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Cisco ME 3400 Series Ethernet Access Switches

Release Notes for the Cisco ME 3400 Ethernet Access Switches, Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1 and Later

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Release Notes for the Cisco ME 3400 Ethernet Access Switches, Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1 and Later

Table Of Contents

Release Notes for the
Cisco ME 3400 Ethernet Access Switches, Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1 and Later

Contents

System Requirements

Hardware Supported

Upgrading the Switch Software

Finding the Software Version and Feature Set

Deciding Which Files to Use

Archiving Software Images

Upgrading a Switch

Recovering from a Software Failure

Installation Notes

New Features

New Hardware Features

New Software Features

Minimum Cisco IOS Release for Major Features

Limitations and Restrictions

Configuration

IP

MAC Addressing

Multicasting

Routing

QoS

SPAN and RSPAN

Trunking

VLAN

Open Caveats

Resolved Caveats

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE5

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE4

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE3

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE2

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1

Documentation Updates

IP SLAs Support

Related Documentation

Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines


Release Notes for the
Cisco ME 3400 Ethernet Access Switches, Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1 and Later


Revised September 24, 2008

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1, SE2, SE3, SE4, and SE5 run on the Cisco ME 3400 Series Ethernet Access switches.

These release notes include important information about Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1, SE2, SE3, SES4, and SE5 and any limitations, restrictions, and caveats that apply to it. Verify that these release notes are correct for your switch:

If you are installing a new switch, see the Cisco IOS release label on the rear panel of your switch.

If your switch is on, use the show version privileged EXEC command. See the "Finding the Software Version and Feature Set" section.

If you are upgrading to a new release or different image, see the software upgrade filename for the software version. See the "Deciding Which Files to Use" section.

For the complete list of Cisco ME 3400 switch documentation, see the "Related Documentation" section.


Note The software documentation for this release refers to Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE, but applies to Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1 and Later.


You can download the switch software from this site (registered Cisco.com users with a login password):

http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/Software/Iosplanner/Planner-tool/iosplanner.cgi

This software release is part of a special release of Cisco IOS software that is not released on the same 8-week maintenance cycle that is used for other platforms. As maintenance releases and future software releases become available, they will be posted to Cisco.com in the Cisco IOS software area.

Contents

This information is in the release notes:

"System Requirements" section

"Upgrading the Switch Software" section

"Installation Notes" section

"New Features" section

"Minimum Cisco IOS Release for Major Features" section

"Limitations and Restrictions" section

"Open Caveats" section

"Resolved Caveats" section

"Documentation Updates" section

"Related Documentation" section

"Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines" section

System Requirements

The system requirements are described in this section:

"Hardware Supported" section

Hardware Supported

Table 1 lists the hardware supported on Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1.

Table 1 Supported Hardware 

Device
Description
Supported by Minimum Cisco IOS Release

ME 3400G-2CS

2 dual-purpose ports and 2 SFP-only module ports, AC power

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1

ME-3400G-12CS-A

12 dual-purpose ports and 4 SFP-only module ports

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)SEG1

ME-3400G-12CS-D

12 dual-purpose ports and 4 SFP-only module ports

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)SEG1

ME-3400-24TS-A

24 10/100 ports and 2 SFP module slots, AC power

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)EX

ME-3400-24TS-D

24 10/100 ports and 2 SFP module slots, DC power

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)EX

SFP modules

1000BASE-T, -BX, -SX, -LX/LH, -ZX
100BASE-BX, FX, -LX
Coarse wavelength-division multiplexing (CWDM)

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)EX

Cable

Catalyst 3560 SFP interconnect cable

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(25)EX


Upgrading the Switch Software

These are the procedures for downloading software. Before downloading software, read this section for important information:

"Finding the Software Version and Feature Set" section

"Deciding Which Files to Use" section

"Archiving Software Images" section

"Upgrading a Switch" section

"Recovering from a Software Failure" section

Finding the Software Version and Feature Set

The Cisco IOS image is stored as a bin file in a directory that is named with the Cisco IOS release. The image is stored on the system board flash device (flash:).

You can use the show version privileged EXEC command to see the software version that is running on your switch. The second line of the display shows the version.

You can also use the dir filesystem: privileged EXEC command to see the directory names of other software images that you might have stored in flash memory.

Deciding Which Files to Use

The upgrade procedures in these release notes describe how to perform the upgrade by using a combined tar file. This file contains the Cisco IOS image file. To upgrade the switch through the command-line interface (CLI), use the tar file and the archive download-sw privileged EXEC command.

Table 2 lists the filenames for this software release.

Table 2 Cisco IOS Software Image Files 

Filename

Description

me340x-metrobase-tar.122-35.SE5.tar

Cisco ME 3400 metro base image.
This image has basic Metro Ethernet features.

me340x-metrobasek9-tar.122-35.SE5.tar

Cisco ME 3400 metro base cryptographic image.
This image has the Kerberos, Secure Shell (SSH), and basic Metro Ethernet features.

me340x-metroaccess-tar.122-35.SE5.tar

Cisco ME 3400 metro access image.
This image has Layer 2 + Metro Ethernet features.

me340x-metroaccessk9-tar.122-35.SE5.tar

Cisco ME 3400 metro access cryptographic image.
This image has the Kerberos, SSH, and Layer 2 + Metro Ethernet features.

me340x-metroipaccess-tar.122-35.SE5.tar

Cisco ME 3400 metro IP access image.
This image has Layer 2+ and full Layer 3 routing Metro Ethernet features.

me340x-metroipaccess9-tar.122-35.SE5.tar

Cisco ME 3400 metro IP access cryptographic image.
This image has the Kerberos, SSH, Layer 2+, and full Layer 3 routing Metro Ethernet features.


Archiving Software Images

Before upgrading your switch software, make sure that you have archived copies of the current Cisco IOS release and the Cisco IOS release to which you are upgrading. You should keep these archived images until you have upgraded all devices in the network to the new Cisco IOS image and until you have verified that the new Cisco IOS image works properly in your network.

Cisco routinely removes old Cisco IOS versions from Cisco.com. See Product Bulletin 2863 for more information:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/products/sw/iosswrel/ps5187/prod_bulletin0900aecd80281c0e.html

You can copy the bin software image file on the flash memory to the appropriate TFTP directory on a host by using the copy flash: tftp: privileged EXEC command.

You can also configure the switch as a TFTP server to copy files from one switch to another without using an external TFTP server by using the tftp-server global configuration command. For more information about the tftp-server command, see the "Basic File Transfer Services Commands" section of the Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference, Release 12.2 at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/iosswrel/ps1835/products_command_reference_chapter09186a00800ca744.html#wp1018426

Upgrading a Switch

This procedure is for copying the combined tar file to the switch. You copy the file to the switch from a TFTP server and extract the files. You can download an image file and replace or keep the current image.


Note For downloading software, we recommend that you connect to the TFTP server through a network node interface (NNI). If you want to connect to the server through a user network interface (UNI), see the "Troubleshooting" chapter of the software configuration guide for methods for enabling ping capability on UNIs. See the "New Software Features" section for a definition of NNIs and UNIs.


To download software, follow these steps:


Step 1 Use Table 2 to identify the file that you want to download.

Step 2 Download the software image file. If you have a SmartNet support contract, log in to cisco.com and go to this URL, and log in to download the appropriate files:

http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/Software/Iosplanner/Planner-tool/iosplanner.cgi

Click on "Launch the IOS Upgrade Planner" and search for ME 3400 to download the appropriate files:

To download the metro base, metro access, or metro IP access files for a Cisco ME 3400 switch, click Cisco ME 3400 software.

To obtain authorization and to download the cryptographic software files, click Cisco ME 3400 3DES Cryptographic Software.

Step 3 Copy the image to the appropriate TFTP directory on the workstation, and make sure that the TFTP server is properly configured.

For more information, refer to Appendix B in the software configuration guide for this release.

Step 4 Log into the switch through the console port or a Telnet session.

Step 5 (Optional) Ensure that you have IP connectivity to the TFTP server by entering this privileged EXEC command:

Switch# ping tftp-server-address


Note By default, ping is supported on network node interfaces (NNIs), but you cannot ping from a user network interface (UNI) because the control-plane security feature drops ICMP response packets received on UNIs. See the "Troubleshooting" chapter of the software configuration guide for methods for pinging from the switch to a host connected to a UNI.


For more information about assigning an IP address and default gateway to the switch, refer to the software configuration guide for this release.

Step 6 Download the image file from the TFTP server to the switch. If you are installing the same version of software that is currently on the switch, overwrite the current image by entering this privileged EXEC command:

Switch# archive download-sw /overwrite /reload 
tftp:[[//location]/directory]/image-name.tar

The /overwrite option overwrites the software image in flash memory with the downloaded one.

The /reload option reloads the system after downloading the image unless the configuration has been changed and not saved.

For //location, specify the IP address of the TFTP server.

For /directory/image-name.tar, specify the directory (optional) and the image to download. Directory and image names are case sensitive.

This example shows how to download an image from a TFTP server at 198.30.20.19 and to overwrite the image on the switch:

Switch# archive download-sw /overwrite 
tftp://198.30.20.19/me340x-metroipaccess-tar.122.34.SE3.tar

You can also download the image file from the TFTP server to the switch and keep the current image by replacing the /overwrite option with the /leave-old-sw option.


Recovering from a Software Failure

For recovery procedures, see the "Troubleshooting" chapter in the software configuration guide for this release.

Installation Notes

You can assign IP information to your switch by using these methods:

The CLI-based setup program, as described in the switch hardware installation guide.

The DHCP-based autoconfiguration, as described in the switch software configuration guide.

Manually assigning an IP address, as described in the switch software configuration guide.

New Features

These sections describe the new supported hardware and the new software features provided in this release:

"New Hardware Features" section

"New Software Features" section

New Hardware Features

For a list of all supported hardware, see the "Hardware Supported" section.

New Software Features

These are the new software features for Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1:

Support for the IEEE 802.3ah Ethernet OAM protocol discovery, link monitoring, remote fault detection, and remote loopback features. Requires the metro IP access or metro access image.

Enhanced object tracking for HSRP (metro IP access image only)

Support for one output policy map for each interface (with only three unique queue-limit configurations)

Support for Multicast VLAN Registration (MVR) over trunk ports to allow you to configure a trunk port as an MVR receiver port

Minimum Cisco IOS Release for Major Features

Table 3 lists the minimum software release (after the first release) required to support the major features of the Cisco ME 3400 switch. Features not listed are supported in all releases.

Table 3 Features Introduced After the First Release and the Minimum Cisco IOS Release Required 

Feature
Minimum Cisco IOS Release Required

Support for Multicast VLAN Registration (MVR) over trunk ports

12.2(35)SE1

Enhanced object tracking for HSRP (metro IP access image only)

12.2(35)SE1

Ethernet OAM IEEE 802.3ah protocol (metro IP access and metro access images only)

12.2(35)SE1

Ethernet OAM CFM (IEEE 802.1ag) and E-LMI (metro IP access and metro access images only)

12.2(25)SEG

Per port per VLAN QoS (metro IP access and metro access images only)

12.2(25)SEG

Support for all OSPF network types (metro IP access only)

12.2(25)SEG

Layer 2 protocol tunneling on trunks (metro IP access and metro access images only)

12.2(25)SEG

IS-IS protocol (metro IP access only)

12.2(25)SEG

NNIs on all ports (metro IP access image only)

12.2(25)SEG

DHCP server

12.2(25)SEG

DHCP Option-82 configurable remote ID and circuit ID

12.2(25)SEG

Multiple spanning-tree (MST) based on the IEEE 802.1s standard

12.2(25)SEG

Nonstop forwarding (NSF) awareness (metro IP access image only)

12.2(25)SEG

Secure Copy Protocol

12.2(25)SEG

Flex Links sub 100 ms convergence; preemptive switchover (metro IP access and metro access images)

12.2(25)SEG

Link-state tracking (trunk failover) (metro IP access and metro access images only)

12.2(25)SEG


Limitations and Restrictions

You should review this section before you begin working with the switch. These are known limitations that will not be fixed, and there is not always a workaround. Some features might not work as documented, and some features could be affected by recent changes to the switch hardware or software.

These limitations apply to the Cisco ME switches:

"Configuration" section

"IP" section

"MAC Addressing" section

"Multicasting" section

"Routing" section

"QoS" section

"SPAN and RSPAN" section

"Trunking" section

"VLAN" section

Configuration

These are the configuration limitations:

A static IP address might be removed when the previously acquired DHCP IP address lease expires.

This problem occurs under these conditions:

When the switch is booted without a configuration (no config.text file in flash memory).

When the switch is connected to a DHCP server that is configured to give an address to it (the dynamic IP address is assigned to VLAN 1).

When an IP address is configured on VLAN 1 before the dynamic address lease assigned to VLAN 1 expires.

The workaround is to reconfigure the static IP address. (CSCea71176 and CSCdz11708)

The DHCP snooping binding database is not written to flash memory or a remote file in any of these situations:

When the Network Time Protocol (NTP) is configured, but the NTP clock is not synchronized. You can check the clock status by entering the show NTP status privileged EXEC command and verifying that the network connection to the NTP server and the peer work correctly.

The DHCP snooping database file is manually removed from the file system. After enabling the DHCP snooping database by configuring a database URL, a database file is created. If the file is manually removed from the file system, the DHCP snooping database does not create another database file. You need to disable the DHCP snooping database and enable it again to create the database file.

The URL for the configured DHCP snooping database was replaced because the original URL was not accessible. The new URL might not take effect after the timeout of the old URL.

No workaround is necessary; these are the designed behaviors. (CSCed50819)

When dynamic ARP inspection is enabled on a switch, ARP and RARP packets greater than 2016 bytes are dropped by the switch or switch stack. This is a hardware limitation.

However, when dynamic ARP inspection is not enabled and a jumbo MTU is configured, ARP and RARP packets are correctly bridged in hardware. (CSCed79734)

Dynamic ARP inspection log entries might be lost after a switch failure. Any log entries that are still in the log buffer (have not been output as a system message) on a switch that fails are lost.

When you enter the show ip arp inspection log privileged EXEC command, the log entries from all switches in the stack are moved to the switch on which you entered the command.

There is no workaround. (CSCed95822)

When port security is enabled on an interface in restricted mode and the switchport block unicast interface command has been entered on that interface, MAC addresses are incorrectly forwarded when they should be blocked

The workaround is to enter the no switchport block unicast interface configuration command on that specific interface. (CSCee93822)

A traceback error occurs if a crypto key is generated after an SSL client session.

There is no workaround. This is a cosmetic error and does not affect the functionality of the switch. (CSCef59331)

IP

These are the IP limitations:

Subnetwork Access Protocol (SNAP) encapsulated IP packets are dropped without an error message being reported at the interface. The switch does not support SNAP-encapsulated IP packets. There is no workaround. (CSCdz89142)

The switch does not create an adjacent table entry when the ARP timeout value is 15 seconds and the ARP request times out. The workaround is to not set an ARP timeout value lower than 120 seconds. (CSCea21674)

MAC Addressing

This is the MAC addressing limitation:

When a MAC address is configured for filtering on the internal VLAN of a routed port, incoming packets from the MAC address to the routed port are not dropped. (CSCeb67937)

Multicasting

These are the multicasting limitations:

The switch does not support tunnel interfaces, including DVMRP and PIM tunneling.

Nonreverse-path forwarded (RPF) IP multicast traffic to a group that is bridged in a VLAN is leaked onto a trunk port in the VLAN even if the port is not a member of the group in the VLAN, but it is a member of the group in another VLAN. Because unnecessary traffic is sent on the trunk port, it reduces the bandwidth of the port. There is no workaround for this problem because non-RPF traffic is continuous in certain topologies. As long as the trunk port is a member of the group in at least one VLAN, this problem occurs for the non-RPF traffic. (CSCdu25219)

If the number of multicast routes and Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) groups are more than the maximum number specified by the show sdm prefer global configuration command, the traffic received on unknown groups is flooded in the received VLAN even though the show ip igmp snooping multicast-table privileged EXEC command output shows otherwise. The workaround is to reduce the number of multicast routes and IGMP snooping groups to less than the maximum supported value. (CSCdy09008)

IGMP filtering is applied to packets that are forwarded through hardware. It is not applied to packets that are forwarded through software. Hence, with multicast routing enabled, the first few packets are sent from a port even when IGMP filtering is set to deny those groups on that port. There is no workaround. (CSCdy82818)

When you use the ip access-group interface configuration command with a router access control list (ACL) to deny access to a group in a VLAN, multicast data to the group that is received in the VLAN is always flooded in the VLAN, regardless of IGMP group membership in the VLAN. This provides reachability to directly connected clients, if any, in the VLAN. The workaround is to not apply a router ACL set to deny access to a VLAN interface. Apply the security through other means; for example, apply VLAN maps to the VLAN instead of using a router ACL for the group. (CSCdz86110)

If an IGMP report packet has two multicast group records, the switch removes or adds interfaces depending on the order of the records in the packet:

If the ALLOW_NEW_SOURCE record is before the BLOCK_OLD_SOURCE record, the switch removes the port from the group.

If the BLOCK_OLD_SOURCE record is before the ALLOW_NEW_SOURCE record, the switch adds the port to the group.

There is no workaround. (CSCec20128)

When IGMP snooping is disabled and you enter the switchport block multicast interface configuration command, IP multicast traffic is not blocked.

The switchport block multicast interface configuration command is only applicable to non-IP multicast traffic.

There is no workaround. (CSCee16865)

Incomplete multicast traffic can be seen under either of these conditions:

You disable IP multicast routing or re-enable it globally on an interface.

A switch mroute table temporarily runs out of resources and recovers later.

The workaround is to enter the clear ip mroute privileged EXEC command on the interface. (CSCef42436)

Routing

These are the routing limitations:

The switch does not support tunnel interfaces for routed traffic.

A route map that has an ACL with a Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) clause cannot be applied to a Layer 3 interface. The switch rejects this configuration and displays a message that the route map is unsupported. There is no workaround. (CSCea52915)

A spanning-tree loop might occur if all of these conditions are true:

Port security is enabled with the violation mode set to protected.

The maximum number of secure addresses is less than the number of switches connected to the port.

There is a physical loop in the network through a switch whose MAC address has not been secured, and its BPDUs cause a secure violation.

The workaround is to change any one of the listed conditions. (CSCed53633)

QoS

This is a quality of service (QoS) limitation:

CSCsb98219

When you use the bandwidth policy-map class command to configure more than one class in a policy map for Class-based Weighted Fair Queuing (CBWFQ), and the committed information rate (CIR) bandwidth for any of the classes is less than 2 percent of the interface rate, the CBWFQ classes in the policy may not receive the configured CIR bandwidths.

There is no workaround, but it is unlikely that a CBWFQ class would be configured with such a low CIR bandwidth.

SPAN and RSPAN

These are the SPAN and Remote SPAN (RSPAN) limitations.

The egress SPAN data rate might degrade when multicast routing is enabled. The amount of degradation depends on the processor loading. Typically, the switch can egress SPAN at up to 40,000 packets per second (64-byte packets). As long as the total traffic being monitored is below this limit, there is no degradation. However, if the traffic being monitored exceeds the limit, only a portion of the source stream is spanned. When this occurs, the following console message appears: Decreased egress SPAN rate. In all cases, normal traffic is not affected; the degradation limits only how much of the original source stream can be egress spanned. If multicast routing is disabled, egress SPAN is not degraded. There is no workaround. If possible, disable multicast routing. If possible, use ingress SPAN to observe the same traffic. (CSCeb01216)

Some IGMP report and query packets with IP options might not be ingress-spanned. Packets that are susceptible to this problem are IGMP packets containing 4 bytes of IP options (IP header length of 24). An example of such packets would be IGMP reports and queries having the router alert IP option. Ingress-spanning of such packets is not accurate and can vary with the traffic rate. Typically, very few or none of these packets are spanned. There is no workaround. (CSCeb23352)

Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) and Port Aggregation Protocol (PAgP) packets received by network node interfaces (NNIs) from a SPAN source are not sent to the destination interfaces of a local SPAN session. The workaround is to use the monitor session session_number destination {interface interface-id encapsulation replicate} global configuration command for local SPAN. (CSCed24036)

Trunking

These are the trunking limitations:

IP traffic with IP options set is sometimes leaked on a trunk port. For example, a trunk port is a member of an IP multicast group in VLAN X but is not a member in VLAN Y. If VLAN Y is the output interface for the multicast route entry assigned to the multicast group and an interface in VLAN Y belongs to the same multicast group, the IP-option traffic received on an input VLAN interface other than one in VLAN Y is sent on the trunk port in VLAN Y because the trunk port is forwarding in VLAN Y, even though the port has no group membership in VLAN Y. There is no workaround. (CSCdz42909).

For trunk ports or access ports configured with IEEE 802.1Q tagging, inconsistent statistics might appear in the show interfaces counters privileged EXEC command output. Valid IEEE 802.1Q frames of 64 to 66 bytes are correctly forwarded even though the port LED blinks amber, and the frames are not counted on the interface statistics. There is no workaround. (CSCec35100).

VLAN

These are the VLAN limitations:

If the number of VLANs times the number of trunk ports exceeds the recommended limit of 13,000, the switch can fail.

The workaround is to not configure more than the recommended number of VLANs and trunks. (CSCeb31087)

A CPUHOG message sometimes appears when you configure a private VLAN. Enable port security on one or more of the ports affected by the private VLAN configuration.

There is no workaround. (CSCed71422)

Open Caveats

This section describes the open caveats in this software release.

CSCse07183

When you enter the service-policy input parent-policy- map-name interface configuration command to attach a per-port per-VLAN service policy, if two or more classes in the per-port per-VLAN parent policy contain the same VLAN, the attachment fails and this error message appears:

QoS: hqm_qoscli_classmap_filter_update_in_servpolicy Overlapping vlan is not allowed in class and class

This is because classes with overlapping VLANs are not allowed within a per-port per-VLAN parent policy. Overlapping VLAN classes occur when two or more class-maps in a per-port per-VLAN parent policy contain match statements the specify the same VLAN.

The workaround is to consolidate overlapping per-port per-VLAN parent classes with overlapping VLANs and to configure per-port per-VLAN child policy classes to classify and act on traffic as desired.

CSCse11323

When 256 policy maps are configured globally on the system, the creation of the 257th policy map is rejected. The platform supports a maximum of 256 policy maps. If you then delete some existing policy maps and again configure the rejected policy map, when you try to attach that policy map to an interface, it might be rejected without any descriptive error message explaining the reason for the rejection or with an unexpected and incorrect error message.

The workaround is to delete the problematic policy map and to reconfigure it with a different name. The new policy map should be accepted as expected.

CSCse36402

When a per-port per-VLAN QoS policy is attached to multiple trunk interfaces and one of the interfaces is changed to a routed port, the policy is detached from all interfaces.

The workaround is to use the service-policy input parent-policy- map-name interface configuration command to reattach the detached per-port per-VLAN parent policies to the trunk interfaces. Traffic then receives the correct QoS treatment.

CSCse85482

If the duplex mode of a GLC-T SFP module that is installed in a Cisco ME-3400G-12CS or ME-3400 2CS switch dual media port is changed from full to half (or the reverse), the mode does not change.

This only occurs if the previous duplex mode was not auto.

These are the workarounds. You only need to do one of these:

Enter the shut and no shut interface configuration commands.

Change the duplex mode to auto before changing it to half or full.

CSCsg36159

When using the CLI, you can configure a qualified queue-limit under class-default for the policy map even though the configuration is not supported.

The workaround is to only use qualified queue-limits under nondefault classes.

Resolved Caveats

These sections describe the caveats have been resolved in these releases:

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE5

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE4

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE3

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE2

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE5

These caveats are resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2.(35)SE5:

CSCed87897

The output of the show ip route privileged EXEC command now correctly displays the default gateway.

CSCsh89429

The switch no longer reloads when the write core privileged EXEC command is entered when testing a core dump configuration and FTP is selected as the file transfer protocol.

CSCsi74508

A switch no longer displays this error message when reading from or writing to the configuration file:

%DATACORRUPTION-1-DATAINCONSISTENCY: write of 11 bytes to 10 bytes 
-Traceback= 0x41186A90 0x411A3960 0x411C1F88 0x413C24B8 0x4031EEDC 0x4032D144 
0x411C3974 0x41193D9C 0x4119420C 0x411DF55C 0x411C70AC 0x411E3184 0x425590F4 
0x4254BD7C 0x421B5CE0 0x421B5CC4

CSCsi94450

When DHCP snooping is enabled on a VLAN, the broadcast DHCP request is now correctly sent over the trusted port and the connected hosts correctly receive their IP addresses.

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE4

These caveats are resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2.(35)SE4:

CSCsd95616

Two crafted Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) packet vulnerabilities exist in Cisco IOS software that may lead to a denial of service (DoS) condition. Cisco has released free software updates that address these vulnerabilities. Workarounds that mitigate these vulnerabilities are available.

This advisory is posted at http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20080924-multicast.shtml.

CSCse24889

On a switch that is configured for SSH version 2, malformed SSH version 2 packets no longer might cause a memory leak.

CSCsg40567

On a switch that has the ip http secure-server global configuration command enabled, malformed Secure Socket Layer (SSL) packets no longer might cause the switch to leak multiple memory blocks.

CSCsi52559

A Cisco ME-3400-2CS AC switch does not support the break sequence from the console port. When the switch is running Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1 to SE3, you cannot break out of the boot process to recover from a corrupted image or lost password.

Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE4 and later includes an upgrade to an automatic bootloader that supports the break sequence. Once the bootloader is upgraded, you can reinstall earlier releases of Cisco IOS and not have this problem.


Caution Powering the switch off while the bootloader is being upgraded makes the switch unusable.

CSCsi56501

When two sockets, for example one IPv4 socket and one IPv6 socket, are bound to the same UDP port, the second File Descriptor no longer receives the requests.

CSCsi74467

IGMP v2 packets generated by a Cisco ME 3400 now support the router alert option in the IP header as required by RFC 2236. This enables the Cisco switch to interoperate with third-party equipment such as DSLAMs that require the router alerts for last-member queries from the switch, allowing subscribers to receive multicast traffic.

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE3

These caveats are resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2.(35)SE3:

CSCsh13063

When a trunk port that is configured as part of a Flex Link pair is shut down or becomes the active link, this no longer might cause the switch to reboot.

CSCsh61220

In switches running Cisco IOS release 12.2(35)SE through 12.2(350SE2, Fast Ethernet ports that are shut down can flap if the port speed is set for autonegotiation and the device at the other end of the link has disabled autonegotiation and is advertising a port speed. This problem has been corrected in this release.

CSCsh80943

Configured service policies no longer are detached from the SFP module port after an online removal and insertion of the SFP module.

CSCsh92834

When a trunk port that is configured as part of a Flex Link pair is shut down or becomes the active link, this no longer might cause the switch to reboot

CSCsh92844.

When Flex Links is configured on an SFP module port that is in an Error Disabled State, online removal and insertion of the SFP module no longer results in an invalid Flex Link state.

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE2

This caveat is resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2.(35)SE2:

CSCsb12598

Cisco IOS device may crash while processing malformed Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) packets. In order to trigger these vulnerabilities, a malicious client must send malformed packets during the SSL protocol exchange with the vulnerable device.

Successful repeated exploitation of any of these vulnerabilities may lead to a sustained Denial-of-Service (DoS); however, vulnerabilities are not known to compromise either the confidentiality or integrity of the data or the device. These vulnerabilities are not believed to allow an attacker will not be able to decrypt any previously encrypted information.

Cisco IOS is affected by the following vulnerabilities:

Processing ClientHello messages, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsb12598

Processing ChangeCipherSpec messages, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsb40304

Processing Finished messages, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsd92405

Cisco has made free software available to address these vulnerabilities for affected customers. There are workarounds available to mitigate the effects of these vulnerabilities.

This advisory is posted at http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-SSL.shtml.


Note Another related advisory has been posted with this advisory. This additional advisory also describes a vulnerability related to cryptography that affects Cisco IOS. This related advisory is available at the following link: http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-crypto.shtml.


A combined software table for Cisco IOS is available to aid customers in choosing a software releases that fixes all security vulnerabilities published as of May 22, 2007. This software table is available at the following link: http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-cry-bundle.shtml.

CSCsb40304

Cisco IOS device may crash while processing malformed Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) packets. In order to trigger these vulnerabilities, a malicious client must send malformed packets during the SSL protocol exchange with the vulnerable device.

Successful repeated exploitation of any of these vulnerabilities may lead to a sustained Denial-of-Service (DoS); however, vulnerabilities are not known to compromise either the confidentiality or integrity of the data or the device. These vulnerabilities are not believed to allow an attacker will not be able to decrypt any previously encrypted information.

Cisco IOS is affected by the following vulnerabilities:

Processing ClientHello messages, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsb12598

Processing ChangeCipherSpec messages, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsb40304

Processing Finished messages, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsd92405

Cisco has made free software available to address these vulnerabilities for affected customers. There are workarounds available to mitigate the effects of these vulnerabilities.

This advisory is posted at http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-SSL.shtml.


Note Another related advisory has been posted with this advisory. This additional advisory also describes a vulnerability related to cryptography that affects Cisco IOS. This related advisory is available at the following link: http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-crypto.shtml.


A combined software table for Cisco IOS is available to aid customers in choosing a software releases that fixes all security vulnerabilities published as of May 22, 2007. This software table is available at the following link: http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-cry-bundle.shtml.

CSCsd92405

Cisco IOS device may crash while processing malformed Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) packets. In order to trigger these vulnerabilities, a malicious client must send malformed packets during the SSL protocol exchange with the vulnerable device.

Successful repeated exploitation of any of these vulnerabilities may lead to a sustained Denial-of-Service (DoS); however, vulnerabilities are not known to compromise either the confidentiality or integrity of the data or the device. These vulnerabilities are not believed to allow an attacker will not be able to decrypt any previously encrypted information.

Cisco IOS is affected by the following vulnerabilities:

Processing ClientHello messages, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsb12598

Processing ChangeCipherSpec messages, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsb40304

Processing Finished messages, documented as Cisco bug ID CSCsd92405

Cisco has made free software available to address these vulnerabilities for affected customers. There are workarounds available to mitigate the effects of these vulnerabilities.

This advisory is posted at http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-SSL.shtml.


Note Another related advisory has been posted with this advisory. This additional advisory also describes a vulnerability related to cryptography that affects Cisco IOS. This related advisory is available at the following link: http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-crypto.shtml.


A combined software table for Cisco IOS is available to aid customers in choosing a software releases that fixes all security vulnerabilities published as of May 22, 2007. This software table is available at the following link: http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20070522-cry-bundle.shtml.

CSCsh34864

There is no longer the potential for a spontaneous reload when you configure a UNI community VLAN with a VLAN ID greater than 1000.

Caveats Resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2(35)SE1

These are the Cisco IOS caveats resolved in Cisco IOS Release 12.2.(35)SE1:

CSCsb84285

The ME 3400 switch no longer allows you to enter the ip vrf forwarding vrf-name interface configuration command (to associate a VPN routing and forwarding table with a Layer 3 interface) on private VLAN interfaces where it is not supported.

CSCsc20515

If you create a private VLAN domain with a primary and secondary VLAN, configure the secondary VLAN as a community VLAN, and associate ports to the private VLAN, the LEDs on the ports that belong to the secondary VLAN display as amber. If you configure one of these ports as a SPAN destination port and later configure it again as a member of the secondary community VLAN, the LED now correctly again shows as amber.

CSCsc21602

When an output policy-map is configured with a qualified queue-limit and associated class-map and the class-map includes extra match statements, the queue-limit configuration is no longer rejected.

CSCsc26465

When you install a CWDM SFP module in the switch, the output of the show inventory user EXEC command now lists the CWDM device.

CSCse21219

If a Putty client is used to change the configuration to a device with SSH, the switch no longer stops responding to incoming traffic, such as SSH, Telnet, or ping packets.

CSCse38455

You can no longer create QoS configurations with more than 46 policers on a Cisco ME 3400 switch. This has always been an unsupported configuration. However, in previous releases, the switch did not check on the amount of policers configured. Unexpected and incorrect QoS behavior for traffic streams assigned to any policer after the first 46 unique policers could occur.

The switch now confirms that the maximum number of most policers in a policymap is 46. This check is consistent with both per-port and per-port-per-VLAN configurations.

CSCse47012

When a hierarchical port-shaping output policy-map with child class-based actions is attached to an interface and an input policy map is modified or detached and re-attached, the class-based actions in the hierarchical output policy map now continue to work correctly.

CSCse94858

IP multicast traffic destined to IP addresses 224.0.0.x/24 is now correctly switched between two community VLAN trunks, allowing routing protocols like EIGRP and OSPF to discover their adjacencies

CSCsf04754

Multiple Cisco products contain either of two authentication vulnerabilities in the Simple Network Management Protocol version 3 (SNMPv3) feature. These vulnerabilities can be exploited when processing a malformed SNMPv3 message. These vulnerabilities could allow the disclosure of network information or may enable an attacker to perform configuration changes to vulnerable devices. The SNMP server is an optional service that is disabled by default. Only SNMPv3 is impacted by these vulnerabilities. Workarounds are available for mitigating the impact of the vulnerabilities described in this document.

The United States Computer Emergency Response Team (US-CERT) has assigned Vulnerability Note VU#878044 to these vulnerabilities.

Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) identifier CVE-2008-0960 has been assigned to these vulnerabilities.

This advisory will be posted at http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/707/cisco-sa-20080610-snmpv3.shtml

CSCsg62606

A hierarchical output policy map with a child policy that includes priority with police now correctly provides the configured bandwidth allocations.

CSCsg96306

The entAliasMappingIdentifier now correctly maps the ifIndices of SFP ports.

CSCsg90953

If you change the policer configuration on an ME switch, the configuration change now correctly takes affect when you detach the service policy, modify it, and then reattach it.

Documentation Updates

This section contains documentation update for this release.

IP SLAs Support

The Cisco ME 3400 switch includes partial support for Cisco IOS IP Service Level Agreements (IP SLAs) to provide advanced network service monitoring information and collect data pertaining to SLAs verification. The switch can initiate and reply jitter probes. However, the traffic does not follow the queuing configuration that is applied to customer traffic. All locally originated traffic always goes to the same egress queue on the switch port, regardless of the ToS setting for the IP SLAs probe. We recommend the use of an external shadow router to measure latency and packet drop rate (PDR) across the switch.

For performance testing purposes, this configuration was validated:

1. Two switches connected back-to-back.

2. No protocols running on the switch CPUs, including STP.

3. Jitter probe send and receive rate:

a. 50 bidirectional probes sent with each probe consisting of up to 50 packets sent at 1-second intervals.

b. Probes started with a 1-second stagger between each probe.

For information about IP SLAs on Cisco routers, see this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/application/pdf/en/us/guest/products/ps6602/c1244/cdccont_0900aecd804fb392.pdf

Related Documentation

These documents provide complete information about the switch and are available from this Cisco.com site:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6580/tsd_products_support_series_home.html

You can order printed copies of documents with a DOC-xxxxxx= number from the Cisco.com sites listed in the "" section.

Cisco ME 3400 Ethernet Access Switch Software Configuration Guide (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Cisco ME 3400 Ethernet Access Switch Command Reference (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Cisco ME 3400 and ME 2400 Ethernet Access Switch System Message Guide (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Cisco ME 3400 Ethernet Access Switch Hardware Installation Guide (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Cisco ME 3400 and ME 2400 Ethernet Access Switches Getting Started Guide (order number DOC-7817050=)

Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco ME 3400 and ME 2400 Ethernet Access Switches (order number DOC-7817051)

Configuration Notes for the Cisco ME 3400G-12CS Ethernet Access Switch (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Cisco Small Form-Factor Pluggable Modules Installation Notes (order number DOC-7815160=)

Cisco CWDM GBIC and CWDM SFP Installation Note (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

These compatibility matrix documents are available from this Cisco.com site:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/modules/ps5455/products_device_support_tables_list.html

Cisco Gigabit Ethernet Transceiver Modules Compatibility Matrix (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Cisco 100-Megabit Ethernet SFP Modules Compatibility Matrix (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Cisco Small Form-Factor Pluggable Modules Compatibility Matrix (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Compatibility Matrix for 1000BASE-T Small Form-Factor Pluggable Modules (not orderable but available on Cisco.com)

Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines

For information on obtaining documentation, obtaining support, providing documentation feedback, security guidelines, and also recommended aliases and general Cisco documents, see the monthly What's New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and revised Cisco technical documentation, at:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/general/whatsnew/whatsnew.html