the dspclkalms description.

Changing the Priority of a Clock Source

To change the priority of a clock source, the command sequence depends on the priority of the sources:

To change the priority of a clock from primary to secondary or secondary to primary, you must first use the delclksrc command to de-configure each source.

To change from one primary source to another primary source, you need to execute only cnfclksrc for the new primary source—the system automatically de-configures the existing primary source.

Responses to Clock Failures

If the current clock is the primary or secondary source and that source fails, the clock circuitry goes into holdover mode. Holdover is a standards-based response to a failed clock. In holdover, the UI-S3 card maintains the clock based on the clock signal's parameters as recorded in hardware. Even for a stratum 1 source, the UI-S3 card maintains the frequency and stability of the failed clock source for up to 24 hours. If the source does not return to use in 24 hours, the node switches to the internal oscillator.

Configuring a BITS Clock

You can configure a node to obtain its primary and secondary clocks from a BITS device connected to the PXM-UI S3. The PXM-UI S3 can support stratum levels 1-3 and has two connectors to receive these highly stable clocks from an external device. If the primary and secondary clocks are externally-sourced, they must be the same rate. For example, you cannot specify a T1 for primary and an E1 for secondary.


Note Whenever the internal oscillator becomes the primary or secondary source due to a failure, a minor alarm is triggered on the local node.


You can enable a revertive mode for the primary BITS clock. The revertive function on the PXM applies when the primary clock source fails. A failure is a loss of the primary clock source after the node has locked to that clock source. If a primary clock recovers from a failure and revertive mode is enabled, the node automatically reverts to the primary source. The restored primary clock must be available for 12 seconds before it again becomes the active clock source.

If the primary clock source fails and revertive mode is disabled, you must re-configure the primary source after the failure has been corrected.

To change the mode from revertive to non-revertive, use cnfclksrc. Follow the portID and priority with "-revertive disable."


Note For an E1 BITS clock, the current product is automatically limited to two parameters of an E1 line that is used as a BITS source: twisted pair cabling and date-type signaling.


Related Commands

dspclksrcs, delclksrc, dspclkalms, cnfclkparms, dspcurclk

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Examples

Configure the E1 clock at the upper connector of the PXM-UI S3 as the primary source. Configure subport (logical port) 10 on the line of the AXSM-1-2488 in slot 3 as the secondary. For the secondary source on the AXSM, note the locations of the periods and colons. Upon successful execution, the system displays a confirmation message.

pinnacle.7.PXM.a> cnfclksrc primary 7.35 -bits e1
Clock Manager has been successfully executed.

pinnacle.7.PXM.a> cnfclksrc secondary 3:1.1:10
Clock Manager has been successfully executed.

Configure a primary network clock to revert to the highest priority E1 clock source after recuperation from a failure. Upon successful execution, the system displays a confirmation message.

pinnacle.7.PXM.a> cnfclksrc primary 7.36 -bits e1 -revertive enable
Clock Manager has been successfully executed.

cnfcmdabbr

Configure Command Abbreviation—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfcmdabbr command lets you specify whether the CLI requires the entire name of a command or accepts the first unique string of characters that identifies a command. For example, "loa" is enough to identify loadrev if command abbreviation is enabled. (The string "lo" is not enough to identify a particular command because of the logout command.)

Syntax

cnfcmdabbr <flag>

Syntax Description

flag

A Boolean expression to enable or disable command abbreviation: enter "on" to enable or "off" to disable command abbreviation.


Related Commands

dspcmdabbr

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SERVICE_GP


Example

Enable command abbreviation, then check its status by executing dspcmdabbr.

excel.1.3.PXM.a > cnfcmdabbr on

Command Abbreviation feature being enabled

pop20one.7.PXM.a > dspcmdabbr
Command Abbreviation feature currently enabled

Test the functionality of command abbreviation by entering "loa" (for loadrev) without parameters.

pop20one.7.PXM.a > loa
ERR: Syntax: loadrev <slot> <revision>
           revision - revision number. E.g.,
                      2.0(1)
                      2.0(1.255)
                      2.0(0)I or 2.0(0)A
                      2.0(0)P1 or 2.0(0)P2

cnfcon

Configure Connection—PXM1E

The cnfcon command lets you modify the bandwidth, policing, and routing parameters of an existing endpoint. On the PXM1E, this command applies to only an SPVC or an SPVP with an endpoint that exists on the network interface (UNI/NNI) back card.The command parameters consist of:

A logical port, VPI, and VCI to identify the connection

Bandwidth parameters for the local (master) end then the remote (slave) end

Policing parameters for the connection as a whole

After you specify the mandatory connection identifier, all other parameters are optional.

Usage Guidelines for the cnfcon Command

The following sections discuss the application of certain cnfcon parameters.


Note On DAX connections, using cnfcon at the slave end has no effect. For DAX connections, use cnfcon at the master end only, and the parameters will take effect on the controller as well.


Traffic Parameters

Traffic parameters such as PCR, SCR, MBS are entered at both the master and slave endpoints for both the forward and reverse directions when you add the connection. For PCR in the cnfcon command, however, specify lpcr and rpcr at the master endpoint only (the connection manager ignores PCR entries at the slave end for the cnfcon command). Be sure that the value entered as "local" on one end is equal to the value entered as "remote" on the other end. For example, the lpcr on the slave endpoint should be same as the rpcr on the master endpoint and vice versa when you provision the connection at the other end. If you modify traffic parameters after creating an SPVC, you just modify them at either the master endpoint or the slave endpoint.

Traffic parameters such as CDV, CTD are entered at both the master and slave endpoints for both the forward and reverse directions. However, the values of these parameters entered at the slave end are ignored during call setup. Therefore, you can specify the lcdv, rcdv, lctd and rctd options at the master end only.

Routing Parameters

Routing parameter, such as maximum route cost (-mc maxcost) or the routing priority (-rtngprio routingPriority) need to be entered at the master endpoint only. The values of the parameters entered at the slave end are ignored during call setup.

You can assign a priority at the master end of an SPVC or SPVP. The PNNI controller routes higher priority connections before lower priority connections. The user-configurable range for a connection is, in descending order of priority, 1-15. The default is 8. See cnfpri-routing for a detailed description of the Priority Routing feature. Also, the cnfpri-routing command lets you configure groups of bandwidth so that the order of routing also reflects the bandwidth requirements of the connection.

If you use the cnfcon command to modify only the routing priority of a connection, PNNI does not immediately re-route the connection. Nevertheless, if you run dspcon for such a changed connection at the master endpoint, it immediately shows the changed priority even before PNNI re-routes the connection. You can also use the dsppncon command to see the priority of the SVC portion that is associated with master and slave endpoints. Note that the dsppncon command shows the new priority only after PNNI re-routes the connection.

Frame Discard

The current release supports two types of frame discard for VCCs carrying AAL5 cells. These frame discard mechanisms are policing-based and congestion-based. Policing-based frame discard depends on the -frame option in the addcon or cnfcon command. (Congestion-based policing for all cell streams is governed by settings in the current port SCT.) This -frame parameter is specified only at the master end.

When policing-based frame discard is enabled, the policer discards all cells of an AAL5 frame that follow a non-compliant cell. Specific actions for PCR and SCR non-compliance are detailed in the section, "Policer Settings and Consequences."

When congestion based frame discard is enabled in the current port-level SCT, if the arriving cells exceed an EPD threshold, the whole frame is discarded.

The table below shows the action applied to a connection according to the frame discard setting. The following information clarifies the table contents:

Frame-based policing is represented by the letter "A." This policing is specified by the -frame option in the addcon or cnfcon command.

A value of 0 for "A" means frame-based policing is disabled. It also implies that regular, cell-based policing will be in effect.

A value of 1 means frame-based policing is enabled.

Frame-based congestion management is represented by the letter "B." This congestion management is specified by the port SCT in use. (To see the SCT thresholds and SCT ID for a port, use the dspportsct command.)

A value of 0 for "B" means that the CLP Lo/Hi thresholds take effect during congestion and that discards would occur on a cell-by-cell basis.

A value of 1 implies that the EPD0/1 thresholds would take effect during congestion and that discards would occur on an AAL5 frame-basis.

Frame Discard Setting

Policer Behavior (frame discard in addcon)

Congestion Thresholds (SCT setting)

A = 0, B = 0

Cell-based policing

CLP lo/hi thresholds

A = 0, B = 1

Cell-based policing

EPD thresholds

A = 1, B = 0

Frame-based policing

CLP lo/hi thresholds

A = 1, B = 1

Frame-based policing

EPD thresholds


Restrictions

Frame discard applies to connections that use ATM AAL5 adaptation (ITU-T I.363.5). Although enabling frame discard on an AAL5 cell stream is not mandatory, it helps improve the useful throughput on a VC by discarding complete frames during times of congestion on the switch. Without frame discard enabled on an AA5 cell stream, corrupted AAL5 frames (containing dropped cells) can reach upper layers and trigger numerous re-sends. Conversely, enabling frame discard on other (non-AAL5) types of cell streams can bring uncertain results. In a worst case, total discard of end-to-end traffic of a non-AAL5 stream can occur in either direction.

The hardware does not support frame-based discard on VPCs. Only VCCs support frame-based discard.


Note An important caveat exists for VPCs that were added with frame discard enabled prior to version 3.0.23 or 4.0.10 (the releases where the two types of frame discard became available). The switch lets you enable frame discard on a VPC even though hardware does not support it. If such a VPC (with frame discard enabled) already exists on the node when you upgrade to 3.0.23, 4.0.10, or later, you cannot subsequently modify the VPC unless you delete it then re-add it with frame discard disabled. To avoid the need to delete a VPC, you must disable frame discard on any such VPCs before upgrading to 3.0.23, 4.0.10, or later releases.


Policer Settings and Consequences

This section describes two types of conformance tests that occur when you enable frame discard through this frame discard parameter. The tests are PCR and SCR conformance tests.

The PCR conformance test is performed using GCRA1 in exactly the same manner as normal cell policing. For this test, the Action should be set to discard. If the PCR conformance test is deemed to be non-compliant, the action will be to discard of the cells in the current frame. In other words, a "partial packet action" can be taken when cells in the current frame fail this conformance test. The PCR conformance test implements a partial packet discard (PPD). The policer does a complete frame discard if the first cell of the packet was discarded as a result of PCR failure

The SCR conformance test is performed using GCRA2, although it differs slightly from the normal cell policing.The SCR conformance test is performed only at the start of a frame. If the first cell of a frame is a conforming CLP=0 cell, then all remaining cells will be as if they are conforming to the SCR conformance test. The SCR conformance test can be programmed to tag non-conforming CLP=0 cells. If the first cell of a frame is a non-conforming CLP=0, then that cell and all other cells in that frame (including the EOM) will be tagged. In other words, the tagged action taken by this conformance test is determined at frame boundaries only. If the SCR conformance test is programmed to discard, the policer can discard at any point in the frame and is not restricted by frame boundaries.

Local-Only Parameters

The parameters CDVT, stats enable, cc enable (specified using -cdvt, -stat, -cc) are significant only at the endpoint where you enter them. Therefore, they can be different at each end of the connection.

Syntax

cnfcon <ifNum> <vpi> <vci>
[-lpcr <local to remote PCR>] [-rpcr <remote to local PCR>] [-lscr <local to remote SCR>] [-rscr <remote to local SCR>] [-lmbs <local to remote MBS>] [-rmbs <remote to local MBS>] [-lcdv <local to remote maxCDV>] [-rcdv <remote to local maxCDV>] [-lctd <local to remote maxCTD>] [-rctd <remote to local maxCTD>] [-cc <OAM CC Cnfg>] [-lmcr <local to remote MCR>] [-rmcr <remote to local MCR>] [-cdvt <local CDVT>] [-cc <OAM CC Cnfg>] [-stat <Stats Cnfg>] [-frame <frame discard>] [-mc <Max Cost>] [-segep <OAM segment endpoint>] [-lputil <local -> remote PUtil>] [-rputil <remote -> local PUtil>] [-rtngprio <routingPriority>] [-prefrte <preferredRouteId>] [-directrte <directRoute>]

Syntax Description

If you modify a point-to-point (P2MP) connection, all parties on that connection are re-routed. The "Cast-type" field in the dspcon output shows whether the connection is P2P or P2MP.


Note Although the help data shows that this command has a parameter for OAM continuity check (OAM CC), the PXM1E does not support this parameter.


ifNum

The logical interface (or port) number. This ifNum corresponds to the ifNum added through the addport command. The range is 1-31.

Note When you add an endpoint on an NNI, make sure that PNNI signaling is disabled on the PXM (cnfpnportsig <portid> -nniver none).

vpi

Virtual path identifier value in the range 0-255 (UNI) or 0-4095 (NNI or VNNI). For VNNI, specify one VPI per port.

vci

Virtual connection identifier (VCI):

For a VCC on a UNI, the range is 1-4095. On an NNI or VNNI, the VCI range is 1-65535. For MPLS, the recommended minimum VCI is 35.

For a VPC, the vci is 0.

-lpcr

Local peak cell rate (PCR). Specifies the PCR from a local endpoint to a remote endpoint (3-5651328 cells per second). PCR is the maximum cell rate for the connection at any time.

Note For the cnfcon command, the switch uses lpcr and rpcr at the master endpoint only. If you specify lpcr and rpcr at the slave endpoint, they are ignored.

-rpcr

Remote peak cell rate (PCR). Specifies the PCR from a remote endpoint to a local endpoint (3-5651328 cells per second). PCR is the maximum cell rate for the connection at any time.

Note For the cnfcon command, the switch uses lpcr and rpcr at the master endpoint only. If you specify lpcr and rpcr at the slave endpoint, they are ignored.

-lscr

Local sustained cell rate (SCR). Specifies the SCR from a local endpoint to a remote endpoint (3-5651328 cells per second). SCR is the maximum cell rate that a connection can sustain for long periods.

-rscr

Remote sustained cell rate (SCR). Specifies the SCR from a remote endpoint to a local endpoint (3-5651328 cells per second). SCR is the maximum cell rate that a connection can sustain for long periods.

-lmbs

Local maximum burst size (MBS). Specifies the MBS from a local endpoint to a remote endpoint (1-5000000 cells). MBS is the maximum number of cells that can burst at the PCR and still be compliant.

-rmbs

Remote maximum burst size (MBS). Specifies the MBS from a remote endpoint to a local endpoint (1-5000000 cells). MBS is the maximum number of cells that can burst at the PCR and still be compliant.

-cdvt

Local cell delay variation tolerance (CDVT). Specifies the CDVT from a local endpoint to a remote endpoint (1-5000000 microseconds). Cell Delay Variation Tolerance controls the time scale over which the PCR is policed.

Note that no remote CDVT is necessary.

-lcdv

The local cell delay variation (CDV) parameter specifies the peak to peak CDV from the local endpoint to the remote endpoint. The range is 1-16777215 microseconds.

To revert to the default value for this parameter, type "-1."

-rcdv

The remote cell delay variation (CDV) parameter specifies the peak to peak CDV from the remote endpoint to the local endpoint. The range is 1-16777215 microseconds.

To revert to the default value for this parameter, type "-1."

-lctd

Local cell transfer delay (CTD). This parameter specifies the CTD from a local endpoint to a remote endpoint. The range is 0-65535 milliseconds.

To revert to the default value for this parameter, type "-1."

-rctd

Remote cell transfer delay (CTD). This parameter specifies the CTD from the remote endpoint to the local endpoint. The range is 0-65535 milliseconds.

To revert to the default value for this parameter, type "-1."

-cc

Operations, administration, and maintenance continuity check (OAM CC):

1: enable

0: disable

Continuity checking involves a round trip of an OAM cell simply to confirm that both directions of the connection are intact.

To provision continuity checking, enable this function at both ends of the connection, otherwise a connection alarm results. When you add a connection and include this parameter, the connection goes into alarm until both ends of the connection are added.

Note that a non-zero AIS delay timer affects CC functionality (if enabled) during the intentional re-routing of a connection following the optrte or cnfrteopt command. (See the cnfaisdelaytimer description for details of this AIS-delay feature.) If the delay timer is configured and the connection is groomed, the switch turns of CC until the connection is re-routed.

Default: 0

-stat

Statistics collection: enter 1 to enable or 0 to disable. The default is 0.

The Cisco WAN Manager tool collects statistics for a connection if you enable it here. Statistics collection is disabled for all connections by default. Statistics collection has an impact (which may not be significant) on the real-time response, especially for SVCs (which can be affected even though you do not add SVCs). Therefore, you should enable statistics collection for only the subset of connections that really warrants such a feature.

-frame

This option lets you enable or disable frame-based policing and discard for the VCC (no VPCs). See the section, "Frame Discard," for more details on frame discard.

Note This -frame parameter is specified only at the master end.

Possible values:

1 to enable

0 to disable

Default: 0 (disabled)

-mc

Maximum cost (maxcost): a value that creates a priority for the connection route. The switch can select a route if the cost does not exceed maxcost. The range for maxcost is 0-4294967295. If you do not specify maxcost, the connection has the highest routing priority by default. Therefore, the maxcost parameter lets you lower the routing priority of a connection. Note the following effects of values in the maxcost range:

To assign the highest priority to an SPVC based on cost (any path is acceptable), use the default of 4294967295. If you do not specify maxcost, the cost appears as a -1 in the dspcon output. (You cannot enter a -1 for maxcost in the addcon command, but display commands generally can show unspecified values as -1.).

Enter a 0 for optimal (or least expensive) path.

For any non-zero maxcost, PNNI allows a path if the total cost for all links does not exceed maxcost.

Although maxcost applies to an individual connection, routing costs substantially depend on a cost-per-link that you specify at every PNNI logical port in the network. The applicable PNNI command is cnfpnni-intf.

The cost of a route is as follows:

routing cost=sum of all costs-per-link

where:

The cost-per-link has been specified through cnfpnni-intf at the egress of each logical port under PNNI control throughout the network. The impact of cost-per-link is cumulative, not just local.

Each link has two egress points: one going to the far endpoint, and one in the return direction. The cost-per-link can differ in each direction, so the switch adds the cost-per-link in each egress instead multiplying cost by two.

The cost-per-link applies to all connections of a particular service type on a port. For example, the cost-per-link is the same for all VBR.1 connections that PNNI controls on a port, and this cost can differ from all UBR.1 connections on the same port. Alternatively, you can use cnfpnni-intf to make the cost-per-link the same for all service types.

To illustrate by examining a four-link route:

1. You specify a maxcost of 100000.

2. A route under consideration has four links for a total of eight egress points.

3. The cost-per-link at 6 ports is 5040 (the default) and 10000 at 2 ports.

The route is usable because the cost of 50240 is less than the maxcost of 100000.

Default: 4294967295 The default makes maxcost meaningless for the connection, so PNNI does not use it as a routing metric.

Note To return maxcost to the default, use the cnfcon command with the parameter -mc 4294967295.

-lputil

Local Percentage Utilization: Range 1-100. The default is 100.

-rputil

Remote Percentage Utilization: Range 1-100. The default is 100.

-rtngprio

You can modify the priority of this connection. The descending range of priorities is 1-15. The default is 8. See the cnfpri-routing description for details on this feature.

-prefrte

This option modifies the preferred route association to the connection. Use this optional parameter at the master endpoint only. See the addpref description for details about the preferred route feature.

To disassociate a connection from a route, type a 0 for this parameter.


Note An SPVC can be associated with one preferred route. For an XPVC, you can associate the preferred route with only the SPVC portion of the XPVC.


Range: 0-65535

Default: 0

-directrte

This parameter specifies whether the connection can take only the preferred route associated through the -prefrte parameter. Use this optional parameter at the master endpoint only. To remove the directed route requirement from the connection, specify a 0 for this parameter. The possible values are as follows:

1: yes (make the preferred route required)

0: no (do not require the connection to take the preferred route)

Default: no (0)


Related Commands

addcon, delcon, dspcon, dspcons, dspconstats, cnfpri-route, addpref, cnfpref

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Examples

In the first example, enable OAM CC in the connection with a VPI and VCI of 10 40 on interface 1.

MGX8850.7.PXM1E.a > cnfcon 1 10 40 -cc 1
Configuration successful

Assign a routing priority of 3 to the connection with a VPI and VCI of 102 and 102, respectively, on interface number 1. Check the result by using the dspcon command.

M8850_LA.7.PXM1E.a > cnfcon 1 102 102 -rtngprio 3
Configuration successful

M8850_LA.7.PXM1E.a > dspcon 3:1.1:1 102 102
Port                   Vpi Vci             Owner      State      Persistency
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Local  3:1.1:1         102.102             MASTER     FAIL       Persistent
       Address: 47.00918100000100001a531c2a.000001031801.00
       Node name: M8850_LA
Remote Routed          102.102             SLAVE       --        Persistent
       Address: 47.00918100000200036b5e30cd.000001011802.00
       Node name: 

-------------------- Provisioning Parameters -------------------- 
Connection Type: VCC          Cast Type: Point-to-Point      
Service Category: CBR         Conformance: CBR.1     
Bearer Class: BCOB-X    
Last Fail Cause: unallocated (unassigned) number        Attempts: 20055
Continuity Check: Disabled    Frame Discard: Disabled 
L-Utils: 100   R-Utils: 100   Max Cost: -1    Routing Cost: 0
OAM Segment Ep: Enabled 
Priority: 3 

cnfconsegep

Configure Connection Segment Endpoint—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfconsegep command lets you configure a segment endpoint for an SVC or SVP on a via node. Its purpose is to support a particular troubleshooting scheme. After you create an endpoint, you can use the tstdelay command and specify the endpoint created with the cnfconsegep command. The Example section shows how to use tstdelay and conntrace in conjunction with the cnfconsegep command.

You can specify more than one endpoint as long as each one complies with the requirements of the cnfconsegep command, as follows:

Before using the cnfconsegep command, be sure continuity checking is de-activated. If you leave checking on, a continuity failure occurs for the connection.

When both the VPI and the VCI are present, the segment endpoint is an F5 flow endpoint (for VCCs). When the optional VCI is not present, the segment endpoint is an F4 flow endpoint (for VPCs). Use the cnfconsegep command only for established calls.

The endpoints must be part of an SVC or SVP. For an SPVC, you can specify only the SVC endpoints within the SPVC. The controller determines if either side (from its perspective) is an SPVC or SPVP and rejects the command if either endpoint belongs to an SPVC or SPVP. For an SPVC, you can use the cnfconsegep command if one or more via nodes exist in the connection path. (See Figure 2-5.)

In Figure 2-5, an SPVC has endpoints at UNI1 and UNI12. You can use cnfconsegep to configure segment endpoints at NNI2, NNI3, NNI4, and NNI5. You cannot configure segment endpoints at UNI1, UNI12, NNI1, and NNI6. After you configure any of these endpoints, you could verify the electrical integrity by using the tstdelay command from UNI1 or UNI12 to each of NNI2, NNI3, NNI4, or NNI5. After you finish troubleshooting, remove all segment endpoints by using delconsegep for each endpoint.

Figure 2-5 Configurable Endpoints for the cnfconsegep Command

Syntax

cnfconsegep <portid> <vpi> [vci]

Syntax Description

portid

The format of the PNNI physical port identifier can vary, as follows:

On a PXM45: slot:subslot.port:subport

On a PXM1E for UNI/NNI back card: slot:subslot.port:subport. On the UNI/NNI back card, the subslot is always 2, but the slot depends on the chassis, as follows:

In an MGX 8850 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 7.

In an MGX 8830 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 1.

On a PXM1E for a narrowband service module (NBSM): slot.port.

For more details, see the section, "PNNI Format," in "Introduction."

vpi

VPI of the connection.

vci

VCI of the connection.


Related Commands

cnfoamsegep, dspoamsegep, delconsegep, dspconsegep

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example

This example shows how the cnfconsegep, conntrace, and tstdelay commands can work to show a point of failure.

9:1.1:1 on "tokyo"

9:1.1:1 on "fiorano"

9:1.2:2 on "tokyo"

9:1.2:2 on "auckland"

9:1.3:3 on "auckland"

9:1.1:3 on "fiorano"

In this network, the following have also been established:

UNI port 9:1.8:8 on "tokyo"

UNI port 9:1.8:8 on "auckland"

A connection between these two ports has a VPI/VCI of 66/66.

Check the connection path by using the conntrace command then displaying the trace results with the dspconntracebuffer command. Note that the dspconntracebuffer command does not use keywords. As expected, it traverses the direct link (PhysPortId=9:1.2:2 as shown in the output display), as follows:

tokyo.8.PXM.a > conntrace 9:1.8:8 -vpi 66 -vci 66

tokyo.8.PXM.a > dspconntracebuffer 9:1.8:8 66 66
Result:SUCCESS  Reason: N/
InterfaceId:9:1.8:8
Originating Interface VPI : 66
Originating Interface VCI : 66
Originating Interface Call Ref : 1
    NodeId                                          EgressPort   VPI    VCI  CallRef
  56:160:47.00918100000000107b65f448.00107b65f448.01 17373186        0     35        1 
PhysPortId=9:1.2:2
  56:160:47.00918100000000309409f3bb.00309409f3bb.01      0
  Terminating Interface VPI : 66
  Terminating Interface VCI : 66
  Terminating Interface Call Ref : 1

To continue this example, the following tasks are performed:

1. To force the connection to take the longer route (using node "fiorano"), use the dnpnport command to administratively down PNNI port 9:1.2:2.

2. Repeat the connection trace for 66/66 on UNI port 9:1.8:8 on node "tokyo." The physical port ID now is 9:1.1:1. Note that 66/66 mapped to 0/36 on 9:1.1:1.

3. Use the uppnport command to bring the port back into service.

tokyo.8.PXM.a > dnpnport 9:1.2:2

tokyo.8.PXM.a > conntrace 9:1.8:8 -vpi 66 -vci 66
 
  Result:SUCCESS  Reason: N/A
  InterfaceId:9:1.8:8
  Originating Interface VPI : 66
  Originating Interface VCI : 66
  Originating Interface Call Ref : 2
    NodeId                                          EgressPort   VPI    VCI  CallRef
  56:160:47.00918100000000107b65f448.00107b65f448.01 17373185        0     36        2 
PhysPortId=9:1.1:1
  56:160:47.00918100000000309409f3b8.00309409f3b8.01 17373187        0     41        1 
PhysPortId=9:1.3:3
  56:160:47.00918100000000309409f3bb.00309409f3bb.01      0
  Terminating Interface VPI : 66
  Terminating Interface VCI : 66
  Terminating Interface Call Ref : 2
 
tokyo.8.PXM.a > uppnport 9:1.2:2

Configure a connection segment endpoint by using the following values on node "fiorano:"

The PNNI port ID is 9:1.1:1.

The VPI/VCI is 0/35—the mapped value observed in the last display of the conntrace command.

fiorano.7.PXM.a > cnfconsegep 9:1.1:1 0 36
PortId: 0.9:1.1:1      Vpi:      0     Vci:     36 
 The connection is configured as a segment end point.

On the CLI of the AXSM in slot 9, use the tstdelay command to measure the required time for sending OAM cells to the far-end and back. From the PNNI physical port ID 9:1.8:8, you know to cc to slot 9 and specify ifNum 8. (Note that Cisco does not recommend using the tstdelay command for acquiring an accurate measurement of the round trip delay. Its function is better suited to confirming the existence of the connection path.)

tokyo.9.AXSM.a > tstdelay 8 66 66
 tstdelay is in progress.
 Connection Id    Test Type    Direction    Result     Round Trip Delay
 =============    =========    =========    =======    ================
 08.0066.00066:    OAM Lpbk     ingress     Success         128 microsec

Delete the configuration of the segment endpoint then measure the round trip delay.

fiorano.7.PXM.a > delconsegep 9:1.1:1 0 36
PortId: 0.9:1.1:1      Vpi:      0     Vci:     36 
 The connection is configured as NOT a segment end point.
tokyo.9.AXSM.a > tstdelay 8 66 66
 tstdelay is in progress.
 Connection Id    Test Type    Direction    Result     Round Trip Delay
 =============    =========    =========    =======    ================
 08.0066.00066:    OAM Lpbk     ingress     Success         194 microsec

Note that the round trip delay is significantly longer (194 microseconds compared to 128 microseconds in the first instance). If the OAM cells did not return to the near end, the segment where traffic was being lost would have been identified.

Also note that the configuration of segment endpoints can occur on many via nodes.

cnfcug

Configure Closed User Group—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfcug command lets you configure the barred-calls restrictions for a closed user group (CUG). CUGs are created through the addcug command. The configuration for barred calls is as follows:

No calls are barred.

With incoming calls barred, the CUG member cannot receive calls.

With outgoing calls barred, the CUG member cannot initiate calls.

Note that you cannot modify an interlock code (IC) by using the cnfcug command. To change the IC for a CUG, do the following:

1. Delete the CUG by using the delcug command.

2. Use the addcug command to re-create the CUG with a different IC.

Syntax

cnfcug <atmaddr> <length> <plan> <cug-index> -callsbarred <incoming | outgoing | none>

Syntax Description

atm-address

The NSAP or E.164 address on the local UNI interface is 20 bytes.

length

Address length. The units of measure differ for each address plan. The -plan option lets you specify E.164 or NSAP.

For an NSAP address plan, the units of measure are bits. The range is 0-160. Using the maximum of a 20-byte ATM address:

20 bytes x 8 bits per byte = 160 bits

For an E.164 address plan, the value is the number of decimal digits. If the ATM address consists of 15 digits, the value for this parameter is also 15.

plan

The plan is either NSAP or E.164 and is set when you added the address by using the addaddr command.

cug-index

The cug-index uniquely identifies the CUG on the ATM address. The maximum number of CUG indexes you can assign to an ATM address is 100.

Range: 1-65535

-callsbarred

This option lets you restrict user-calls within the CUG. (To control user calls outside the CUG, use the cnfaddrcug command.) You can determine whether CUG members are barred from receiving or making calls. The default is to bar neither type of call. Type one of the following possible words in its entirety:

incoming

outgoing

none

Default: none


Related Commands

addcug, delcug, dspcug, cnfaddrcug, clrcugdefaddr, cnfnodecug, dspaddrcug, dspcugdefaddr, dspnodecug, setcugdefaddr

Example

At ATM address 47.0091.8100.0000.0001.4444.7777 (length 104 and plan NSAP), bar incoming calls for CUG index 12.

Geneva.7.PXM.a > cnfcug 47.0091.8100.0000.0001.4444.7777 104 nsap 12 -callsbarred incoming

cnfdate

Configure Date—PXM45, PXM1E

Configure the system date. The system does not return a message unless an error occurred. To see the date, use the dspdate command.


Note The RPM requires local specification of the date on each card. Use the appropriate IOS command.


Syntax

cnfdate <mm/dd/yyyy>

Syntax Description

mm/dd/yyyy

mm is the month in the range 01-12.

dd is the day in the range 01-31.

yyyy is the year in the range 0000-9999.


Related Commands

dspdate

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SUPER_GP


Example

Set date to June 26, 2000.

excel.7.PXM.a > cnfdate 06/26/2000

cnfdiag

Configure Diagnostics—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfdiag command enables either the on-line or off-line diagnostics. It also lets you configure the settings for the start time and coverage for running the off-line diagnostics. This system blocks any attempt to apply this command to an empty slot or an unsupported card.

The cnfdiagall command is the same as cnfdiag except that it configures all slots on the card at once.


Note Do not remove the active PXM while the off-line diagnostic is running on the redundant PXM. If you remove it, the redundant PXM reboots but will not be able to become active unless its hard disk was previously synchronized to the disk on the previously active PXM.


The Purpose of the Diagnostics

The diagnostics configured by the cnfdiag command test and validate the communication paths or devices on the PXM and the service modules during periods of operation or non-operation (on-line or off-line, respectively). The diagnostics are always scheduled from the PXM controller card whether they run on the PXM or a service module.

The PXM45 has a backward-compatibility requirement to support service modules that transport ATM cells over the Cellbus. (The PXM1E supports only Cellbus-based cards and so does not have this backward compatibility issue.) The PXM45 transport ATM cells over the following two buses:

A 1.2 Gbps Cellbus (for Cellbus-based cards)

A 45 Gbps serial bus (for AXSMs)

Because of the difference between bus speeds on the backplane, the Reliability Availability Serviceability (RAS) requirements demand that diagnostics periodically run on the communications paths. Therefore, diagnostics should periodically run on both active and standby cards—especially on standby cards. Frequent testing of standby cards through diagnostics helps to ensure that when an active card fails, the standby card is ready to take the active card role immediately.

On-line Diagnostics

On-line diagnostics are nondestructive tests (that do not interfere with live traffic) and run on either an active card or a standby card. The MGX 8950, MGX 8850, and MGX 8830 switches support various on-line diagnostics tests. The sections that follow describe the tests that run on a PXM45 or PXM1E.

Off-line Diagnostics

Off-line diagnostics are destructive (interfere with traffic) and therefore run only on standby cards. These diagnostics are scheduled by using the off-line start (offStart) and off-line day-of-week (offDow) parameters. The coverage (offCover) parameter specifies the length of time that the diagnostics run.


Note When an active card fails, the shelf manager must immediately stop the diagnostics on the standby card, reset, and allow normal operation to occur.


The off-line diagnostics that can be enabled and scheduled depend on the circuitry. The sections that follow list the off-line diagnostic by card.

Syntax

cnfdiag <slot> <onEnb> <offEnb> [<offCover> <offStart> <offDow>]

Syntax Description

slot

The slot of the card for which to configure the diagnostics.

onEnb

This parameter enables or disables on-line diagnostics. Type either enable or disable.

Default: disable

offEnb

This parameter enables or disables off-line diagnostics. Type either enable or disable.

Default: disable

offCover

Sets the off-line diagnostics coverage time to light, medium, or full.

light = 5 minutes or less

medium = 30 minutes or less

full = unlimited

offStart

Sets the time for the off-line diagnostics to begin using 24 hour time. The format is:

hh:mm

For example: 03:45 or 22:30.

offDow

Sets the day of the week for the off-line diagnostics to run. The format is SMTWTFS. For example: -M-W--- means Mondays and Wednesdays only.


Related Commands

cnfdiagall, dspdiagcnf, abortofflinediag, clrdiagerr, clrdiagstat

Attributes

Log: no

State: active

Privilege: SERVICE_GP


Example

For slot 7, enable light on-line diagnostics for 10:30 PM on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

Geneva.7.PXM.a > cnfdiag 7 enable disable light 22:30 -M-W-F-

cnfdiagall

Configure Diagnostics All—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfdiagall command enables and configures on-line or off-line diagnostics for all card slots. (This command is the same as cnfdiag except that it effects all slots. See the cnfdiag description for details about these diagnostics.) The system blocks the diagnostics at an empty slot or for unsupported cards.


Note Do not remove the active PXM while the off-line diagnostic is running on the redundant PXM. If you remove it, the redundant PXM reboots but is not able to become active unless its hard disk drive was previously synchronized to the hard disk on the other PXM.


Syntax

cnfdiagall <onEnb> <offEnb> [<offCover> <offStart> <offDow>]

Syntax Description

onEnb

This parameter enables or disables on-line diagnostics. Type either enable or disable.

Default: disable

offEnb

This parameter enables or disables off-line diagnostics. Type either enable or disable.

Default: disable

offCover

Sets the off-line diagnostics coverage time to light, medium, or full.

light = 5 minutes or less

medium = 30 minutes or less

full = unlimited

offStart

Sets the time for the off-line diagnostics to begin using 24 hour time. The format is:

hh:mm

For example: 03:45 or 22:30.

offDow

Sets the day of the week for the off-line diagnostics to run. The format is SMTWTFS. Enter a dash (-) for days on which you do not want diagnostics to run. For example:

-M-W--- is Mondays and Wednesdays only


Related Commands

cnfdiag, dspdiagcnf

Attributes

Log: no

State: active, standby

Privilege: SERVICE_GP


Example

Enable light on-line diagnostics to start at 10:30 PM on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday.

Geneva.7.PXM.a > cnfdiagall enable disable light 22:30 -M-W-F-

cnfe164justify

Configure E.164 Justification—PXM45, PXM1E

Specifies whether the E.164 AESAs with the E.164 AFI are converted to the left or right-justified encoding format. For PNNI to search the address correctly, all nodes in the PNNI network must use the same justification.

Syntax

cnfe164justify left | right

Syntax Description

left or right

Justification of E164 addresses. Type the entire word "left" or "right."

Default: left


Related Commands

dspsvcparm

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SUPER_GP


Examples

Configure right-hand justification for the E.164 AESAs.

Geneva.7.PXM.a > cnfe164justify right

cnfenhiisp

Configure Enhanced IISP—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfenhiisp command enables or disables the enhanced IISP feature on the port. This command applies to only IISP ports. When you change the operational state of enhanced IISP, the change does not affect existing calls.

The items that enhanced IISP include are as follows:

Generic identifier transport (GIT)

Virtual path service over the IISP

Added support for nrt-VBR and rt-VBR

Transport of frame discard specification

Note the following behavioral characteristics of this feature:

The cnfenhiisp command works only if the link is up and running.

When you set up PNNI signalling for IISP (see cnfpnportsig command), one end must be network, and one end must be user.

Only manually entered addresses are propagated between the two networks.

No mechanism exists to prevent routing loops that can result from the use of manually configured static routes. This potential is heightened if you duplicate manually entered addresses.

Syntax

cnfenhiisp <portid> {yes | no}

Syntax Description

portid

The format of the PNNI physical port identifier can vary, as follows:

On a PXM45: slot:subslot.port:subport

On a PXM1E for UNI/NNI back card: slot:subslot.port:subport. On the UNI/NNI back card, the subslot is always 2, but the slot depends on the chassis, as follows:

In an MGX 8850 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 7.

In an MGX 8830 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 1.

On a PXM1E for a narrowband service module (NBSM): slot.port.

For more details, see the section, "PNNI Format," in "Introduction."

yes | no

Enter "yes" to enable enhanced IISP or "no" to disable enhanced IISP.

Default: no


Related Commands

dspenhiisp, cnfpnportsig

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SUPER_GP


Examples

Enable enhanced IISP on port 11:2.1:1.

Geneva.7.PXM.a > cnfenhiisp 11:2.1:1 yes

cnfetherif

Configure Ethernet Interface—PXM45, PXM1E (init state only)

The cnfetherif command lets you configure an Ethernet interface while the PXM is in the init state. The dspetherif command displays the configuration. Both of these commands are available only when the PXM is in the init state.


Note In the course of PXM initialization, the PXM passes through a series of readiness states, one of which is the init state. In this state, the PXM is not ready and can run only a subset of the full command set. Most commands in the init state are intended to help you determine the condition of the PXM and do not support run state operation.


Syntax

cnfetherif <ip_address> [ net_mask ]

ip_address

The IP address has the format a.b.c.d. See the Example section.

net_mask

The optional net mask has the format a.b.c.d. See Example for a typical netmask.


Syntax Description

This command has no parameters.

Related Commands

dspetherif

Attributes

Log: no

State: init

Privilege: ANYUSER


Example

Configure an init-state Ethernet interface to have Ethernet address 177.19.21.66 and a netmask of 255.255.0.0. Display the new Ethernet interface.

scott.8.PXM.if > cnfetherif 177.19.21.66 255.255.0.0

scott.8.PXM.if > dspetherif
scott                          System Rev:03.00   Sep. 20, 2002 12:49:26 PST
MGX8850                                              Node Alarm:MINOR
ETHERNET IP INTERFACE CONFIGURATION
--------------------------------------------------------------------
lnPci (unit number 0):
     Flags:(0x63) UP BROADCAST ARP RUNNING 
     Type:ETHERNET_CSMACD
     Internet address:177.19.21.66
     Broadcast address:177.19.21.255
     Netmask 0xffff0000 Subnetmask 0xffffff00
     Ethernet address is 00:30:94:09:f3:ab
     Metric is 0
     Maximum Transfer Unit size is 1500
     342500 packets received; 281994 packets sent
     60401 multicast packets received
     282 multicast packets sent
     0 input errors; 0 output errors
     0 collisions; 0 dropped
     DISK IP address:177.19.21.66

cnffltset

Configure Filter Set—PXM45, PXM1E

Use cnffltset to modify an existing filter set. This command can:

Add more addresses to the filter set.

Change the access mode or address field of a filter set entry.

After a filter is modified for a specific port, associate the filter to that port by using cnf-pnportacc.

Syntax

cnffltset <name> [-address atm-address -length address-length [-plan {nsap | e164}] [-list {calling | called}]] [-index number] [-accessMode {permit | deny}]

Syntax Description

name

A name for the filter set: the maximum is 30 characters.

address

The 1-40 digit NSAP or 1-15 digit E.164 address. You can add the address to a filter set. The default is modifying the accessMode field of a filter element using the index only: in this case, the you need not specify the address field.

length

If the address is specified, the length must be specified.

For NSAP, the length is in bits.

For E164, the length is in bytes.

plan

Address Plan: e.164 or nsap. You may specify this field only if you also specify the address field.

Default: nsap

list

Address List: calling or called. You may specify this field only if you also specify the address field.

Default: calling

index

Order in which filters are set.

Range: 1-65535
Default: 1

AccessMode

Specify the access mode (permit or deny) to whether accept or deny the call on the port if the address pattern-matching succeeds.

Default: permit.


Related Commands

addfltset, delfltset, dspfltset

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SUPER_GP


cnfilmi

Configure ILMI—PXM1E

The cnfilmi command lets you configure the card-level integrated local management interface (ILMI) for the PXM1E UNI/NNI back card (for the VSI slave side). Activating the card-level ILMI through cnfilmi requires a pre-existing logical port (see addport) and resource partition (see addrscprtn or addpart). No response appears unless an error occurs.


Note For network-level ILMI in relation to PNNI, run the PNNI-specific ILMI commands on the PXM45 or PXM1E. (The PNNI-specific ILMI commands also apply to the VSI master on the PXM1E.)


Syntax

cnfilmi <ifNum> -id <partitionID> -ilmi <ilmiEnable> -vpi <vpi> -vci <vci> -trap <ilmiTrapEnable> -s <keepAliveInt> -t <pollingIntervalT491> -k <pollInctFact>

Syntax Description

ifNum

Logical port number in the range is 1-31

-id

Partition ID in the range 1-20.

See the addpart description for information regarding resource partition ID.

-ilmi

Enable or disable ILMI. 1=enable. 2=disable.

-vpi

VPI for the ILMI signaling connection. The range is 0-255.

-vci

VPI for the ILMI signaling connection. The range is 0-65535.

-trap

Enable or disable ILMI trap. 1=enable. 2=disable.

-s

Keep alive interval. The range is 1-16 seconds.

-t

Polling interval for T491 in the range 0-255 seconds.

A 0 for pollingIntervalT491 disables polling.

-k

Polling interval K in the range 1-255 seconds.


Related Commands

dspilmi, dspilmis, dspilmicnt, clrilmicnt, dnilmi, upilmi

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Examples

Unknown.7.PXM1E.a > cnfilmi 1 1 -ilmi 1 -vpi 40 -vci 99 -s 10 -t 10 -k

cnfilmienable

Configure ILMI Enable—PXM45, PXM1E

Enables ILMI on a PNNI port. Prior to cnfilmienable, the port must be administratively down. Use the dnpnport command to down the port and uppnport to up it.

Syntax

cnfilmienable <portid> [yes | no]

Syntax Description

portid

The format of the PNNI physical port identifier can vary, as follows:

On a PXM45: slot:subslot.port:subport

On a PXM1E for UNI/NNI back card: slot:subslot.port:subport. On the UNI/NNI back card, the subslot is always 2, but the slot depends on the chassis, as follows:

In an MGX 8850 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 7.

In an MGX 8830 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 1.

On a PXM1E for a narrowband service module (NBSM): slot.port.

For more details, see the section, "PNNI Format," in "Introduction."

yes or
no

Type "yes" to enable ILMI or "no" to disable ILMI on the specified PNNI port.

Default: disabled


Related Commands

dnpnport, uppnport, dsppnilmi

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Examples

Enable ILMI on a PNNI port 4:1.1:11. First, disable the port by using dnpnport.

Geneva.1.PXM.a > dspilmi 4:1.1:11
INFO: No ilmi address registered

Geneva.7.PXM.a > dnpnport 4:1.1:11

Geneva.7.PXM.a > cnfilmienable 4:1.1:1 

Geneva.7.PXM.a > uppnport 4:1.1:11

Geneva.7.PXM.a >

cnfilmiproto

Configure ILMI Protocol—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfilmiproto command lets you configure how PNNI reacts to ILMI events that occur on the VSI slave (a service module). Use the dsppnilmi command to confirm changes to the configuration.

Syntax

cnfilmiproto <portid> [-securelink {yes | no}] [-attachmentpoint {yes | no] [-modlocalattrstd {yes | no]

Syntax Description

portid

The format of the PNNI physical port identifier can vary, as follows:

On a PXM45: slot:subslot.port:subport

On a PXM1E for UNI/NNI back card: slot:subslot.port:subport. On the UNI/NNI back card, the subslot is always 2, but the slot depends on the chassis, as follows:

In an MGX 8850 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 7.

In an MGX 8830 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 1.

On a PXM1E for a narrowband service module (NBSM): slot.port.

For more details, see the section, "PNNI Format," in "Introduction."

-securelink

Sets the flag securelink to make PNNI release the call if it loses connection to the ILMI slave.

no: do not enable the ILMI Secure link protocol.
yes: disable the ILMI Secure link protocol.

Default: yes

-attachmentpoint

Sets the flag attachmentpoint to make PNNI release the call if the slave ILMI session sees changes in peer information, such as the system name or system ID.

no: do not enable the detection of loss of attachmentpoint protocol.
yes: Enable the detection of loss of attachmentpoint.

Default: yes

-modlocalattrstd

Sets the flag modlocalattrstd to make PNNI release the call if the slave ILMI sees ATM layer (partition resource) changes, such as the VPI or VCI.

no: disable the ILMI standard procedure for modification of local ATM param.
yes: enable the ILMI standard procedure for modification of local ATM param.

Default: yes


Related Commands

dsppnilmi

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example

Jose.7.PXM.a > cnfilmiproto 11:2.1.1 -securelink no -attachmentpoint no -modlocalattrstd 
yes

cnfimagrp

Configure IMA Group—PXM1E

The cnfimagrp command lets you modify one or more attributes of an existing IMA group. Modifying any IMA group attribute causes the IMA group to restart. Note that an IMA group is initially created through the addimagrp command but is not active until you configure it (through the cnfimagrp command, for example). See the addimagrp and addimaport descriptions for more details on IMA.

Syntax

cnfimagrp <-grp group> [-ver <version>] [-txm <minLinks>] [-txid <txImaId>] [-txfl <txFrameLen>] [-dd <diffDelayMax>] [-uptim <groupUpTime>] [-dntim <groupDownTime>]

Syntax Description

-grp

The group has the format bay.group and the following possible values:

bay: always 2 on the PXM1E

group: 1-16

-ver

Specify a protocol of the IMA group by entering a 1 or 2 for version:

1 = IMA version 1.0

2 = IMA version 1.1

-txm

The minLinks is the minimum number of links required for the IMA group to operate.

Range: 1-16

-txid

The txImaId is the IMA ID transmitted in the IMA ID field of the ICP cell.

Range: 0-255

-txfl

The length of a transmitted IMA frame is specified in bytes.

For version 1.0 IMA, txImaFrameLength is always 128 bytes.

For version 1.1 IMA, txImaFrameLength can be 32, 64, 128, or 256 bytes.

Default: 128. For IMA version 1.0, the value is always 128.

-dd

The maximum differential delay ranges depend on the line type:

T1: 1-275 milliseconds

E1: 1-220 milliseconds

Defaults: T1 = 275, E1 = 220

-uptim

The group up time has a range of 0-400,000 milliseconds.

Default: 10000

-dntim

The group down time has a range of 0-100,000 milliseconds.

Default: 2500


Related Commands

addimagrp, delimagrp, dspimagrp, dspimagrps, rstimagrp, dspimalnk

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example

For IMA group 16, specify a differential delay of 200 milliseconds.

MGX8850.7.PXM1E.a > cnfimagrp -grp 2.16 -dd 200

cnfimalnk

Configure IMA Link—PXM1E

The cnfimalnk command lets you configure loss of IMA frame (LIF) and link out of delay synchronization (LODS) integration timers for an IMA link.

Syntax

cnfimalnk -lnk <link> [-uplif <lifUpTime>] [-dnlif <lifDnTime>] [-uplods <lodsUpTime>]
[-dnlods <lodsDnTime>]

Syntax Description

-lnk

The link identifier consists of a bay number as well as a link number in the format bay.link:

bay: always 2 on the PXM1E

link: 1-16

lifUpTime

LIF integration up time. The LIF defect is the occurrence of persistent out of IMA frame (OIF) anomalies for at least two IMA frames.

Range: 0-400000 milliseconds

lifDnTime

LIF integration down time. The LIF defect is the occurrence of persistent OIF anomalies for at least two IMA frames.

Range: 0-100000 milliseconds

lodsUpTime

LODS integration up time. The LODS defect is a link event indicating that the link is not synchronized with other links in the IMA group.

Range: 0-400000 milliseconds

lodsDnTime

LODS integration down time. The LODS defect is a link event indicating that the link is not synchronized with other links in the IMA group.

Range: 0-100000 milliseconds


Related Commands

addimagrp, cnfimagrp, cnfimalnktst

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example

cnfimalnktst

Configure IMA Link Test—PXM1E

The cnfimalnktst command lets you specify a pattern test to confirm the integrity of an individual link. To start and end the test, use the startimalnktst and stopimalnktst commands, respectively.

The test pattern is a number in the range 0-254. A 0 causes the system to select a number for the pattern. If the transmitted number is the same as the number that arrives at the receiving end of the link, the link is valid. If the test pattern is different or does not arrive at all, the link is invalid.


Note Link test works for version 1.0 only.


Syntax

cnfimalnktst <-grp group> <-lnk link> <-pat test Pattern>

Syntax Description

-grp

The group identifier consists of a bay number as well as a group number in the format bay.group, as follows:

bay: always 2 on the PXM1E

group: 1-16

-lnk

The link identifier consists of a bay number as well as a link number in the format bay.link, as follows:

bay: always 2 on the PXM1E

link: 1-16

-pat

The test Pattern is a number in the range 0-254. A 0 causes the system to select a number for the test pattern.

Default: 0


Related Commands

startimalnktst, stopimalnktst

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example

For group 1 and link 1, specify a test pattern of 77.

MGX8850.7.PXM1E.a> cnfimalnktst -grp 2.1 -lnk 2.1 -pat 77

cnfintfcongth

Configure Interface Congestion Threshold—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfintfcongth command lets you configure congestion thresholds for a logical port. The thresholds apply to incoming calls and status enquiries. When the upper congestion limit is reached, the port may block incoming calls and adjust the pace of status enquiries.

You must specify at least one keyword.

Syntax

cnfintfcongth <portid> [-setuphi {setuphival [-unackedstatenqlo {unackedstatenqloval} ]
[ -unackedstatenqhi {unackedstatenqloval} ]

Syntax Description

portid

The format of the PNNI physical port identifier can vary, as follows:

On a PXM45: slot:subslot.port:subport

On a PXM1E for UNI/NNI back card: slot:subslot.port:subport. On the UNI/NNI back card, the subslot is always 2, but the slot depends on the chassis, as follows:

In an MGX 8850 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 7.

In an MGX 8830 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 1.

On a PXM1E for a narrowband service module (NBSM): slot.port.

For details, see the section, "PNNI Format," in "Introduction."

-setuphi

The number of connection set-up messages per second. Above this number, the condition of set-up messages on the interface is congested.

Range: 1-1200 calls per second
Default: 180

-unackedStatEnqLo

The number of status enquires yet to be acknowledged by peer-to-peer interface. Below this value, the congestion condition for status enquiries at the interface level is dropped.

Range: 1-500 messages
Default: 40

-unackedStatEnqHi

The number of status enquires yet to be acknowledged by peer-to-peer interface. The interface is considered to be congested with status enquiries when this thresholds is reached.

Range: 1-500 messages
Default: 100


Related Commands

dspintfcongth, dspnodalcongth

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example

Configure a congestion threshold of 200 for set-up messages on 6:1.1:1. Check the results by using the dspintfcongth command.

M8850_NY.7.PXM.a > cnfintfcongth 6:1.1:1 -setuphi 200

M8850_NY.7.PXM.a > dspintfcongth 6:1.1:1

Congestion Thresholds for port: 6:1.1:1 

Parameter            Value        unit
---------            -----        ----
setuphi              100          cps
unackedStatEnqLo     40           messages
unackedStatEnqHi     200          messages

M8850_NY.7.PXM.a > 

cnfintfvsvd

Configure Interface for VS/VD—PXM45, PXM1E


Note In the current release, the PXM1E does not support VS/VD.


The cnfintfvsvd command lets you enable internal or external virtual source/virtual destination (VS/VD) on a PNNI port. If VS/VD is disabled on a port, you can enable VS/VD for individual ABR connections by using the cnfabr command. As described in Syntax Description, the cnfintfvsvd command also lets the service class template determine whether VS/VD is enabled.

Before using the cnfintfvsvd command, note the following.

The command applies to ports configured for UNI 4.0 or higher.

The port must be administratively down (see dnpnport).

The port must exist on an AXSM-E because it alone supports ABR VS/VD.

Syntax

cnfintfvsvd <portid> [-internal {off | on | unspecified}] [-external {off| on | unspecified}]L

Syntax Description

portid

The format of the PNNI physical port identifier can vary, as follows:

On a PXM45: slot:subslot.port:subport

On a PXM1E for UNI/NNI back card: slot:subslot.port:subport. On the UNI/NNI back card, the subslot is always 2, but the slot depends on the chassis, as follows:

In an MGX 8850 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 7.

In an MGX 8830 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 1.

On a PXM1E for a narrowband service module (NBSM): slot.port.

For more details, see the section, "PNNI Format," in "Introduction."

internal

Indicates the internal loop for VS/VD. The choices are as follows:

off: at the port level, VS/VD service for ABR connections is disabled. Therefore, for an ABR connection to have VS/VD support, you must use the cnfabr command to enable it.

on: at the port level, VS/VD service for ABR connections is enabled. Therefore, all ABR connections on the port have VS/VD support. If you do not want a particular ABR connection to have VS/VD, use the cnfabr command to disable it for that connection.

unspecified: the port defaults to the VS/VD capability that the port-level SCT specifies.

Default: unspecified

external

Indicates the external loop for VS/VD. The choices are as follows:

off: at the port level, VS/VD service for ABR connections is disabled. Therefore, for an ABR connection to have VS/VD support, you must use the cnfabr command to enable it.

on: at the port level, VS/VD service for ABR connections is enabled. Therefore, all ABR connections on the port have VS/VD support. If you do not want a particular ABR connection to have VS/VD, use the cnfabr command to disable it for that connection.

unspecified: the port defaults to the VS/VD capability that the port-level SCT specifies.

Default: unspecified


Related Commands

dsppnport, cnfabr

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example

This example starts with the assumption that port 5:1.1:1 is administratively down and is configured for an interface type other than UNI 4.0. Do the following:


Step 1 Specify UNI 4.0 for port 5:1.1:1 by using the cnfpnportsig command.

Step 2 Enable internal and external VS/VD.

Step 3 Up the port by using the uppnport command.

Step 4 Confirm that internal and external VS/VD is enabled on the port. Note that, for UNI 4.0 or higher, the dsppnport shows VS/VD status. For earlier UNI versions, the dsppnport display does not show VS/VD.


M8850_NY.7.PXM.a > cnfpnportsig 5:1.1:1 -univer uni40
M8850_NY.7.PXM.a > cnfintfvsvd 5:1.1:1 -internal on -external on
M8850_NY.7.PXM.a > uppnport 5:1.1:1 
M8850_NY.7.PXM.a > dsppnport 5:1.1:1

Port:               5:1.1:1           Logical ID:       17111041          
IF status:          down              Admin Status:     up                
VSVD Internal Loop: on                
VSVD External Loop: on                
UCSM:               enable            
Auto-config:        enable            Addrs-reg:        enable            
IF-side:            network           IF-type:          uni               
UniType:            private           Version:          uni4.0            
PassAlongCapab:     n/a               
Input filter:       0                 Output filter:    0                 
minSvccVpi:         0                 maxSvccVpi:       255               
minSvccVci:         35                maxSvccVci:       65535             
minSvpcVpi:         1                 maxSvpcVpi:       255               

       #SpvcCfg:  #SpvcActive:  #SpvpCfg:  #SpvpActive:  
p2p :  0          0             0          0             
p2mp:  0          0             0          0             
       #Svcc:     #Svpc:        Total:     
p2p :  0          0             0          
p2mp:  0          0             0          
                                Total:     0             

M8850_NY.7.PXM.a > 

cnflink

Configure Link—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnflink command lets you change the framing for a T1 tributary in the bulk distribution feature on a Service Resource Module-Enhanced (SRME). For an individual link, this command lets you configure the framing. (The upln and cnfln commands result in a particular line framing for all tributaries.)

Syntax

cnflink <SrmStartLinkIf> <FramingType>

Syntax Description

SrmStartLinkIf

The format for SrmStartLinkIf is slot.line.link. The SrmStartLinkIf parameter identifies physical and logical elements on the SRME. The slot is a logical number that applies to both the active and the standby SRME.

Possible entries are as follows:

The slot varies with the chassis model, as follows:

MGX 8850 chassis: 15 or 31

MGX 8830 chassis: always 7

The line: always 1

The link is the targeted T1 tributary and has a range of 1-84.

FramingType

The framing type is either superframe (SF) or extended superframe (ESF).

Possible entries are:

2: SF

3: ESF


Related Commands

addlink, dellink, dsplink, dspslotlink

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example

cnfln

Configure Line—PXM45, PXM1E

On a PXM, the cnfln command lets you configure a line on one of the following cards:

PXM1E UNI/NNI back card (This back card is also known as the uplink card or uplink bay.)

Service Resource Module (SRME or SRM-3T3/C) under control of a PXM45 or PXM1E

Note the following before you use the cnfln command on a PXM:

You must first activate the line by using the upln command.

You cannot configure a line that has virtual interfaces (see addport description).

If you do not know the line type (required by cnfln), use the dsplns or dspcd command to check.

The SRMs have a "no back card" capability. This capability lets the SRM operate without a back card if the SRM in a bay is intended to operate without bulk mode distribution. If no back card is present, no need exists to configure lines.

(If the switch is already powered on and the SRMs installed, you can pull the back card from the primary SRM and, if present, the back card from the secondary SRM. If the cards are out of the backplane and power is off, just install the front cards. An SRM with no back card appears in card displays as "SRM_NO-BC.)

Generic Syntax

This section introduces general information about the syntax. The syntax varies according to the line type, so each line type has its own description.

Your entries for line type and slot number determine the option list for cnfln on a PXM. The options for line type depend on whether the line is SONET, SDH, T3, E3, E1, or T1. The slot indicates to the controller whether the card is an SRM or the PXM1E network interface card. The generic syntax follows:

cnfln -<lineType> slot.line <optionList>

If you enter only the line type, slot number, and line number, the Help feature displays appropriate syntax with option list. In the sections that follow, the Syntax and Syntax Description heading shows the line type.

To help you enter the correct line type and to locate the SRMs, use some of the high-level commands. To see all cards in the switch, use the dspcds command. The display shows where and what type of SRMs are present. To see the type of PXM1E back card, use the dspcd command on the PXM1E CLI. To see the types for all lines, use the dsplns command.

Syntax for PXM1E SONET or SDH Line

cnfln -sonet <X.line> -slt <LineType> -clk <clockSource>

Syntax Description for PXM1E SONET or SDH Line

-sonet

The sonet keyword identifies the line as a SONET line and enables the choices that follow.

X.line

X is a logical slot number regardless of where the card actually resides. Also, X can refer to ether the UNI/NNI back card or an SRM, as follows:

For the UNI/NNI back card, X is always 2.

For an SRM, X depends on the chassis, as follows:

For MGX 8850 chassis, X can be 15 or 31.

For MGX 8830 chassis, X can be 7.

The range for the line parameter reflects the combination back card. The combo card has four OC3c/STM1 lines and eight T3 or E3 lines. (The latter group of eight is configurable though the cnfcdmode command). The range for line:

1-4 on straight OC-3c card

9-12 on the combo card

-slt

Type one of the following numbers to specify SONET or SDH:

1: SONET

2: SDH

-clk

The clock can come from the backplane (local timing) or the receive line (loop timing). Type "1" or "2," as needed:

1: Loop timing

2: Local timing

Default: Local timing


Syntax for PXM1E T3 Line

cnfln -ds3 <X.line> -lt <LineType> -len <LineLength> -oof <OOFCriteria> -cb <A>
-clk <clockSource> -rfeac <RcvFEACValidation>

Syntax Description for PXM1E T3 Line

-ds3

Typing -ds3 as the first parameter enables the applicable list of options.

X.line

X is a logical slot number regardless of where the card actually resides. Also, X can refer to ether the UNI/NNI back card or an SRM, as follows:

For the UNI/NNI back card, X is always 2.

For an SRM, X depends on the chassis, as follows:

For MGX 8850 chassis, X can be 15 or 31.

For MGX 8830 chassis, X can be 7.

The range for the line parameter reflects the combination back card. The combo card has four OC3c/STM1 lines and eight T3 or E3 lines. (The latter group of eight is configurable though the cnfcdmode command).

Range: 1-8 on the combo card or T3/E3 card

-lt

Enter one of the following numbers for the appropriate DS3 line type:

1: ds3cbitadm

2: ds3cbitplcp

-len

The length has a range of 0-64000 meters.

-oof

For the out of frame criteria, type one of the following numbers to select criteria:

1: 3 out of 8

2: 3 out of 16

-cb

For check bit handling, enter one of the following numbers:

1: Check the C-bit

2: Ignore the C-bit

-clk

With loop timing, the clock for the transmit direction is generated by redirecting the receive clock to the transmit clock line. With local timing, the clock comes from the backplane.

1: Loop timing

2 Local timing

Default: Local timing

-rfeac

For receive FEAC validation, enter one of the following numbers:

1: 4 out of 5

2: 8 out of 10

3: disable


Syntax for PXM1E E3 Line

cnfln -e3 <X.line> -len <LineLength> -clk <clockSource>

-e3

Typing -e3 as the first parameter enables the applicable list of options.

X.line

X is a logical slot number regardless of where the card actually resides. Also, X can refer to ether the UNI/NNI back card or an SRM, as follows:

For the UNI/NNI back card, X is always 2.

For an SRM, X depends on the chassis, as follows:

For MGX 8850 chassis, X can be 15 or 31.

For MGX 8830 chassis, X can be 7.

The range for the line parameter reflects the combination back card. The combo card has four OC3c/STM1 lines and eight T3 or E3 lines. (The latter group of eight is configurable though the cnfcdmode command).

Range: 1-8 on the combo card or T3/E3 card

-len

The length has a range of 0-64000 meters.

-clk

With loop timing, the clock for the transmit direction is generated by redirecting the receive clock to the transmit clock line. With local timing, the clock comes from the backplane.

1: Loop timing

2 Local timing

Default: Local timing


Syntax for PXM1E DS1 Line

-ds1

Typing -ds1 as the first parameter enables the applicable options.

X.line

X is a logical slot number regardless of where the card actually resides. For the UNI/NNI back card, X is always 2.

Range for line: 1-16

-len

The length has a range of 0-64000 meters.

-clk

With loop timing, the clock for the transmit direction is generated by redirecting the receive clock to the transmit clock line. With local timing, the clock comes from the backplane.

1: Loop timing

2 Local timing

Default: Local timing


Syntax for PXM1E E1 Line

-e1

Typing -e1 as the first parameter enables the applicable options.

X.line

X is a logical slot number regardless of where the card actually resides. For the UNI/NNI back card, X is always 2.

Range for line: 1-16

-clk

With loop timing, the clock for the transmit direction is generated by redirecting the receive clock to the transmit clock line. With local timing, the clock comes from the backplane.

1: Loop timing

2 Local timing

Default: Local timing


Syntax for SRME Line

cnfln -sonet <slot.line> -slt <LineType> -clk <clockSource> -lpb <loopback> -sfs <FrameScramble> -rdiv <RDI-V Type> -rdip <RDI-P Type> -tt <Tributary Type> -tm <TributaryMappingType>
-tf <TributaryFramingType> -st <SignallingTranportMode> -tg <TributaryGroupingType>

Syntax Description for SRME Line

If you are planning bulk distribution to T1 lines in Japan, specify a SDH (STM1) line type (see the -slt parameter). For bulk distribution to E1 lines, you must also specify the SDH line type.

-sonet

The sonet keyword identifies the line as a SONET line and enables the choices that follow.

slot.line

The slot is a logical slot number regardless of where the SRME actually resides. For example, if the switch has an SRME in only 16 but not 15—not a likely situation—you would still enter "15." On the SRME, only one line exists on the back card, so line is always "1." The slot numbers vary with the chassis model, as follows:

MGX 8850: 15, 31

MGX 8830: 7

-slt

The line type is either SONET or SDH. Type one of the following choices for LineType:

1: SONET

2: SDH

-clk

The clock can come from the backplane (local timing) or the receive line (loop timing). Type "1" or "2," as needed:

1: Loop timing

2: Local timing

Default: Local timing

-lpb

Enables one of two loopback types or disables an active loopback, as follows:

1: No loopback

2: Local loopback

3: Remote loopback

Default: no loopback

-sfs

The frame scramble enable

1 = enable

2 = disable

-rdiv

Specifies the number of RDI V bits. Follow the keyword with either a "1" for 1 bit or a "3" for 3 bits.

-rdip

Specifies the number of RDI P bits. Follow the keyword with either a "1" for 1 bit or a "3" for 3 bits.

-tt

The TributaryType selects a tributary type based on whether the line is SONET or SDH. For SONET, type "1." For SDH, type "2." This choice results in the following standard for virtual tributary (VT) and virtual container (VC).

1: VT1.5/VC11

2: VT2/VC12

Note In the current release, VT2 is not supported.

-tm

The tributary mapping type is either asynchronous or byte-synchronous. Type a "1" or "2."

1: Asynchronous

2: Byte-synchronous (the current release supports byte-sync for T1 only)

Default: asynchronous

-tf

The tributary framing type is either superframe or extended superframe. This option applies only if the tributary mapping is byte-synchronous (-tm 2). Type a "2" or "3."

2: Superframe

3: Extended superframe

-st

The signaling transport mode applies only if you have selected byte-synchronous tributary mapping (-tm 2). The transport mode is either transfer mode or clear mode:

With transfer mode, the framing bit is transferred to the VT header.

With clear mode, the signaling bit is transferred to the VT header.

Follow the keyword with either a "2" or a "3."

2: Transfer Mode

3: Clear Mode

-tg

The tributary grouping type applies to SDH. Type a "2" or a "3."

2: AU3

3: AU4


Syntax for SRM-3T3

cnfln -ds3 <X.line> -lt <LineType> -len <LineLength> -oof <OOFCriteria> -cb <A>
-rfeac <RcvFEACValidation> -clk <clockSource>

Syntax Description for SRM-3T3/C

-ds3

Typing -ds3 as the first parameter enables the applicable list of options.

X.line

X is a logical slot number regardless of physical slot. X also depends on the chassis type:

MGX 8850: 15 or 31

MGX 8830: 7

Range for line: SRM-3T3/C: 1-3

-lt

Enter one of the following numbers according to the DS3 line type:

1: ds3cbitadm

2: ds3cbitplcp

-len

The length has a range of 0-64000 meters.

-oof

For the out of frame criteria, type one of the following numbers to select criteria:

1: 3 out of 8

2: 3 out of 16

-cb

For check bit handling, enter one of the following numbers:

1: Check the C-bit

2: Ignore the C-bit

-rfeac

For receive FEAC validation, enter one of the following numbers:

1: 4 out of 5

2: 8 out of 10

-clk

With loop timing, the transmit clock is generated by redirecting the receive clock to the transmit clock line. With local timing, the clock comes from the backplane.

1: Loop timing

2 Local timing

Default: Local timing


Related Commands

upln, dnln, dspln, dsplns, cnfcdmode

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example PXM1E T3 Line

Configure T3 line 2.4 to have ds3cbitadm coding, be 10 meters, oof=2, clock local, and rfeac=2.

MGX8850.7.PXM1E.a > cnfln -ds3 2.4 -lt 1 -len 10 -oof 2 -cb 1 -clk 2 -rfeac 1

Examples for SRME

Check the tributary mapping on the SRME SONET line in slot 15 and change it to byte-synchronous if the current configuration is asynchronous.

Unknown.7.PXM.a > dspln -sonet 15.1
  Line Number            : 15.1
  Admin Status           : Up
  Loopback               : NoLoop            APS enabled         : Disable
  Frame Scrambling       : Enable            RDI-V Type          : one bit
  Xmt Clock source       : loopTiming        RDI-P Type          : one bit
  Line Type              : sonetSts3         VT Type             : vt15/vc11
  Medium Type(SONET/SDH) : SONET             VT Mapping Type     : asynchronous
  Medium Time Elapsed    : 11985             VT Framing Type     : N/A
  Medium Valid Intervals : 13                VT Signalling Mode  : N/A
  Medium Line Type       : ShortSMF          VT Grouping Type    : N/A

The VT Mapping Type field shows asynchronous, so configure the line for byte-synchronous. The command is rejected because of existing links. List the links then delete them.

Unknown.7.PXM.a > cnfln -sonet 15.1 -tm 2
ERROR: There are links on the line, remove links first

Unknown.7.PXM.a > dsplink 15.1
Line Num  VtNum  RowStatus  TargetSlot  TargetSlotLine FramingType
========  ====== ========== ==========  ============== ===========
  1        1        Add         11            1         Not Appl
  1        2        Add         11            2         Not Appl

Unknown.7.PXM.a > delslotlink 11 0

Proceed with configuring the line for byte-synchronous tributary mapping and check the configuration. Note that Framing Type and Signaling Mode take on the default values now that the tributary mapping has become byte-synchronous.

Unknown.7.PXM.a > cnfln -sonet 15.1 -tm 2

Unknown.7.PXM.a > dspln -sonet 15.1
  Line Number            : 15.1
  Admin Status           : Up
  Loopback               : NoLoop            APS enabled         : Disable
  Frame Scrambling       : Enable            RDI-V Type          : one bit
  Xmt Clock source       : loopTiming        RDI-P Type          : one bit
  Line Type              : sonetSts3         VT Type             : vt15/vc11
  Medium Type(SONET/SDH) : SONET             VT Mapping Type     : byteSynchrons
  Medium Time Elapsed    : 12034             VT Framing Type     : ESF
  Medium Valid Intervals : 13                VT Signalling Mode  : Transfer Mode
  Medium Line Type       : ShortSMF          VT Grouping Type    : N/A

Configure the line on the SRME in slot 15 for a SDH line type. Check the configuration and note the default values for SDH.

Unknown.7.PXM.a > cnfln -sonet 15.1 -slt 2
Unknown.7.PXM.a > dspln -sonet 15.1
  Line Number            : 15.1
  Admin Status           : Up
  Loopback               : NoLoop            APS enabled         : Disable
  Frame Scrambling       : Enable            RDI-V Type          : one bit
  Xmt Clock source       : loopTiming        RDI-P Type          : one bit
  Line Type              : sonetStm1         VT Type             : vt15/vc11
  Medium Type(SONET/SDH) : SDH               VT Mapping Type     : byteSynchrons
  Medium Time Elapsed    : 12099             VT Framing Type     : ESF
  Medium Valid Intervals : 13                VT Signalling Mode  : Transfer Mode
  Medium Line Type       : ShortSMF          VT Grouping Type    : Au3

cnfloginmsg

Configure Login Message—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfloginmsg command lets you create a message that appears when any user logs into the switch.

Syntax

cnfloginmsg

Syntax Description

The interface prompts for a login message. The maximum length is 500 characters. The interface also instructs you to terminate message creation by putting a period on a line with no other characters on that line. See Example.

Related Commands

dsploginmsg, clrloginmsg

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active, standby, init

Privilege: ANYUSER


Example

Create a login message that says, "Call system administrator before using this switch." Complete the message by typing a period on a line. Check the message by using the dsploginmsg command.

M8950_DC.7.PXM.a > cnfloginmsg
Enter new Login Message (Less than 500 characters)
To complete message enter a line with only a "."
Call system administrator before using this switch
.
Following message will be displayed when user logs in:
Call system administrator before using this switch

Confirm entry of new message Y/N:(N) y
Storing changed Login message 

M8950_DC.7.PXM.a > dsploginmsg

Call system administrator before using this switch

cnfmbsdft

Configure Maximum Burst Size Default—PXM45, PXM1E

Configures the default maximum burst size (MBS) for SPVCs on a port. The applicable service types are real-time and non real-time variable bit rate (rt-VBR and nrt-VBR).

The most likely connection type for which you would use cnfmbsdft is SVC. You can also rely on the value set with this command as a default for SPVCs if you do not specify an MBS through addcon for each SPVC of service type VBR.

The new configuration applies to new incoming calls, not existing calls. You can use cnfmbsdft whether the port is active or in the provisioning state.

Syntax

cnfmbsdft <portid> <service_category> [num-of-cell]:

Syntax Description

portid

The format of the PNNI physical port identifier can vary, as follows:

On a PXM45: slot:subslot.port:subport

On a PXM1E for UNI/NNI back card: slot:subslot.port:subport. On the UNI/NNI back card, the subslot is always 2, but the slot depends on the chassis, as follows:

In an MGX 8850 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 7.

In an MGX 8830 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 1.

On a PXM1E for a narrowband service module (NBSM): slot.port.

For more details, see the section, "PNNI Format," in "Introduction."

service_category

ATM 4.0 service category—either rt-VBR or nrt-VBR.

num-of-cell

The units of measure for MBS are cells.

Range: 0-2147483647 cells
Default: set by the platform to 1024 cells.


Related Commands

dspmbsdft

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Examples

Configure a default MBS of 10000 cells for nrt-VBR.

cnfmbsdft 11:2.1:1 nrtvbr 10000

cnfname

Configure Name—PXM45, PXM1E

The case-sensitive node name must begin with a letter. It can include:

Up to 32 letters or numbers

Two special characters ("_" and "-")

No spaces

After you enter the name, the system prompts for confirmation. To see the name, use dspcds (or many of the other node-level display commands): the node name is the first item in the display.


Note Although 32 characters is the maximum, Cisco recommends that you not exceed 20 characters. A node name greater than 20 characters causes the configuration save and restore features to fail.


Syntax

cnfname <node name>

Syntax Description

node name

The node name can contain up to 32 alpha-numeric characters.


Related Commands

None

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SUPER_GP


Example

Configure the node name to be "MGX8850." The system requests you to confirm the name. The CLI prompt returns with the new name. In this example, however, the name as it appears in the prompt is truncated to eight characters because of space limitations for information displayed in the prompt.

NODENAME.7.PXM.a > cnfname MGX8850
This node name will be changed to MGX8850. Please Confirm
Do you want to proceed (Yes/No)?
MGX8850.7.PXM.a >

cnfncdp

Configure NCDP—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfncdp command lets you change the clock distribution mode at the switch level. The choices are manual mode and Network Clock Distribution Protocol (NCDP). At every switch that you plan to use NCDP, you must enable it through the cnfncdp command. (See Syntax and Syntax Description for the optional parameters.) A switch can use only one distribution mode, and the default mode is manual. The unused mode is disabled. Normally, if you enter a command that applies to the mode that is disabled, the controller rejects the command. Although the two modes are mutually exclusive, the configuration for each mode is saved. If you return a switch to its previous distribution mode, the previous configuration is operational.


Note NCDP does not apply to the transmit clock for the lines on a Service Resource Module (if the SRM if configured with physical lines). Use the cnfsrmclksrc command for SRM lines,


For manual clock distribution, use cnfclksrc and related commands to modify, view, or delete clock sources. If you upgrade from Release 2.1 to Release 3 or later software, the switch comes up in manual clock distribution mode and has the previous configuration for manual distribution.


Note You can pre-configure NCDP clock sources. You can set up a BITS by using the cnfncdpclksrc command before changing from manual mode to NCDP. This pre-configuration helps prevent loss of reliable, network-wide synchronization when you cut over to NCDP.


The manual and NCDP modes require some configuration at each switch. Regardless of the mode, a switch can synchronize to any of the following:

The free-running oscillator on a PXM

A Building Integrated Timing Source (BITS) connected to a PXM

A PNNI port or an interface that supports synchronous clock recovery

If you select NCDP, the optional cnfncdp parameters let you configure as needed the following values:

The greatest number of hops between any two nodes in the clocking domain

The number of milliseconds between transmission of configuration PDUs

The number of milliseconds to wait before sending the next configuration PDU

The interval for which the topology change notification bit is sent in the configuration PDUs


Note An NCDP clocking domain crosses peer group boundaries.


NCDP synchronizes each switch to a single root (or master) clock reference. When you first enable NCDP on more than one switch, it automatically selects the oscillator on one of the switches to be the root of a network clock spanning tree. (On the other hand, if you have pre-configured an external source, NCDP becomes enabled with that source.) When you further configure clock source priorities and a possible BITS device, NCDP again identifies the best source according to your parameter entries.

With each change in NCDP clock state—such as node reset or introduction of a BITS device—it uses the values in the following hierarchy to select a root.

1. Clock priority

2. Stratum level

3. ID of external source or internal oscillator (external is ranked higher priority)

4. ATM address serves as a tie-breaker if all others are equal, with lowest address winning (assuming this ATM address is unique—a unique address prevents serious problems)

After NCDP determines the default root clock source, it identifies that root to every node in the network.

NCDP ensures that all nodes have a record of the entire spanning clock tree. Thus, each node has a record of the node with the root (or "best") clock source and gets its root source from that node. The maximum number of hops to that master clock node is configurable.

The default clock source under NCDP—a free-running, internal oscillator—is sufficient for a small network. However, the concept of the "best" clock source actually becomes meaningful when you connect a BITS clock or define clocking domains.


Note If you run the switchcc command, the clock manager momentarily does not have not information about the best clock source. Therefore, the active PXM uses the internal oscillator as a clock source for about one second.


To create clocking domains or to configure a BITS clock, NCDP provides the following commands:

Use cnfncdp to specify the size of the clocking domain and set various PNNI-related timers.

Use cnfncdpclksrc to specify a BITS source (or other external clock), a priority for that clock source, and a stratum number for the external source.

Use cnfncdpport to do any of the following:

Specify characteristics of an NCDP signaling channel

Modify the administrative cost of a port to influence route selection

Disable NCDP on an NNI port to form a boundary for the clocking domain

Syntax

cnfncdp [ -distributionMode {ncdp | manual] [-maxNetworkDiameter hopcount]
[-hello milliseconds] [-holdtime milliseconds] [-topoChangeTimer milliseconds]

Syntax Description

If the distribution mode is manual, only the -distributionMode parameter is meaningful. If you enable NCDP, all other parameters become meaningful.

-distributionMode

Specify the distribution mode as NCDP or manual. If manual, use the cnfclksrc command and related commands for network synchronization. When you specify NCDP mode, it is enabled at all nodes and all ports. To disable NCDP at a specific port, use the cndncdpport command.

Possible entries:

1 for NCDP or just "ncdp"

2 for manual clocking or just "manual"

Default: manual

-maxNetworkDiameter

The network diameter is the maximum number of hops between any two nodes in a clocking domain.

Range: 3-200

Default: 20

-hello

NCDP informs each network node of the clock characteristics of all other nodes through the exchange of Hello packets. The hello parameter lets you modify the number of milliseconds between transmission of Hello packets.

Range: 75-60000 milliseconds

Default: 500 milliseconds

-holdtime

The holdtime parameter lets you specify the number of milliseconds the switch waits before it transmits the next configuration PDU.

Range: 75-60000 milliseconds

Default: 500 milliseconds

-topoChangeTimer

The holdtime parameter lets you specify the number of milliseconds the switch waits before it transmits a topology change notification bit in the next configuration PDU.

Range: 75-60000 milliseconds

Default: 500 milliseconds


Related Commands

cnfncdpclksrc, cnfncdpport, delncdpclksrc, dspncdp, dspncdpclksrc, dspncdpclksrcs, dspncdpport, dspncdpports

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SUPER_GP


Example

Configure the current switch to be in NCDP mode and set the maximum network diameter to 50.

M8850_LA.8.PXM.a > cnfncdp -distributionMode 1 -maxNetworkDiameter 50

cnfncdpclksrc

Configure NCDP Clock Source—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfncdpclksrc command lets you configure clock sources so that NCDP selects the clock source you want to serve as the best (or root or master) source. The primary use of this command is for specifying external clock sources. To do so, you indicate a high priority and stratum level for the external source. NCDP uses these values to determine the best clock source in the network and build the spanning clock tree. An external source can be a Building Integrated Timing Source (BITS) device connected to a PXM or—much less commonly—a UNI port somewhere on the switch.


Note If no external sources exist, the only reason to use the cnfncdpclksrc command is to identify the internal oscillator of a particular node as the best source. You can also identify other back-up nodes.


External Clock Sources

Even with external sources, you do not need to use the cnfncdpclksrc command at each node (although you must enable NCDP at each node by using the cnfncdp command). You can specify a small number of external sources and, if desired, one or two internal sources as backup for unlikely failure scenarios and leave it to NCDP to utilize the priorities as needed. If every configured source were to fail—leaving all internal oscillators in the network with the same priority—NCDP would use the ATM address of each node as a tie-breaker to select and propagate a root clock.

Internal Clock Sources

You can direct NCDP to select the internal oscillator of a particular node as the root for the following reasons:

No BITS devices exist in the network.

All external sources fail.

NCDP chooses a node as the best source whether or not you assign a priority to an internal clock. NCDP uses its usual hierarchy of values in the following list to pick a node as the root. In the case of an internal source, the pertinent values are priority and nodal ATM address, as the annotations in the list state:

1. Priority, which you can configure through the cnfncdpclksrc command

2. Stratum—fixed at 3 for all internal oscillators

3. PRS-ID—the same for all internal sources

4. Nodal ATM address as a tie-breaker

Operational Details of the cnfncdpclksrc Command

The cnfncdpclksrc parameters let you specify the following values:

A PNNI physical port ID that identifies the BITS device, UNI port, or internal oscillator

A primary source identifier, which simply indicates whether the source is external or internal

The line type for the BITS device, if present

A priority for the identified clock source (note that the relationship between the priority and the value of the parameter is inverse—the lower the number, the higher the priority)

A stratum level for the external source—usually a BITS device (whose stratum level should be taken from the specification of the manufacturer)

The only ports you can specify with the cnfncdpclksrc command are those of an external device or a UNI (see the syntax description for port details). You do not specify an NNI as a source, yet NCDP on each node may determine that its root clock comes through an NNI. If a node receives its root clock source through an NNI based on the protocol's calculations, the dspncdpclksrcs output reveals this fact. With NCDP enabled at the node level by the cnfncdp command, all NNI ports are enabled to support NCDP. (On a per-port basis, you can disable NCDP by using the cnfncdpport command.)

Displaying NCDP Clock Sources

The dspncdpclksrcs command identifies where the current node receives its clock. This command applies to only the node where you run it. If the local node is not the source of the best clock according to NCDP, the dspncdpclksrcs output shows the NNI port that is the node's timing source. No command searches the whole network and shows where the master clock originates. To find the source if it was not recorded, you would have to telnet to each node and run dspncdpclksrcs. Therefore, record the sources you configure with the cnfncdpclksrc command. For more details, see the section, "Usage Guidelines for the cnfncdpclksrc Command."

How NCDP Chooses the Root Clock Source

The root clock source is the root of the spanning tree for the clocking domain. Under NCDP control, clock source data in configuration PDUs from each node spread throughout the network. Using the information propagated by the configuration PDUs, NCDP builds a spanning network clock tree. Note that NCDP determines the root clock source based on information you provide. A derivative of the spanning tree algorithm and protocols specified in ANSI/IEEE Standard 802.1d are used to construct the network clock spanning tree. If you provide no information, NCDP selects a root based on a sequence of possible tie-breakers.

NCDP can rely on the clock priority alone to determine the root clock source. As needed, NCDP uses the following hierarchy of criteria for finding the root clock source. For example, if 1, 2, and 3 in the following list are the same throughout the clocking domain, the ATM address (4) serves as tie-breaker:

1. Priority (should be sufficient to find the root).

2. Stratum level.

3. Clock source reference.

4. Switch ATM address, assuming this address is unique (a unique address prevents serious problems.)

Convergence is reached when all switches using NCDP have received PDUs with the clock configuration values from the total number of switches equal to the maximum-length clocking path. (The maximum clocking path is the largest number of hops between any two switches in the clocking domain. This value is configurable through the cnfncdp command.) Upon convergence, NCDP determines the root clock source and builds the spanning tree.

How NCDP Propagates the Root Clock

This sections introduces how NCDP uses NNI ports for propagating the best clock.

In Figure 2-6, Node 1 has a BITS device that has an assigned clock priority of 1, so it has the highest priority of all NCDP sources in the network and is therefore the root. Node 1 transmits its clock through two NNI ports (1a and 1b) to Node 2. Node 2 chooses port 2a as its root clock source because port 2a has a lower numerical significance then port 2b. (Node 2 also has a BITS device, but its priority is 10, making it the back-up clock source in case the root clock source becomes unavailable.) In the same way, Node 3 and Node 4 receive and pass on the best clock.


Note No NCDP command explicitly configures a "secondary" source (unlike manual clock commands), and no display command calls this source the "secondary." The network administrator must know which user-specified parameters can lead NCDP to determine the root and back-up sources.


Figure 2-6 Distribution of a Master Clock

Usage Guidelines for the cnfncdpclksrc Command

Planning for network synchronization should include factors such as:

The eventual size of the network

The presence of switches that do not support NCDP

Whether switches are planned for distant locations


Note For example, a network may initially exist in one city and have one BITS device, but groups of nodes eventually may exist thousands of miles from each other and have one BITS device in each location.Cisco recommends that the primary and backup BITS sources reside in two different switches to prevent a single point of failure.

On a node with redundant PXMs, you should connect the BITS lines through a Y-cable connector.


Syntax

cnfncdpclksrc <portid> <prs-id> [e1 | t1] [-priority priority] [-stratumLevel level]

Syntax Description

portid

The port ID has the format of a PNNI physical port number, as follows:

For a BITS device in an Cisco MGX 8850 or MGX 8950 chassis, portid is 7.35 for the upper connector or 7.36 for the lower connector on the PXM user interface (UI) back card.

For a BITS source in a Cisco MGX 8830 chassis, the portid is either 1.35 for the upper connector or 1.36 for the lower connector on the user interface back card.

For the internal oscillator, the port ID is 255.255.

For a UNI, the port has the usual format of a PNNI physical port ID.

prs-id

The primary source ID (prs-id) is either 0 for external or 255 for internal. The external source is a BITS device or a UNI. The internal primary source is the free-running oscillator on the PXM back card.

Possible values: 0 or 255

Default: 255

e1 | t1

The clock type pertains to a BITS only. Specify it only if the port ID is 7.35, 7.36, 1.35, or 1.36.

Type t1 or e1. This parameter refers to the BITS line type and not to line types on a service module.

Default: e1

-priority

NCDP uses the priority of the current clock source to determine the network-wide root clock source. The range of 1-255 is sufficient to determine a root source within the maximum domain length of 200 nodes.

Range: 1-255 (the lower the number, the higher the priority)

Default: 128 (the priority of the internal oscillator)

-stratumLevel

Use the stratum level indicated in the manufacturer's documentation. (The manufacturer of the BITS device provides information about the clock.) The internal oscillator on the PXM45 has a stratum level of 3.

The descending order of possible entries are as follows: 1, 2E, 2, 3E, 3, 4E

Default: 3


Related Commands

cnfncdp, cnfncdpport, delncdpclksrc, dspncdp, dspncdpclksrc, dspncdpclksrcs, dspncdpport, dspncdpports

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SUPER_GP


Example

For this example, take the following steps:

1. Display the current clock configuration by using the dspncdp command. Note that no NCDP configuration has occurred: the mode is "manual;" the root stratum and priority are "0" and "N/A," respectively; and the last clock change timestamp and reason are "N/A" and "none," respectively.

2. Enable NCDP and keep the defaults for the other parameters.

3. Display NCDP configuration. Note that all the fields cited in the first step have changed.

4. Display all the NCDP clock sources by using the dspncdpclksrcs command. Only one source exists.

5. Configure the internal oscillator to have a priority of 120 by using the cnfncdpclksrc command.

6. Display the local NCDP clock source by using the dspncdpclksrc command.

7. Again run dspncdp to see that the Root Priority has changed from th default of 128 to 120.

p2spvc2.8.PXM.a > dspncdp

Distribution Mode               : manual 
Node stratum level              : 3
Max network diameter            : 20
Hello time interval             : 500
Holddown time interval          : 500
Topology change time interval   : 500
Root Clock Source               : 255.255
Root Clock Source Status        : Good
Root Stratum Level              : unknown
Root Priority                   : 0
Last clk src change time        : N/A
Last clk src change reason      : None

PXM1E_SJ.7.PXM.a > cnfncdp -distributionMode 1

PXM1E_SJ.7.PXM.a > dspncdp
Distribution Mode               : ncdp 
Node stratum level              : 3
Max network diameter            : 20
Hello time interval             : 500
Holddown time interval          : 500
Topology change time interval   : 500
Root Clock Source               : 255.255
Root Clock Source Status        : Good
Root Stratum Level              : 3
Root Priority                   : 128
Last clk src change time        : Nov 19 2002 13:21:46 
Last clk src change reason      : Topology Changed

PXM1E_SJ.7.PXM.a > dspncdpclksrcs

PortId    Best clk src    Priority   Stratum level  Prs id          Health
255.255   Yes             128        3              255(internal)   Good    

PXM1E_SJ.7.PXM.a > cnfncdpclksrc 255.255 255 -priority 120

PXM1E_SJ.7.PXM.a > dspncdpclksrc 255.255
Best clock source           : Yes
Priority                    : 120
Stratum level               : 3
Primary reference src id    : 255(internal)
Health                      : Good

PXM1E_SJ.7.PXM.a > dspncdp
Distribution Mode               : ncdp 
Node stratum level              : 3
Max network diameter            : 20
Hello time interval             : 500
Holddown time interval          : 500
Topology change time interval   : 500
Root Clock Source               : 255.255
Root Clock Source Status        : Good
Root Stratum Level              : 3
Root Priority                   : 120
Last clk src change time        : Nov 19 2002 13:21:46
Last clk src change reason      : Topology Changed

cnfncdpport

Configure NCDP Port—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfncdpport command lets you modify NCDP-specific parameters on an NNI port.


Note When NCDP is enabled, it automatically runs on NNI, AINI, and IISP links. For VNNIs or EVNNIs, NCDP must also be enabled on a per-interface basis.


After you enable NCDP by using the cnfncdp command, it is enabled on all NNI ports on the node. (At the node level, NCDP is disabled by default.) The cnfncdpport command lets you do the following:

Disable NCDP on an NNI port to define the boundary of a clocking domain for reasons such as:

The domain has reached a certain size in terms of node count or geographical area.

The interface on the far end switch does not support NCDP (for example, a switch from a non-Cisco vendor).

Modify the VPI, VCI, or bandwidth parameters of the signaling channel. The reserved VPI/VCI for NCDP signaling is 0/34.


Note The VPI and VCI must be configured to fall within the partition range of the port. In some cases, where the VCI minimum in a partition was set to 35, you may need to reduce the minimum VCI on the port partition to 34.

Also, for NCDP to work, the VPI and VCI at each end of the channel must be the same.


Modify the administrative cost of the port to increase or decrease the likelihood that the routing protocol will use the port for the signaling channel.

Syntax

cnfncdpport portid [-ncdp enable | disable] [-vpi vpi] [-vci vci] [-adminCost cost] [-pcr pcr]
[-scr scr ] [-mbs mbs]

Syntax Description

portid

The portid is an NNI. The format of the PNNI physical port ID can vary, as follows:

On a PXM45: slot:subslot.port:subport

On a PXM1E for UNI/NNI back card: slot:subslot.port:subport. On the UNI/NNI back card, the subslot is always 2, but the slot depends on the chassis, as follows:

In an MGX 8850 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 7.

In an MGX 8830 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 1.

On a PXM1E for a narrowband service module (NBSM): slot.port.

For more details, see the section, "PNNI Format," in "Introduction."

-ncdp

Enable or disable NCDP on the port. Type the word "disable" or "enable."

Default: enable

-vpi

The reserved VPI of the signaling channel. Normally, no reason exists to change it. Note that the VPI at the local and remote ends of the channel must match.

Range: 0-4095

Default: 0

Note The default minimum VPI/VCI is 0/34 even if the minimum VPI/VCI on an AXSM partition is 1/35.

However, if a protocol such as MPLS, PNNI, or SSCOP has reserved 0/34 in its partition, NCDP cannot use 0/34. Furthermore, VNNIs or EVNNIs should not have VPIs that conflict with the NCDP signaling channel.

-vci

The reserved VCI of the signaling channel. Normally, no reason exists to change it. Note that the VCI at the local and remote ends of the channel must match.

Range: 32-65535

Default: 34

Note The default minimum VPI/VCI is 0/34 even if the minimum VPI/VCI on an AXSM partition is 1/35.

However, if a protocol such as MPLS, PNNI, or SSCOP has reserved 0/34 in its partition, NCDP cannot use 0/34. Furthermore, VNNIs or EVNNIs should not have VPIs that conflict with the NCDP signaling channel.

-adminCost

You can use the option to raise or lower the routing cost of the port. For example, if the equipment were in an area with a large amount of electronic noise, or if the switch carried a particularly large amount of traffic, you might want to raise the cost.

Range: 1-(2^24-1)

Default: 10

-pcr

Default: 250 cells per second

-scr

Default: 150 cells per second

-mbs

Default: 100 cells


Related Commands

cnfncdp, cnfncdclksrc, delncdpclksrc, dspncdp, dspncdpclksrc, dspncdpclksrcs, dspncdpport, dspncdpports

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SUPER_GP


Example

cnfndidrtes

Configure Node Identifier for All Preferred Routes—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfndidrtes command lets you update a node ID in all preferred routes where that node exists so you do not need to update affected routes manually. This command relates to the Preferred Route feature is useful only when a node's ID is changed. (See Example.) This command has only local significance.

Syntax

cnfndidrtes <oldNodeId> <newNodeId>

Syntax Description

oldNodeId

The oldNodeId is the 22-octet node ID to change.

newNodeId

The newNodeId is the new 22-octet node ID.


Related Commands

addpref, dsppref, dspprefs

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example

In this example, change one node ID with the following steps:

1. Display all the network nodes by using the dspnwnodes command.

2. Display all preferred routes by using the dspprefs command.

3. Use cnfndidrtes to change a node ID to a new node ID, as follows:

Old: 56:160:47.009181000000003071f80186.003071f80186.01

New: 34:160:47.009181000000003071f80186.003071f80186.01

4. Check the result by using the dspprefs command.

orses17.1.PXM.a > dspnwnodes
Total Number of Network Nodes: 11
Node Identifier                                    PXM    Node name
---------------                                    ---    ---------
56:160:47.009181000000000164444b01.000164444b01.01 PXM45 p2spvc9
56:160:47.00918100000000036b5e30b8.00036b5e30b8.01 PXM45 p2spvc18
56:160:47.00918100000000500ffde80b.00500ffde80b.01 PXM1   orses13
56:160:47.009181000000001029300129.001029300129.01 PXM1   orses14
56:160:47.00918100000000107bc15355.00107bc15355.01 PXM1   orses15
56:160:47.00918100000000d058ac24a2.00d058ac24a2.01 PXM1   orses16
56:160:47.0091810000000007856e1216.0007856e1216.01 PXM1   1bmgx101
56:160:47.009181000000000164444423.000164444423.01 PXM45 p2spvc8
56:160:47.00918100000000d058ac2655.00d058ac2655.01 PXM1   orses10
56:160:47.009181000000003071f80186.003071f80186.01 PXM1   orses17
34:160:47.009181000000003071f80186.003071f80186.01 PXM1   orses17-n
orses17.1.PXM.a > dspprefs

total number of preferred routes = 4

Route Identifier: 1
DestNE position : 2
ne1               56:160:47.009181000000003071f80186.003071f80186.01/6.1
ne2               56:160:47.009181000000000164444423.000164444423.01/1:1.1:1

Route Identifier: 2
DestNE position : 2
ne1               56:160:47.009181000000003071f80186.003071f80186.01/6.2
ne2               56:160:47.009181000000000164444423.000164444423.01/1:1.1:1

Route Identifier: 4
DestNE position : 2
ne1               orses17/6.1
ne2               p2spvc8/1:1.2:2

Route Identifier: 5
DestNE position : 2
ne1               orses17/6.1
ne2               p2spvc8/1:1.1:1

orses17.1.PXM.a > cnfndidrtes 56:160:47.009181000000003071f80186.003071f80186.01 
34:160:47.009181000000003071f80186.003071f80186.01
Update pref route 1
Update pref route 2
Update pref route 4
Update pref route 5

orses17.1.PXM.a > dspprefs

total number of preferred routes = 4

Route Identifier: 1
DestNE position : 2
ne1               34:160:47.009181000000003071f80186.003071f80186.01/6.1
ne2               56:160:47.009181000000000164444423.000164444423.01/1:1.1:1

Route Identifier: 2
DestNE position : 2
ne1               34:160:47.009181000000003071f80186.003071f80186.01/6.2
ne2               56:160:47.009181000000000164444423.000164444423.01/1:1.1:1

Route Identifier: 4
DestNE position : 2
ne1               orses17-n/6.1
ne2               p2spvc8/1:1.2:2

Route Identifier: 5
DestNE position : 2
ne1               orses17-n/6.1
ne2               p2spvc8/1:1.1:1

cnfndparms (PXM45)

Configure Node Parameters—PXM45

The cnfndparms command lets you configure a diverse set of node-level parameters.


Note Variations exist in the available parameters according to controller card and chassis. For the parameters on a PXM1E, see the next description of the cnfndparms command.


The parameters consist of an option number and a value or a yes/no choice. The configuration resides in non-volatile RAM and thus survives a system reset or power cycle. Due to the wide range of options and the possible values assigned to these options, the sections that follow describe each option and later describe the values you can assign (a hexadecimal number, a yes or no entry, and so on).

To see the current configuration for these parameters, use the dspndparms command. For information on the alarms that may relate to the parameters, see dspndalms and dspenvalms.

Maximum Card Resets

The first two options are a window (in seconds) for counting resets and a number of resets. The combined purpose of these parameters is to prevent an endless loop of card resets.

Option 1 lets you select the sliding window of time for counting the resets of the shelf management cards. The characteristics of the time period option are:

The units of measure are seconds.

The number is a 16-bit decimal number and therefore has the range 0-65355.

A 0 means an infinite time period. The impact of an infinite time period is that only a specified count of resets can stop the resets.

The default is 3600 seconds (1 hour).

Option 2 lets you select the maximum number of resets of the shelf management card group per time period. Its characteristics are:

The number is an eight-bit decimal number and therefore has the range 0-255. The meaning of a 0 for this parameter is an infinite number of resets—the resets can continue indefinitely.

The default is 3 resets per time period.

Shutting Off Alarms for Absent Core Cards

This option lets you specify whether a redundant core card that is removed from the backplane causes an alarm. (The core cards are the PXMs and SRMs.) The purpose of this option is to let you turn off alarms when the node configuration shows core card redundancy but one card stays out of the backplane for an extended period of time. The purpose is to let you turn off alarms until you re-install the card.

Enable Expanded Memory for 250K Connections

This option lets you enable expanded memory on the PXM45 to support 250K connections. To enable expanded memory, a pair of PXM45/Bs or PXM45/Cs must reside in the system.


Caution Once enabled, this option cannot be disabled even if you use the clrallcnf command.

Required Power Supply Module Bitmap

This option lets you specify the locations of required power supplies in an AC-powered system. If any one of the required supplies is removed, an alarm results. (See also the descriptions of dspndalms and dspenvalms regarding alarms.) Additional supplies can also exist in the power supply tray, but removing one of the additional supplies does not cause an alarm.

An AC power supply tray holds six power supply units (PSUs). (Refer to the hardware installation guide for details.) A supply belongs to one of two groups: A1-A3 or B1-B3. An 8-bit hexadecimal number identifies an individual supply. The value is the sum of any combination of hexadecimal numbers. For example, the value for requiring A1 and B1 is:

0x01 + 0x10 = 0x11

Required Fan Trays

This option lets you specify required fan trays for the purpose of alarm generation. You can specify either or both fan trays as required. The value is an 8-bit hexadecimal number.


Note AN MGX 8850 or MGX 8950 chassis requires two fan trays for cooling regardless of the number you specify for alarm purposes with the cnfndparms command.


0x0 means no fan try requirement. (The enclosure still must have at least one fan tray for cooling.

0x01 refers to the bottom fan tray.

0x02 refers to the top fan tray.

To require top and bottom fan trays, for example, enter a hexadecimal 3 for the option value:

0x01+0x02=0x03

Trap Manager Aging Timeout

This option lets you specify the number of hours that a trap manager can age before the switch deletes that trap manager's registration. This node-level setting applies to all registered trap managers. The default of 0 means that the registration of trap managers on the switch do not age. The only applicable trap managers for this parameter are Cisco WAN Manager (CWM) workstations.

The application of a non-zero aging parameter is an environment where the IP address of the network management stations are likely to change or where the workstations themselves are likely to be moved. Non-CWM users or managers of a stable network manager environment should leave the setting at zero.

Primary IP Interface for Network Management

This option lets you specify a primary interface type for discovery by CWM. The main purpose is to let you change from the default ATM interface to a LAN interface for use by CWM. The context of the LAN choice is where you want to build an IP connectivity infrastructure for CWM by using LAN interfaces. After specifying a LAN interface, CWM discovers this type while doing an ILMI MIB-walk.

Secondary IP Interface for Network Management

This option automatically enables CWM to learn the secondary IP interface by doing a MIB-walk and reading the PNNI topology state element table. If you do not enable this feature, the PTSEs do not flood the secondary IP address.

Automatic Setting of Cellbus Clock Speed for RPM

This option lets you enable the automatic setting of Cellbus clock speeds for the Route Processor Module-Premium (RPM-PR). If you enable this feature, the switch automatically adjusts the Cellbus clock as needed when you insert or remove an RPM-PR at a particular Cellbus. If this feature is enabled, for example, and two RPM-PRs are plugged into a Cellbus, the clock speed is 42 MHz. If you remove one RPM-PR, the clock drops to 21 MHz.

The Cellbus clock rates must be correct for the RPM-PR to do traffic shaping. If clock-setting is not automatic, you would have to adjust clock speeds by using the cnfcbclk command. To see whether automatic or manual clock setting is enabled, use the dspcbclk command.

If you turn on this feature and one or more AXSMs is running at 42 MHz, the clock for all such AXSMs immediately becomes 21 MHz regardless of how many AXSMs reside in the switch.

Inband Node-to-Node IP Connectivity

This option lets you enable or disable inband, node-to-node IP connectivity so you can telnet from the CLI of one switch to the CLI of another switch.

After you telnet, an SVC is set up between the local node and the remote node. (The SVC is the transmission medium for all IP traffic between two nodes, yet the SVC and telnet are independent of each other: the telnet is just one kind of traffic.) If you disable this feature after the SVC is created then proceed to transfer more IP data between nodes, the transfer of IP data is successful. In fact, it works without disruption until the SVC is torn down. Note that the SVC is torn down when no IP traffic traverses the SVC for 15 minutes.

To exit the CLI of the remote switch—to break the connection and terminate the telnet session—enter the exit or bye command. See Examples section for this feature.

This parameter is enabled by default after you run the clrallcnf command. On the other hand, if you upgrade from a software release that does not have this parameter, the default state is disabled.

PXM Switchover on Back Card Mismatch

When enabled, this option causes a switchover of redundant PXMs if the incorrect, field-replaceable back card (FRU) is inserted. The existence of various models of the PXM45, variations in the PXM1Es, and two models of the user interface (UI) back card have led to the creation of an option that lets you specify that if the incorrect combination is detected, the redundant pair switches over. See for the supported and disallowed combinations. The "yes" indicates a supported combination, and the "no" indicates a mismatched combination.

Table 2-10 Supported and Mismatched PXM and UI Card Combinations 

Controller
PXM-UI-S3
PXM-UI-S3/B

PXM45/A

Yes

No

PXM45/B

Yes

No

PXM45/C

No

Yes

PXM1E with R7000 processor

Yes*

Yes

PXM1E-8-OC3

No

Yes

*Supported, but Cisco recommends against this combination.


Disabling the High Priority LCN for Inter-Process Communication

The switch reserves two logical connection numbers (LCNs) for inter-process communication (IPC)—in this instance, the communication between applications on different cards. One LCN carries low-priority messages, and the other LCN carries high-priority (urgent) messages. By default, both priorities of LCN are available, and the cards select the priority for messages as needed.

This option lets you disable the high-priority LCN so that the applications exchanges all messages on the low priority LCN.

Option Values

This command requires various number formats to support its parameters, as follows:

Boolean yes/no

An 8-bit decimal has the range 0-255.

A 16-bit decimal number has the range 0-65535.

A 32-bit decimal number has the range 0-4294962795.

An 8-bit hexadecimal number has the range 0-0xff.

A 16-bit hexadecimal number has the range 0-0xffff

A 32-bit hexadecimal number has the range 0-0xffffffff.

Each option description states the type of number involved and the actual range for that option. Alternatively, the description states if the choice is "yes" to enable of "no" to disable.

Syntax

cnfndparms <option_number> <option_value>

Syntax Description for PXM45

option number

A number that selects the option. Refer to the description of each option at the beginning of this description for important details and warnings.

Range: 1-14

Option 1

Option 1 is the number of seconds to count the resets of the shelf management cards. The range is 0-65355 (a 16-bit decimal number). The default is 3600 seconds (1 hour). A 0 means an infinite time period. The impact of an infinite time period is that only a specified count of resets can stop the resets.

Option 2

This option lets you set the maximum number of resets of the shelf management card group per time period. (The time period is specified through Option 1.) The number is an 8-bit decimal number and therefore has the range 0-255. The meaning of a 0 for this parameter is an infinite number of resets—the resets can continue without end.

Default: 3 resets per period.

Option 3

This option lets you enable or disable core card redundancy. Enter "yes" to enable or "no" to disable alarms on a missing, redundant core card. The default is enable, which means an alarm appears in the absence of a redundant core card.

Option 4

This option lets you enable or disable expanded memory on the PXM45/B or PXM45/C to support 250K connections. Enter "yes" to enable or "no" to disable The default is no. Once enabled, this option cannot be disabled—even by the clrallcnf command.

Option 5

This option you specify the locations of required power supplies in an AC-powered system. The number is 8-bit hexadecimal:

0x0 (the default) means no specified power supply requirement related to this particular form of alarm generation (although the configuration must still meet the power requirements of the switch).

0x01: PSU A1 is required.

0x02: PSU A2 is required.

0x04: PSU A3 is required.

0x10: PSU B1 is required.

0x20: PSU B2 is required.

0x40: PSU B3 is required.

Option 6

This option lets you specify the location of one or more required fan trays. The number is 8-bit hexadecimal:

0 for no specific fan try requirement

0x01 for bottom fan tray required

0x02 for top fan tray required

Option 7

This option lets you specify the number of hours that a trap manager can age before the switch deletes that trap manager's registration. This node-level setting applies to all registered trap managers. For important details, see the section, "Trap Manager Aging Timeout."

Option 8

This option automatically enables Cisco WAN Manager (CWM) to learn the primary IP interface by doing a MIB-walk and reading the PNNI topology state element table. The range of entries for this option is 0-2, with the following significance:

0: The atm0 interface is the primary.

1: No interface is used. This choice prevents ILMI node discovery.

2: The lnPci0 interface is the primary.

Option 9

This option automatically enables Cisco WAN Manager (CWM) to learn the secondary IP interface by doing a MIB-walk and reading the PNNI topology state element table. The range of entries for this option is 0-2, with the following significance:

0: The atm0 interface is the secondary.

1: No interface is used as the secondary.

2: The lnPci0 interface is the secondary.

Option 10

This option lets you enable the automatic setting of Cellbus clock speed. In the current release, it applies to RPM-PR only. The choices are "yes" and "no."

Default: yes

Option 11

This option lets you enable inband, node-to-node IP connectivity so you can telnet between this CLI and other switches where this feature is enabled. Type "yes" to enable or "no" to disable.

Default: enabled

Option 12

This option is reserved for future use. 0 No Gang, 1 Left, 2 Right, 3 Both Gang Present

Option 13

This option enables automatic switch-over when a FRU back card mismatch occurs. Type a 1 to enable or a 0 to disable this feature. This choice relates to the combinations of controller card models and the user interface (UI) back card. Refer to the section, "PXM Switchover on Back Card Mismatch," for information on the combinations.

Default: 0 (disabled).

Option 14

Type yes to disable the high priority LCN for IPC between cards. Type no to remove the disable on high priority communication between cards. The effects of each choice are as follows:

Yes: the card-to-card, high priority LCN is not used. This choice forces all IPC traffic between cards to share the same, low-priority LCN and prevents applications from sending urgent messages or critical data over a high priority connection to applications on other cards.

No: the card-to-card, high priority LCN is used. This choice allows applications to choose the appropriate priority for carrying IPC traffic between cards. An application with a purpose for sending urgent or critical data selects the high priority LCN (if both cards support the high priority LCN). Other messages take the low priority LCN as needed.

Default: No

option value

The option value can be a decimal or hexadecimal number or a "yes" or "no" entry. The following shows the possible ranges or values for each type of numeric option.

8-bit decimal: 0-255

16-bit decimal: 0-65535

32-bit decimal: 0-4294962795

8-bit hexadecimal: 0-0xff

16-bit hexadecimal: 0-0xffff

32-bit hexadecimal: 0-0xffffffff


Related Commands

dspndparms, dspndalms, dspenvalms, cnfcbclk, dspcbclk

Attributes

Log: no

State: active

Privilege: SUPER_GP


Examples

Specify 30 minutes (1800 seconds) for Card Reset Sliding Window. You can enter the option number and option value without prompting. The system subsequently uses the parameters and shows the result.

MGX8850.7.PXM.a > cnfndparms 1 1800
NODE CONFIGURATION OPTIONS
Opt#  Value       Type           Description
----  -----       ----           -----------

1 1800 16bit Decimal SHM Card Reset Sliding Window (secs)


Enable automatic setting of Cellbus clock speed. Type the cnfndparms command without parameters to see all options, then enter "10" and "y" at the subsequent prompt. Note that this card is a PXM45. Afterwards, check the status by using the dspcbclk command.

scott.7.PXM.a > cnfndparm

scott                          System Rev:03.00 Sep. 25, 2002
11:06:04 PST
MGX8850                                              Node Alarm:NONE
NODE CONFIGURATION OPTIONS
Opt#  Value       Type           Description
----  -----       ----           -----------
1     3600        16bit Decimal  SHM Card Reset Sliding Window (secs)
2     3           8bit Decimal   SHM Max Card Resets Per Window (0 = infinite)
3     Yes         Boolean        Core Redundancy Enabled
4     No          Boolean        Expanded Memory on PXM45B Enabled
5     0x0         8bit Hex       Required Power Supply Module Bitmap
6     0x0         8bit Hex       Required Fan Tray Unit Bitmap
7     0           8bit Decimal   Trap Manager Aging timeout value(Hour(s))
8     atm0        8bit Decimal   Primary IP interface for Netmgmt
9     lnPci0      8bit Decimal   Secondary IP interface for Netmgmt
10    Yes         Boolean        Auto Setting of Cellbus Clock Rate Enabled
11    Yes         Boolean        Inband Node-to-Node IP Connectivity Enabled

Enter option number (1-14):10
NODE CONFIGURATION OPTIONS
Opt#  Value       Type           Description
----  -----       ----           -----------
10    Yes         Boolean        Auto Setting of Cellbus Clock Rate Enabled
Enable/Disable Automatic Cellbus Clock Rate Setting. If option set to:
    Yes: Automatic Setting Enabled. This allows for automatic
           determination of cellbus clock rate depending on the
           insertion and removal of cards such as RPM in the shelf.
    No:   Automatic Setting Disabled. This prevents automatic
           determination of cellbus clock rate. Manual manipulation
           must be performed using the cnfcbclk CLI command.

Enter value for option 10 (Y/Nay
NODE CONFIGURATION OPTIONS
Opt#  Value       Type           Description
----  -----       ----           -----------
10    Yes         Boolean        Auto Setting of Cellbus Clock Rate

Enable

Determine whether automatic clock setting is enabled by using the dspcbclk command.

scott.7.PXM.a > dspcbclk

     CellBus    Rate (MHz)    Slots     Allowable Rates (MHz)
    ----------------------------------------------------------
       CB1         21        1, 2            21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB2         42        3, 4            21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB3         21        5, 6            21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB4         21        17 - 22         21
       CB5         21        9, 10           21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB6         21        11, 12          21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB7         21        13, 14          21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB8         21        25 - 30         21

scott.7.PXM.a >

cnfndparms (PXM1E)

Configure Node Parameters—PXM1E

The cnfndparms command lets you configure a diverse set of node-level parameters.


Note Variations exist in the available parameters according to controller card and chassis. For the parameters on a PXM45, see the previous description of the cnfndparms command.

A Syntax Description for each chassis type due to a difference in available parameters.


The parameters consist of an option number and a value or a yes/no choice. The configuration resides in non-volatile RAM and thus survives a system reset or power cycle. Due to the wide range of options and the possible values assigned to these options, the sections that follow describe each option and later describe the values you can assign.

To see the current configuration for these parameters, use the dspndparms command. For information on the alarms that may relate to the parameters, see dspndalms and dspenvalms.

Maximum Card Resets

The first two options are a window (in seconds) for counting resets and a number of resets. The combined purpose of these parameters is to prevent an endless loop of card resets.

Option 1 lets you select the sliding window of time for counting the resets of the shelf management cards. The characteristics of the time period option are:

The units of measure are seconds.

The number is a 16-bit decimal number and therefore has the range 0-65355.

A 0 means an infinite time period. The impact of an infinite time period is that only a specified count of resets can stop the resets.

The default is 3600 seconds (1 hour).

Option 2 lets you select the maximum number of resets of the shelf management card group per time period. Its characteristics are:

The number is an eight-bit decimal number and therefore has the range 0-255. The meaning of a 0 for this parameter is an infinite number of resets—the resets can continue indefinitely.

The default is 3 resets per time period.

Shutting Off Alarms for Absent Core Cards

This option lets you specify whether a redundant core card that is removed from the backplane causes an alarm. (The core cards are the PXMs and SRMs.) The purpose of this option is to let you turn off alarms when the node configuration shows core card redundancy but one card stays out of the backplane for an extended period of time. The purpose is to let you turn off alarms until you re-install the card.

Required Power Supply Module Bitmap

This option lets you specify the locations of required power supplies in an AC-powered system. If any one of the required supplies is removed, an alarm results. (See also the descriptions of dspndalms and dspenvalms regarding alarms.) If you remove a power supply not identified as a required supply, no alarm is triggered.

An AC power supply tray holds six power supply units (PSUs). (Refer to the hardware installation guide for details.) A supply belongs to one of two groups: A1-A3 or B1-B3. An 8-bit hexadecimal number identifies an individual supply. The value for this option can be the sum of any combination of hexadecimal numbers. For example, the value for requiring A1 and B1 is:

0x01 + 0x10 = 0x11

Required Fan Trays

This option lets you specify required fan trays for the purpose of alarm generation. You can specify either or both fan trays as required. The value is an 8-bit hexadecimal number.


Note An MGX 8850 chassis requires two fan trays for cooling regardless of the number you specify for alarm purposes with the cnfndparms command.

An MGX 8830 chassis has only one fan tray, so this option is not available on the MGX 8830 chassis.


0x0 means no fan try requirement. (The enclosure still must have at least one fan tray for cooling.

0x01 refers to the bottom fan tray.

0x02 refers to the top fan tray.

To require top and bottom fan trays, for example, enter a hexadecimal 3 for the option value:

0x01 + 0x02 = 0x03

Trap Manager Aging Timeout

This option lets you specify the number of hours that a trap manager can age before the switch deletes that trap manager's registration. This node-level setting applies to all registered trap managers. The default of 0 means that the registration of trap managers on the switch do not age. The only applicable trap managers for this parameter are Cisco WAN Manager workstations.

The application of a non-zero aging parameter is an environment where the IP address of the network management stations are likely to change or where the workstations themselves are likely to be moved. Non-CWM users or managers of a stable network manager environment should leave the setting at zero.

Primary IP Interface for Network Management

This option lets you specify a primary interface type for discovery by Cisco WAN Manager. The main purpose is to let you change from the default ATM interface to a LAN interface for use by CWM. The context of the LAN choice is where you want to build an IP connectivity infrastructure for CWM by using LAN interfaces. After specifying a LAN interface, CWM discovers this type while doing an ILMI MIB-walk.

Secondary IP Interface for Network Management

This option automatically enables Cisco WAN Manager (CWM) to learn the secondary IP interface by doing a MIB-walk and reading the PNNI topology state element table. If you do not enable this feature, the PTSEs do not flood the secondary IP address.

Automatic Setting of Cellbus Clock Speed for RPM

This option lets you enable the automatic setting of Cellbus clock speeds for the Route Processor Module-Premium (RPM-PR). If you enable this feature, the switch automatically adjusts the Cellbus clock as needed when you insert or remove an RPM-PR at a particular Cellbus. If this feature is enabled, for example, and two RPM-PRs are plugged into a Cellbus, the clock speed is 42 MHz. If you remove one RPM-PR, the clock drops to 21 MHz.

The Cellbus clock rates must be correct for the RPM-PR to do traffic shaping. If clock-setting is not automatic, you would have to adjust clock speeds by using the cnfcbclk command. To see whether automatic or manual clock setting is enabled, use the dspcbclk command.

Inband Node-to-Node IP Connectivity

This option lets you enable or disable inband, node-to-node IP connectivity so you can telnet from the CLI of one switch to the CLI of another switch.

After you telnet, an SVC is set up between the local node and the remote node. (The SVC is the transmission medium for all IP traffic between two nodes, yet the SVC and telnet are independent of each other: the telnet is just one kind of traffic.) If you disable this feature after the SVC is created then proceed to transfer more IP data between nodes, the transfer of IP data is successful. In fact, it works without disruption until the SVC is torn down. Note that the SVC is torn down when no IP traffic traverses the SVC for 15 minutes.

To exit the CLI of the remote switch—to break the connection and terminate the telnet session—enter the exit or bye command. See Examples section for this feature.

This parameter is enabled by default after you run the clrallcnf command. On the other hand, if you upgrade from a software release that does not have this parameter, the default state is disabled.

PXM Switchover on Back Card Mismatch

When enabled, this option causes a switchover of redundant PXMs if the incorrect, field-replaceable back card (FRU) is inserted. The existence of various models of the PXM45, variations in the PXM1Es, and two models of the user interface (UI) back card have led to the creation of an option that lets you specify that if the incorrect combination is detected, the redundant pair switches over. See for the supported and disallowed combinations. The "yes" indicates a supported combination, and the "no" indicates a mismatched combination.

Table 2-11 Supported and Mismatched PXM and UI Card Combinations 

Controller
PXM-UI-S3
PXM-UI-S3/B

PXM45/A

Yes

No

PXM45/B

Yes

No

PXM45/C

No

Yes

PXM1E with R7000 processor

Yes*

Yes

PXM1E-8-OC3

No

Yes

*Supported, but Cisco recommends against this combination.


Disabling the High Priority LCN for Inter-Process Communication

The switch reserves two logical connection numbers (LCNs) for inter-process communication (IPC)—in this instance, the communication between applications on different cards. One LCN carries low-priority messages, and the other LCN carries high-priority (urgent) messages. By default, both priorities of LCN are available, and the cards select the priority for messages as needed.

This option lets you disable the high-priority LCN so that the applications exchanges all messages on the low priority LCN.

Option Values

This command requires various number formats to support its parameters, as follows:

Boolean yes/no

An 8-bit decimal has the range 0-255.

A 16-bit decimal number has the range 0-65535.

A 32-bit decimal number has the range 0-4294962795.

An 8-bit hexadecimal number has the range 0-0xff.

A 16-bit hexadecimal number has the range 0-0xffff

A 32-bit hexadecimal number has the range 0-0xffffffff.

Each option description states the type of number involved and the actual range for that option. Alternatively, the description states if the choice is "yes" to enable of "no" to disable.

Syntax

cnfndparms <option_number> <option_value>

Syntax Description for PXM1E in an MGX 8850 Chassis

option number

A number that selects the option. Refer to the description of each option at the beginning of this description for important details and warnings.

Range: 1-13

Option 1

Option 1 is the number of seconds to count the resets of the shelf management cards. The range is 0-65355 (a 16-bit decimal number). The default is 3600 seconds (1 hour). A 0 means an infinite time period. The impact of an infinite time period is that only a specified count of resets can stop the resets.

Option 2

This option lets you set the maximum number of resets of the shelf management card group per time period. (The time period is specified through Option 1.) The number is an 8-bit decimal number and therefore has the range 0-255. The meaning of a 0 for this parameter is an infinite number of resets—the resets can continue without end.

Default: 3 resets per period.

Option 3

This option lets you enable or disable core card redundancy. Enter "yes" to enable or "no" to disable alarms on a missing, redundant core card. The default is enable, which means an alarm appears in the absence of a redundant core card.

Option 4

This option you specify the locations of required power supplies in an AC-powered system. The number is 8-bit hexadecimal:

0x0 (the default) means no specified power supply requirement related to this particular form of alarm generation (although the configuration must still meet the power requirements of the switch).

0x01: PSU A1 is required.

0x02: PSU A2 is required.

0x04: PSU A3 is required.

0x10: PSU B1 is required.

0x20: PSU B2 is required.

0x40: PSU B3 is required.

Option 5

This option lets you specify the location of one or more required fan trays. The number is 8-bit hexadecimal:

0 for no specific fan try requirement

0x01 for bottom fan tray required

0x02 for top fan tray required

Option 6

This option lets you specify the number of hours that a trap manager can age before the switch deletes that trap manager's registration. This setting applies to all registered trap managers. For important details, see the section, "Trap Manager Aging Timeout."

Option 7

This option automatically enables Cisco WAN Manager (CWM) to learn the primary IP interface by doing a MIB-walk and reading the PNNI topology state element table. The range of entries for this option is 0-2, with the following significance:

0: The atm0 interface is the primary.

1: No interface is used. This choice prevents ILMI node discovery.

2: The lnPci0 interface is the primary.

Option 8

This option automatically enables Cisco WAN Manager (CWM) to learn the secondary IP interface by doing a MIB-walk and reading the PNNI topology state element table. The range of entries for this option is 0-2, with the following significance:

0: The atm0 interface is the secondary.

1: No interface is used as the secondary.

2: The lnPci0 interface is the secondary.

Option 9

This option lets you enable the automatic setting of Cellbus clock speed. In the current release, it applies to RPM-PR only. The choices are "yes" and "no."

Default: yes

Option 10

This option lets you enable inband, node-to-node IP connectivity so you can telnet between this CLI and other switches where this feature is enabled. Type "yes" to enable or "no" to disable.

Default: yes (enabled)

Option 11

This option is reserved for future use. 0 No Gang, 1 Left, 2 Right, 3 Both Gang Present

Option 12

This option enables automatic switch-over when a FRU back card mismatch occurs. Type a 1 to enable or a 0 to disable this feature. This choice relates to the combinations of controller card models and the user interface (UI) back card. Refer to the section, "PXM Switchover on Back Card Mismatch," for information on the allowed combinations.

Default: 0 (disabled).

Option 13

Type yes to disable the high priority LCN for IPC between cards. Type no to remove the disable on high priority communication between cards. The effects of each choice are as follows:

Yes: the card-to-card, high priority LCN is not used. This choice forces all IPC traffic between cards to share the same, low-priority LCN and prevents applications from sending urgent messages or critical data over a high priority connection to applications on other cards.

No: the card-to-card, high priority LCN is used. This choice allows applications to choose the appropriate priority for carrying IPC traffic between cards. An application with a purpose for sending urgent or critical data selects the high priority LCN (if both cards support the high priority LCN). Other messages take the low priority LCN as needed.

Default: No

option value

The option value can be a decimal or hexadecimal number or a "yes" or "no" entry. The following shows the possible ranges or values for each type of numeric option.

8-bit decimal: 0-255

16-bit decimal: 0-65535

32-bit decimal: 0-4294962795

8-bit hexadecimal: 0-0xff

16-bit hexadecimal: 0-0xffff

32-bit hexadecimal: 0-0xffffffff


Syntax Description for PXM1E in an MGX 8830 Chassis

option number

A number that selects the option. Refer to the description of each option at the beginning of this description for important details and warnings.

Range: 1-12

Option 1

Option 1 is the number of seconds to count the resets of the shelf management cards. The range is 0-65355 (a 16-bit decimal number). The default is 3600 seconds (1 hour). A 0 means an infinite time period. The impact of an infinite time period is that only a specified count of resets can stop the resets.

Option 2

This option lets you set the maximum number of resets of the shelf management card group per time period. (The time period is specified through Option 1.) The number is an 8-bit decimal number and therefore has the range 0-255. The meaning of a 0 for this parameter is an infinite number of resets—the resets can continue without end.

Default: 3 resets per period.

Option 3

This option lets you enable or disable core card redundancy. Enter "yes" to enable or "no" to disable alarms on a missing, redundant core card. The default is enable, which means an alarm appears in the absence of a redundant core card.

Option 4

This option you specify the locations of required power supplies in an AC-powered system. The number is 8-bit hexadecimal:

0x0 (the default) means no specified power supply requirement related to this particular form of alarm generation (although the configuration must still meet the power requirements of the switch).

0x01: PSU A1 is required.

0x10: PSU B1 is required.

Option 5

This option lets you specify the number of hours that a trap manager can age before the switch deletes that trap manager's registration. This setting applies to all registered trap managers. For important details, see the section, "Trap Manager Aging Timeout."

Option 6

This option automatically enables Cisco WAN Manager (CWM) to learn the primary IP interface by doing a MIB-walk and reading the PNNI topology state element table. The range of entries for this option is 0-2, with the following significance:

0: The atm0 interface is the primary.

1: No interface is used. This choice prevents ILMI node discovery.

2: The lnPci0 interface is the primary.

Option 7

This option automatically enables Cisco WAN Manager (CWM) to learn the secondary IP interface by doing a MIB-walk and reading the PNNI topology state element table. The range of entries for this option is 0-2, with the following significance:

0: The atm0 interface is the secondary.

1: No interface is used as the secondary.

2: The lnPci0 interface is the secondary.

Option 8

This option lets you enable the automatic setting of Cellbus clock speed. In the current release, it applies to RPM-PR only. The choices are "yes" and "no."

Default: yes

Option 9

This option lets you enable inband, node-to-node IP connectivity so you can telnet between this CLI and other switches where this feature is enabled. Type "yes" to enable or "no" to disable.

Default: enabled

Option 10

This option is reserved for future use. 0 No Gang, 1 Left, 2 Right, 3 Both Gang Present

Option 11

This option enables automatic switch-over when a FRU back card mismatch occurs. Type a 1 to enable or a 0 to disable this feature. This choice relates to the combinations of controller card models and the user interface (UI) back card. Refer to the section, "PXM Switchover on Back Card Mismatch," for information on the allowed combinations.

Default: 0 (disabled).

Option 12

Type yes to disable the high priority LCN for IPC between cards. Type no to remove the disable on high priority communication between cards. The effects of each choice are as follows:

Yes: the card-to-card, high priority LCN is not used. This choice forces all IPC traffic between cards to share the same, low-priority LCN and prevents applications from sending urgent messages or critical data over a high priority connection to applications on other cards.

No: the card-to-card, high priority LCN is used. This choice allows applications to choose the appropriate priority for carrying IPC traffic between cards. An application with a purpose for sending urgent or critical data selects the high priority LCN (if both cards support the high priority LCN). Other messages take the low priority LCN as needed.

Default: No

option value

The option value can be a decimal or hexadecimal number or a "yes" or "no" entry. The following shows the possible ranges or values for each type of numeric option.

8-bit decimal: 0-255

16-bit decimal: 0-65535

32-bit decimal: 0-4294962795

8-bit hexadecimal: 0-0xff

16-bit hexadecimal: 0-0xffff

32-bit hexadecimal: 0-0xffffffff


Related Commands

dspndparms, dspndalms, dspenvalms, cnfcbclk, dspcbclk

Attributes

Log: no

State: active

Privilege: SUPER_GP


Examples

Specify 30 minutes (1800 seconds) for Card Reset Sliding Window. You can enter the option number and option value without prompting. The system subsequently uses the parameters and shows the result.

MGX8850.7.PXM.a > cnfndparms 1 1800
NODE CONFIGURATION OPTIONS
Opt#  Value       Type           Description
----  -----       ----           -----------

1 1800 16bit Decimal SHM Card Reset Sliding Window (secs)


On the MGX 8850 switch with the PXM1E, disable inband node-to-node IP connectivity.

PXM1E_SJ.7.PXM.a > cnfndparms 10
NODE CONFIGURATION OPTIONS
Opt#  Value       Type           Description
----  -----       ----           -----------
10    Yes         Boolean        Inband Node-to-Node IP Connectivity Enabled 
Enable/Disable Inband Node-to-Node IP Connectivity. If option set to:
    Yes:   Inband Node-to-Node IP Connectivity Enabled. This
           allows IP access from/to this node to/from other nodes via
           IP and inband ATM SVCs. Applications such as telnet and
           ping are supported.
    No:    Inband Node-to-Node IP Connectivity Disabled. This
           prevents IP access from/to this node to/from other nodes via
           IP and inband ATM SVCs. All incoming requests will be rejected.

Enter value for option 10 (Y/N): n
NODE CONFIGURATION OPTIONS
Opt#  Value       Type           Description
----  -----       ----           -----------

10 No Boolean Inband Node-to-Node IP Connectivity Enabled

Enable automatic setting of Cellbus clock speed. Type the cnfndparms command with the parameter number "9" then "y" at the subsequent prompt. Afterwards, check the status by using dspcbclk.

scott.7.PXM.a > cnfndparm 9

Enter option number (1-13):9
NODE CONFIGURATION OPTIONS
Opt#  Value       Type           Description
----  -----       ----           -----------
9 Yes         Boolean        Auto Setting of Cellbus Clock Rate Enabled
Enable/Disable Automatic Cellbus Clock Rate Setting. If option set to:
    Yes: Automatic Setting Enabled. This allows for automatic
           determination of cellbus clock rate depending on the
           insertion and removal of cards such as RPM in the shelf.
    No:   Automatic Setting Disabled. This prevents automatic
           determination of cellbus clock rate. Manual manipulation
           must be performed using the cnfcbclk CLI command.

Determine whether automatic clock setting is enabled by using the dspcbclk command.

scott.7.PXM.a > dspcbclk

     CellBus    Rate (MHz)    Slots     Allowable Rates (MHz)
    ----------------------------------------------------------
       CB1         21        1, 2            21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB2         42        3, 4            21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB3         21        5, 6            21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB4         21        17 - 22         21
       CB5         21        9, 10           21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB6         21        11, 12          21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB7         21        13, 14          21, 42 (Auto Setting Enabled)
       CB8         21        25 - 30         21

scott.7.PXM.a >

cnfnodalcongth

Configure Nodal Congestion Thresholds—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfnodalcongth command lets you configure congestion thresholds at the node level. The thresholds relate to call setup messages, status enquiries, queue levels, and so on. You must specify at least one optional parameter.

Syntax

cnfnodalcongth -setuphi {setupHiThreshold}] -statenqlo {statusEnqLoThreshold}] -statenqhi {statusEnqHiThreshold}] -connpendlo {connPendingLo}] -connpendhi {connPendingHi} ] -incompjour {incompleteJournalCallsHi}] -vsiqmild {mildCongPerc}] -vsiqmedium {mediumCongPerc}] -vsiqsevere {severeCongPerc}] [-p2mppartpendlo <value>] [-p2mppartpendhi <value>]

Syntax Description

-setuphi

The number of connection set-up messages per second above which the node is congested.

Range: 1-1000 connection set-up messages per second
Default:

500 on a PXM45/B with R7K processor

180 in all other cases

-statenqlo

The number of status enquiries per second below which the node is not congested.

Range: 1-500 messages per second
Default: 100

-statenqhi

The number of status enquiries per second above which the node is congested with status enquiries.

Range: 1-500 status enquiries per second
Default: 200 status enquiries per second

-connpendlo

The aggregate number of connections in the establishment phase below which the establishment congestion flag is dropped.

Range: 1-2400 connections
Default: 400 connections

-connpendhi

The aggregate number of connections in the establishment phase above which the establishment congestion state is flagged.

Range: 1-2400 connections
Default: 500 connections

-incompjour

The number of incomplete journaling cycles that must be exceeded to trigger an increase in the journaling rate.

Range: 5-60
Default: 5

Note For a PXM45C-based switch, the recommended value for incompjour is 30 because the re-route rates are higher. More messages can be queued up in the pnRedman task for journalling. A lower threshold results in more frequent congestion for this journalling.

-vsiqmild

The VSI Q depth above which VSI master is mildly congested. The mildCongPerc value is a percentage of VSI master-slave communication window size. This threshold applies to all the PNNI logical ports on the node.

Range: 1-175
Default: 5

-vsiqmedium

The VSI Q depth above which VSI master is congested at a medium level. The mediumCongPercis value is a percent of VSI master-slave communication window size.This threshold applies to all interfaces on the node.

Range: 1-175
Default: 10

-vsiqsevere

The VSI Q depth above which VSI master is severely congested. The severeCongPerc value is a percent of VSI master-slave communication window size. This threshold applies to all interfaces on the node.

Range: 1-175
Default: 20

-p2mppartpendlo

The number of P2MP connections in the establishment phase below which the establishment congestion flag is dropped.

Range: 1-1000
Default: 900

-p2mppartpendhi

The number of P2MP connections in the establishment phase above which the establishment congestion state is flagged.

Range: 1-1000
Default: 1000


Related Commands

dspnodalcongth

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SUPER_GP


Example

Configure the nodal congestion thresholds, as follows:

svcpop1.1.PXM.a > cnfnodalcongth -setuphi 80 -vsiqmild 100 -vsiqmedium 140 -vsiqsevere 175

 svcpop1.1.PXM.a > dspnodalcongth 
 Parameter         Value      Unit 
 ================================= 
 setuphi(prov)       80       cps 
 setuphi(curr)       80       cps 
 statenqlo          100       cps 
 statenqhi          200       cps 
 connpendinglo      400       messages 
 connpendinghi      500       messages 
 incompjournalhi      5       cycles 
 vsiqdepthmild      100       multiplier 
 vsiqdepthmedium    140       multiplier 
 vsiqdepthsevere    175       multiplier 

cnfnodalfd

Configure Nodal Frame Discard—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfnodalfd command lets you enable or disable frame discard for AAL5 cells. The default is enabled. You can display the configuration by using the dspnodalfd command.


Note This command formerly had the name cnffdonaal5.


Syntax

cnfnodalfd <enable | disable>

Syntax Description

enable

disable

Enter the word in its entirety to enable or discard frame discard for AAL5 cells.

Default: enable


Related Commands

dspnodalfd

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SUPER_GP


Example

Enable frame discard for AAL5 cells, then check the result.

SanJose.7.PXM.a > cnfnodalfd enable
SanJose.7.PXM.a > dspnodalfd
Global Signaling Parameters
============================
Frame Discard on AAL5 IE: yes

SanJose.7.PXM.a >

cnfnodecug

Configure Node CUG—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfnodecug command creates a node-level, administrative AESA that serves as a useful troubleshooting tool. You provide only the AESA portion of this AESA-IC. The IC-portion is fixed at 0xBAD0BABE. This nodal CUG IC (nodal CUG-administrative AESA coupled with 0xBAD0BABE) overrides the CUG configuration for all the ATM addresses at the destination node.

The steps for using a nodal CUG are as follows:

Use cnfnodecug to configure the nodal administrative AESA on the destination node.

Add this CUG IC to an address on the source node by using the addcug command.

At the source interface, use this nodal CUG IC of the destination to make a call to any address on the destination node.

At the destination UNI, a call is accepted without the regular, destination-CUG validation if the following is true:

The setup message arrives with a CUG-IC consisting of a 20-byte AESA portion that matches the nodal administrative AESA you have configured and an IC portion of 0xBAD0BABE.

After you have finished troubleshooting, delete the nodal AESA-IC at the source ATM address by using the delcug command.

Syntax

cnfnodecug [-aesa <admin-aesa>]

Syntax Description

-aesa

The admin-aesa can be any 40 hexadecimal numbers (20 bytes).


Related Commands

addcug, cnfcug, clrcugdefaddr, cnfaddrcug, delcug, dspaddrcug, dspcug, dspcugdefaddr, dspnodecug, setcugdefaddr

Attributes

log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SUPEER_GP


Example

Create a node-level, administrative CUG with an AESA portion of the following:

47009181000000000142265B3900000101180400

Geneva.7.PXM.a > cnfnodecug -aesa 47009181000000000142265B3900000101180400

cnfoamsegep

Configure OAM Segment Endpoint—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfoamsegep command lets you define a port as a segment endpoint for F4 and F5 operations administration and maintenance (OAM) cells. This command does not affect existing connections: it applies to new calls. You can use the cnfoamsegep command regardless of the state of the port.

Syntax

cnfoamsegep <portid> [{yes | no}]

Syntax Description

portid

The format of the PNNI physical port identifier can vary, as follows:

On a PXM45: slot:subslot.port:subport

On a PXM1E for UNI/NNI back card: slot:subslot.port:subport. On the UNI/NNI back card, the subslot is always 2, but the slot depends on the chassis, as follows:

In an MGX 8850 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 7.

In an MGX 8830 chassis, slot is always the logical slot 1.

On a PXM1E for a narrowband service module (NBSM): slot.port.

For more details, see the section, "PNNI Format," in "Introduction."

yes

The port is configured as a segment endpoint and is a segment endpoint for all connections on this port.

no

The port is not a segment endpoint.

Default: no


Related Commands

dspoamsegep, cnfconsegep, delconsegep

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


cnfpart

Configure Resource Partition—PXM1E

The cnfpart command lets you modify the bandwidth and other resource partitioning on a logical port. The entity that makes use of the resources in a partition is a network controller. For many partition parameters, you can dynamically make modifications—without administratively downing the port—by using the cnfpart or cnfrscprtn command. However, before you can modify the minimum or maximum VPI or VCI, the port must be down.

The existing controllers are the Private Network to Network Interface (PNNI) and the Label Switch Controller (LSC). In the current release of the PXM1E, only PNNI is supported. Before you add a resource partition, have a plan for future changes, such as the support of a new controller.

A resource partition consists of:

A guaranteed percentage of bandwidth.

VPI and VCI ranges.

Guaranteed minimum and maximum number of connections. Note that the maximum number of connections must be greater than 10.


Note The cnfpart and cnfrscprtn commands are identical and interchangeable. The name "cnfrscprtn" is consistent with the corresponding command in Release 1 of the MGX 8850 node. Use the name that suits you. This interchangeability also applies to all the other partition commands.


Ports, Partitions, Controllers, and Interface Types

This section contains details regarding ports, partitions, and controllers that you should note before adding a partition.

On each port—regardless of the interface type—a controller can have one partition. Therefore, on a port, you can add one partition for PNNI and one for LSC (but keep in mind that the PXM1E currently uses only PNNI). This requirement applies regardless of whether an interface (specified through addport) is UNI, NNI, VUNI, or VNNI.

The pairing of partition ID and controller ID must be the same across all interfaces. In this situation, the interface number uniquely identifies the partition. For example, on a PXM1E-4-OC3 with two UNIs and two NNIs, you could specify:

Logical interface 1 (on line 1), partition ID 1, controller ID 2

Logical interface 2 (on line 2), partition ID 1, controller ID 2

Logical interface 3 (on line 3), partition ID 1, controller ID 2

Logical interface 4 (on line 4), partition ID 1, controller ID 2

The VPIs and VCIs you modify with the cnfpart command must be within the range specified when the port was created through the addport command,

Syntax

cnfpart -if <if> -id <partionID> -ctlr <controllerID> -emin <egrMinBw> -emax <egrMaxBw> -imin <ingMinBw> -imax <ingMaxBw> -vpmin <minVpi> -vpmax <maxVpi> -vcmin <minVci> -vcmax <maxVci> -mincon <min connections> -maxcon <max connections>

Syntax Description


Note On a standard virtual trunk, where the interface type is VNNI or VUNI, the minVpi and maxVpi must be the same. See the -vpmin and -vpmax descriptions for ranges.

On an enhanced virtual trunk, where the interface type is EVNNI or EVUNI, the minVpi and maxVpi can be different. The maxvpi cannot be less than the minvpi.


-if

Logical interface (port) number. The range for if is 1-31.

-id

The partition ID number. The range for partionID is 1-20.

-ctlr

The controllerID is a number that identifies a network controller. The PXM1E supports only the PNNI controller—option 2. (The range for reserved controller IDs is 1-3.)

The reserved controller IDs are as follows:

1 = PAR (Portable AutoRoute)—currently not used on the PXM1E or PXM45

2 = PNNI

3 = LSC (Label Switch Controller, also known as MPLS for Multiprotocol Label Switching) is not supported on the PXM1E

(The absolute range for the PXM1E is 1-254.)

-emin

Specifies the guaranteed percentage of egress bandwidth. Each unit of egrMinBw is 0.00001 of the total bandwidth on the port. (An egrMinBw of 1000000 = 100%.) This approach provides a high level of granularity.

-emax

Specifies the maximum percentage of the bandwidth. Each unit of egrMaxBw is 0.00001 of the total bandwidth available to the port. (An egrMaxBw of 1000000 = 100%.) The resulting bandwidth must be at least 50 cps.

-imin

Specifies the guaranteed percentage of the ingress bandwidth. Each unit of ingMinBw is 0.00001 of the total bandwidth available to the port. For example, an ingMinBw of 1000000 = 100%.

-imax

Specifies the maximum percentage of the ingress bandwidth. Each increment of ingMaxBw is 0.00001 of the total bandwidth on the port. For example, an ingMaxBw of 1000000 = 100%. Note that the maximum ingress bandwidth must be at least 50 cps.

-vpmin

The minimum VPI applies to the proprietary enhanced virtual trunking. The minvpi cannot be greater than the maxvpi,

EVNNI range: 0 and 4095

EVUNI range: 0 and 255

-vpmax

The maximum VPI applies to the proprietary enhanced virtual trunking. The minvpi cannot be greater than the maxvpi,

EVNNI range: 0-4095

EVUNI range: 0-255

-vpmin

Specifies the minimum VPI. For NNI, the range is 0-4095. For UNI, the range is 0-255.

-imax

Specifies the maximum VPI in the range 0-4095 for an NNI. For a UNI, the range is 0-255. The maxvpi cannot be less than the minvpi.

-vcmin

Minimum VCI range on the PXM1E is 32-65535.

-vcmax

Maximum VCI range on the PXM1E is 32-65535.

-mincon

Specifies the guaranteed number of connections. On the PXM1E UNI/NNI, the ranges vary according to the line types, as follows:

For OC3, T3, and E3 lines, the range is 10-27000.

For T1 and E1 lines, the range is 10-13500.

(On the AXSM series of cards, the range is 10 through the maximum number of connections in the port group. See dspcd for information about port groups. On narrowband service modules, the range varies: see the CLI of individual cards.)

-maxcon

Specifies the guaranteed number of connections. On the PXM1E UNI/NNI, the ranges vary according to the line types, as follows:

For OC3, T3, and E3 lines, the range is 10-27000.

For T1 and E1 lines, the range is 10-13500.

maxConns cannot be less than minConns.


Related Commands

addpart, delpart, dsppart, dsppart

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: GROUP1


Example

Configure the following for logical port 1:

The partition number is 1.

The controller is PNNI (number 2).

The ingress and egress each have a minimum of 10% and a maximum of 15% of the bandwidth.

VPI range is 20-100.

VCI range is 1-32767.

Minimum guaranteed number of connections is 1000.

Maximum number of connections is 2000.

MGX8850.7.PXM1E.a > cnfrscprtn -if 1 -id 1 -ctlr 2 -emin 100000 -emax 150000 -imin 10000 
-imax 15000 -vpmin 20 -vpmax 100 -vcmin 1 -vcmax 32767 -mincon 1000 -maxcon 2000

cnfpasswd

Configure Password—PXM45, PXM1E

Change your own password. After you enter the cnfpasswd command without parameters, the system prompts you to enter the new password then prompts you to re-enter it.


Note The default password is for a user-account is newuser.


Syntax

cnfpasswd <password>

Syntax Description

password

Your new password.


Related Commands

adduser, dspusers, cnfuser

Attributes

Log: no

State: active

Privilege: ANYUSER


Change your password. After you enter the command, it prompts you once to enter a new password then prompts you to re-enter it.

pinnacle.8.PXM.a > cnfpasswd
Enter password:

Re-enter password:

cnfpasswdreset

Configure Password Reset—PXM45, PXM1E

The cnfpasswdreset command lets you enable or disable the function carried out by the sequence of key-strokes that resets the node to the Cisco default password. This sequence is:

ESC CTRL-Y

Syntax

cnfpasswdreset <flag>

Syntax Description

flag

A Boolean expression to enable or disable password reset: enter "on" to enable or "off" to disable the sequence of keys that resets the password.


Related Commands

dsppasswdreset

Attributes

Log: yes

State: active

Privilege: SERVICE_GP


Example

Enable command reset, then check its status by executing dsppasswdreset.

pop20one.7.PXM.a > cnfpasswdreset on
Password Reset feature being enabled

pop20one.7.PXM.a > dsppasswdreset
Password Reset feature currently enabled