Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Security Configuration Guide, Release 6.x
Configuring DHCP
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Configuring DHCP

Contents

Configuring DHCP

This chapter describes how to configure the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) on a Cisco NX-OS device.

This chapter includes the following sections:

Information About DHCP Snooping

DHCP snooping acts like a firewall between untrusted hosts and trusted DHCP servers. DHCP snooping performs the following activities:

  • Validates DHCP messages received from untrusted sources and filters out invalid messages.
  • Builds and maintains the DHCP snooping binding database, which contains information about untrusted hosts with leased IP addresses.
  • Uses the DHCP snooping binding database to validate subsequent requests from untrusted hosts.

DHCP snooping can be enabled globally and on a per-VLAN basis. By default, the feature is disabled globally and on all VLANs. You can enable the feature on a single VLAN or a range of VLANs.

Trusted and Untrusted Sources

You can configure whether DHCP snooping trusts traffic sources. An untrusted source may initiate traffic attacks or other hostile actions. To prevent such attacks, DHCP snooping filters messages from untrusted sources.

In an enterprise network, a trusted source is a device that is under your administrative control. These devices include the switches, routers, and servers in the network. Any device beyond the firewall or outside the network is an untrusted source. Generally, host ports are treated as untrusted sources.

In a service provider environment, any device that is not in the service provider network is an untrusted source (such as a customer switch). Host ports are untrusted sources.

In the Cisco NX-OS device, you indicate that a source is trusted by configuring the trust state of its connecting interface.

The default trust state of all interfaces is untrusted. You must configure DHCP server interfaces as trusted. You can also configure other interfaces as trusted if they connect to devices (such as switches or routers) inside your network. You usually do not configure host port interfaces as trusted.


Note


For DHCP snooping to function properly, all DHCP servers must be connected to the device through trusted interfaces.


DHCP Snooping Binding Database

Using information extracted from intercepted DHCP messages, DHCP snooping dynamically builds and maintains a database. The database contains an entry for each untrusted host with a leased IP address if the host is associated with a VLAN that has DHCP snooping enabled. The database does not contain entries for hosts connected through trusted interfaces.


Note


The DHCP snooping binding database is also referred to as the DHCP snooping binding table.


DHCP snooping updates the database when the device receives specific DHCP messages. For example, the feature adds an entry to the database when the device receives a DHCPACK message from the server. The feature removes the entry in the database when the IP address lease expires or the device receives a DHCPRELEASE message from the host.

Each entry in the DHCP snooping binding database includes the MAC address of the host, the leased IP address, the lease time, the binding type, and the VLAN number and interface information associated with the host.

Dynamic ARP inspection (DAI) and IP Source Guard also use information stored in the DHCP snooping binding database.

You can remove entries from the binding database by using the clear ip dhcp snooping binding command.

DHCP Snooping in a vPC Environment

A virtual port channel (vPC) allows two Cisco NX-OS switches to appear as a single logical port channel to a third device. The third device can be a switch, server, or any other networking device that supports port channels.

In a typical vPC environment, DHCP requests can reach one vPC peer switch and the responses can reach the other vPC peer switch, resulting in a partial DHCP (IP-MAC) binding entry in one switch and no binding entry in the other switch. As a result, DHCP snooping and associated features such as dynamic ARP inspection (DAI) and IP Source Guard are disrupted. Beginning with Cisco NX-OS Release 5.1, this issue is addressed by using Cisco Fabric Service over Ethernet (CFSoE) distribution to ensure that all DHCP packets (requests and responses) appear on both switches, which helps in creating and maintaining the same binding entry on both switches for all clients behind the vPC link.

CFSoE distribution also allows only one switch to forward the DHCP requests and responses on the vPC link. In non-vPC environments, both switches forward the DHCP packets.

Synchronizing DHCP Snooping Binding Entries

The dynamic DHCP binding entries should be synchronized in the following scenarios:
  • When the remote vPC is online, all the binding entries for that vPC link should be synchronized with the peer.
  • When DHCP snooping is enabled on the peer switch, the dynamic binding entries for all vPC links should be synchronized with the peer.

Packet Validation

The device validates DHCP packets received on the untrusted interfaces of VLANs that have DHCP snooping enabled. The device forwards the DHCP packet unless any of the following conditions occur (in which case, the packet is dropped):

  • The device receives a DHCP response packet (such as a DHCPACK, DHCPNAK, or DHCPOFFER packet) on an untrusted interface.
  • The device receives a packet on an untrusted interface, and the source MAC address and the DHCP client hardware address do not match. This check is performed only if the DHCP snooping MAC address verification option is turned on.
  • The device receives a DHCPRELEASE or DHCPDECLINE message from an untrusted host with an entry in the DHCP snooping binding table, and the interface information in the binding table does not match the interface on which the message was received.

In addition, you can enable strict validation of DHCP packets, which checks the options field of DHCP packets, including the “magic cookie” value in the first four bytes of the options field. By default, strict validation is disabled. When you enable it, by using the ip dhcp packet strict-validation command, if DHCP snooping processes a packet that has an invalid options field, it drops the packet.

DHCP Snooping Option 82 Data Insertion

DHCP can centrally manage the IP address assignments for a large number of subscribers. When you enable Option 82, the device identifies a subscriber device that connects to the network (in addition to its MAC address). Multiple hosts on the subscriber LAN can connect to the same port on the access device and are uniquely identified.

When you enable Option 82 on the Cisco NX-OS device, the following sequence of events occurs:

  1. The host (DHCP client) generates a DHCP request and broadcasts it on the network.
  2. When the Cisco NX-OS device receives the DHCP request, it adds the Option 82 information in the packet. The Option 82 information contains the device MAC address (the remote ID suboption) and the port identifier, vlan-mod-port, from which the packet is received (the circuit ID suboption). For hosts behind the port channel, the circuit ID is filled with the if_index of the port channel.

    Note


    For vPC peer switches, the remote ID suboption contains the vPC switch MAC address, which is unique in both switches. This MAC address is computed with the vPC domain ID. The Option 82 information is inserted at the switch where the DHCP request is first received before it is forwarded to the other vPC peer switch.


  3. The device forwards the DHCP request that includes the Option 82 field to the DHCP server.
  4. The DHCP server receives the packet. If the server is Option 82 capable, it can use the remote ID, the circuit ID, or both to assign IP addresses and implement policies, such as restricting the number of IP addresses that can be assigned to a single remote ID or circuit ID. The DHCP server echoes the Option 82 field in the DHCP reply.
  5. The DHCP server sends the reply to the Cisco NX-OS device. The Cisco NX-OS device verifies that it originally inserted the Option 82 data by inspecting the remote ID and possibly the circuit ID fields. The Cisco NX-OS device removes the Option 82 field and forwards the packet to the interface that connects to the DHCP client that sent the DHCP request.

If the previously described sequence of events occurs, the following values do not change:

  • Circuit ID suboption fields
    • Suboption type
    • Length of the suboption type
    • Circuit ID type
    • Length of the circuit ID type
  • Remote ID suboption fields
    • Suboption type
    • Length of the suboption type
    • Remote ID type
    • Length of the circuit ID type
Figure 1. Suboption Packet Formats.

This figure shows the packet formats for the remote ID suboption and the circuit ID suboption. The Cisco NX-OS device uses the packet formats when you globally enable DHCP snooping and when you enable Option 82 data insertion and removal. For the circuit ID suboption, the module field is the slot number of the module.



Figure 2. Circuit ID Suboption Frame Format for Regular and vPC Interfaces.

Beginning with Cisco NX-OS Release 6.2(2), a new circuit ID format is used when Option 82 is enabled in DHCP snooping. The new circuit ID format is used by default and cannot be disabled. However, you might need to configure the DHCP server for the new circuit ID format if it was using the old Option 82 format for IP address allocation. These figures show the new default circuit ID format that is used for regular interfaces and vPC interfaces when Option 82 is enabled for DHCP snooping.

The enhanced Option 82 format improves DHCP packet processing. For vPC and vPC+ interfaces, the new format assigns vPC peers a unique circuit ID in case some are configured with different port channel numbers.







Information About the DHCP Relay Agent

DHCP Relay Agent

You can configure the device to run a DHCP relay agent, which forwards DHCP packets between clients and servers. This feature is useful when clients and servers are not on the same physical subnet. Relay agents receive DHCP messages and then generate a new DHCP message to send out on another interface. The relay agent sets the gateway address (giaddr field of the DHCP packet) and, if configured, adds the relay agent information option (Option 82) in the packet and forwards it to the DHCP server. The reply from the server is forwarded back to the client after removing Option 82.

After you enable Option 82, the device uses the binary ifindex format by default. If needed, you can change the Option 82 setting to use an encoded string format instead.


Note


When the device relays a DHCP request that already includes Option 82 information, the device forwards the request with the original Option 82 information without altering it.


DHCP Relay Agent Option 82

You can enable the device to insert and remove Option 82 information on DHCP packets that are forwarded by the relay agent.

Figure 3. DHCP Relay Agent in a Metropolitan Ethernet Network.

This figure shows an example of a metropolitan Ethernet network in which a centralized DHCP server assigns IP addresses to subscribers connected to the device at the access layer. Because the DHCP clients and their associated DHCP server do not reside on the same IP network or subnet, a DHCP relay agent is configured with a helper address to enable broadcast forwarding and to transfer DHCP messages between the clients and the server.



When you enable Option 82 for the DHCP relay agent on the Cisco NX-OS device, the following sequence of events occurs:

  1. The host (DHCP client) generates a DHCP request and broadcasts it on the network.
  2. When the Cisco NX-OS device receives the DHCP request, it adds the Option 82 information in the packet. The Option 82 information contains the device MAC address (the remote ID suboption) and the port identifier, vlan-mod-port, from which the packet is received (the circuit ID suboption). In DHCP relay, the circuit ID is filled with the if_index of the SVI or Layer 3 interface on which DHCP relay is configured.

    Note


    For vPC peer devices, the remote ID suboption contains the vPC device MAC address, which is unique in both devices. This MAC address is computed with the vPC domain ID. The Option 82 information is inserted at the device where the DHCP request is first received before it is forwarded to the other vPC peer device.


  3. The device adds the IP address of the relay agent to the DHCP packet.
  4. The device forwards the DHCP request that includes the Option 82 field to the DHCP server.
  5. The DHCP server receives the packet. If the server is Option 82 capable, it can use the remote ID, the circuit ID, or both to assign IP addresses and implement policies, such as restricting the number of IP addresses that can be assigned to a single remote ID or circuit ID. The DHCP server echoes the Option 82 field in the DHCP reply.
  6. The DHCP server unicasts the reply to the Cisco NX-OS device if the request was relayed to the server by the device. The Cisco NX-OS device verifies that it originally inserted the Option 82 data by inspecting the remote ID and possibly the circuit ID fields. The Cisco NX-OS device removes the Option 82 field and forwards the packet to the interface that connects to the DHCP client that sent the DHCP request.

VRF Support for the DHCP Relay Agent

You can configure the DHCP relay agent to forward DHCP broadcast messages from clients in a virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instance to DHCP servers in a different VRF. By using a single DHCP server to provide DHCP support to clients in multiple VRFs, you can conserve IP addresses by using a single IP address pool rather than one for each VRF. For general information about VRFs, see the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Unicast Routing Configuration Guide.

Enabling VRF support for the DHCP relay agent requires that you enable Option 82 for the DHCP relay agent.

If a DHCP request arrives on an interface that you have configured with a DHCP relay address and VRF information, and the address of the DCHP server belongs to a network on an interface that is a member of a different VRF, the device inserts Option 82 information in the request and forwards it to the DHCP server in the server VRF. The Option 82 information includes the following:

VPN identifier

Name of the VRF that the interface that receives the DHCP request is a member of.

Link selection

Subnet address of the interface that receives the DHCP request. When DHCP smart relay is enabled, the link selection is filled with the subnet of the active giaddr.

Server identifier override

IP address of the interface that receives the DHCP request. When DHCP smart relay is enabled, the server identifier is filled with the active giaddr.


Note


The DHCP server must support the VPN identifier, link selection, and server identifier override options.


When the device receives the DHCP response message, it strips off the Option 82 information and forwards the response to the DHCP client in the client VRF.

DHCP Smart Relay Agent

When the DHCP relay agent receives broadcast DHCP request packets from a host, it sets giaddr to the primary address of the inbound interface and forwards the packets to the server. The server allocates IP addresses from the giaddr subnet pool until the pool is exhausted and ignores further requests.

Beginning with Cisco NX-OS Release 5.2, you can configure the DHCP smart relay agent to allocate IP addresses from the secondary IP address subnet pool if the first subnet pool is exhausted or the server ignores further requests. This enhancement is useful if the number of hosts is greater than the number of IP addresses in the pool or if multiple subnets are configured on an interface using secondary addresses.

Information About the DHCPv6 Relay Agent

DHCPv6 Relay Agent

You can configure the device to run a DHCPv6 relay agent, which forwards DHCPv6 packets between clients and servers. This feature is useful when clients and servers are not on the same physical subnet. Relay agents receive DHCPv6 messages and then generate a new DHCPv6 message to send out on another interface. The relay agent sets the gateway address (giaddr field of the DHCPv6 packet) and forwards it to the DHCPv6 server.

VRF Support for the DHCPv6 Relay Agent

You can configure the DHCPv6 relay agent to forward DHCPv6 broadcast messages from clients in a virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instance to DHCPv6 servers in a different VRF. By using a single DHCPv6 server to provide DHCP support to clients in multiple VRFs, you can conserve IP addresses by using a single IP address pool rather than one for each VRF. For general information about VRFs, see the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Unicast Routing Configuration Guide.

Virtualization Support for DHCP

The following information applies to DHCP used in virtual device contexts (VDCs):

  • DHCP snooping binding databases are unique per VDC. Bindings in one VDC do not affect DHCP snooping in other VDCs.
  • The system does not limit the binding database size on a per-VDC basis.
  • The DHCP smart relay agent can be configured independently in default and nondefault VDCs.

Licensing Requirements for DHCP

This table shows the licensing requirements for DHCP.

Product

License Requirement

Cisco NX-OS

DHCP requires no license. Any feature not included in a license package is bundled with the Cisco NX-OS system images and is provided at no extra charge to you. For an explanation of the Cisco NX-OS licensing scheme, see the Cisco NX-OS Licensing Guide.

Prerequisites for DHCP

DHCP has the following prerequisite:

  • You should be familiar with DHCP before you configure DHCP snooping or the DHCP relay agent.

Guidelines and Limitations for DHCP

DHCP has the following configuration guidelines and limitations:

  • For Cisco NX-OS Release 6.2 and later releases, you must enable the insertion of Option 82 information for DHCP packets to support the highest DHCP snooping scale.
  • If you use DHCP relay where DHCP clients and servers are in different VRF instances, use only one DHCP server within a VRF.
  • Before globally enabling DHCP snooping on the device, make sure that the devices acting as the DHCP server and the DHCP relay agent are configured and enabled.
  • DHCP snooping should not be followed by DHCP relay in the network.
  • If a VLAN ACL (VACL) is configured on a VLAN that you are configuring with DHCP snooping, ensure that the VACL permits DHCP traffic between DHCP servers and DHCP hosts. When both DHCP snooping and DHCP relay are enabled on a VLAN and the SVI of that VLAN, DHCP relay takes precedence.
  • If an ingress router ACL is configured on a Layer 3 interface that you are configuring with a DHCP server address, ensure that the router ACL permits DHCP traffic between DHCP servers and DHCP hosts.
  • Access-control list (ACL) statistics are not supported if the DHCP snooping feature is enabled.
  • Make sure that the DHCP configuration is synchronized across the devices in a vPC link. Otherwise, a run-time error can occur, resulting in dropped packets.
  • Beginning with Cisco NX-OS Release 5.1, DHCP snooping is supported with FabricPath. Follow these guidelines when enabling DHCP snooping in a FabricPath network:
    • DHCP snooping should be enabled on CE-FabricPath boundary devices.
    • DHCP snooping is enabled on all access layer devices to secure the network at the access layer itself.
    • DHCP does not learn any binding entries on ports in FabricPath mode as users should have enabled DHCP snooping on all access layer devices. As a result, when DAI is enabled, ARP packets received on FabricPath ports are allowed.
    • IPSG cannot be enabled on ports in FabricPath mode.

    Note


    For more information on FabricPath, see the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS FabricPath Configuration Guide.


  • DHCP smart relay and DHCP subnet broadcast support are limited to the first 100 IP addresses of the interface on which they are enabled.
  • You must configure a helper address on the interface in order to use DHCP smart relay and DHCP subnet broadcast support.
  • In a vPC environment with DHCP smart relay enabled, the subnet of the primary and secondary addresses of an interface should be the same on both Cisco NX-OS devices.
  • When you configure DHCPv6 server addresses on an interface, a destination interface cannot be used with global IPv6 addresses.

Note


For DHCP configuration limits, see the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Verified Scalability Guide.


Default Settings for DHCP

This table lists the default settings for DHCP parameters.



Table 1 Default DHCP Parameters

Parameters

Default

DHCP feature

Disabled

DHCP snooping

Disabled

DHCP snooping on VLANs

Disabled

DHCP snooping MAC address verification

Enabled

DHCP snooping Option 82 support

Disabled

DHCP snooping trust

Untrusted

DHCP relay agent

Enabled

DHCPv6 relay agent

Enabled

VRF support for the DHCP relay agent

Disabled

VRF support for the DHCPv6 relay agent

Disabled

DHCP relay sub-option type cisco

Disabled

DHCPv6 relay option type cisco

Disabled

DHCP Option 82 for relay agent

Disabled

Subnet broadcast support for the DHCP relay agent

Disabled

DHCP smart relay agent

Disabled

DHCP server IP address

None

Configuring DHCP

Minimum DHCP Configuration


Step 1   Enable the DHCP feature.

When the DHCP feature is disabled, you cannot configure DHCP snooping.

Step 2   Enable DHCP snooping globally.
Step 3   Enable DHCP snooping on at least one VLAN.

By default, DHCP snooping is disabled on all VLANs.

Step 4   Ensure that the DHCP server is connected to the device using a trusted interface.
Step 5   (Optional)If DHCP servers and clients are in different VRF instances, do the following:
  1. Enable Option 82 for the DHCP relay agent.
  2. Enable VRF support for the DHCP relay agent.
Step 6   (Optional) Configure an interface with the IP address of the DHCP server.

Enabling or Disabling the DHCP Feature

You can enable or disable the DHCP feature on the device. By default, DHCP is disabled.

When the DHCP feature is disabled, you cannot configure DHCP snooping, the DHCP relay agent, or any of the features that depend on DHCP, such as dynamic ARP inspection and IP Source Guard. In addition, all DHCP, dynamic ARP inspection, and IP Source Guard configuration is removed from the device.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    config t

    2.    [no] feature dhcp

    3.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    4.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 config t


Example:
switch# config t
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2 [no] feature dhcp


Example:
switch(config)# feature dhcp
 

Enables the DHCP feature. The no option disables the DHCP feature and erases all DHCP configuration.

 
Step 3 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch(config)# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 4 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Enabling or Disabling DHCP Snooping Globally

You can enable or disable DHCP snooping globally on the device.

Before You Begin

Ensure that you have enabled the DHCP feature.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    config t

    2.    [no] ip dhcp snooping

    3.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    4.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 config t


Example:
switch# config t
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2 [no] ip dhcp snooping


Example:
switch(config)# ip dhcp snooping
 

Enables DHCP snooping globally. The no option disables DHCP snooping.

 
Step 3 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch(config)# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 4 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Enabling or Disabling DHCP Snooping on a VLAN

You can enable or disable DHCP snooping on one or more VLANs. By default, DHCP snooping is disabled on all VLANs.

Before You Begin

Ensure that the DHCP feature is enabled.


Note


If a VACL is configured on a VLAN that you are configuring with DHCP snooping, ensure that the VACL permits DHCP traffic between DHCP servers and DHCP hosts.


SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    config t

    2.    [no] ip dhcp snooping vlan vlan-list

    3.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    4.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 config t


Example:
switch# config t
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2 [no] ip dhcp snooping vlan vlan-list


Example:
switch(config)# ip dhcp snooping vlan 100,200,250-252
 

Enables DHCP snooping on the VLANs specified by vlan-list. The no option disables DHCP snooping on the VLANs specified.

 
Step 3 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch(config)# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 4 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Enabling or Disabling DHCP Snooping MAC Address Verification

You can enable or disable DHCP snooping MAC address verification. If the device receives a packet on an untrusted interface and the source MAC address and the DHCP client hardware address do not match, address verification causes the device to drop the packet. MAC address verification is enabled by default.

Before You Begin

Ensure that the DHCP feature is enabled.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    config t

    2.    [no] ip dhcp snooping verify mac-address

    3.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    4.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 config t


Example:
switch# config t
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2 [no] ip dhcp snooping verify mac-address


Example:
switch(config)# ip dhcp snooping verify mac-address
 

Enables DHCP snooping MAC address verification. The no option disables MAC address verification.

 
Step 3 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch(config)# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 4 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Enabling or Disabling Option 82 Data Insertion and Removal

You can enable or disable the insertion and removal of Option 82 information for DHCP packets forwarded without the use of the DHCP relay agent. By default, the device does not include Option 82 information in DHCP packets.


Note


DHCP relay agent support for Option 82 is configured separately.



Note


To support a higher DHCP pps scale, you must enable the insertion of Option 82 information for DHCP packets.


Before You Begin

Ensure that the DHCP feature is enabled.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    config t

    2.    [no] ip dhcp snooping information option

    3.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    4.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 config t


Example:
switch# config t
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2 [no] ip dhcp snooping information option


Example:
switch(config)# ip dhcp snooping information option
 

Enables the insertion and removal of Option 82 information for DHCP packets. The no option disables the insertion and removal of Option 82 information.

 
Step 3 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch(config)# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 4 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Enabling or Disabling Strict DHCP Packet Validation

You can enable or disable the strict validation of DHCP packets. By default, strict validation of DHCP packets is disabled.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    config t

    2.    [no] ip dhcp packet strict-validation

    3.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    4.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 config t


Example:
switch# config t
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2 [no] ip dhcp packet strict-validation


Example:
switch(config)# ip dhcp packet strict-validation
 

Enables the strict validation of DHCP packets. The no option disables strict DHCP packet validation.

 
Step 3 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch(config)# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 4 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Configuring an Interface as Trusted or Untrusted

You can configure whether an interface is a trusted or untrusted source of DHCP messages. By default, all interfaces are untrusted. You can configure DHCP trust on the following types of interfaces:

  • Layer 2 Ethernet interfaces
  • Layer 2 port-channel interfaces
Before You Begin

Ensure that the DHCP feature is enabled.

Ensure that the interface is configured as a Layer 2 interface.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    config t

    2.    Do one of the following options:

    • interface ethernet slot/port
    • interface port-channel channel-number

    3.    [no] ip dhcp snooping trust

    4.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    5.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 config t


Example:
switch# config t
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2Do one of the following options:
  • interface ethernet slot/port
  • interface port-channel channel-number


Example:
switch(config)# interface ethernet 2/1
switch(config-if)#
 
  • Enters interface configuration mode, where slot/port is the Layer 2 Ethernet interface that you want to configure as trusted or untrusted for DHCP snooping.
  • Enters interface configuration mode, where slot/port is the Layer 2 port-channel interface that you want to configure as trusted or untrusted for DHCP snooping.
 
Step 3 [no] ip dhcp snooping trust


Example:
switch(config-if)# ip dhcp snooping trust
 

Configures the interface as a trusted interface for DHCP snooping. The no option configures the port as an untrusted interface.

 
Step 4 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch(config-if)# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 5 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch(config-if)# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Enabling or Disabling the DHCP Relay Agent

You can enable or disable the DHCP relay agent. By default, the DHCP relay agent is enabled.

Before You Begin

Ensure that the DHCP feature is enabled.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    config t

    2.    [no] ip dhcp relay

    3.    (Optional) show ip dhcp relay

    4.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    5.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 config t


Example:
switch# config t
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2[no] ip dhcp relay


Example:
switch(config)# ip dhcp relay
 

Enables the DHCP relay agent. The no option disables the relay agent.

 
Step 3show ip dhcp relay


Example:
switch(config)# show ip dhcp relay
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP relay configuration.

 
Step 4 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch(config)# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 5 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Enabling or Disabling Option 82 for the DHCP Relay Agent

You can enable or disable the device to insert and remove Option 82 information on DHCP packets forwarded by the relay agent.

By default, the DHCP relay agent does not include Option 82 information in DHCP packets.

Before You Begin

Ensure that the DHCP feature is enabled.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    configure terminal

    2.    [no] ip dhcp relay information option

    3.    (Optional) [no] ip dhcp relay information sub-option circuit-id format-type string

    4.    (Optional) show ip dhcp relay

    5.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    6.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 configure terminal


Example:
switch# configure terminal
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2 [no] ip dhcp relay information option


Example:
switch(config)# ip dhcp relay information option
 

Enables the DHCP relay agent to insert and remove Option 82 information on the packets that it forwards. The Option 82 information is in binary ifindex format by default. The no option disables this behavior.

 
Step 3[no] ip dhcp relay information sub-option circuit-id format-type string


Example:
switch(config)# ip dhcp relay information sub-option circuit-id format-type string 
 
(Optional)

Configures Option 82 to use encoded string format instead of the default binary ifindex format.

 
Step 4 show ip dhcp relay


Example:
switch(config)# show ip dhcp relay
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP relay configuration.

 
Step 5 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch(config)# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 6 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Saves the change persistently through reboots and restarts by copying the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Enabling or Disabling VRF Support for the DHCP Relay Agent

You can configure the device to support the relaying of DHCP requests that arrive on an interface in one VRF to a DHCP server in a different VRF instance.

Before You Begin

You must enable Option 82 for the DHCP relay agent.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    config t

    2.    [no] ip dhcp relay information option vpn

    3.    [no] ip dhcp relay sub-option type cisco

    4.    (Optional) show ip dhcp relay

    5.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    6.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 config t


Example:
switch# config t
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2[no] ip dhcp relay information option vpn


Example:
switch(config)# ip dhcp relay information option vpn
 

Enables VRF support for the DHCP relay agent. The no option disables this behavior.

 
Step 3 [no] ip dhcp relay sub-option type cisco


Example:
switch(config)# ip dhcp relay sub-option type cisco
 

Enables DHCP to use Cisco proprietary numbers 150, 152, and 151 when filling the link selection, server ID override, and VRF name/VPN ID relay agent Option 82 suboptions. The no option causes DHCP to use RFC numbers 5, 11, and 151 for the link selection, server ID override, and VRF name/VPN ID suboptions.

 
Step 4show ip dhcp relay


Example:
switch(config)# show ip dhcp relay
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP relay configuration.

 
Step 5 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch(config)# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 6 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Enabling or Disabling Subnet Broadcast Support for the DHCP Relay Agent on a Layer 3 Interface

You can configure the device to support the relaying of DHCP packets from clients to a subnet broadcast IP address. When this feature is enabled, the VLAN ACLs (VACLs) accept IP broadcast packets and all subnet broadcast (primary subnet broadcast as well as secondary subnet broadcast) packets.

Before You Begin

Ensure that the DHCP feature is enabled.

Ensure that the DHCP relay agent is enabled.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    config t

    2.    interface interface slot/port

    3.    [no] ip dhcp relay subnet-broadcast

    4.    exit

    5.    exit

    6.    (Optional) show ip dhcp relay

    7.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    8.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 config t


Example:
switch# config t
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2 interface interface slot/port


Example:
switch(config)# interface ethernet 2/2
switch(config-if)#
 

Enters interface configuration mode, where slot/port is the interface for which you want to enable or disable subnet broadcast support for the DHCP relay agent.

 
Step 3 [no] ip dhcp relay subnet-broadcast


Example:
switch(config-if)# ip dhcp relay subnet-broadcast
 

Enables subnet broadcast support for the DHCP relay agent. The no option disables this behavior.

 
Step 4 exit


Example:
switch(config-if)# exit
switch(config)#
 

Exits interface configuration mode.

 
Step 5 exit


Example:
switch(config)# exit
switch#
 

Exits global configuration mode.

 
Step 6 show ip dhcp relay


Example:
switch# show ip dhcp relay
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP relay configuration.

 
Step 7 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 8 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Configuring DHCP Server Addresses on an Interface

You can configure DHCP server IP addresses on an interface. When an inbound DHCP BOOTREQUEST packet arrives on the interface, the relay agent forwards the packet to all DHCP server IP addresses specified. The relay agent forwards replies from all DHCP servers to the host that sent the request.

Before You Begin

Ensure that the DHCP feature is enabled.

Ensure that the DHCP server is correctly configured.

Determine the IP address for each DHCP server that you want to configure on the interface.

If the DHCP server is in a different VRF instance than the interface, ensure that you have enabled VRF support.


Note


If an ingress router ACL is configured on an interface that you are configuring with a DHCP server address, ensure that the router ACL permits DHCP traffic between DHCP servers and DHCP hosts.


SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    config t

    2.    Do one of the following options:

    • interface ethernet slot/port[. number]
    • interface vlan vlan-id
    • interface port-channel channel-id[.subchannel-id]

    3.    ip dhcp relay address IP-address [use-vrf vrf-name]

    4.    (Optional) show ip dhcp relay address

    5.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    6.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 config t


Example:
switch# config t
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2Do one of the following options:
  • interface ethernet slot/port[. number]
  • interface vlan vlan-id
  • interface port-channel channel-id[.subchannel-id]


Example:
switch(config)# interface ethernet 2/3
switch(config-if)#
 
  • Enters interface configuration mode, where slot/port is the physical Ethernet interface that you want to configure with a DHCP server IP address. If you want to configure a subinterface, include the number argument to specify the subinterface number.
  • Enters interface configuration mode, where vlan-id is the ID of the VLAN that you want to configure with a DHCP server IP address.
  • Enters interface configuration mode, where channel-id is the ID of the port channel that you want to configure with a DHCP server IP address. If you want to configure a subchannel, include the subchannel-id argument to specify the subchannel ID.
 
Step 3 ip dhcp relay address IP-address [use-vrf vrf-name]


Example:
switch(config-if)# ip dhcp relay address 10.132.7.120 use-vrf red
 

Configures an IP address for a DHCP server to which the relay agent forwards BOOTREQUEST packets received on this interface.

To configure more than one IP address, use the ip dhcp relay address command once per address.

 
Step 4 show ip dhcp relay address


Example:
switch(config-if)# show ip dhcp relay address
 
(Optional)

Displays all the configured DHCP server addresses.

 
Step 5 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch(config-if)# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 6 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch(config-if)# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Enabling or Disabling DHCP Smart Relay Globally

You can enable or disable DHCP smart relay globally on the device.

Before You Begin

Ensure that the DHCP feature is enabled.

Ensure that the DHCP relay agent is enabled.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    config t

    2.    [no] ip dhcp smart-relay global

    3.    (Optional) show ip dhcp relay

    4.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    5.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 config t


Example:
switch# config t
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2 [no] ip dhcp smart-relay global


Example:
switch(config)# ip dhcp smart-relay global
 

Enables DHCP smart relay globally. The no option disables DHCP smart relay.

 
Step 3 show ip dhcp relay


Example:
switch(config)# show ip dhcp relay
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP smart relay configuration.

 
Step 4 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch(config)# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 5 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Enabling or Disabling DHCP Smart Relay on a Layer 3 Interface

You can enable or disable DHCP smart relay on Layer 3 interfaces.

Before You Begin

Ensure that the DHCP feature is enabled.

Ensure that the DHCP relay agent is enabled.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    config t

    2.    interface interface slot/port

    3.    [no] ip dhcp smart-relay

    4.    exit

    5.    exit

    6.    (Optional) show ip dhcp relay

    7.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    8.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 config t


Example:
switch# config t
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2interface interface slot/port


Example:
switch(config)# interface ethernet 2/3
switch(config-if)#
 

Enters interface configuration mode, where slot/port is the interface for which you want to enable or disable DHCP smart relay.

 
Step 3 [no] ip dhcp smart-relay


Example:
switch(config-if)# ip dhcp smart-relay
 

Enables DHCP smart relay on the interface. The no option disables DHCP smart relay on the interface.

 
Step 4 exit


Example:
switch(config-if)# exit
switch(config)#
 

Exits interface configuration mode.

 
Step 5 exit


Example:
switch(config)# exit
switch#
 

Exits global configuration mode.

 
Step 6 show ip dhcp relay


Example:
switch# show ip dhcp relay
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP smart relay configuration.

 
Step 7 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 8 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Configuring DHCPv6

Enabling or Disabling the DHCPv6 Relay Agent

You can enable or disable the DHCPv6 relay agent. By default, the DHCPv6 relay agent is enabled.

Before You Begin

Ensure that the DHCP feature is enabled.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    configure terminal

    2.    [no] ipv6 dhcp relay

    3.    (Optional) show ipv6 dhcp relay [interface interface]

    4.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    5.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 configure terminal


Example:
switch# configure terminal
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2[no] ipv6 dhcp relay


Example:
switch(config)# ipv6 dhcp relay
 

Enables the DHCPv6 relay agent. The no option disables the relay agent.

 
Step 3show ipv6 dhcp relay [interface interface]


Example:
switch(config)# show ipv6 dhcp relay
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCPv6 relay configuration.

 
Step 4 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch(config)# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 5 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Enabling or Disabling VRF Support for the DHCPv6 Relay Agent

You can configure the device to support the relaying of DHCPv6 requests that arrive on an interface in one VRF to a DHCPv6 server in a different VRF.

Before You Begin

Ensure that the DHCP feature is enabled.

Ensure that the DHCPv6 relay agent is enabled.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    configure terminal

    2.    [no] ipv6 dhcp relay option vpn

    3.    [no] ipv6 dhcp relay option type cisco

    4.    (Optional) show ipv6 dhcp relay [interface interface]

    5.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    6.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 configure terminal


Example:
switch# configure terminal
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2[no] ipv6 dhcp relay option vpn


Example:
switch(config)# ipv6 dhcp relay option vpn
 

Enables VRF support for the DHCPv6 relay agent. The no option disables this behavior.

 
Step 3 [no] ipv6 dhcp relay option type cisco


Example:
switch(config)# ipv6 dhcp relay option type cisco
 

Causes the DHCPv6 relay agent to insert virtual subnet selection (VSS) details as part of the vendor-specific option. The no option causes the DHCPv6 relay agent to insert VSS details as part of the VSS option (68), which is defined in RFC-6607. This command is useful when you want to use DHCPv6 servers that do not support RFC-6607 but allocate IPv6 addresses based on the client VRF name.

 
Step 4show ipv6 dhcp relay [interface interface]


Example:
switch(config)# show ipv6 dhcp relay
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCPv6 relay configuration.

 
Step 5 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch(config)# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 6 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Configuring DHCPv6 Server Addresses on an Interface

You can configure DHCPv6 server IP addresses on an interface. When an inbound DHCP BOOTREQUEST packet arrives on the interface, the relay agent forwards the packet to all DHCPv6 server IP addresses specified. The relay agent forwards replies from all DHCPv6 servers to the host that sent the request.

Before You Begin

Ensure that the DHCP feature is enabled.

Ensure that the DHCPv6 server is correctly configured.

Determine the IP address for each DHCPv6 server that you want to configure on the interface.

If the DHCPv6 server is in a different VRF than the interface, ensure that you have enabled VRF support.


Note


If an ingress router ACL is configured on an interface that you are configuring with a DHCPv6 server address, ensure that the router ACL permits DHCP traffic between DHCPv6 servers and DHCP hosts.


SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    config t

    2.    Do one of the following options:

    • interface ethernet slot/port[. number]
    • interface port-channel channel-id[.subchannel-id]

    3.    [no] ipv6 dhcp relay address IPv6-address [use-vrf vrf-name] [interface interface]

    4.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    5.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 config t


Example:
switch# config t
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2Do one of the following options:
  • interface ethernet slot/port[. number]
  • interface port-channel channel-id[.subchannel-id]


Example:
switch(config)# interface ethernet 2/3
switch(config-if)#
 
  • Enters interface configuration mode, where slot/port is the physical Ethernet interface that you want to configure with a DHCPv6 server IP address. If you want to configure a subinterface, include the number argument to specify the subinterface number.
  • Enters interface configuration mode, where channel-id is the ID of the port channel that you want to configure with a DHCPv6 server IP address. If you want to configure a subchannel, include the subchannel-id argument to specify the subchannel ID.
 
Step 3 [no] ipv6 dhcp relay address IPv6-address [use-vrf vrf-name] [interface interface]


Example:
switch(config-if)# ipv6 dhcp relay address FF02:1::FF0E:8C6C use-vrf red
 

Configures an IP address for a DHCPv6 server to which the relay agent forwards BOOTREQUEST packets received on this interface.

Use the use-vrf option to specify the VRF name of the server if it is in a different VRF and the other argument interface is used to specify the output interface for the destination.

The server address can either be a link-scoped unicast or multicast address or a global or site-local unicast or multicast address. The interface option is mandatory for a link-scoped server address and multicast address. It is not allowed for a global or site-scoped server address.

To configure more than one IP address, use the ipv6 dhcp relay address command once per address.

 
Step 4 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch(config-if)# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCPv6 configuration.

 
Step 5 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch(config-if)# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Configuring the DHCPv6 Relay Source Interface

You can configure the source interface for the DHCPv6 relay agent. By default, the DHCPv6 relay agent uses the relay agent address as the source address of the outgoing packet. Configuring the source interface enables you to use a more stable address (such as the loopback interface address) as the source address of relayed messages.

Before You Begin

Ensure that the DHCP feature is enabled.

Ensure that the DHCPv6 relay agent is enabled.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    configure terminal

    2.    [no] ipv6 dhcp relay source-interface interface

    3.    (Optional) show ipv6 dhcp relay [interface interface]

    4.    (Optional) show running-config dhcp

    5.    (Optional) copy running-config startup-config


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 configure terminal


Example:
switch# configure terminal
switch(config)#
 

Enters global configuration mode.

 
Step 2 [no] ipv6 dhcp relay source-interface interface


Example:
switch(config)# ipv6 dhcp relay source-interface loopback 2
 

Configures the source interface for the DHCPv6 relay agent.

Note   

The DHCPv6 relay source interface can be configured globally, per interface, or both. When both the global and interface levels are configured, the interface-level configuration overrides the global configuration.

 
Step 3show ipv6 dhcp relay [interface interface]


Example:
switch(config)# show ipv6 dhcp relay
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCPv6 relay configuration.

 
Step 4 show running-config dhcp


Example:
switch(config)# show running-config dhcp
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP configuration.

 
Step 5 copy running-config startup-config


Example:
switch(config)# copy running-config startup-config
 
(Optional)

Copies the running configuration to the startup configuration.

 

Verifying the DHCP Configuration

To display DHCP configuration information, perform one of the following tasks. For detailed information about the fields in the output from these commands, see the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Security Command Reference.

Command

Purpose

show running-config dhcp [all]

Displays the DHCP configuration in the running configuration.

show ip dhcp relay

Displays the DHCP relay configuration.

show ipv6 dhcp relay [interface interface]

Displays the DHCPv6 relay global or interface-level configuration.

show ip dhcp relay address

Displays all the DHCP server addresses configured on the device.

show ip dhcp snooping

Displays general information about DHCP snooping.

show startup-config dhcp [all]

Displays the DHCP configuration in the startup configuration.

Displaying DHCP Bindings

Use the show ip dhcp snooping binding command to display the DHCP binding table. For detailed information about the fields in the output from this command, see the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Security Command Reference.

Clearing the DHCP Snooping Binding Database

You can remove entries from the DHCP snooping binding database, including a single entry, all entries associated with an interface, or all entries in the database.

Before You Begin

Ensure that the DHCP feature is enabled.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    (Optional) clear ip dhcp snooping binding

    2.    (Optional) clear ip dhcp snooping binding interface ethernet slot/port[.subinterface-number]

    3.    (Optional) clear ip dhcp snooping binding interface port-channel channel-number[.subchannel-number]

    4.    (Optional) clear ip dhcp snooping binding vlan vlan-id mac mac-address ip ip-address interface {ethernet slot/port[.subinterface-number | port-channel channel-number[.subchannel-number] }

    5.    (Optional) show ip dhcp snooping binding


DETAILED STEPS
 Command or ActionPurpose
Step 1 clear ip dhcp snooping binding


Example:
switch# clear ip dhcp snooping binding
 
(Optional)

Clears all entries from the DHCP snooping binding database.

 
Step 2 clear ip dhcp snooping binding interface ethernet slot/port[.subinterface-number]


Example:
switch# clear ip dhcp snooping binding interface ethernet 1/4
 
(Optional)

Clears entries associated with a specific Ethernet interface from the DHCP snooping binding database.

 
Step 3 clear ip dhcp snooping binding interface port-channel channel-number[.subchannel-number]


Example:
switch# clear ip dhcp snooping binding interface port-channel 72
 
(Optional)

Clears entries associated with a specific port-channel interface from the DHCP snooping binding database.

 
Step 4 clear ip dhcp snooping binding vlan vlan-id mac mac-address ip ip-address interface {ethernet slot/port[.subinterface-number | port-channel channel-number[.subchannel-number] }


Example:
switch# clear ip dhcp snooping binding vlan 23 mac 0060.3aeb.54f0 ip 10.34.54.9 interface 
ethernet 2/11
 
(Optional)

Clears a single, specific entry from the DHCP snooping binding database.

 
Step 5 show ip dhcp snooping binding


Example:
switch# show ip dhcp snooping binding
 
(Optional)

Displays the DHCP snooping binding database.

 

Clearing DHCP Relay Statistics

Use the clear ip dhcp relay statistics command to clear the global DHCP relay statistics.

Use the clear ip dhcp relay statistics interface interface command to clear the DHCP relay statistics for a particular interface.

Clearing DHCPv6 Relay Statistics

Use the clear ipv6 dhcp relay statistics command to clear the global DHCPv6 relay statistics.

Use the clear ipv6 dhcp relay statistics interface interface command to clear the DHCPv6 relay statistics for a particular interface.

Monitoring DHCP

Use the show ip dhcp snooping statistics command to monitor DHCP snooping.

Use the show ip dhcp relay statistics [interface interface] command to monitor DHCP relay statistics at the global or interface level.

Use the show ipv6 dhcp relay statistics [interface interface] command to monitor DHCPv6 relay statistics at the global or interface level.


Note


For detailed information about the fields in the output from these commands, see the Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Security Command Reference.


Configuration Examples for DHCP

This example shows how to enable DHCP snooping on two VLANs, with Option 82 support enabled and Ethernet interface 2/5 trusted because the DHCP server is connected to that interface:

feature dhcp 
ip dhcp snooping 
ip dhcp snooping info option

interface Ethernet 2/5
  ip dhcp snooping trust 
ip dhcp snooping vlan 1 
ip dhcp snooping vlan 50

This example shows how to enable the DHCP relay agent and configure the DHCP server IP address for Ethernet interface 2/3, where the DHCP server IP address is 10.132.7.120 and the DHCP server is in the VRF instance named red:

feature dhcp 
ip dhcp snooping 
ip dhcp relay 
ip dhcp relay information option
ip dhcp relay information option vpn

interface Ethernet 2/3
  ip dhcp relay address 10.132.7.120 use-vrf red

This example shows how to enable and use the DHCP smart relay agent. In this example, the device forwards the DHCP broadcast packets received on Ethernet interface 2/2 to the DHCP server (10.55.11.3), inserting 192.168.100.1 in the giaddr field. If the DHCP server has a pool configured for the 192.168.100.0/24 network, it responds. If the server does not respond, the device sends two more requests using 192.168.100.1 in the giaddr field. If the device still does not receive a response, it starts using 172.16.31.254 in the giaddr field instead.

feature dhcp
ip dhcp snooping
ip dhcp relay
ip dhcp smart-relay global

interface Ethernet 2/2
		ip address 192.168.100.1/24
		ip address 172.16.31.254/24 secondary
		ip dhcp relay address 10.55.11.3

Additional References for DHCP

Related Documents

Related Topic

Document Title

DHCP commands: complete command syntax, command modes, command history, defaults, usage guidelines, and examples

Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Security Command Reference

VRFs and Layer 3 virtualization

Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Unicast Routing Configuration Guide

vPCs

Cisco Nexus 7000 Series NX-OS Interfaces Configuration Guide

Standards

Standards

Title

RFC-2131

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (http:/​/​tools.ietf.org/​html/​rfc2131)

RFC-3046

DHCP Relay Agent Information Option (http:/​/​tools.ietf.org/​html/​rfc3046)

RFC-6607

Virtual Subnet Selection Options for DHCPv4 and DHCPv6 http:/​/​tools.ietf.org/​html/​rfc6607

Feature History for DHCP

This table lists the release history for this feature.



Table 2  Feature History for DHCP

Feature Name

Releases

Feature Information

DHCP

6.2(2)

Added support for the DHCPv6 relay agent.

DHCP

6.2(2)

Added a new default circuit ID format that is used when Option 82 is enabled for DHCP snooping.

DHCP

6.0(1)

No change from Release 5.2.

DHCP

5.2(1)

Added support for DHCP smart relay.

DHCP

5.2(1)

Added subnet broadcast support for the DHCP relay agent.

DHCP

5.1(1)

Optimized DHCP snooping to work in a vPC environment.

DHCP

5.0(2)

Modified the DHCP relay agent to support VRFs, added the ip dhcp relay information option vpn command, and modified the ip dhcp relay address command to add the use-vrf vrf-name option.

DHCP

5.0(2)

Added the ip dhcp relay sub-option type cisco command to enable DHCP to use Cisco proprietary numbers 150, 152, and 151 for the link selection, server ID override, and VRF name/VPN ID relay agent Option 82 suboptions.

DHCP

4.2(1)

Deprecated the service dhcp command and replaced it with the ip dhcp relay command.