Cisco Identity Services Engine Hardware Installation Guide, Release 1.1.x
Appendix D, Installing the Cisco SNS-3400 Series Hardware
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Table of Contents

Installing the Cisco SNS-3400 Series Hardware

Connecting and Powering On the Server

Checking the LEDs

Front Panel LEDs and Buttons

Rear Panel LEDs and Buttons

Configuring CIMC

Creating a Bootable USB Drive

Installing or Replacing Server Components

Installing the Cisco SNS-3400 Series Hardware

This appendix describes how to install your Cisco SNS-3400 Series appliances and connect any of the supported appliances to the network. This information is contained in the following sections:

Connecting and Powering On the Server

This section describes how to power on the server and assign an IP address to connect to it.The server is shipped with a default NIC mode called Shared LOM, default NIC redundancy is active-active, and DHCP is enabled . Shared LOM mode enables the two 1-Gb Ethernet ports to access the Cisco Integrated Management Interface (CIMC). If you want to use the 1-Gb Ethernet dedicated management port, or a port on a Cisco UCS P81E Virtual Interface Card (VIC) to access the CIMC, you must first connect to the server and change the NIC mode as described in Step 3 of the following procedure. In that step, you can also change the NIC redundancy and set static IP settings.

Use the following procedure to perform initial setup of the server:


Step 1 Attach a supplied power cord to each power supply in your server, and then attach the power cord to a grounded AC power outlet. See the Power Specifications for power specifications.

Wait for approximately two minutes to let the server boot in standby power during the first bootup.

You can verify power status by looking at the Power Status LED:

    • Off—There is no AC power present in the server.
  • Amber—The server is in standby power mode. Power is supplied only to the CIMC and some motherboard functions.
  • Green—The server is in main power mode. Power is supplied to all server components.

Note During bootup, the server beeps once for each USB device that is attached to the server. Even if there are no external USB devices attached, there is a short beep for each virtual USB device such as a virtual floppy drive, CD/DVD drive, keyboard, or mouse. A beep is also emitted if a USB device is hot-plugged or hot-unplugged during BIOS power-on self test (POST), or while you are accessing the BIOS Setup utility or the EFI shell.


Step 2 Connect a USB keyboard and VGA monitor by using the supplied KVM cable connected to the KVM connector on the front panel.


Note Alternatively, you can use the VGA and USB ports on the rear panel. However, you cannot use the front panel VGA and the rear panel VGA at the same time. If you are connected to one VGA connector and you then connect a video device to the other connector, the first VGA connector is disabled.



 

Checking the LEDs

When the Cisco SNS-3400 Series appliances have been started up and are running, observe the state of the front-panel and rear-panel LEDs. The following topics describe the LED color, its power status, activity, and other important status indicators that are displayed for the Cisco SNS-3400 Series appliance:

  • Front Panel LEDs and Buttons, page B-2
  • Rear Panel LEDs and Buttons, page B-4

Front Panel LEDs and Buttons

 

Table 1-1 Front Panel LEDs, Definitions of States

LED Name
State

Power button/Power status LED

  • Off—There is no AC power to the server.
  • Amber—The server is in standby power mode. Power is supplied only to the CIMC and some motherboard functions.
  • Green—The server is in main power mode. Power is supplied to all server components.

Identification

  • Off—The Identification LED is not in use.
  • Blue—The Identification LED is activated.

System status

  • Green—The server is running in normal operating condition.
  • Green, blinking—The server is performing system initialization and memory check.
  • Amber, steady—The server is in a degraded operational state. For example:

Power supply redundancy is lost.

CPUs are mismatched.

At least one CPU is faulty.

At least one DIMM is faulty.

At least one drive in a RAID configuration failed.

  • Amber, blinking—The server is in a critical fault state. For example:

Boot failed.

Fatal CPU and/or bus error is detected.

Server is in over-temperature condition.

Fan status

  • Green—All fan modules are operating properly.
  • Amber, steady—One fan module has failed.
  • Amber, blinking—Critical fault, two or more fan modules have failed.

Temperature status

  • Green—The server is operating at normal temperature.
  • Amber, steady—One or more temperature sensors have exceeded a warning threshold.
  • Amber, blinking—One or more temperature sensors have exceeded a critical threshold.

Power supply status

  • Green—All power supplies are operating normally.
  • Amber, steady—One or more power supplies are in a degraded operational state.
  • Amber, blinking—One or more power supplies are in a critical fault state.

Network link activity

  • Off—The Ethernet link is idle.
  • Green—One or more Ethernet LOM ports are link-active, but there is no activity.
  • Green, blinking—One or more Ethernet LOM ports are link-active, with activity.

Hard drive fault

  • Off—The hard drive is operating properly.
  • Amber—This hard drive has failed.
  • Amber, blinking—The device is rebuilding.

Hard drive activity

  • Off—There is no hard drive in the hard drive sled (no access, no fault).
  • Green—The hard drive is ready.
  • Green, blinking—The hard drive is reading or writing data.

Rear Panel LEDs and Buttons

 

Table 1-2 Rear Panel LEDs, Definitions of States

LED Name
State

Power supply fault

  • Off—The power supply is operating normally.
  • Amber, blinking—An event warning threshold has been reached, but the power supply continues to operate.
  • Amber, solid—A critical fault threshold has been reached, causing the power supply to shut down (for example, a fan failure or an over-temperature condition).

Power supply AC OK

  • Off—There is no AC power to the power supply.
  • Green, blinking—AC power OK, DC output not enabled.
  • Green, solid—AC power OK, DC outputs OK.

1-Gb Ethernet dedicated management link speed

  • Off—link speed is 10 Mbps.
  • Amber—link speed is 100 Mbps.
  • Green—link speed is 1 Gbps.

1-Gb Ethernet dedicated management link status

  • Off—No link is present.
  • Green—Link is active.
  • Green, blinking—Traffic is present on the active link.

1-Gb Ethernet link speed

  • Off—link speed is 10 Mbps.
  • Amber—link speed is 100 Mbps.
  • Green—link speed is 1 Gbps.

1-Gb Ethernet link status

  • Off—No link is present.
  • Green—Link is active.
  • Green, blinking—Traffic is present on the active link.

Identification

  • Off—The Identification LED is not in use.
  • Blue—The Identification LED is activated.

Configuring CIMC

You can perform all operations on the Cisco SNS-3400 series appliances through the CIMC. To do this, you must first configure an IP address and IP gateway to access the CIMC from a web-based browser.


Step 1 Plug in the power cord.

Step 2 Press the Power button to boot the server. Watch for the prompt to press F8 as shown in TBD.

 

 

Step 3 During bootup, press F8 when prompted to open the BIOS CIMC Configuration Utility. The following screen appears.

 

Step 4 Set the NIC mode to your choice for which ports to use to access the CIMC for server management (see Figure 1-3 on page 1-3 for identification of the ports):

Dedicated—The 1-Gb Ethernet management port is used to access the CIMC. You must select NIC redundancy None and select IP settings.

Shared LOM (default)—The two 1-Gb Ethernet ports are used to access the CIMC. This is the factory default setting, along with Active-active NIC redundancy and DHCP enabled.

Cisco Card—The ports on an installed Cisco UCS P81E VIC are used to access the CIMC. You must select a NIC redundancy and IP setting.


Note The Cisco Card NIC mode is currently supported only with a Cisco UCS P81E VIC (N2XX-ACPCI01) that is installed in PCIe slot 1. See also Special Considerations for Cisco UCS Virtual Interface Cards, page 3-33.


Step 5 Use this utility to change the NIC redundancy to your preference. This server has three possible NIC redundancy settings:

None—The Ethernet ports operate independently and do not fail over if there is a problem.

Active-standby—If an active Ethernet port fails, traffic fails over to a standby port.

Active-active—All Ethernet ports are utilized simultaneously.

Step 6 Choose whether to enable DHCP for dynamic network settings, or to enter static network settings.


Note Before you enable DHCP, your DHCP server must be preconfigured with the range of MAC addresses for this server. The MAC address is printed on a label on the rear of the server. This server has a range of six MAC addresses assigned to the CIMC. The MAC address printed on the label is the beginning of the range of six contiguous MAC addresses.


Step 7 Optional: Use this utility to make VLAN settings, and to set a default CIMC user password.


Note Changes to the settings take effect after approximately 45 seconds. Refresh with F5 and wait until the new settings appear before you reboot the server in the next step.


Step 8 Press F10 to save your settings and reboot the server.


Note If you chose to enable DHCP, the dynamically assigned IP and MAC addresses are displayed on the console screen during bootup.



 

What To Do Next

Configuring Cisco ISE on the Cisco SNS-3400 Series Appliance Using CIMC

Creating a Bootable USB Drive

The Cisco ISE 1.1.4 ISO image contains an “images” directory that has a Readme file and a script to create a bootable USB to install Cisco ISE 1.1.4.

Before You Begin

  • Ensure that you have read the Readme in the “images” directory
  • You need the following:

Linux machine with RHEL-5 or above, CentOS 5.x or above. If you are going to use your PC or MAC, ensure that you have installed a Linux VM on it.

An 8-GB USB drive

The iso-to-usb.sh script


Step 1 Plug in your USB drive into the USB port.

Step 2 Copy the iso-to-usb.sh script and the Cisco ISE 1.1.4 ISO image to a directory on your linux machine.

Step 3 Enter the following command:

iso-to-usb.sh source_iso usb_device

For example, # ./iso-to-usb.sh ise-1.1.4.218.i386.iso /dev/sdb where iso-to-usb.sh is the name of the script, ise-1.1.4.218.i386.iso is the name of the ISO image, and /dev/sdb is your USB device.

Step 4 A screen appears prompting you to specify the Cisco SNS-3400 Series appliance (Cisco SNS-3415 or Cisco SNS-3495).

Step 5 Enter a value corresponding to your appliance type to create a bootable USB drive.

Step 6 Enter Y to continue.

Step 7 A success message appears.

Step 8 Unplug your USB drive.


 

What To Do Next

Configuring Cisco ISE on the Cisco SNS-3400 Series Appliance Using CIMC

Installing or Replacing Server Components

Refer to the Cisco UCS C220 Server Installation and Service Guide for information on how to install or replace the SNS 3415 or 3495 appliance components.