Catalyst Supervisor Engine 32 PISA IOS Command Reference, 12.2ZY
channel-protocol to class-map
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channel-protocol

Table Of Contents

channel-protocol

class-map

class-map type multicast-flows

class (policy-map)


channel-protocol

To set the protocol that is used on an interface to manage channeling, use the channel-protocol command. To deselect the protocol, use the no form of this command.

channel-protocol {lacp | pagp}

no channel-protocol

Syntax Description

lacp

Specifies LACP to manage channeling.

pagp

Specifies PAgP to manage channeling.


Defaults

pagp

Command Modes

Interface configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(18)ZY

Support for this command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

You can also select the protocol using the channel-group command.

If the interface belongs to a channel, the no form of this command is rejected.

All ports in an EtherChannel must use the same protocol.

PAgP and LACP are not compatible; both ends of a channel must use the same protocol.

The channel-protocol command is performed on a channel-group basis and affects ports in the channel group that is being reconfigured only. You can use the channel-protocol command to restrict anyone from selecting a mode that is not applicable to the selected protocol.

Configure all ports in an EtherChannel to operate at the same speed and duplex mode (full duplex only for LACP mode). For a complete list of guidelines, refer to the "Configuring EtherChannel" section of the Catalyst Supervisor Engine 32 PISA Cisco IOS Software Configuration Guide—Release 12.2ZY.

Examples

This example shows how to select LACP to manage channeling on the interface:

Router(config-if)# channel-protocol lacp
Router(config-if)#

Related Commands

Command
Description

channel-group

Assigns and configures an EtherChannel interface to an EtherChannel group.

show etherchannel

Displays the EtherChannel information for a channel.


class-map

To access the QoS class map configuration mode to configure QoS class maps, use the class-map command. To delete a class map, use the no form of this command.

class-map name [match-all | match-any]

no class-map name [match-all | match-any]

Syntax Description

name

Class map name.

match-all

(Optional) Matches all match criteria in the class map.

match-any

(Optional) Matches one or more match criteria.


Defaults

When you do not specify the match-all or match-any keyword, the default is match-all.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(18)ZY

Support for this command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

You apply the class-map command and its subcommands on a per-interface basis to define packet classification, marking, aggregate, and flow policing as part of a globally named service policy.

You can attach a service policy to an EtherChannel. Do not attach a service policy to a port that is a member of an EtherChannel.

After you are in QoS class map configuration mode, these configuration commands are available:

exit—Used to exit from QoS class map configuration mode.

no—Used to remove a match statement from a class map.

match—Used to configure classification criteria. These optional match subcommands are available:

access-group {acl-index | acl-name}

ip {dscp | precedence} value1 value2 ... value8

These subcommands appear in the CLI help but are not supported on LAN interfaces or WAN interfaces on the OSMs:

input-interface {{interface interface-number} | {null number} | {vlan vlan-id}}

protocol linktype

destination-address mac mac-address

source-address mac mac-address

PFC QoS does not support these subcommands:

input-interface {{interface interface-number} | {null number} | {vlan vlan-id}}

protocol linktype

destination-address mac mac-address

source-address mac mac-address

qos-group group-value

If you enter these subcommands, PFC QoS does not detect the unsupported keywords until you attach a policy map to an interface. When you try to attach the policy map to an interface, you get an error message. For additional information, refer to the Catalyst Supervisor Engine 32 PISA Cisco IOS Software Configuration Guide—Release 12.2ZY and the Cisco IOS Release 12.2 Command Reference publications.

After you have configured the class-map name and are in class-map configuration mode, you can enter the match subcommands. The syntax for these subcommands is as follows:

match {[{access-group acl-index} | acl-name] | [{ip dscp} | {precedence value}]}

See Table 2-1 for a syntax description of the match subcommands.

Table 2-1 match Syntax Description

Optional Subcommand
Description

access-group acl-index | acl-name

Specifies the access list index or access list names; valid access list index values are from 1 to 2699.

access-group acl-name

Specifies the named access list.

ip dscp value1 value2 ... value8

Specifies the IP DSCP values to match; valid values are from 0 to 63. You can enter up to 8 DSCP values, and separate each value with one white space.

ip precedence value1 value2 ... value8

Specifies the IP precedence values to match; valid values are from 0 to 7. You can enter up to 8 precedence values, and separate each value with one white space.


Examples

This example shows how to access the class-map commands and subcommands, configure a class map named ipp5, and enter a match statement for ip precedence 5:

Router(config)# class-map ipp5
Router(config-cmap)# match ip precedence 5
Router(config-cmap)# 
 
   

This example shows how to configure the class map to match an already configured access list:

Router(config-cmap)# match access-group IPacl1
Router(config-cmap)# 

Related Commands

Command
Description

policy-map

Accesses QoS policy-map configuration mode to configure the QoS policy map.

show class-map

Displays class-map information.

show policy-map interface

Displays the statistics and the configurations of the input and output policies that are attached to an interface.


class-map type multicast-flows

To create multicast class maps and enter the multicast class map configuration mode, use the class-map type multicast-flows command. To delete a class map, use the no form of this command.

class-map type multicast-flows name

no class-map type multicast-flows name

Syntax Description

name

Class-map name.


Defaults

No class is specified.

Command Modes

Global configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(18)ZY

Support for this command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

After you are in the multicast class-map configuration mode, these configuration commands are available:

exit—Used to exit from multicast class-map configuration mode.

group—Used to configure a multicast group range. The syntax for these subcommands is as follows:

group group-addr [source addr | to addr]

See Table 2-2 for a syntax description of the group subcommands.

Table 2-2 group Syntax Description

Subcommand
Description

group-addr

Multicast group address.

source addr

(Optional) Specifies the channel-source address.

to addr

(Optional) Specifies the multicast group range end address.


no—Used to negate a command or set its defaults.

Examples

This example shows how to create a multicast class map:

Router(config)# class-map type multicast-flows static2 
Router(config-mcast-flows-cmap)#
 
   

This example shows how to configure a multicast group range:

Router(config-mcast-flows-cmap)# group 192.0.2.0 source 192.0.2.10 
Router(config-mcast-flows-cmap)#

class (policy-map)

To specify the name of the class that has a policy that you want to create or change or to specify the default class (commonly known as the class-default class) before you configure its policy, use the class command in QoS policy-map configuration mode. To remove a class from the policy map, use the no form of this command.

class {class-name | class-default}

no class {class-name | class-default}

Syntax Description

class-name

Name of the class to configure or modify the policy.

class-default

Specifies the default class.


Defaults

No class is specified.

Command Modes

QoS policy-map configuration

Command History

Release
Modification

12.2(18)ZY

Support for this command was introduced.


Usage Guidelines

You can use the class (policy-map) command to specify the class name of the policy that you want to create or change. You must first identify the policy map.

To identify the policy map (and enter the required QoS policy-map configuration mode), use the policy-map command before you use the class (policy-map) command. After you specify a policy map, you can configure the policy for new classes or modify the policy for any existing classes in that policy map.

To define the class characteristics, use the following guidelines:

The class name that you specify in the policy map ties the characteristics for that class—that is, its policy—to the class map and its match criteria, as configured using the class-map command.

When you configure a policy for a class, specify its bandwidth, and attach the policy map to an interface, CBWFQ determines if the bandwidth requirement of the class can be satisfied. If so, CBWFQ allocates a queue for the bandwidth requirement.

When a class is removed, available bandwidth for the interface is incremented by the amount that was previously allocated to the class.

The maximum number of classes that you can configure within a policy map is 64.

The class-default keywords are used to specify the predefined default class called class-default. The predefined default class called class-default is the class to which traffic is directed if that traffic does not match any of the match criteria in the configured class maps.

You can define a class policy to use either tail drop by using the queue-limit command or WRED by using the random-detect command. When using either tail drop or WRED, follow these guidelines:

The queue-limit and random-detect commands cannot be used in the same class policy, but they can be used in two class policies in the same policy map.

You can use the bandwidth command when either the queue-limit or the random-detect command is configured in a class policy. The bandwidth command specifies the amount of bandwidth allocated for the class.

For the predefined default class, you can use the fair-queue (class-default) command. The fair-queue command specifies the number of dynamic queues for the default class. The fair-queue command can be used in the same class policy as either the queue-limit or random-detect command; it cannot be used with the bandwidth command.

Examples

This example shows how to configure three class policies included in the policy map called policy1. Class1 specifies the policy for the traffic that matches access control list 136. Class2 specifies the policy for the traffic on interface ethernet101. The third class is the default class to which packets that do not satisfy configured match criteria are directed.

Router(config)# policy-map policy1
Router(config-pmap)# class-map class1
Router(config-pmap-c)# match access-group 136
Router(config-pmap)# class-map class2
Router(config-pmap-c)# match input-interface ethernet101
 
   

These examples show how to create the policy map that contains the policy specifications for class1, class2, and the default class:

Router(config)# policy-map policy1
Router(config-pmap)# class-map class1
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth 2000
Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 40
 
   
Router(config-pmap)# class class2
Router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth 3000
Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect
Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect exponential-weighting-constant 10
 
   
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# fair-queue 16
Router(config-pmap-c)# queue-limit 20
 
   

Note When the policy map containing these classes is attached to the interface to stipulate the service policy for that interface, available bandwidth is assessed, including all class policies and the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP), if configured.


This example shows how to configure the policy for the class-default default class included in the policy map called policy8. The class-default default class has 20 hashed queues for the traffic that does not meet the match criteria of the other classes that have policies that are defined by the policy map called policy8 and a weight factor of 14 that is used to calculate the average queue size. For congestion avoidance, WRED packet drop is used, not tail drop.

Router(config)# policy-map policy8
Router(config-pmap)# class class-default
Router(config-pmap-c)# fair-queue 20
Router(config-pmap-c)# random-detect exponential-weighting-constant 14

Related Commands

Command
Description

class-map

Accesses the QoS class map configuration mode to configure QoS class maps.

fair-queue

Specifies the number of dynamic queues to be reserved for use by the class-default class as part of the default class policy.

policy-map

Accesses the QoS policy-map configuration mode to configure the QoS policy map.

queue-limit

Specifies or modifies the maximum number of packets that the queue can hold for a class policy configured in a policy map.

random-detect (interface)

Enables WRED or DWRED.

random-detect exponential- weighting-constant

Configures the WRED and DWRED exponential weight factor for the average queue size calculation for the queue.

random-detect precedence

Configures the WRED and DWRED parameters for a particular IP precedence.