Catalyst 2960 and 2960-S Switches Software Configuration Guide, Release 15.0(1)SE
Configuring IPv6 Routing
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Configuring IPv6 Host Functions

Table Of Contents

Configuring IPv6 Host Functions

Understanding IPv6

IPv6 Addresses

Supported IPv6 Host Features

128-Bit Wide Unicast Addresses

DNS for IPv6

ICMPv6

Neighbor Discovery

IPv6 Stateless Autoconfiguration and Duplicate Address Detection

IPv6 Applications

Dual IPv4 and IPv6 Protocol Stacks

SNMP and Syslog Over IPv6

HTTP(S) Over IPv6

IPv6 and Switch Stacks

Configuring IPv6

Default IPv6 Configuration

Configuring IPv6 Addressing and Enabling IPv6 Host

Configuring IPv6 ICMP Rate Limiting

Configuring Static Routes for IPv6

Displaying IPv6


Configuring IPv6 Host Functions


This chapter describes how to configure IPv6 host functions on the Catalyst 2960, 2960-S, or 2960-C switch.

For information about configuring IPv6 Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) snooping, see Chapter 36 "Configuring IPv6 MLD Snooping."

To enable dual stack environments (supporting both IPv4 and IPv6) on a Catalyst 2960 switch, you must configure the switch to use the a dual IPv4 and IPv6 switch database management (SDM) template. See the "Dual IPv4 and IPv6 Protocol Stacks" section. This template is not required on Catalyst 2960-S switches.


Note VFor complete syntax and usage information for the commands used in this chapter, see the Cisco IOS documentation referenced in the procedures.


"Understanding IPv6" section

"Configuring IPv6" section

"Displaying IPv6" section

Understanding IPv6

IPv4 users can move to IPv6 and receive services such as end-to-end security, quality of service (QoS), and globally unique addresses. The IPv6 address space reduces the need for private addresses and Network Address Translation (NAT) processing by border routers at network edges.

For information about how Cisco Systems implements IPv6, go to:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6553/products_ios_technology_home.html

For information about IPv6 and other features in this chapter:

See the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/12_2t/ipv6/ipv6_vgf.html

Use the Search field to locate the Cisco IOS software documentation. For example, if you want information about static routes, you can enter Implementing Static Routes for IPv6 in the search field to get this document about static routes:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/ipv6/configuration/guide/ip6-stat_routes_ps6441_TSD_Products_Configuration_Guide_Chapter.html

These sections describe IPv6 implementation on the switch.

IPv6 Addresses

Supported IPv6 Host Features

IPv6 and Switch Stacks

IPv6 Addresses

The switch supports only IPv6 unicast addresses. It does not support site-local unicast addresses, anycast addresses, or multicast addresses.

The IPv6 128-bit addresses are represented as a series of eight 16-bit hexadecimal fields separated by colons in the format: n:n:n:n:n:n:n:n. This is an example of an IPv6 address:

2031:0000:130F:0000:0000:09C0:080F:130B

For easier implementation, leading zeros in each field are optional. This is the same address without leading zeros:

2031:0:130F:0:0:9C0:80F:130B

You can also use two colons (::) to represent successive hexadecimal fields of zeros, but you can use this short version only once in each address:

2031:0:130F::09C0:080F:130B

For more information about IPv6 address formats, address types, and the IPv6 packet header, see the "Implementing IPv6 Addressing and Basic Connectivity" chapter of Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

In the "Implementing Addressing and Basic Connectivity" chapter, these sections apply to the Catalyst 2960, 2960-S, or 2960-C switch:

IPv6 Address Formats

IPv6 Address Output Display

Simplified IPv6 Packet Header

Supported IPv6 Host Features

These sections describe the IPv6 protocol features supported by the switch:

128-Bit Wide Unicast Addresses

DNS for IPv6

ICMPv6

Neighbor Discovery

IPv6 Stateless Autoconfiguration and Duplicate Address Detection

IPv6 Applications

Dual IPv4 and IPv6 Protocol Stacks

SNMP and Syslog Over IPv6

HTTP(S) Over IPv6

Support on the switch includes expanded address capability, header format simplification, improved support of extensions and options, and hardware parsing of the extension header. The switch supports hop-by-hop extension header packets, which are routed or bridged in software.

128-Bit Wide Unicast Addresses

The switch supports aggregatable global unicast addresses and link-local unicast addresses. It does not support site-local unicast addresses.

Aggregatable global unicast addresses are IPv6 addresses from the aggregatable global unicast prefix. The address structure enables strict aggregation of routing prefixes and limits the number of routing table entries in the global routing table. These addresses are used on links that are aggregated through organizations and eventually to the Internet service provider.

These addresses are defined by a global routing prefix, a subnet ID, and an interface ID. Current global unicast address allocation uses the range of addresses that start with binary value 001 (2000::/3). Addresses with a prefix of 2000::/3(001) through E000::/3(111) must have 64-bit interface identifiers in the extended unique identifier (EUI)-64 format.

Link local unicast addresses can be automatically configured on any interface by using the link-local prefix FE80::/10(1111 1110 10) and the interface identifier in the modified EUI format. Link-local addresses are used in the neighbor discovery protocol (NDP) and the stateless autoconfiguration process. Nodes on a local link use link-local addresses and do not require globally unique addresses to communicate. IPv6 routers do not forward packets with link-local source or destination addresses to other links.

For more information, see the section about IPv6 unicast addresses in the "Implementing IPv6 Addressing and Basic Connectivity" chapter in the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

DNS for IPv6

IPv6 supports Domain Name System (DNS) record types in the DNS name-to-address and address-to-name lookup processes. The DNS AAAA resource record types support IPv6 addresses and are equivalent to an A address record in IPv4. The switch supports DNS resolution for IPv4 and IPv6.

ICMPv6

The Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) in IPv6 generates error messages, such as ICMP destination unreachable messages, to report errors during processing and other diagnostic functions. In IPv6, ICMP packets are also used in the neighbor discovery protocol and path MTU discovery.

Neighbor Discovery

The switch supports NDP for IPv6, a protocol running on top of ICMPv6, and static neighbor entries for IPv6 stations that do not support NDP. The IPv6 neighbor discovery process uses ICMP messages and solicited-node multicast addresses to determine the link-layer address of a neighbor on the same network (local link), to verify the reachability of the neighbor, and to keep track of neighboring routers.

The switch supports ICMPv6 redirect for routes with mask lengths less than 64 bits. ICMP redirect is not supported for host routes or for summarized routes with mask lengths greater than 64 bits.

Neighbor discovery throttling ensures that the switch CPU is not unnecessarily burdened while it is in the process of obtaining the next hop forwarding information to route an IPv6 packet. The switch drops any additional IPv6 packets whose next hop is the same neighbor that the switch is actively trying to resolve. This drop avoids further load on the CPU.

IPv6 Stateless Autoconfiguration and Duplicate Address Detection

The switch uses stateless autoconfiguration to manage link, subnet, and site addressing changes, such as management of host and mobile IP addresses. A host autonomously configures its own link-local address, and booting nodes send router solicitations to request router advertisements for configuring interfaces.

For more information about autoconfiguration and duplicate address detection, see the "Implementing IPv6 Addressing and Basic Connectivity" chapter of Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

IPv6 Applications

The switch has IPv6 support for these applications:

Ping, traceroute, and Telnet

Secure Shell (SSH) over an IPv6 transport

HTTP server access over IPv6 transport

DNS resolver for AAAA over IPv4 transport

Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) support for IPv6 addresses

For more information about managing these applications, see the "Managing Cisco IOS Applications over IPv6" chapter and the "Implementing IPv6 Addressing and Basic Connectivity" chapter in the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

Dual IPv4 and IPv6 Protocol Stacks

On a Catalyst 2960 switch, you must use the dual IPv4 and IPv6 template to allocate ternary content addressable memory (TCAM) usage to both IPv4 and IPv6 protocols.

Figure 35-1 shows a router forwarding both IPv4 and IPv6 traffic through the same interface, based on the IP packet and destination addresses.

Figure 35-1 Dual IPv4 and IPv6 Support on an Interface

Use the dual IPv4 and IPv6 switch database management (SDM) template on a Catalyst 2960 switch to enable dual stack environments (supporting both IPv4 and IPv6). For more information about the dual IPv4 and IPv6 SDM template, see Chapter 8 "Configuring SDM Templates."

The dual IPv4 and IPv6 templates on Catalyst 2960 switches allow the switch to be used in dual stack environments.

If you try to configure IPv6 without first selecting a dual IPv4 and IPv6 template, a warning message appears.

In IPv4-only environments, the switch applies IPv4 QoS and ACLs in hardware. IPv6 packets are not supported.

In dual IPv4 and IPv6 environments, the switch applies IPv4 QoS and ACLs in hardware.

IPv6 QoS and ACLs are not supported.

If you do not plan to use IPv6, do not use the dual stack template because this template results in less TCAM capacity for each resource.

For more information about IPv4 and IPv6 protocol stacks, see the "Implementing IPv6 Addressing and Basic Connectivity" chapter of Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

SNMP and Syslog Over IPv6

To support both IPv4 and IPv6, IPv6 network management requires both IPv6 and IPv4 transports. Syslog over IPv6 supports address data types for these transports.

SNMP and syslog over IPv6 provide these features:

Support for both IPv4 and IPv6

IPv6 transport for SNMP and to modify the SNMP agent to support traps for an IPv6 host

SNMP- and syslog-related MIBs to support IPv6 addressing

Configuration of IPv6 hosts as trap receivers

For support over IPv6, SNMP modifies the existing IP transport mapping to simultaneously support IPv4 and IPv6. These SNMP actions support IPv6 transport management:

Opens User Datagram Protocol (UDP) SNMP socket with default settings

Provides a new transport mechanism called SR_IPV6_TRANSPORT

Sends SNMP notifications over IPv6 transport

Supports SNMP-named access lists for IPv6 transport

Supports SNMP proxy forwarding using IPv6 transport

Verifies SNMP Manager feature works with IPv6 transport

For information on SNMP over IPv6, including configuration procedures, see the "Managing Cisco IOS Applications over IPv6" chapter in the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

For information about syslog over IPv6, including configuration procedures, see the "Implementing IPv6 Addressing and Basic Connectivity" chapter in the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

HTTP(S) Over IPv6

The HTTP client sends requests to both IPv4 and IPv6 HTTP servers, which respond to requests from both IPv4 and IPv6 HTTP clients. URLs with literal IPv6 addresses must be specified in hexadecimal using 16-bit values between colons.

The accept socket call chooses an IPv4 or IPv6 address family. The accept socket is either an IPv4 or IPv6 socket. The listening socket continues to listen for both IPv4 and IPv6 signals that indicate a connection. The IPv6 listening socket is bound to an IPv6 wildcard address.

The underlying TCP/IP stack supports a dual-stack environment. HTTP relies on the TCP/IP stack and the sockets for processing network-layer interactions.

Basic network connectivity (ping) must exist between the client and the server hosts before HTTP connections can be made.

For more information, see the "Managing Cisco IOS Applications over IPv6" chapter in the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

IPv6 and Switch Stacks

The switch supports IPv6 forwarding across the stack and IPv6 host functionality on the stack master. The stack master runs IPv6 host functionality and IPv6 applications.

While the new stack master is being elected and is resetting, the switch stack does not forward IPv6 packets. The stack MAC address changes, which also changes the IPv6 address. When you specify the stack IPv6 address with an extended unique identifier (EUI) by using the ipv6 address ipv6-prefix/prefix length eui-64 interface configuration command, the address is based on the interface MAC address. See the "Configuring IPv6 Addressing and Enabling IPv6 Host" section.

If you configure the persistent MAC address feature on the stack and the stack master changes, the stack MAC address does not change for approximately 4 minutes. For more information, see the "Enabling Persistent MAC Address" section in Chapter 7 "Managing Switch Stacks."

Configuring IPv6

These sections contain this IPv6 forwarding configuration information:

Default IPv6 Configuration

Configuring IPv6 Addressing and Enabling IPv6 Host

Configuring IPv6 ICMP Rate Limiting

Configuring Static Routes for IPv6

Default IPv6 Configuration

Table 35-1 shows the default IPv6 configuration.

Table 35-1 Default IPv6 Configuration 

Feature
Default Setting

SDM template

Default

IPv6 addresses

None configured.


Configuring IPv6 Addressing and Enabling IPv6 Host

This section describes how to assign IPv6 addresses to individual Layer 3 interfaces and to globally forward IPv6 traffic on the switch.

Before configuring IPv6 on the switch, consider these guidelines:

Be sure to select a dual IPv4 and IPv6 SDM template.

In the ipv6 address interface configuration command, you must enter the ipv6-address and ipv6-prefix variables with the address specified in hexadecimal using 16-bit values between colons. The prefix-length variable (preceded by a slash [/]) is a decimal value that shows how many of the high-order contiguous bits of the address comprise the prefix (the network portion of the address).

To forward IPv6 traffic on an interface, you must configure a global IPv6 address on that interface. Configuring an IPv6 address on an interface automatically configures a link-local address and activates IPv6 for the interface. The configured interface automatically joins these required multicast groups for that link:

solicited-node multicast group FF02:0:0:0:0:1:ff00::/104 for each unicast address assigned to the interface (this address is used in the neighbor discovery process.)

all-nodes link-local multicast group FF02::1

all-routers link-local multicast group FF02::2

For more information about configuring IPv6, see the "Implementing Addressing and Basic Connectivity for IPv6" chapter in the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to assign an IPv6 address to a Layer 3 interface and enable IPv6forwarding:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

configure terminal

Enter global configuration mode.

Step 2 

sdm prefer dual-ipv4-and-ipv6 default

Select the SDM template that supports IPv4 and IPv6.

Step 3 

end

Return to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 4 

reload

Reload the operating system.

Step 5 

configure terminal

Enter global configuration mode after the switch reloads.

Step 6 

interface interface-id

Enter interface configuration mode, and specify the interface to configure.

Step 7 

ipv6 address ipv6-prefix/prefix length eui-64

or

ipv6 address ipv6-address/prefix length

or
ipv6 address ipv6-address link-local

or


ipv6 enable

Specify a global IPv6 address with an extended unique identifier (EUI) in the low-order 64 bits of the IPv6 address. Specify only the network prefix; the last 64 bits are automatically computed from the switch MAC address. This enables IPv6 processing on the interface.

Manually configure an IPv6 address on the interface.

Specify a link-local address on the interface to be used instead of the link-local address that is automatically configured when IPv6 is enabled on the interface. This command enables IPv6 processing on the interface.

Automatically configure an IPv6 link-local address on the interface, and enable the interface for IPv6 processing. The link-local address can only be used to communicate with nodes on the same link.

Step 8 

exit

Return to global configuration mode.

Step 9 

end

Return to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 10 

show ipv6 interface interface-id

Verify your entries.

Step 11 

copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Save your entries in the configuration file.

To remove an IPv6 address from an interface, use the no ipv6 address ipv6-prefix/prefix length eui-64 or no ipv6 address ipv6-address link-local interface configuration command. To remove all manually configured IPv6 addresses from an interface, use the no ipv6 address interface configuration command without arguments. To disable IPv6 processing on an interface that has not been explicitly configured with an IPv6 address, use the no ipv6 enable interface configuration command. To globally disable IPv6 routing, use the no ipv6 unicast-routing global configuration command.

This example shows how to enable IPv6 with both a link-local address and a global address based on the IPv6 prefix 2001:0DB8:c18:1::/64. The EUI-64 interface ID is used in the low-order 64 bits of both addresses. Output from the show ipv6 interface EXEC command shows how the interface ID (20B:46FF:FE2F:D940) is appended to the link-local prefix FE80::/64 of the interface.

Switch(config)# sdm prefer dual-ipv4-and-ipv6 default 
Switch(config)# interface gigabitethernet1/0/1
Switch(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:0DB8:c18:1::/64 eui 64
Switch(config-if)# end
Switch# show ipv6 interface gigabitethernet1/0/1
GigabitEthernet1/0/1 is up, line protocol is up
IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::20B:46FF:FE2F:D940
  Global unicast address(es):
  2001:0DB8:c18:1:20B:46FF:FE2F:D940, subnet is 2001:0DB8:c18:1::/64 [EUI]
  Joined group address(es):
    FF02::1
    FF02::2
    FF02::1:FF2F:D940
  MTU is 1500 bytes
  ICMP error messages limited to one every 100 milliseconds
  ICMP redirects are enabled
  ND DAD is enabled, number of DAD attempts: 1
  ND reachable time is 30000 milliseconds
  ND advertised reachable time is 0 milliseconds
  ND advertised retransmit interval is 0 milliseconds
  ND router advertisements are sent every 200 seconds
  ND router advertisements live for 1800 seconds
  Hosts use stateless autoconfig for addresses.

Configuring IPv6 ICMP Rate Limiting

ICMP rate limiting is enabled by default with a default interval between error messages of 100 milliseconds and a bucket size (maximum number of tokens to be stored in a bucket) of 10.

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to change the ICMP rate-limiting parameters:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

configure terminal

Enter global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipv6 icmp error-interval interval [bucketsize]

Configure the interval and bucket size for IPv6 ICMP error messages:

interval—The interval (in milliseconds) between tokens being added to the bucket. The range is from 0 to 2147483647 milliseconds.

bucketsize—(Optional) The maximum number of tokens stored in the bucket. The range is from 1 to 200.

Step 3 

end

Return to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 4 

show ipv6 interface [interface-id]

Verify your entries.

Step 5 

copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Save your entries in the configuration file.

To return to the default configuration, use the no ipv6 icmp error-interval global configuration command.

This example shows how to configure an IPv6 ICMP error message interval of 50 milliseconds and a bucket size of 20 tokens.

Switch(config)#ipv6 icmp error-interval 50 20

Configuring Static Routes for IPv6

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to configure an IPv6 static route:

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

configure terminal

Enter global configuration mode.

Step 2 

ipv6 route ipv6-prefix/prefix length {ipv6-address | interface-id [ipv6-address]} [administrative distance]

Configure a static IPv6 route.

ipv6-prefix—The IPv6 network that is the destination of the static route. It can also be a hostname when static host routes are configured.

/prefix length—The length of the IPv6 prefix. A decimal value that shows how many of the high-order contiguous bits of the address comprise the prefix (the network portion of the address). A slash mark must precede the decimal value.

ipv6-addressThe IPv6 address of the next hop that can be used to reach the specified network. The IPv6 address of the next hop need not be directly connected; recursion is done to find the IPv6 address of the directly connected next hop. The address must be specified in hexadecimal using 16-bit values between colons.

interface-id—Specify direct static routes from point-to-point and broadcast interfaces. With point-to-point interfaces, there is no need to specify the IPv6 address of the next hop. With broadcast interfaces, you should always specify the IPv6 address of the next hop, or ensure that the specified prefix is assigned to the link, specifying a link-local address as the next hop. You can optionally specify the IPv6 address of the next hop to which packets are sent.

Note You must specify an interface-id when using a link-local address as the next hop (the link-local next hop must also be an adjacent router).

administrative distance—(Optional) An administrative distance. The range is 1 to 254; the default value is 1, which gives static routes precedence over any other type of route except connected routes. To configure a floating static route, use an administrative distance greater than that of the dynamic routing protocol.

Step 3 

end

Return to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 4 

show ipv6 static [ipv6-address | ipv6-prefix/prefix length] [interface interface-id] [recursive] [detail]

or

show ipv6 route static [updated]

Verify your entries by displaying the contents of the IPv6 routing table.

interface interface-id—(Optional) Display only those static routes with the specified interface as an egress interface.

recursive—(Optional) Display only recursive static routes. The recursive keyword is mutually exclusive with the interface keyword, but it can be used with or without the IPv6 prefix included in the command syntax.

detail—(Optional) Display this additional information:

For valid recursive routes, the output path set, and maximum resolution depth.

For invalid routes, the reason why the route is not valid.

Step 5 

copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Save your entries in the configuration file.

To remove a configured static route, use the no ipv6 route ipv6-prefix/prefix length {ipv6-address | interface-id [ipv6-address]} [administrative distance] global configuration command.

This example shows how to configure a floating static route with an administrative distance of 130 to an interface:

Switch(config)# ipv6 route 2001:0DB8::/32 gigabitethernet0/1 130
 
   

For more information about configuring static IPv6 routing, see the "Implementing Static Routes for IPv6" chapter in the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

Displaying IPv6

For complete syntax and usage information on these commands, see the Cisco IOS command reference publications.

Table 35-2 shows the privileged EXEC commands for monitoring IPv6 on the switch.

Table 35-2 Commands for Monitoring IPv6

Command
Purpose

show ipv6 access-list

Display a summary of access lists.

show ipv6 interface interface-id

Display IPv6 interface status and configuration.

show ipv6 mtu

Display IPv6 MTU per destination cache.

show ipv6 neighbors

Display IPv6 neighbor cache entries.

show ipv6 prefix-list

Display a list of IPv6 prefix lists.

show ipv6 protocols

Display IPv6 routing protocols on the switch.

show ipv6 route

Display the IPv6 route table entries.

show ipv6 static

Display IPv6 static routes.

show ipv6 traffic

Display IPv6 traffic statistics.


Table 35-3 shows the privileged EXEC commands for displaying information about IPv4 and IPv6 address types.

Table 35-3 Commands for Displaying IPv4 and IPv6 Address Types 

Command
Purpose

show ip http server history

Display the previous 20 connections to the HTTP server, including the IP address accessed and the time when the connection was closed.

show ip http server connection

Display the current connections to the HTTP server, including the local and remote IP addresses being accessed.

show ip http client connection

Display the configuration values for HTTP client connections to HTTP servers.

show ip http client history

Display a list of the last 20 requests made by the HTTP client to the server.


This is an example of the output from the show ipv6 interface privileged EXEC command:

Switch# show ipv6 interface
Vlan1 is up, line protocol is up
  IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::20B:46FF:FE2F:D940
  Global unicast address(es):
    3FFE:C000:0:1:20B:46FF:FE2F:D940, subnet is 3FFE:C000:0:1::/64 [EUI]
  Joined group address(es):
    FF02::1
    FF02::2
    FF02::1:FF2F:D940
  MTU is 1500 bytes
  ICMP error messages limited to one every 100 milliseconds
  ICMP redirects are enabled
  ND DAD is enabled, number of DAD attempts: 1
  ND reachable time is 30000 milliseconds
  ND advertised reachable time is 0 milliseconds
  ND advertised retransmit interval is 0 milliseconds
  ND router advertisements are sent every 200 seconds
  ND router advertisements live for 1800 seconds
<output truncated>
 
   
 
   

This is an example of the output from the show ipv6 protocols privileged EXEC command:

Switch# show ipv6 protocols
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "connected"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "static"
IPv6 Routing Protocol is "rip fer"
  Interfaces:
    Vlan6
    GigabitEthernet2/0/4
    GigabitEthernet2/0/
    GigabitEthernet1/0/12
Redistribution:
    None
 
   
 
   

This is an example of the output from the show ipv6 static privileged EXEC command:

Switch# show ipv6 static
IPv6 Static routes
Code: * - installed in RIB
* ::/0 via nexthop 3FFE:C000:0:7::777, distance 1
 
   

This is an example of the output from the show ipv6 neighbor privileged EXEC command:

Switch# show ipv6 neighbors
IPv6 Address                              Age Link-layer Addr State Interface
3FFE:C000:0:7::777                          - 0007.0007.0007  REACH Vl7
3FFE:C101:113:1::33                         - 0000.0000.0033  REACH Fa1/0/13
 
   

This is an example of the output from the show ipv6 route privileged EXEC command:

Switch# show ipv6 route
IPv6 Routing Table - Default - 1 entries
Codes: C - Connected, L - Local, S - Static, U - Per-user Static route
L   FF00::/8 [0/0]
     via Null0, receive
 
   

This is an example of the output from the show ipv6 traffic privileged EXEC command.

Switch# show ipv6 traffic
IPv6 statistics:
  Rcvd:  1 total, 1 local destination
         0 source-routed, 0 truncated
         0 format errors, 0 hop count exceeded
         0 bad header, 0 unknown option, 0 bad source
         0 unknown protocol, 0 not a router
         0 fragments, 0 total reassembled
         0 reassembly timeouts, 0 reassembly failures
  Sent:  36861 generated, 0 forwarded
         0 fragmented into 0 fragments, 0 failed
         0 encapsulation failed, 0 no route, 0 too big
         0 RPF drops, 0 RPF suppressed drops
  Mcast: 1 received, 36861 sent
 
   
ICMP statistics:
  Rcvd: 1 input, 0 checksum errors, 0 too short
        0 unknown info type, 0 unknown error type
        unreach: 0 routing, 0 admin, 0 neighbor, 0 address, 0 port
        parameter: 0 error, 0 header, 0 option
        0 hopcount expired, 0 reassembly timeout,0 too big
        0 echo request, 0 echo reply
        0 group query, 0 group report, 0 group reduce
        1 router solicit, 0 router advert, 0 redirects
        0 neighbor solicit, 0 neighbor advert
  Sent: 10112 output, 0 rate-limited
        unreach: 0 routing, 0 admin, 0 neighbor, 0 address, 0 port
        parameter: 0 error, 0 header, 0 option
        0 hopcount expired, 0 reassembly timeout,0 too big
        0 echo request, 0 echo reply
        0 group query, 0 group report, 0 group reduce
        0 router solicit, 9944 router advert, 0 redirects
        84 neighbor solicit, 84 neighbor advert
 
   
UDP statistics:
  Rcvd: 0 input, 0 checksum errors, 0 length errors
        0 no port, 0 dropped
  Sent: 26749 output
 
   
TCP statistics:
  Rcvd: 0 input, 0 checksum errors
  Sent: 0 output, 0 retransmitted