Cisco Nexus 5000 Series NX-OS Software Configuration Guide
Using the Command-Line Interface
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Table of Contents

Using the Command-Line Interface

Accessing the Command Line Interface

Using the CLI

Using CLI Command Modes

Changing Command Modes

Listing the Commands Used with Each Command Mode

CLI Command Hierarchy

EXEC Mode Commands

Configuration Mode Commands

Using Commands

Listing Commands and Syntax

Entering Command Sequences

Undoing or Reverting to Default Values or Conditions

Using Keyboard Shortcuts

Using CLI Variables

User-Defined Persistent CLI Variables

Using Command Aliases

Defining Command Aliases

Command Scripts

Executing Commands Specified in a Script

Using CLI Variables in Scripts

Setting the Delay Time

Using the Command-Line Interface

This chapter describes the command-line interface (CLI) and CLI command modes. It includes the following sections:

Accessing the Command Line Interface

You can connect to the switch using a terminal plugged into the console port. See Console Settings for information on how to set console port parameters.

You can also connect to the switch with Telnet or SSH. The switch supports up to eight simultaneous Telnet and SSH connections. To connect with Telnet or SSH, you need to know the hostname or IP address of the switch.

To make a Telnet connection to the switch, perform these steps:

 

Command
Purpose

Step 1

telnet { hostname | ip_addr }

Makes a Telnet connection from your host to the switch that you want to access.

Step 2

Login: admin

Password: password

Initiates authentication.

Note If no password has been configured, press Return.

Step 3

switch# exit

Exits the session when finished.

Alternatively, to make an SSH connection to the switch, use the following command:

 

Command
Purpose

ssh { hostname | ip_addr }

Makes an SSH connection from your host to the switch that you want to access.

Using the CLI

The section includes the following topics:

Using CLI Command Modes

Switches in the Cisco Nexus 5000 Series have two main command modes: user EXEC mode and configuration mode. The commands available to you depend on the mode you are in. To obtain a list of available commands in either mode, type a question mark (?) at the system prompt.

Table 2-1 lists and describes the two commonly used modes, how to enter the modes, and the resulting system prompts. The system prompt helps you identify which mode you are in and the commands that are available to you in that mode.

 

Table 2-1 Frequently Used Switch Command Modes

Mode
Description
How to Access
Prompt

EXEC

Enables you to temporarily change terminal settings, perform basic tests, and display system information.

Note Changes made in this mode are generally not saved across system resets.

At the switch prompt, enter the required EXEC mode command.

switch#

Configuration mode

Enables you to configure features that affect the system as a whole.

Note Changes made in this mode are saved across system resets if you save your configuration.

From EXEC mode, enter the configure terminal command.

switch(config)#

You can abbreviate commands and keywords by entering just enough characters to make the command unique from other commands. For example, you can abbreviate the configure terminal command to conf t.

Changing Command Modes

Configuration mode, also known as terminal configuration mode, has several submodes. Each of these submodes places you further down in the prompt hierarchy. When you type exit, the switch backs out of the current level and returns you to the previous level. When you type end, the switch backs out to the user EXEC level. You can also press Ctrl-Z in configuration mode as an alternative to typing end.

Listing the Commands Used with Each Command Mode

You can display the commands available in any command mode by typing a question mark (?) at the switch prompt.

CLI Command Hierarchy

CLI commands are organized hierarchically, with commands that perform similar functions grouped under the same level. For example, all commands that display information about the system, configuration, or hardware are grouped under the show command, and all commands that allow you to configure the switch are grouped under the configure terminal command.

To execute a command, you enter the command by starting at the top level of the hierarchy. For example, to configure an interface, use the config terminal command. Once you are in configuration mode, enter the interface command. When you are in the interface submode, you can query the available commands.

The following example shows how to query the available command in the interface submode:

switch# configure terminal
switch(config)# interface fc 3/1
switch(config-if)# ?
channel-group add to/remove from a san-port-channel
description Enter description of maximum 80 characters
exit Exit from command interpreter
fcdomain Configure fcdomain parameters
fspf Configure FSPF parameters
no Negate a command or set its defaults
out-of-service Put an interface out of service.
shutdown Enable/disable an interface
switchport Configure switchport parameters

EXEC Mode Commands

When you start a session on the switch, you begin in EXEC mode. From EXEC mode, you can enter configuration mode. Most of the EXEC commands are one-time commands, such as show commands, which display the current configuration status.

The following commands are available in EXEC mode:

switch# ?
callhome callhome commands
cd Change current directory
clear Reset functions
cli CLI commands
clock Manage the system clock
configure Enter configuration mode
copy Copy from one file to another
debug Debugging functions
debug-filter Enable filtering for debugging functions
delete delete a file
dir list files in a directory
discover discover information
end Exit configuration mode
ethanalyzer Configure cisco fabric analyzer
exit Exit from command interpreter
fcping Ping an N-Port
fctrace Trace the route for an N-Port.
file File management commands
find Find a file below the current directory
format Format disks
gunzip Uncompresses LZ77 coded files
gzip Compresses file using LZ77 coding
install upgrade software
ip Configure IP features
license Enter the license configuration mode
logit Add syslog message
mkdir Create new directory
move Move files
no Negate a command or set its defaults
ntp Execute NTP commands
ping Test network reachability
purge Deletes unused data
pwd View current directory
reload Reboot the entire box
replace Discard the entire configuration and load the entire configuration in
<filename>
rmdir delete a directory
run-script Run shell scripts
san-port-channel Port-Channel related commands
send Send message to open sessions
session Configure session preferences
setup Run the basic SETUP command facility
show Show running system information
sleep Sleep for the specified number of seconds
ssh SSH to another system
syslog Execute a logging command
system System management commands
tac-pac save tac information to a specific location
tail Display the last part of a file
telnet Telnet to another system
terminal Set terminal line parameters
terminate Terminates a config session
test test command
traceroute Traceroute to destination
undebug Disable Debugging functions (See also debug)
unmount unmount compact flash disk or usb drive
update Update license
write Write current configuration
xml xml agent
zone Execute Zone Server commands
zoneset Execute zoneset commands

Configuration Mode Commands

Configuration mode allows you to make changes to the existing configuration. When you save the configuration, these commands are saved across switch reboots. Once you are in configuration mode, you can enter interface configuration mode, zone configuration mode, and a variety of protocol-specific modes. Configuration mode is the starting point for all configuration commands.

The following commands are available in configuration mode:

switch# configure terminal
switch(config)# ?
aaa Configure aaa functions
arp ARP
banner Configure banner message
boot Configure boot variables
callhome Enter the callhome configuration mode
cdp CDP Configuration parameters
cfs CFS configuration commands
class-map Configure class-map
cli Configure CLI aliases
clock Configure time-of-day clock
device-alias Device-alias configuration commands
diagnostic Diagnostic commands
end Exit configuration mode
exit Exit from command interpreter
fabric Switch fabric information
fabric-binding Fabric Binding configuration
fc FCoE/FC feature
fcalias Fcalias configuration commands
fcdomain Enter the fcdomain configuration mode
fcdroplatency configure switch or network latency
fcflow Configure fcfloww
fcid-allocation Add/remove company id(or OUIs) from auto area list
fcinterop Interop commands
fcns name server configuration
fcroute Configure FC routes
fcs Configure Fabric Config Server
fcsp Config commands for FC-SP
fctimer configure fibre channel timers
fdmi config commands for FDMI
feature Command to enable/disable features
fspf Configure fspf
hostname Configure system's host name
hw-module Enable/Disable OBFL information
in-order-guarantee set in-order delivery guarantee
interface Configure interfaces
ip Configure IP features
ipv6 Configure IPv6 features
line Configure a terminal line
lldp Configure global LLDP parameters
logging Modify message logging facilities
mac MAC configuration commands
mac-address-table MAC Address Table
monitor Ethernet SPAN
no Negate a command or set its defaults
npiv Nx port Id Virtualization (NPIV) feature enable
npv Config commands for FC N_port Virtualizer
ntp NTP Configuration
pm packet manager
policy-map Configure policy-map
port-channel Add to/remove from a port-channel
port-security Configure Port Security
port-track Configure Switch port track config
privilege Command privilege parameters
prompt Define default prompt
radius-server Configure RADIUS related parameters
resequence Resequence a list with sequence numbers
rib Configure RIB parameters
rlir config commands for RLIR
rmon Remote Monitoring
role Configure roles
rscn config commands for RSCN
scsi-target scsi-target configuration
show Show running system information
snmp-server Configure snmp server
spanning-tree Spanning Tree Subsystem
ssh Configure SSH parameters
svi svi configuration commands
switchname Configure system's host name
system system config command
system Configure system
tacacs+ Enable tacacs+
telnet Enable telnet
track Object tracking configuration commands
trunk Configure Switch wide trunk protocol
username Configure user information.
vlan Vlan commands
vrf Configure VRF parameters
vsan Enter the vsan configuration mode
wwn Set secondary base MAC addr and range for additional WWNs
xml xml agent
zone Zone configuration commands
zoneset Zoneset configuration commands

Using Commands

You can configure the CLI to function in two ways: configure it interactively by entering commands at the CLI prompt or create an ASCII file containing switch configuration information (use the CLI to edit and activate the file).

Listing Commands and Syntax

In any command mode, you can obtain a list of available commands by entering a question mark (?).

switch# ?
 

To see a list of commands that begin with a particular character sequence, type those characters followed by a question mark (?). Do not include a space before the question mark.

switch# co?
configure copy
 

To list keywords or arguments, enter a question mark in place of a keyword or argument. Include a space before the question mark. This form of help is called command syntax help because it reminds you which keywords or arguments are applicable based on the commands, keywords, and arguments you have already entered.

switch# # configure ?
<CR>
terminal Configure the system from terminal input

Tip If you are having trouble entering a command, check the system prompt and enter the question mark (?) for a list of available commands. You might be in the wrong command mode or using incorrect syntax.


Entering Command Sequences

In any command mode, you can begin a particular command sequence, then immediately press the Tab key to complete the rest of the command.

switch (config)# ro<Tab>
switch (config)# role <Tab>
switch (config)# role name
 

This form of help is called command completion because it completes a word for you. If several options are available for the typed letters, all options that match those letters are displayed.

Undoing or Reverting to Default Values or Conditions

You can enter the no form of any command to perform the following actions:

  • Undo an incorrectly entered command.

If you enter the zone member command, you can undo the results:

switch(config)# zone name test vsan 1
switch(config-zone)# member pwwn 12:12:12:12:12:12:12:12
switch(config-zone)# no member pwwn 12:12:12:12:12:12:12:12
WARNING: Zone is empty. Deleting zone test. Exit the submode.
switch(config-zone)#
 
  • Delete a created facility.

If you want to delete a zone that you created:

switch(config)# zone name test vsan 1
switch(config-zone)# exit
switch(config)# no zone name test vsan 1
switch(config)#
 

You cannot delete a zone facility called test while still in zone configuration submode. You must first exit the zone submode and return to configuration mode.

  • Revert to the default value.

If you enter the zone merge-control restrict vsan command, you can undo the results:

switch(config)# zone merge-control restrict vsan 10
switch(config)# no zone merge-control restrict vsan 10
switch(config)#

Using Keyboard Shortcuts

You can execute an EXEC mode command from a configuration mode or submode prompt. You can enter this command from any submode within the configuration mode. When in configuration mode (or in any submode), enter the do command along with the required EXEC mode command. The command is executed at the EXEC level, and the prompt resumes its current mode level.

switch(config)# do terminal session-timeout 0
switch(config)#
 

In this example, terminal session-timeout is an EXEC mode command. You are entering an EXEC mode command using the configuration mode do command.

The do command applies to all EXEC mode commands other than the end and exit commands. You can also use the help (?) and command completion (Tab) features for EXEC commands when entering a do command along with the EXEC command.

Table 2-2 lists some useful command keys that can be used in both EXEC and configuration modes.

 

Table 2-2 Useful Command Keys

Command
Description

Ctrl-P

Up history

Ctrl-N

Down history

Ctrl-X-H

List history

Alt-P

History search backwards

Note The difference between Tab completion and Alt-P or Alt-N is that pressing Tab completes the current word, while Alt-P and Alt-N completes a previously entered command.

Alt-N

History search forwards

Ctrl-G

Exit

Ctrl-Z

End

Ctrl-L

Clear session

Table 2-3 describes the commonly used configuration submodes.

 

Table 2-3 Common Configuration Submodes

Submode Name
From Configuration Mode, Enter:
Submode Prompt

Call home

callhome

switch(config-callhome)#

FCS Registration

fcs register

switch(config-fcs-register)#

From FCS registration submode:

platform name name vsan vsan-id

switch(config-fcs-register-attrib)#

Fibre Channel alias

fcalias name name vsan vsan-id

switch(congif-fcalias)#

FSPF

fspf config vsan vsan-id

switch(config-(fspf-config))#

Interface configuration

interface type slot/port

switch(config-if)#

Line console

line console

switch(config-console)

Virtual terminal line

line vty

switch(config-line)#

Role

role name

switch(config-role)#

VLAN

vlan

switch(config-vlan)#

VSAN database

vsan database

switch(config-vsan-db)#

Zone

zone name string vsan vsan-id

switch(config-zone)#

Zone set

zoneset name name vsan vsan-id

switch(config-zoneset)#

Using CLI Variables

The Cisco Nexus 5000 Series CLI parser supports the definition and use of variables in CLI commands. CLI variables can be used as follows:

  • Entered directly on the command line.
  • Passed to the child script initiated using the run-script command.

The variables defined in the parent shell are available for use in the child run-script command process (see the “Executing Commands Specified in a Script” section).

CLI variables have the following characteristics:

  • You cannot reference a variable through another variable using nested references.
  • You can define persistent variables that are available across switch reloads.
  • You can reference only one predefined system variable, which is the TIMESTAMP variable.

User-Defined Persistent CLI Variables

You can define CLI session variables to persist only for the duration of your CLI session using the cli var name command in EXEC mode. CLI session variables are useful for scripts that you execute periodically.

The following example shows how to create a user-defined CLI session variable:

switch# cli var name testinterface fc 1/1
 

You can reference a variable using the syntax $(variable). The following example shows how to reference a user-defined CLI session variable:

switch# show interface $(testinterface)
fc2/1 is up
Hardware is Fibre Channel, SFP is short wave laser w/o OFC (SN)
Port WWN is 20:01:00:0d:ec:0e:1d:00
Admin port mode is auto, trunk mode is on
snmp traps are enabled
Port mode is F, FCID is 0x01000b
Port vsan is 1
Speed is 2 Gbps
Transmit B2B Credit is 7
Receive B2B Credit is 16
Receive data field Size is 2112
Beacon is turned off
5 minutes input rate 256 bits/sec, 32 bytes/sec, 1 frames/sec
5 minutes output rate 256 bits/sec, 32 bytes/sec, 1 frames/sec
232692 frames input, 7447280 bytes
0 discards, 0 errors
0 CRC, 0 unknown class
0 too long, 0 too short
232691 frames output, 7448692 bytes
0 discards, 0 errors
0 input OLS, 0 LRR, 0 NOS, 0 loop inits
1 output OLS, 1 LRR, 0 NOS, 1 loop inits
16 receive B2B credit remaining
7 transmit B2B credit remaining
 

Use the show cli variables command to display user-defined CLI session variables. The following example displays user-defined CLI session variables:

switch# show cli variables
VSH Variable List
-----------------
TIMESTAMP="2005-10-24-21.29.33"
testinterface="fc 1/1"
 

Use the cli no var name command to remove user-defined CLI session variables. The following example removes a user-defined CLI session variable:

switch# cli no var name testinterface

Using Command Aliases

Command alias support has the following characteristics:

  • Command aliases are global for all user sessions.
  • Command aliases are saved across reboots.
  • Commands being aliased must be typed in full without abbreviation.
  • Command alias translation always takes precedence over any keyword in any configuration mode or submode.
  • Command alias support is only available on the supervisor module, not the switching modules.
  • Command alias configuration takes effect for other user sessions immediately.
  • You cannot override the default command alias alias, which aliases the show cli alias command.
  • Nesting of command aliases is permitted to a maximum depth of 1. One command alias can refer to another command alias that must refer to a valid command, not to another command alias.
  • A command alias always replaces the first command keyword on the command line.
  • You can define command aliases for commands in any configuration submode or the EXEC mode.

Defining Command Aliases

You can define command aliases using the cli alias name command in configuration mode.

This following example shows how to define command aliases:

switch# configure terminal
switch(config)# cli alias name eth interface ethernet
switch(config)# cli alias name shintbr show interface brief
switch(config)# cli alias name shfcintup shintbr | include up | include fc
 

You can display the command aliases defined on the switch using the alias default command alias.

The following example shows how to display the command aliases defined on the switch:

switch# alias
CLI alias commands
==================
alias :show cli alias
gigint :interface gigabitethernet
shintbr :show interface brief
shfcintup :shintbr | include up | include fc

Command Scripts

This section includes the following topics:

Executing Commands Specified in a Script

The run-script command executes the commands specified in a file. To use this command, be sure to create the file and specify commands in the required order.


Note You cannot create the script file at the switch prompt. You can create the script file on an external machine and copy it to the bootflash: directory. This section assumes that the script file resides in the bootflash: directory.


The syntax for this command is run-scrip t filename.

This example displays the CLI commands specified in a test file that resides in the bootflash: directory.

switch# show file bootflash:testfile
configure terminal
interface fc 3/1
no shutdown
end
show interface fc 3/1
 

This file output is in response to the run-script command executing the contents in the test file:

switch# run-script bootflash:testfile
'configure terminal'
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
'interface fc 3/1'
'no shutdown'
'end'
'show interface fc 3/1'
fc3/1 is trunking
Hardware is Fibre Channel, SFP is short wave laser w/o OFC (SN)
Port WWN is 20:81:00:0d:ec:6b:cd:c0
Peer port WWN is 20:01:00:0d:ec:0d:d0:00
Admin port mode is auto, trunk mode is on
snmp link state traps are enabled
Port mode is TE
Port vsan is 1
Speed is 2 Gbps
Transmit B2B Credit is 255
Receive B2B Credit is 16
Receive data field Size is 2112
Beacon is turned off
Trunk vsans (admin allowed and active) (1)
Trunk vsans (up) (1)
Trunk vsans (isolated) ()
Trunk vsans (initializing) ()
5 minutes input rate 96 bits/sec, 12 bytes/sec, 0 frames/sec
5 minutes output rate 64 bits/sec, 8 bytes/sec, 0 frames/sec
77423 frames input, 6708868 bytes
0 discards, 0 errors
0 CRC, 0 unknown class
0 too long, 0 too short
77302 frames output, 4184976 bytes
0 discards, 0 errors
1 input OLS, 2 LRR, 0 NOS, 0 loop inits
1 output OLS, 0 LRR, 1 NOS, 0 loop inits
16 receive B2B credit remaining
255 transmit B2B credit remaining
 

Using CLI Variables in Scripts

You can use CLI variables defined by the cli var command (see the “Using CLI Variables” section) or passed as arguments in the run-script command.

The following example shows how to use CLI session variables in a script file used by the run-script command:

switch# cli var name testinterface fc 1/1
switch# show file bootflash:test1.vsh
show interface $(testvar)
switch# run-script bootflash:test1.vsh
`show interface $(testvar)`
fc2/1 is down (SFP not present)
Hardware is Fibre Channel
Port WWN is 20:01:00:05:30:00:8e:1e
Admin port mode is auto, trunk mode is on
Port vsan is 1
Receive data field Size is 2112
Beacon is turned off
5 minutes input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 bytes/sec, 0 frames/sec
5 minutes output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 bytes/sec, 0 frames/sec
1 frames input, 128 bytes
0 discards, 0 errors
0 CRC, 0 unknown class
0 too long, 0 too short
1 frames output, 128 bytes
0 discards, 0 errors
0 input OLS, 0 LRR, 0 NOS, 0 loop inits
0 output OLS, 0 LRR, 0 NOS, 0 loop inits
0 receive B2B credit remaining
0 transmit B2B credit remaining
 

The following example shows how you can pass CLI session variable as arguments to a child run-script command process:

switch# show file bootflash:test1.vsh
show interface $(var1) $(var2)
switch# run bootflash:test2.vsh var1="fc2/1" var2="brief"
`show interface $(var1) $(var2)`
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Interface Vsan Admin Admin Status SFP Oper Oper Port
Mode Trunk Mode Speed Channel
Mode (Gbps)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
fc2/1 1 auto on sfpAbsent -- -- -- \
 

Setting the Delay Time

The sleep command delays an action by a specified number of seconds.

The syntax for this command is sleep seconds.

switch# sleep 30
 

You will see the switch prompt return after 30 seconds. This command is useful within scripts. For example, if you create a command script called test-script.

switch# show file bootflash:test-script
discover scsi-target remote
sleep 10
show scsi-target disk
switch# run-script bootflash:test-script
 

When you execute the test-script command script, the switch software executes the discover scsi-target remote command, and then waits for 10 seconds before executing the show scsi-target disk command.