Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI, 8.3
Configuring the Cisco Phone Proxy
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Configuring the Cisco Phone Proxy

Table Of Contents

Configuring the Cisco Phone Proxy

Information About the Cisco Phone Proxy

Phone Proxy Functionality

Supported Cisco UCM and IP Phones for the Phone Proxy

Licensing Requirements for the Phone Proxy

Prerequisites for the Phone Proxy

Media Termination Instance Prerequisites

Certificates from the Cisco UCM

DNS Lookup Prerequisites

Cisco Unified Communications Manager Prerequisites

Access List Rules

NAT and PAT Prerequisites

Prerequisites for IP Phones on Multiple Interfaces

7960 and 7940 IP Phones Support

Cisco IP Communicator Prerequisites

Prerequisites for Rate Limiting TFTP Requests

Rate Limiting Configuration Example

About ICMP Traffic Destined for the Media Termination Address

End-User Phone Provisioning

Ways to Deploy IP Phones to End Users

Phone Proxy Guidelines and Limitations

General Guidelines and Limitations

Media Termination Address Guidelines and Limitations

Configuring the Phone Proxy

Task Flow for Configuring the Phone Proxy in a Non-secure Cisco UCM Cluster

Importing Certificates from the Cisco UCM

Task Flow for Configuring the Phone Proxy in a Mixed-mode Cisco UCM Cluster

Creating Trustpoints and Generating Certificates

Creating the CTL File

Using an Existing CTL File

Creating the TLS Proxy Instance for a Non-secure Cisco UCM Cluster

Creating the TLS Proxy for a Mixed-mode Cisco UCM Cluster

Creating the Media Termination Instance

Creating the Phone Proxy Instance

Enabling the Phone Proxy with SIP and Skinny Inspection

Configuring Linksys Routers with UDP Port Forwarding for the Phone Proxy

Configuring Your Router

Troubleshooting the Phone Proxy

Debugging Information from the Security Appliance

Debugging Information from IP Phones

IP Phone Registration Failure

TFTP Auth Error Displays on IP Phone Console

Configuration File Parsing Error

Configuration File Parsing Error: Unable to Get DNS Response

Non-configuration File Parsing Error

Cisco UCM Does Not Respond to TFTP Request for Configuration File

IP Phone Does Not Respond After the Security Appliance Sends TFTP Data

IP Phone Requesting Unsigned File Error

IP Phone Unable to Download CTL File

IP Phone Registration Failure from Signaling Connections

SSL Handshake Failure

Certificate Validation Errors

Media Termination Address Errors

Audio Problems with IP Phones

Saving SAST Keys

Configuration Examples for the Phone Proxy

Example 1: Nonsecure Cisco UCM cluster, Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher

Example 2: Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster, Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher

Example 3: Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster, Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Different Servers

Example 4: Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster, Primary Cisco UCM, Secondary and TFTP Server on Different Servers

Example 5: LSC Provisioning in Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster; Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher

Example 6: VLAN Transversal

Feature History for the Phone Proxy


Configuring the Cisco Phone Proxy


This chapter describes how to configure the adaptive security appliance for Cisco Phone Proxy feature.

This chapter includes the following sections:

Information About the Cisco Phone Proxy

Licensing Requirements for the Phone Proxy

Prerequisites for the Phone Proxy

Phone Proxy Guidelines and Limitations

Configuring the Phone Proxy

Troubleshooting the Phone Proxy

Configuration Examples for the Phone Proxy

Feature History for the Phone Proxy

Information About the Cisco Phone Proxy

The Cisco Phone Proxy on the adaptive security appliance bridges IP telephony between the corporate IP telephony network and the Internet in a secure manner by forcing data from remote phones on an untrusted network to be encrypted.

Phone Proxy Functionality

Telecommuters can connect their IP phones to the corporate IP telephony network over the Internet securely via the phone proxy without the need to connect over a VPN tunnel as illustrated by Figure 44-1.

Figure 44-1 Phone Proxy Secure Deployment

The phone proxy supports a Cisco UCM cluster in mixed mode or nonsecure mode. Regardless of the cluster mode, the remote phones that are capable of encryption are always forced to be in encrypted mode. TLS (signaling) and SRTP (media) are always terminated on the adaptive security appliance. The adaptive security appliance can also perform NAT, open pinholes for the media, and apply inspection policies for the SCCP and SIP protocols. In a nonsecure cluster mode or a mixed mode where the phones are configured as nonsecure, the phone proxy behaves in the following ways:

The TLS connections from the phones are terminated on the adaptive security appliance and a TCP connection is initiated to the Cisco UCM.

SRTP sent from external IP phones to the internal network IP phone via the adaptive security appliance is converted to RTP.

In a mixed mode cluster where the internal IP phones are configured as authenticated, the TLS connection is not converted to TCP to the Cisco UCM but the SRTP is converted to RTP.

In a mixed mode cluster where the internal IP phone is configured as encrypted, the TLS connection remains a TLS connection to the Cisco UCM and the SRTP from the remote phone remains SRTP to the internal IP phone.

Since the main purpose of the phone proxy is to make the phone behave securely while making calls to a nonsecure cluster, the phone proxy performs the following major functions:

Creates the certificate trust list (CTL) file, which is used to perform certificate based authentication with remote phones.

Modifies the IP phone configuration file when it is requested via TFTP, changes security fields from nonsecure to secure, and signs all files sent to the phone. These modifications secure remote phones by forcing the phones to perform encrypted signaling and media.

Terminates TLS signaling from the phone and initiates TCP or TLS to Cisco UCM

Inserts itself into the media path by modifying the Skinny and SIP signaling messages.

Terminates SRTP and initiates RTP/SRTP to the called party.


Note As an alternative to authenticating remote IP phones through the TLS handshake, you can configure authentication via LSC provisioning. With LSC provisioning you create a password for each remote IP phone user and each user enters the password on the remote IP phones to retrieve the LSC.

Because using LSC provisioning to authenticate remote IP phones requires the IP phones first register in nonsecure mode, Cisco recommends LSC provisioning be done inside the corporate network before giving the IP phones to end-users. Otherwise, having the IP phones register in nonsecure mode requires the Administrator to open the nonsecure signaling port for SIP and SCCP on the adaptive security appliance.

See "Example 5: LSC Provisioning in Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster; Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher". See also the Cisco Unified Communications Manager Security Guide for information on Using the Certificate Authority Proxy Function (CAPF) to install a locally significant certificate (LSC).


Supported Cisco UCM and IP Phones for the Phone Proxy

Cisco Unified Communications Manager

The following release of the Cisco Unified Communications Manager are supported with the phone proxy:

Cisco Unified CallManager Version 4.x

Cisco Unified CallManager Version 5.0

Cisco Unified CallManager Version 5.1

Cisco Unified Communications Manager 6.1

Cisco Unified Communications Manager 7.0

Cisco Unified IP Phones

The phone proxy supports these IP phone features:

Enterprise features like conference calls on remote phones connected through the phone proxy

XML services


Note The phone proxy supports only the features described in the list above. All other IP phone features not described by this list are unsupported by the phone proxy.


The phone proxy does not support displaying the lock icon on IP phone screens. IP phones display the lock icon on the phone screen during encrypted calls. Even though the lock icon is not displayed on the screen, the IP phone call is still encrypted because the phone proxy encrypts calls by default.

The following IP phones in the Cisco Unified IP Phones 7900 Series are supported with the phone proxy:

Cisco Unified IP Phone 7975

Cisco Unified IP Phone 7971

Cisco Unified IP Phone 7970

Cisco Unified IP Phone 7965

Cisco Unified IP Phone 7962

Cisco Unified IP Phone 7961

Cisco Unified IP Phone 7961G-GE

Cisco Unified IP Phone 7960 (SCCP protocol support only)

Cisco Unified IP Phone 7945

Cisco Unified IP Phone 7942

Cisco Unified IP Phone 7941

Cisco Unified IP Phone 7941G-GE

Cisco Unified IP Phone 7940 (SCCP protocol support only)

Cisco Unified Wireless IP Phone 7921

Cisco Unified Wireless IP Phone 7925


Note To support Cisco Unified Wireless IP Phone 7925, you must also configure MIC or LSC on the IP phone so that it properly works with the phone proxy.


CIPC for softphones ( CIPC versions with Authenticated mode only)


Note The Cisco IP Communicator is supported with the phone proxy VLAN Traversal in authenticated TLS mode. We do not recommend it for remote access because SRTP/TLS is not supported currently on the Cisco IP Communicator.



Note The adaptive security appliance supports inspection of traffic from Cisco IP Phones running SCCP protocol version 19 and earlier.


Licensing Requirements for the Phone Proxy

The Cisco Phone Proxy feature supported by the adaptive security appliance require a Unified Communications Proxy license.

The following table shows the Unified Communications Proxy license details by platform:

Model
License Requirement

ASA 5505

Base License and Security Plus License: 2 sessions1 .

Optional license: 24 sessions.

ASA 5510

Base License and Security Plus License: 2 sessions1.

Optional licenses: 24, 50, or 100 sessions.

ASA 5520

Base License: 2 sessions1.

Optional licenses: 24, 50, 100, 250, 500, 750, or 1000 sessions.

ASA 5540

Base License: 2 sessions1.

Optional licenses: 24, 50, 100, 250, 500, 750, 1000, or 2000 sessions.

ASA 5550

Base License: 2 sessions1.

Optional licenses: 24, 50, 100, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 2000, or 3000 sessions.

ASA 5580

Base License: 2 sessions1.

Optional licenses: 24, 50, 100, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 2000, 3000, 5000, or 10,000 sessions.2

1 The following applications use TLS proxy sessions for their connections. Each TLS proxy session used by these applications (and only these applications) is counted against the UC license limit:
- Phone Proxy
- Presence Federation Proxy
- Encrypted Voice Inspection

Other applications that use TLS proxy sessions do not count towards the UC limit, for example, Mobility Advantage Proxy (which does not require a license) and IME (which requires a separate IME license).

Some UC applications might use multiple sessions for a connection. For example, if you configure a phone with a primary and backup Cisco Unified Communications Manager, there are 2 TLS proxy connections, so 2 UC Proxy sessions are used.

You independently set the TLS proxy limit using the tls-proxy maximum-sessions command. To view the limits of your model, enter the tls-proxy maximum-sessions ? command. When you apply a UC license that is higher than the default TLS proxy limit, the adaptive security appliance automatically sets the TLS proxy limit to match the UC limit. The TLS proxy limit takes precedence over the UC license limit; if you set the TLS proxy limit to be less than the UC license, then you cannot use all of the sessions in your UC license.

Note: For license part numbers ending in "K8" (for example, licenses under 250 users), TLS proxy sessions are limited to 1000. For license part numbers ending in "K9" (for example, licenses 250 users or larger), the TLS proxy limit depends on the configuration, up to the model limit. K8 and K9 refer to whether the license is restricted for export: K8 is unrestricted, and K9 is restricted.

Note: If you clear the configuration (using the clear configure all command, for example), then the TLS proxy limit is set to the default for your model; if this default is lower than the UC license limit, then you see an error message to use the tls-proxy maximum-sessions command to raise the limit again . If you use failover and enter the write standby command on the primary unit to force a configuration synchronization, the clear configure all command is generated on the secondary unit automatically, so you may see the warning message on the secondary unit. Because the configuration synchronization restores the TLS proxy limit set on the primary unit, you can ignore the warning.

You might also use SRTP encryption sessions for your connections:
- For K8 licenses, SRTP sessions are limited to 250.
- For K9 licenses, there is not limit.

Note: Only calls that require encryption/decryption for media are counted towards the SRTP limit; if passthrough is set for the call, even if both legs are SRTP, they do not count towards the limit.

2 With the 10,000-session license, the total combined sessions can be 10,000, but the maximum number of Phone Proxy sessions is 5000.


For more information about licensing, see Chapter 3 "Managing Feature Licenses."

Prerequisites for the Phone Proxy

This section contains the following topics:

Media Termination Instance Prerequisites

Certificates from the Cisco UCM

DNS Lookup Prerequisites

Cisco Unified Communications Manager Prerequisites

Access List Rules

NAT and PAT Prerequisites

Prerequisites for IP Phones on Multiple Interfaces

7960 and 7940 IP Phones Support

Cisco IP Communicator Prerequisites

Prerequisites for Rate Limiting TFTP Requests

About ICMP Traffic Destined for the Media Termination Address

End-User Phone Provisioning

Media Termination Instance Prerequisites

The adaptive security appliance must have a media termination instance that meets the following criteria:

You must configure one media termination for each phone proxy on the adaptive security appliance. Multiple media termination instances on the adaptive security appliance are not supported.

For the media termination instance, you can configure a global media-termination address for all interfaces or configure a media-termination address for different interfaces. However, you cannot use a global media-termination address and media-termination addresses configured for each interface at the same time.

If you configure a media termination address for multiple interfaces, you must configure an address on each interface that the adaptive security appliance uses when communicating with IP phones.

For example, if you had three interfaces on the adaptive security appliance (one internal interface and two external interfaces) and only one of the external interfaces were used to communicate with IP phones, you would configure two media termination addresses: one on the internal interface and one on the external interface that communicated with the IP phones.

Only one media-termination address can be configured per interface.

The IP addresses are publicly routable addresses that are unused IP addresses within the address range on that interface.

The IP address on an interface cannot be the same address as that interface on the adaptive security appliance.

The IP addresses cannot overlap with existing static NAT pools or NAT rules.

The IP addresses cannot be the same as the Cisco UCM or TFTP server IP address.

For IP phones behind a router or gateway, you must also meet this prerequisite. On the router or gateway, add routes to the media termination address on the adaptive security appliance interface that the IP phones communicate with so that the phone can reach the media termination address.

Certificates from the Cisco UCM

Import the following certificates which are stored on the Cisco UCM. These certificates are required by the adaptive security appliance for the phone proxy.

Cisco_Manufacturing_CA

CAP-RTP-001

CAP-RTP-002

CAPF certificate (Optional)

If LSC provisioning is required or you have LSC enabled IP phones, you must import the CAPF certificate from the Cisco UCM. If the Cisco UCM has more than one CAPF certificate, you must import all of them to the adaptive security appliance.


Note You can configure LSC provisioning for additional end-user authentication. See the Cisco Unified Communications Manager configuration guide for information.


See Importing Certificates from the Cisco UCM. For example, the CA Manufacturer certificate is required by the phone proxy to validate the IP phone certificate.

DNS Lookup Prerequisites

If you have an fully qualified domain name (FQDN) configured for the Cisco UCM rather than an IP address, you must configure and enable DNS lookup on the adaptive security appliance. For information about the dns domain-lookup command and how to use it to configure DNS lookup, see Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference.

After configuring the DNS lookup, make sure that the adaptive security appliance can ping the Cisco UCM with the configured FQDN.

You must configure DNS lookup when you have a CAPF service enabled and the Cisco UCM is not running on the Publisher but the Publisher is configured with a FQDN instead of an IP address.

Cisco Unified Communications Manager Prerequisites

The TFTP server must reside on the same interface as the Cisco UCM.

The Cisco UCM can be on a private network on the inside but you need to have a static mapping for the Cisco UCM on the adaptive security appliance to a public routable address.

If NAT is required for Cisco UCM, it must be configured on the adaptive security appliance, not on the existing firewall.

Access List Rules

If the phone proxy is deployed behind an existing firewall, access-list rules to permit signaling, TFTP requests, and media traffic to the phone proxy must be configured.

If NAT is configured for the TFTP server or Cisco UCMs, the translated "global" address must be used in the access lists.

Table 44-1 lists the ports that are required to be configured on the existing firewall:

Table 44-1 Port Configuration Requirements

Address
Port
Protocol
Description

Media Termination

1024-65535

UDP

Allow incoming SRTP

TFTP Server

69

UDP

Allow incoming TFTP

Cisco UCM

2443

TCP

Allow incoming secure SCCP

Cisco UCM

5061

TCP

Allow incoming secure SIP

CAPF Service (on Cisco UCM)

3804

TCP

Allow CAPF service for LSC provisioning



Note All these ports are configurable on the Cisco UCM, except for TFTP. These are the default values and should be modified if they are modified on the Cisco UCM. For example, 3804 is the default port for the CAPF Service. This default value should be modified if it is modified on the Cisco UCM.


NAT and PAT Prerequisites

NAT Prerequisites

If NAT is configured for the TFTP server, the NAT configuration must be configured prior to configuring the tftp-server command under the phone proxy.

If NAT is configured for the TFTP server or Cisco UCMs, the translated "global" address must be used in the access lists.

PAT Prerequisites

When the Skinny inspection global port is configured to use a non-default port, then you must configure the nonsecure port as the global_sccp_port+443.

Therefore, if global_sccp_port is 7000, then the global secure SCCP port is 7443. Reconfiguring the port might be necessary when the phone proxy deployment has more than one Cisco UCM and they must share the interface IP address or a global IP address.

/* use the default ports for the first CUCM */
object network obj-10.0.0.1-01
host 10.0.0.1
nat (inside,outside) static interface service tcp 2000 2000
object network obj-10.0.0.1-02
host 10.0.0.1
nat (inside,outside) static interface service tcp 2443 2443
/* use non-default ports for the 2nd CUCM */
object network obj-10.0.0.2-01
host 10.0.0.2
nat (inside,outside) static interface service tcp 2000 7000
object network obj-10.0.0.2-02
host 10.0.0.2
nat (inside,outside) static interface service tcp 2443 7443

Note Both PAT configurations—for the nonsecure and secure ports—must be configured.


When the IP phones must contact the CAPF on the Cisco UCM and the Cisco UCM is configured with static PAT (LCS provisioning is required), you must configure static PAT for the default CAPF port 3804.

Prerequisites for IP Phones on Multiple Interfaces

When IP phones reside on multiple interfaces, the phone proxy configuration must have the correct IP address set for the Cisco UCM in the CTL file.

See the following example topology for information about how to correctly set the IP address:

phones --- (dmz)-----|
                     |----- ASA PP --- (outside Internet) --- phones
phones --- (inside)--|
 
   

In this example topology, the following IP address are set:

Cisco UCM on the inside interface is set to 10.0.0.5

The DMZ network is 192.168.1.0/24

The inside network is 10.0.0.0/24

The Cisco UCM is mapped with different global IP addresses from DMZ > outside and inside interfaces > outside interface.

In the CTL file, the Cisco UCM must have two entries because of the two different IP addresses. For example, if the static statements for the Cisco UCM are as follows:

object network obj-10.0.0.5-01
host 10.0.0.5
nat (inside,outside) static 209.165.202.129
object network obj-10.0.0.5-02
host 10.0.0.5
nat (inside,dmz) static 198.168.1.2
 
   

There must be two CTL file record entries for the Cisco UCM:

record-entry cucm trustpoint cucm_in_to_out address 209.165.202.129
record-entry cucm trustpoint cucm_in_to_dmz address 192.168.1.2
 
   

7960 and 7940 IP Phones Support

An LSC must be installed on these IP phones because they do not come pre installed with a MIC. Install the LSC on each phone before using them with the phone proxy to avoid opening the nonsecure SCCP port for the IP phones to register in nonsecure mode with the Cisco UCM.

See the following document for the steps to install an LSC on IP phones:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/cucm/security/7_0_1/secugd/secucapf.html#wp1093518


Note If an IP phone already has an LSC installed on it from a different Cisco UCM cluster, delete the LSC from the different cluster and install an LSC from the current Cisco UCM cluster.



Note You can configure LSC provisioning for additional end-user authentication. See the Cisco Unified Communications Manager configuration guide for information.


The CAPF certificate must be imported onto the adaptive security appliance.

The CTL file created on the adaptive security appliance must be created with a CAPF record-entry.

The phone must be configured to use only the SCCP protocol because the SIP protocol does not support encryption on these IP phones.

If LSC provisioning is done via the phone proxy, you must add an ACL to allow the IP phones to register with the Cisco UCM on the nonsecure port 2000.

Cisco IP Communicator Prerequisites

To configure Cisco IP Communicator (CIPC) with the phone proxy, you must meet the following prerequisites:

Include the cipc security-mode authenticated command under the phone-proxy command when configuring the phone proxy instance.

Create an ACL to allow CIPC to register with the Cisco UCM in nonsecure mode.

Configure null-sha1 as one of the SSL encryption ciphers.

Current versions of Cisco IP Communicator (CIPC) support authenticated mode and perform TLS signaling but not voice encryption. Therefore, you must include the following command when configuring the phone proxy instance:

cipc security-mode authenticated

Because CIPC requires an LSC to perform the TLS handshake, CIPC needs to register with the Cisco UCM in nonsecure mode using cleartext signaling. To allow the CIPC to register, create an ACL that allows the CIPC to connect to the Cisco UCM on the nonsecure SIP/SCCP signalling ports (5060/2000).


Note You can configure LSC provisioning for additional end-user authentication. See the Cisco Unified Communications Manager configuration guide for information.


CIPC uses a different cipher when doing the TLS handshake and requires the null-sha1 cipher and SSL encryption be configured. To add the null-shal cipher, use the show run all ssl command to see the output for the ssl encryption command and add null-shal to the end of the SSL encryption list.


Note When used with CIPC, the phone proxy does not support end-users resetting their device name in CIPC (Preferences > Network tab > Use this Device Name field) or Administrators resetting the device name in Cisco Unified CM Administration console (Device menu > Phone Configuration > Device Name field). To function with the phone proxy, the CIPC configuration file must be in the format: SEP<mac_address>.cnf.xml. If the device name does not follow this format (SEP<mac_address>), CIPC cannot retrieve its configuration file from Cisco UMC via the phone proxy and CIPC will not function.


Prerequisites for Rate Limiting TFTP Requests

In a remote access scenario, we recommend that you configure rate limiting of TFTP requests because any IP phone connecting through the Internet is allowed to send TFTP requests to the TFTP server.

To configure rate limiting of TFTP requests, configure the police command in the Modular Policy Framework. See the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference for information about using the police command.

Policing is a way of ensuring that no traffic exceeds the maximum rate (in bits/second) that you configure, thus ensuring that no one traffic flow can take over the entire resource. When traffic exceeds the maximum rate, the adaptive security appliance drops the excess traffic. Policing also sets the largest single burst of traffic allowed.

Rate Limiting Configuration Example

The following example describes how you configure rate limiting for TFTP requests by using the police command and the Modular Policy Framework.

Begin by determining the conformance rate that is required for the phone proxy. To determine the conformance rate, use the following formula:

X * Y * 8
 
   

Where

X = requests per second

Y = size of each packet, which includes the L2, L3, and L4 plus the payload

Therefore, if a rate of 300 TFTP requests/second is required, then the conformance rate would be calculated as follows:

300 requests/second * 80 bytes * 8 = 192000
 
   

The example configuration below shows how the calculated conformance rate is used with the police command:

access-list tftp extended permit udp any host 192.168.0.1 eq tftp 
 
   
class-map tftpclass
match access-list tftp
 
   
policy-map tftpmap
class tftpclass
police output 192000
 
   
service-policy tftpmap interface inside

About ICMP Traffic Destined for the Media Termination Address

To control which hosts can ping the media termination address, use the icmp command and apply the access rule to the outside interface on the adaptive security appliance.

Any rules for ICMP access applied to the outside interface apply to traffic destined for the media termination address.

For example, use the following command to deny ICMP pings from any host destined for the media termination address:

icmp deny any outside

End-User Phone Provisioning

The phone proxy is a transparent proxy with respect to the TFTP and signaling transactions. If NAT is not configured for the Cisco UCM TFTP server, then the IP phones need to be configured with the Cisco UCM cluster TFTP server address.

If NAT is configured for the Cisco UCM TFTP server, then the Cisco UCM TFTP server global address is configured as the TFTP server address on the IP phones.

Ways to Deploy IP Phones to End Users

In both options, deploying a remote IP phone behind a commercial Cable/DSL router with NAT capabilities is supported.

Option 1 (Recommended)

Stage the IP phones at corporate headquarters before sending them to the end users:

The phones register inside the network. IT ensures there are no issues with the phone configurations, image downloads, and registration.

If Cisco UCM cluster was in mixed mode, the CTL file should be erased before sending the phone to the end user.

Advantages of this option are:

Easier to troubleshoot and isolate problems with the network or phone proxy because you know whether the phone is registered and working with the Cisco UCM.

Better user experience because the phone does not have to download firmware from over a broadband connection, which can be slow and require the user to wait for a longer time.

Option 2

Send the IP phone to the end user. When using option 2, the user must be provided instructions to change the settings on phones with the appropriate Cisco UCM and TFTP server IP address.


Note As an alternative to authenticating remote IP phones through the TLS handshake, you can configure authentication via LSC provisioning. With LSC provisioning you create a password for each remote IP phone user and each user enters the password on the remote IP phones to retrieve the LSC.

Because using LSC provisioning to authenticate remote IP phones requires the IP phones first register in nonsecure mode, Cisco recommends LSC provisioning be done inside the corporate network before giving the IP phones to end-users. Otherwise, having the IP phones register in nonsecure mode requires the Administrator to open the nonsecure signaling port for SIP and SCCP on the adaptive security appliance.

See "Example 5: LSC Provisioning in Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster; Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher". See also the Cisco Unified Communications Manager Security Guide for information on Using the Certificate Authority Proxy Function (CAPF) to install a locally significant certificate (LSC).


Phone Proxy Guidelines and Limitations

This section includes the following topics:

General Guidelines and Limitations

Media Termination Address Guidelines and Limitations

General Guidelines and Limitations

The phone proxy has the following general limitations:

Only one phone proxy instance can be configured on the adaptive security appliance by using the phone-proxy command. See the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference for information about the phone-proxy command. See also Creating the Phone Proxy Instance.

The phone proxy only supports one Cisco UCM cluster. See Creating the CTL File for the steps to configure the Cisco UCM cluster for the phone proxy.

The phone proxy is not supported when the adaptive security appliance is running in transparent mode or multiple context mode.

When a remote IP phone calls an invalid internal or external extension, the phone proxy does not support playing the annunciator message from the Cisco UCM. Instead, the remote IP phone plays a fast busy signal instead of the annunciator message "Your call cannot be completed ..." However, when an internal IP phone dials in invalid extension, the annunciator messages plays "Your call cannot be completed ..."

Packets from phones connecting to the phone proxy over a VPN tunnel are not inspected by the adaptive security appliance inspection engines.

The phone proxy does not support IP phones sending Real-Time Control Protocol (RTCP) packets through the adaptive security appliance. Disable RTCP packets in the Cisco Unified CM Administration console from the Phone Configuration page. See your Cisco Unified Communications Manager (CallManager) documentation for information about setting this configuration option.

When used with CIPC, the phone proxy does not support end-users resetting their device name in CIPC (Preferences > Network tab > Use this Device Name field) or Administrators resetting the device name in Cisco Unified CM Administration console (Device menu > Phone Configuration > Device Name field). To function with the phone proxy, the CIPC configuration file must be in the format: SEP<mac_address>.cnf.xml. If the device name does not follow this format (SEP<mac_address>), CIPC cannot retrieve its configuration file from Cisco UMC via the phone proxy and CIPC will not function.

The phone proxy does not support IP phones sending SCCP video messages using Cisco VT Advantage because SCCP video messages do not support SRTP keys.

For mixed-mode clusters, the phone proxy does not support the Cisco Unified Call Manager using TFTP to send encrypted configuration files to IP phones through the adaptive security appliance.

Multiple IP phones behind one NAT device must be configured to use the same security mode.

When the phone proxy is configured for a mixed-mode cluster and multiple IP phones are behind one NAT device and registering through the phone proxy, all the SIP and SCCP IP phones must be configured as authenticated or encrypted, or all as non-secure on the Unified Call Manager.

For example, if there are four IP phones behind one NAT device where two IP phones are configured using SIP and two IP phones are configured using SCCP, the following configurations on the Unified Call Manager are acceptable:

Two SIP IP phones: one IP phone in authenticated mode and one in encrypted mode, both in authenticated mode, or both in encrypted mode

Two SCCP IP phones: one IP phone in authenticated mode and one in encrypted mode, both in authenticated mode, or both in encrypted mode

Two SIP IP phones: both in non-secure mode

Two SCCP IP phones: one IP phone in authenticated mode and one in encrypted mode, both in authenticated mode, both in encrypted mode

Two SIP IP phones: one IP phone in authenticated mode and one in encrypted mode, both in authenticated mode, both in encrypted mode

Two SCCP IP phones: both in non-secure mode

This limitation results from the way the application-redirect rules (rules that convert TLS to TCP) are created for the IP phones.

The phone proxy does not support displaying the lock icon on IP phone screens. IP phones display the lock icon on the phone screen during encrypted calls. Even though the lock icon is not displayed on the screen, the IP phone call is still encrypted because the phone proxy encrypts calls by default.

Media Termination Address Guidelines and Limitations

The phone proxy has the following limitations relating to configuring the media-termination address:

When configuring the media-termination address, the phone proxy does not support having internal IP phones (IP phones on the inside network) being on a different network interface from the Cisco UCM unless the IP phones are forced to use the non-secure Security mode.

When internal IP phones are on a different network interface than the Cisco UCM, the IP phones signalling sessions still go through adaptive security appliance; however, the IP phone traffic does not go through the phone proxy. Therefore, Cisco recommends that you deploy internal IP phones on the same network interface as the Cisco UMC.

If the Cisco UMC and the internal IP phones must be on different network interfaces, you must add routes for the internal IP phones to access the network interface of the media-termination address where Cisco UMC resides.

When the phone proxy is configured to use a global media-termination address, all IP phones see the same global address, which is a public routable address.

If you decide to configure a media-termination address on interfaces (rather than using a global interface), you must configure a media-termination address on at least two interfaces (the inside and an outside interface) before applying the phone-proxy service policy. Otherwise, you will receive an error message when enabling the Phone Proxy with SIP and Skinny Inspection.

The phone proxy can use only one type of media termination instance at a time; for example, you can configure a global media-termination address for all interfaces or configure a media-termination address for different interfaces. However, you cannot use a global media-termination address and media-termination addresses configured for each interface at the same time.

Configuring the Phone Proxy

This section includes the following topics:

Task Flow for Configuring the Phone Proxy in a Non-secure Cisco UCM Cluster

Importing Certificates from the Cisco UCM

Task Flow for Configuring the Phone Proxy in a Mixed-mode Cisco UCM Cluster

Creating Trustpoints and Generating Certificates

Creating the CTL File

Using an Existing CTL File

Creating the TLS Proxy Instance for a Non-secure Cisco UCM Cluster

Creating the TLS Proxy for a Mixed-mode Cisco UCM Cluster

Creating the Media Termination Instance

Creating the Phone Proxy Instance

Enabling the Phone Proxy with SIP and Skinny Inspection

Configuring Linksys Routers with UDP Port Forwarding for the Phone Proxy

Task Flow for Configuring the Phone Proxy in a Non-secure Cisco UCM Cluster

Follow these tasks to configure the phone proxy in a Non-secure Cisco UCM Cluster:


Step 1 Create trustpoints and generate certificates for each entity in the network (Cisco UCM, Cisco UCM and TFTP, TFTP server, CAPF) that the IP phone must trust. The certificates are used in creating the CTL file. See Creating Trustpoints and Generating Certificates.


Note Before you create the trustpoints and generate certificates, you must have imported the required certificates, which are stored on the Cisco UCM. See Certificates from the Cisco UCM and Importing Certificates from the Cisco UCM


Step 2 Create the CTL file for the phone proxy. See Creating the CTL File.

Step 3 Create the TLS proxy instance. See Creating the TLS Proxy Instance for a Non-secure Cisco UCM Cluster.

Step 4 Create the media termination instance for the phone proxy. See Creating the Media Termination Instance.

Step 5 Create the phone proxy instance. See Creating the Phone Proxy Instance.

Step 6 Enable the phone proxy y with SIP and Skinny inspection. See Enabling the Phone Proxy with SIP and Skinny Inspection.


Importing Certificates from the Cisco UCM

For the TLS proxy used by the phone proxy to complete the TLS handshake successfully, it needs to verify the certificates from the IP phone (and the Cisco UCM if doing TLS with Cisco UCM). To validate the IP phone certificate, we need the CA Manufacturer certificate which is stored on the Cisco UCM. Follow these steps to import the CA Manufacturer certificate to the adaptive security appliance.


Step 1 Go to the Cisco UCM Operating System Administration web page.

Step 2 Choose Security > Certificate Management.


Note Earlier versions of Cisco UCM have a different UI and way to locate the certificates. For example, in Cisco UCM version 4.x, certificates are located in the directory C:\Program Files\Cisco\Certificates. See your Cisco Unified Communications Manager (CallManager) documentation for information about locating certificates.


Step 3 Click Find and it will display all the certificates.

Step 4 Find the filename Cisco_Manufacturing_CA. This is the certificate need to verify the IP phone certificate. Click the .PEM file Cisco_Manufacturing_CA.pem. This will show you the certificate information and a dialog box that has the option to download the certificate.


Note If the certificate list contains more than one certificate with the filename Cisco_Manufacturing_CA, make you select the certificate Cisco_Manufacturing_CA.pem—the one with the .pem file extension.


Step 5 Click Download and save the file as a text file.

Step 6 On the adaptive security appliance, create a trustpoint for the Cisco Manufacturing CA and enroll via terminal by entering the following commands. Enroll via terminal because you will paste the certificate you downloaded in Step 4.

hostname(config)# crypto ca trustpoint trustpoint_name
hostname(config-ca-trustpoint)# enrollment terminal
 
   

Step 7 Authenticate the trustpoint by entering the following command:

hostname(config)# crypto ca authenticate trustpoint
 
   

Step 8 You are prompted to "Enter the base 64 encoded CA Certificate." Copy the .PEM file you downloaded in Step 4 and paste it at the command line. The file is already in base-64 encoding so no conversion is required. If the certificate is OK, you are prompted to accept it: "Do you accept this certificate? [yes/no]." Enter yes.


Note When you copy the certificate, make sure that you also copy also the lines with BEGIN and END.



Tip If the certificate is not ok, use the debug crypto ca command to show debug messages for PKI activity (used with CAs).


Step 9 Repeat the Step 1 through Step 8 for the next certificate. Table 44-2 shows the certificates that are required by the adaptive security appliance.

Table 44-2 Certificates Required by the Security Appliance for the Phone Proxy

Certificate Name
Required for...

CallManager

Authenticating the Cisco UCM during TLS handshake; only required for mixed-mode clusters.

Cisco_Manufacturing_CA

Authenticating IP phones with a Manufacturer Installed Certificate (MIC).

CAP-RTP-001

Authenticating IP phones with a MIC.

CAP-RTP-002

Authenticating IP phones with a MIC.

CAPF

Authenticating IP phones with an LSC.



Task Flow for Configuring the Phone Proxy in a Mixed-mode Cisco UCM Cluster


Note For mixed-mode clusters, the phone proxy does not support the Cisco Unified Call Manager using TFTP to send encrypted configuration files to IP phones through the adaptive security appliance.


Follow these tasks to configure the phone proxy in a Non-secure Cisco UCM Cluster:


Step 1 Create trustpoints and generate certificates for each entity in the network (Cisco UCM, Cisco UCM and TFTP, TFTP server, CAPF) that the IP phone must trust. The certificates are used in creating the CTL file. See Creating Trustpoints and Generating Certificates.


Note Before you create the trustpoints and generate certificates, you must have imported the required certificates, which are stored on the Cisco UCM. See Certificates from the Cisco UCM and Importing Certificates from the Cisco UCM


Step 2 Create the CTL file for the phone proxy. See Creating the CTL File.


Note When the phone proxy is being configured to run in mixed-mode clusters, you have the following option to use an existing CTL file to install the trustpoints. See Using an Existing CTL File.


Step 3 Create the TLS proxy instance. See Creating the TLS Proxy for a Mixed-mode Cisco UCM Cluster.

Step 4 Create the media termination instance for the phone proxy. See Creating the Media Termination Instance.

Step 5 Create the phone proxy instance. See Creating the Phone Proxy Instance.

Step 6 While configuring the phone proxy instance (in the Phone Proxy Configuration mode), enter the following command to configure the mode of the cluster to be mixed mode because the default is nonsecure:

hostname(config-phone-proxy)# cluster-mode mixed
 
   

Step 7 Enable the phone proxy y with SIP and Skinny inspection. See Enabling the Phone Proxy with SIP and Skinny Inspection.


Creating Trustpoints and Generating Certificates

Create trustpoints and generate certificates for each entity in the network (Cisco UCM, Cisco UCM and TFTP, TFTP server, CAPF) that the IP phone must trust. The certificates are used in creating the CTL file.

You need to create trustpoints for each Cisco UCM (primary and secondary if a secondary Cisco UCM is used) and TFTP server in the network. The trustpoints need to be in the CTL file for the phones to trust the Cisco UCM.

Prerequisites

Import the required certificates, which are stored on the Cisco UCM. See Certificates from the Cisco UCM and Importing Certificates from the Cisco UCM.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

hostname(config)# crypto key generate rsa label 
key-pair-label modulus size
Example:
crypto key generate rsa label cucmtftp_kp modulus 
1024

Creates a keypair that can be used for the trustpoints.

Step 2 

hostname(config)# crypto ca trustpoint 
trustpoint_name
Example:
crypto ca trustpoint cucm_tftp_server

Creates the trustpoints for each entity in the network (primary Cisco UCM, secondary Cisco UCM, and TFTP server).

Note You are only required to create a separate trustpoint for the TFTP server when the TFTP server resides on a different server from the Cisco UCM. See Example 3: Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster, Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Different Servers for an example of this configuration.

Step 3 

hostname(config-ca-trustpoint)# enrollment self

Generates a self-signed certificate.

Step 4 

hostname(config-ca-trustpoint)# keypair keyname
Example:
keypair cucmtftp_kp

Specifies the keypair whose public key is being certified.

Step 5 

hostname(config-ca-trustpoint)# exit

Exits from the Configure Trustpoint mode.

Step 6 

hostname(config)# crypto ca enroll trustpoint
Example:
crypto ca enroll cucm_tftp_server

Requests the certificate from the CA server and causes the adaptive security appliance to generate the certificate.

When prompted to include the device serial number in the subject name, type Y to include the serial number or type N to exclude it.

When prompted to generate the self-signed certificate, type Y.

What to Do Next

Once you have created the trustpoints and generated the certificates, create the CTL file for the phone proxy. See Creating the CTL File.

If you are configuring the phone proxy in a mixed-mode cluster, you can use an existing CTL file. See Using an Existing CTL File.

Creating the CTL File

Create the CTL file that will be presented to the IP phones during the TFTP requests.

Prerequisites

If you are using domain names for your Cisco UCM and TFTP server, you must configure DNS lookup on the adaptive security appliance. Add an entry for each of the outside interfaces on the adaptive security appliance into your DNS server, if such entries are not already present. Each adaptive security appliance outside IP address should have a DNS entry associated with it for lookups. These DNS entries must also be enabled for Reverse Lookup.

Enable DNS lookups on your adaptive security appliance with the dns domain-lookup interface_name command (where the interface_name specifies the interface that has a route to your DNS server). Additionally, define your DNS server IP address on the adaptive security appliance; for example: dns name-server 10.2.3.4 (IP address of your DNS server).


Note You can enter the dns domain-lookup command multiple times to enable DNS lookup on multiple interfaces. If you enter multiple commands, the adaptive security appliance tries each interface in the order it appears in the configuration until it receives a response.


See the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference for information about the dns domain-lookup command.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

hostname(config)# ctl-file ctl_name
Example:
ctl-file myctl

Creates the CTL file instance.

Step 2 

hostname(config-ctl-file)# record-entry tftp 
trustpoint trustpoint_name address TFTP_IP_address
Example:
record-entry cucm-tftp trustpoint cucm_tftp_server 
address 10.10.0.26

Creates the record entry for the TFTP server.

Note Use the global or mapped IP address of the TFTP server or Cisco UCM if NAT is configured.

Step 3 

hostname(config-ctl-file)# record-entry cucm 
trustpoint trustpoint_name address IP_address
Example:
record-entry cucm trustpoint cucm_server address 
10.10.0.26

Creates the record entry for the each Cisco UCM (primary and secondary).

Note Use the global or mapped IP address of the Cisco UCM.

Step 4 

hostname(config-ctl-file)# record-entry capf 
trustpoint trust_point address
Example:
record-entry capf trustpoint capf address 10.10.0.26

Creates the record entry for CAPF.

Note You only enter this command when LSC provisioning is required or you have LSC enabled IP phones.

Step 5 

hostname(config-ctl-file)# no shutdown

Creates the CTL file.

When the file is created, it creates an internal trustpoint used by the phone proxy to sign the TFTP files. The trustpoint is named _internal_PP_ctl-instance_filename.

Step 6 

hostname(config)# copy running-configuration 
startup-configuration

Saves the certificate configuration to Flash memory.

What to Do Next

Once you have configured the CTL file for the phone proxy, create the TLS proxy instance. See Creating the TLS Proxy Instance for a Non-secure Cisco UCM Cluster to add the TLS proxy when configuring the phone proxy in a non-secure mode or see Creating the TLS Proxy for a Mixed-mode Cisco UCM Cluster if the phone proxy is running in a mixed-mode cluster.

Using an Existing CTL File


Note Only when the phone proxy is running in mixed-mode clusters, you have the option to use an existing CTL file to install trustpoints.


If you have an existing CTL file that contains the correct IP addresses of the entities (namely, the IP address that the IP phones use for the Cisco UCM or TFTP servers), you can be use it to create a new CTL file thereby using the existing CTL file to install the trustpoints for each entity in the network (Cisco UCM, Cisco UCM and TFTP, TFTP server, CAPF) that the IP phones must trust.

Prerequisites

If a CTL file exists for the cluster, copy the CTL file to Flash memory. When you copy the CTL file to Flash memory, rename the file and do not name the file CTLFile.tlv.

If you are using domain names for your Cisco UCM and TFTP server, you must configure DNS lookup on the adaptive security appliance. See the prerequisites for Creating the CTL File.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

hostname(config)# ctl-file ctl_name
Example:
ctl-file myctl

Creates the CTL file instance.

Step 2 

hostname(config-ctl-file)# cluster-ctl-file 
filename_path
Example:
hostname(config-ctl-file)# cluster-ctl-file 
disk0:/old_ctlfile.tlv

Uses the trustpoints that are already in the existing CTL file stored in Flash memory.

Where the existing CTL file was saved to Flash memory with a filename other than CTLFile.tlv; for example, old_ctlfile.tlv.

What to Do Next

When using an existing CTL file to configure the phone proxy, you can add additional entries to the file as necessary. See Creating the CTL File.

Once you have configured the CTL file for the phone proxy, create the TLS proxy instance. See Creating the TLS Proxy Instance for a Non-secure Cisco UCM Cluster to add the TLS proxy when configuring the phone proxy in a non-secure mode or see Creating the TLS Proxy for a Mixed-mode Cisco UCM Cluster if the phone proxy is running in a mixed-mode cluster.

Creating the TLS Proxy Instance for a Non-secure Cisco UCM Cluster

Create the TLS proxy instance to handle the encrypted signaling.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

hostname(config)# tls-proxy proxy_name
Example:
tls-proxy mytls

Creates the TLS proxy instance.

Step 2 

hostname(config-tlsp)# server trust-point _internal_PP_ctl-instance_filename

Example:
server trust-point _internal_PP_myctl

Configures the server trustpoint and references the internal trustpoint named _internal_PP_ctl-instance_filename.

What to Do Next

Once you have created the TLS proxy instance, create the phone proxy instance. See Creating the Phone Proxy Instance.

Creating the TLS Proxy for a Mixed-mode Cisco UCM Cluster

For mixed mode clusters, there might be IP phones that are already configured as encrypted so it requires TLS to the Cisco UCM. You must configure the LDC issuer for the TLS proxy.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

hostname(config)# crypto key generate rsa label 
key-pair-label modulus size
Examples:
hostname(config)# crypto key generate rsa label 
ldc_signer_key modulus 1024
hostname(config)# crypto key generate rsa label 
phone_common modulus 1024

Creates the necessary RSA key pairs.

Where the key-pair-label is the LDC signer key and the key for the IP phones.

Step 2 

hostname(config)# crypto ca trustpoint 
trustpoint_name
Example:
hostname(config)# crypto ca trustpoint ldc_server

Creates an internal local CA to sign the LDC for Cisco IP phones.

Where the trustpoint_name is for the LDC.

Step 3 

hostname(config-ca-trustpoint)# enrollment self 

Generates a self-signed certificate.

Step 4 

hostname(config-ca-trustpoint)# proxy-ldc-issuer 

Defines the local CA role for the trustpoint to issue dynamic certificates for the TLS proxy.

Step 5 

hostname(config-ca-trustpoint)# fqdn fqdn
Example:
hostname(config-ca-trustpoint)# fqdn 
my_ldc_ca.example.com

Includes the indicated FQDN in the Subject Alternative Name extension of the certificate during enrollment.

Where the fqdn is for the LDC.

Step 6 

hostname(config-ca-trustpoint)# subject-name 
X.500_name
Example:
hostname(config-ca-trustpoint)# subject-name 
cn=FW_LDC_SIGNER_172_23_45_200

Includes the indicated subject DN in the certificate during enrollment

Where the X.500_name is for the LDC.

Use commas to separate attribute-value pairs. Insert quotation marks around any value that contains commas or spaces.

For example:

cn=crl,ou=certs,o="cisco systems, inc.",c=US

The maximum length is 500 characters.

Step 7 

hostname(config-ca-trustpoint)# keypair keypair
Example:
hostname(config-ca-trustpoint)# keypair 
ldc_signer_key

Specifies the key pair whose public key is to be certified.

Where the keypair is for the LDC.

Step 8 

hostname(config)# crypto ca enroll ldc_server
Example:
hostname(config)# crypto ca enroll ldc_server

Starts the enrollment process with the CA.

Step 9 

hostname(config)# tls-proxy proxy_name
Example:
tls-proxy mytls

Creates the TLS proxy instance.

Step 10 

hostname(config-tlsp)# server trust-point 
_internal_PP_ctl-instance_filename
Example:
hostname(config-tlsp)# server trust-point 
_internal_PP_myctl

Configures the server trustpoint and references the internal trustpoint named _internal_PP_ctl-instance_filename.

Step 11 

hostname(config-tlsp)# client ldc issuer ca_tp_name
Example:
client ldc issuer ldc_server

Specifies the local CA trustpoint to issue client dynamic certificates.

Step 12 

hostname(config-tlsp)# client ldc keypair key_label
Example:
hostname(config-tlsp)# client ldc keypair 
phone_common

Specifies the RSA keypair to be used by client dynamic certificates.

Step 13 

hostname(config-tlsp)# client cipher-suite 
cipher-suite
Example:
hostname(config-tlsp)# client cipher-suite 
aes128-sha1 aes256-sha1

Specifies the cipher suite.

Options include des-sha1, 3des-sha1, aes128-sha1, aes256-sha1, or null-sha1.

Step 14 

 

Exports the local CA certificate and installs it as a trusted certificate on the Cisco Unified Communications Manager server by performing one of the following actions.

hostname(config)# crypto ca export trustpoint 
identity-certificate
Example:
hostname(config)# crypto ca export ldc_server 
identity-certificate

Exports the certificate if a trustpoint with proxy-ldc-issuer is used as the signer of the dynamic certificates.

hostname(config)# show crypto ca server certificates 

Exports the certificate for the embedded local CA server LOCAL-CA-SERVER.

After exporting the certificate, you must save the output to a file and import it on the Cisco Unified Communications Manager. You can use the Display Certificates function in the Cisco Unified Communications Manager software to verify the installed certificate.

For information about performing these procedures, see the following URLs:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/cucm/cucos/5_0_4/iptpch6.html#wp1040848

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/cucm/cucos/5_0_4/iptpch6.html#wp1040354

What To Do Next

Once you have created the TLS proxy instance and installed the certificate on the Cisco Unified Communications Manager, create the phone proxy instance. See Creating the Phone Proxy Instance.

Creating the Media Termination Instance

Create the media termination instance that you will use in the phone proxy.

The media termination address you configure must meet the requirements as described in Media Termination Instance Prerequisites.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

hostname(config)# media-termination instance_name
Example: 
hostname(config)# media-termination mediaterm1

Creates the media termination instance that you attach to the phone proxy.

Step 2 

hostname(config-media-termination)# address 
ip_address [interface intf_name]
Examples: 
hostname(config-media-termination)# address 
192.0.2.25 interface inside
hostname(config-media-termination)# address 
10.10.0.25 interface outside

Configures the media-termination address used by the media termination instance. The phone proxy uses this address for SRTP and RTP.

For the media termination instance, you can configure a global media-termination address for all interfaces or configure a media-termination address for different interfaces. However, you cannot use a global media-termination address and media-termination addresses configured for each interface at the same time.

If you configure a media termination address for multiple interfaces, you must configure an address on each interface that the adaptive security appliance uses when communicating with IP phones.

The IP addresses are publicly routable addresses that are unused IP addresses within the address range on that interface.

See Media Termination Instance Prerequisites for the complete list of prerequisites that you must follow when creating the media termination instance and configuring the media termination addresses.

Step 3 

(Optional)

hostname(config-media-termination)# rtp-min-port 
port1 rtp-max-port port2
Example: 
hostname(config-media-termination)# rtp-min-port 
2001 rtp-maxport 32770

Specifies the minimum and maximum values for the RTP port range for the media termination instance.

Where port1 and port2 can be a value from 1024 to 65535.

What To Do Next

Once you have created the media termination instance, create the phone proxy instance. See Creating the Phone Proxy Instance.

Creating the Phone Proxy Instance

Create the phone proxy instance.

Prerequisites

You must have already created the CTL file and TLS proxy instance for the phone proxy.

See Creating the CTL File and Creating the TLS Proxy Instance for a Non-secure Cisco UCM Cluster

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

hostname(config)# phone-proxy phone_proxy_name
Example:
hostname(config)# phone-proxy myphoneproxy

Creates the phone proxy instance.

Only one phone proxy instance can be configured on the security appliance.

Step 2 

hostname(config-phone-proxy)# media-termination 
instance_name
Examples: 
hostname(config-phone-proxy)# media-termination 
my_mt

Specifies the media termination instance used by the phone proxy for SRTP and RTP.

Note You must create the media termination instance before you specify it in the phone proxy instance.

See Creating the Media Termination Instance for the steps to create the media termination instance.

Step 3 

hostname(config-phone-proxy)# tftp-server address 
ip_address interface interface
Example:
hostname(config-phone-proxy)# tftp-server address 
192.0.2.101 interface inside

Creates the TFTP server using the actual internal address and specify the interface on which the TFTP server resides.

Step 4 

hostame(config-phone-proxy)# tls-proxy proxy_name
Example:
hostame(config-phone-proxy)# tls-proxy mytls

Configures the TLS proxy instance that you have already created.

Step 5 

hostname(config-phone-proxy)# ctl-file ctl_name
Example:
hostame(config-phone-proxy)# ctl-file myctl

Configures the CTL file instance that you have already created,

Step 6 

hostname(config-phone-proxy)# proxy-server address 
ip_address [listen_port] interface ifc
Example:
hostname(config-phone-proxy)# proxy-server 
192.168.1.2 interface inside

(Optional) If the operational environment has an external HTTP proxy to which the IP phones direct all HTTP request, configures a proxy server.

You can configure only one proxy server while the phone proxy is in use.

By default, the Phone URL Parameters configured under the Enterprise Parameters use an FQDN in the URLs. The parameters might need to be changed to use an IP address if the DNS lookup for the HTTP proxy does not resolve the FQDNs.

Note If the IP phones have already downloaded their configuration files after you have configured the proxy server, you must restart the IP phones so that they get the configuration file with the proxy server address in the file.

Step 7 

hostname(config-phone-proxy)# cipc security-mode 
authenticated

(Optional) Forces Cisco IP Communicator (CIPC) softphones to operate in authenticated mode when CIPC softphones are deployed in a voice and data VLAN scenario.

See Cisco IP Communicator Prerequisites for all requirements for using the phone proxy with CIPC.

Step 8 

hostname(config-phone-proxy)# no disable 
service-settings

(Optional) Preserve the settings configured on the Cisco UCM for each IP phone configured.

By default, the following settings are disabled on the IP phones:

PC Port

Gratuitous ARP

Voice VLAN access

Web Access

Span to PC Port

What to Do Next

Once you have created the phone proxy instance, configuring SIP and Skinny for the phone proxy. See Enabling the Phone Proxy with SIP and Skinny Inspection.

Enabling the Phone Proxy with SIP and Skinny Inspection

Enables the phone proxy instance that you created to inspect SIP and Skinny protocol traffic.

Prerequisites

You must have already created the phone proxy instance. See Creating the Phone Proxy Instance.

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

hostname(config)# class-map class_map_name
Example:
class-map sec_sccp

Configures the secure Skinny class of traffic to inspect. Traffic between the Cisco Unified Communications Manager and Cisco IP Phones uses SCCP and is handled by SCCP inspection.

Where class_map_name is the name of the Skinny class map.

Step 2 

hostname(config-cmap)# match port tcp eq 2443

Matches the TCP port 2443 to which you want to apply actions for secure Skinny inspection.

Step 3 

hostname(config-cmap)# exit

Exits from the Class Map configuration mode.

Step 4 

hostname(config)# class-map class_map_name
Example:
class-map sec_sip

Configures the secure SIP class of traffic to inspect.

Where class_map_name is the name of the SIP class map.

Step 5 

hostname(config-cmap)# match port tcp eq 5061

Matches the TCP port 5061 to which you want to apply actions for secure SIP inspection

Step 6 

hostname(config-cmap)# exit

Exits from the Class Map configuration mode.

Step 7 

hostname(config)# policy-map name
Example:
policy-map pp_policy

Configure the policy map and attach the action to the class of traffic.

Step 8 

hostname(config-pmap)# class classmap-name
Example:
class sec_sccp

Assigns a class map to the policy map so that you can assign actions to the class map traffic.

Where classmap_name is the name of the Skinny class map.

Step 9 

hostname(config-pmap-c)# inspect skinny phone-proxy 
pp_name
Example:
inspect skinny phone-proxy mypp

Enables SCCP (Skinny) application inspection and enables the phone proxy for the specified inspection session.

Step 10 

hostnae(config-pmap)# class classmap-name
Example:
class sec_sip

Assigns a class map to the policy map so that you can assign actions to the class map traffic.

Where classmap_name is the name of the SIP class map.

Step 11 

hostname(config-pmap-c)# inspect sip phone-proxy 
pp_name
Example:
inspect sip phone-proxy mypp

Enables SIP application inspection and enables the phone proxy for the specified inspection session.

Step 12 

hostname(config-pmap-c)# exit

Exits from Policy Map configuration mode.

Step 13 

hostname(config)# service-policy policymap_name 
interface intf
Example:
service-policy pp_policy interface outside

Enables the service policy on the outside interface.

Configuring Linksys Routers with UDP Port Forwarding for the Phone Proxy

When IP phones are behind a NAT-capable router, the router can be configured to forward the UDP ports to the IP address of the IP phone. Specifically, configure the router for UDP port forwarding when an IP phone is failing during TFTP requests and the failure is due to the router dropping incoming TFTP data packets. Configure the router to enable UDP port forwarding on port 69 to the IP phone.

As an alternative of explicit UDP forwarding, some Cable/DSL routers require you to designate the IP phone as a DMZ host. For Cable/DSL routers, this host is a special host that receives all incoming connections from the public network.

When configuring the phone proxy, there is no functional difference between an IP phone that has UDP ports explicitly forwarded or an IP phone designated as a DMZ host. The choice is entirely dependent upon the capabilities and preference of the end user.

Configuring Your Router

Your firewall/router needs to be configured to forward a range of UDP ports to the IP phone. This will allow the IP phone to receive audio when you make/receive calls.


Note Different Cable/DSL routers have different procedures for this configuration. Furthermore most NAT-capable routers will only allow a given port range to be forwarded to a single IP address


The configuration of each brand/model of firewall/router is different, but the task is the same. For specific instructions for your brand and model of router, please contact the manufacturer's website.

Linksys Routers


Step 1 From your web browser, connect to the router administrative web page. For Linksys, this is typically something like http://192.168.1.1.

Step 2 Click Applications & Gaming or the Port Forwarding tab (whichever is present on your router).

Step 3 Locate the table containing the port forwarding data and add an entry containing the following values:

Table 44-3 Port Forwarding Values to Add to Router

Application
Start
End
Protocol
IP Address
Enabled

IP phone

1024

65535

UDP

Phone IP address

Checked

TFTP

69

69

UDP

Phone IP address

Checked


Step 4 Click Save Settings. Port forwarding is configured.


Troubleshooting the Phone Proxy

This section includes the following topics:

Debugging Information from the Security Appliance

Debugging Information from IP Phones

IP Phone Registration Failure

Media Termination Address Errors

Audio Problems with IP Phones

Saving SAST Keys

Debugging Information from the Security Appliance

This section describes how to use the debug, capture, and show commands to obtain debugging information for the phone proxy. See the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference for detailed information about the syntax for these commands.

Table 44-4 lists the debug commands to use with the phone proxy.

Table 44-4 Security Appliance Debug Commands to Use with the Phone Proxy

To
Use the Command
Notes

To show error and event messages for TLS proxy inspection.

debug inspect tls-proxy [events | errors]

Use this command when your IP phone has successfully downloaded all TFTP files but is failing to complete the TLS handshake with the TLS proxy configured for the phone proxy.

To show error and event messages of media sessions for SIP and Skinny inspections related to the phone proxy.

debug phone-proxy media [events | errors]

Use this command in conjunction with the debug sip command and the debug skinny command if your IP phone is experiencing call failures or audio problems.

To show error and event messages of signaling sessions for SIP and Skinny inspections related to the phone proxy.

debug phone-proxy signaling [events | errors]

Use this command in conjunction with the debug sip command and the debug skinny command if your IP phone is failing to register with the Cisco UCM or if you are experiencing call failure.

To show error and event messages of TFTP inspection, including creation of the CTL file and configuration file parsing.

debug phone-proxy tftp [events | errors]

 

To show debug messages for SIP application inspection.

debug sip

Use this command when your IP phones are experiencing connection problems; for example, you can connect within the network but cannot make calls off the network. In the output, check for 4XX or 5XX messages.

To show debug messages for SCCP (Skinny) application inspection.

debug skinny

Use this command when your IP phones are experiencing connection problems; for example, you can connect within the network but cannot make calls off the network. In the output, check for 4XX or 5XX messages.


Table 44-5 lists the capture commands to use with the phone proxy. Use the capture command on the appropriate interfaces (IP phones and Cisco UCM) to enable packet capture capabilities for packet sniffing and network fault isolation.

Table 44-5 Security Appliance Capture Commands to Use with the Phone Proxy

To
Use the Command
Notes

To capture packets on the adaptive security appliance interfaces.

capture capture_name interface interface_name

Use this command if you are experiencing any problems that might require looking into the packets.

For example, if there is a TFTP failure and the output from the debug command does not indicate the problem clearly, run the capture command on the interface on which the IP phone resides and the interface on which the TFTP server resides to see the transaction and where the problem could be.

To capture data from the TLS proxy when there is a non-secure IP phone connecting to the phone proxy on the inside interface.

capture capture_name packet-length bytes interface inside buffer buf_size

 

To capture encrypted data from the TLS proxy when there are secure IP phones connecting to the phone proxy on the inside interface.

capture capture_name type tls-proxy buffer buf_size packet-length bytes interface inside

 

To capture encrypted inbound and outbound data from the TLS proxy on one or more interfaces.

capture capture_name type tls-proxy buffer buf_size packet-length bytes interface interface_name

If signaling fails, you might require capturing decrypted packets to see the contents of the SIP and SCCP signaling message. Use the type tls-proxy option in the capture command.


Table 44-6 Security Appliance Show Commands to Use with the Phone Proxy

To
Use the Command
Notes

To show the packets or connections dropped by the accelerated security path.

show asp drop

Use this command to troubleshoot audio quality issues with the IP phones or other traffic issues with the phone proxy. In addition to running this command, get call status from the phone to check for any dropped packets or jitter. See Debugging Information from IP Phones.

To show the classifier contents of the accelerated security path for the specific classifier domain.

show asp table classify domain domain_name

If the IP phones are not downloading TFTP files, use this command to check that the classification rule for the domain inspect-phone-proxy is set for hosts to the configured TFTP server under the phone proxy instance.

If the IP phones are failing to register, use this command to make sure there is a classification rule for the domain app-redirect set for the IP phones that cannot register.

To show the connections that are to the adaptive security appliance or from the adaptive security appliance, in addition to through-traffic connections.

show conn all

If you are experiencing problems with audio, use this command to make sure that there are connections opened from the IP phone to the media termination address.

Note Use the show conn command with following options to display TFTP connections that have replicated (unused) connections:

hostname# show conn | 
include p
 
        

The output for the TFTP connections should have a "p" flag at the end:

UDP out 64.169.58.181:9014 in 
192.168.200.101:39420 idle 0:01:51 
bytes 522 flags p
 
        

Using this command shows that the phone proxy has connections that are going through "inspect-phone-proxy", which inspects TFTP connections. Using this command verifies that the TFTP requests are being inspected because the p flag is there.

To show the logs in the buffer and logging settings.

show logging

Before entering the show logging command, enable the logging buffered command so that the show logging command displays the current message buffer and the current settings.

Use this command to determine if the phone proxy and IP phones are successfully completing the TLS handshake.

Note Using the show logging command is useful for troubleshooting many problems where packets might be denied or there are translation failures.

To show the corresponding media sessions stored by the phone proxy.

show phone-proxy media-sessions

Use this command to display output from successful calls. Additionally, use this command to troubleshoot problems with IP phone audio, such as one-way audio.

To show the IP phones capable of Secure mode stored in the database.

show phone-proxy secure-phones

For any problems, make sure there is an entry for the IP phone in this output and that the port for this IP phone is non-zero, which indicates that it has successfully registered with the Cisco UCM.

To show the corresponding signaling sessions stored by the phone proxy.

show phone-proxy signaling-sessions

Use this command to troubleshoot media or signaling failure.

To show the configured service policies.

show service-policy

Use this command to show statistics for the service policy.

To show active TLS proxy sessions related to the phone proxy.

show tls-proxy sessions

If the IP phone has failed to register, use this command to see if the IP phone has successfully completed the handshake with the TLS proxy configured for the phone proxy.


Table 44-6 lists the show commands to use with the phone proxy.

Debugging Information from IP Phones

On the IP phone, perform the following actions:

Check the Status messages on the IP phone by selecting the Settings button > Status > Status Messages and selecting the status item that you want to view.

Collect the call-statistics data from the IP phone by selecting the Settings button > Status > Call Statistic. Data like the following displays:

RxType: G.729               TxType: G.729
RxSize:   20 ms             TxSize:  20 ms
RxCnt: 0                    TxCnt: 014174
AvgJtr:   10                MaxJtr:  59
RxDisc: 0000                RxLost: 014001
 
   

Check the Security settings on the IP phone by selecting the Settings button > Security Configuration. Settings for web access, Security mode, MIC, LSC, CTL file, trust list, and CAPF appear. Under Security mode, make sure the IP phone is set to Encrypted.

Check the IP phone to determine which certificates are installed on the phone by selecting the Settings button > Security Configuration > Trust List. In the trustlist, verify the following:

Make sure that there is an entry for each entity that the IP phone will need to contact. If there is a primary and backup Cisco UCM, the trustlist should contain entries for each Cisco UCM.

If the IP phone needs an LSC, the record entry should contain a CAPF entry.

Make sure that the IP addresses listed for each entry are the mapped IP addresses of the entities that the IP phone can reach.

Open a web browser and access the IP phone console logs at the URL http://IP_phone_IP address. The device information appears in the page. In the Device Logs section in the left pane, click Console Logs.

IP Phone Registration Failure

The following errors can make IP phones unable to register with the phone proxy:

TFTP Auth Error Displays on IP Phone Console

Configuration File Parsing Error

Configuration File Parsing Error: Unable to Get DNS Response

Non-configuration File Parsing Error

Cisco UCM Does Not Respond to TFTP Request for Configuration File

IP Phone Does Not Respond After the Security Appliance Sends TFTP Data

IP Phone Requesting Unsigned File Error

IP Phone Unable to Download CTL File

IP Phone Registration Failure from Signaling Connections

SSL Handshake Failure

Certificate Validation Errors

TFTP Auth Error Displays on IP Phone Console

Problem   The IP phone displays the following Status message:

TFTP Auth Error

Solution   This Status message can indicate a problem with the IP phone CTL file.

To correct problems with the IP phone CTL file, perform the following:


Step 1 From the IP phone, select the Setting button > Security Configuration > Trust List. Verify that each entity in the network—Primary Cisco UCM, Secondary Cisco UCM, TFTP server—has its own entry in the trustlist and that each entity IP address is reachable by the IP phone.

Step 2 From the adaptive security appliance, verify that the CTL file for the phone proxy contains one record entry for each entity in the network—Primary Cisco UCM, Secondary Cisco UCM, TFTP server—by entering the following command:

hostname# show running-config all ctl-file [ctl_name]
 
   

Each of these record entries creates one entry on the IP phone trustlist. The phone proxy creates one entry internally with the function CUCM+TFTP.

Step 3 In the CTL file, verify that each IP address is the global or mapped IP address of the entity. If the IP phones are on multiple interfaces, additional addressing requirements apply. See Prerequisites for IP Phones on Multiple Interfaces.


Configuration File Parsing Error

Problem   When the adaptive security appliance receives the configuration file from the Cisco UCM and tries to parse it, the following error appears in the debug output (debug phone-proxy tftp errors):

PP: 192.168.10.5/49357 requesting SEP00010002003.cnf.xml.sgn
PP: opened 0x193166
.......
PP: Beginning of element tag is missing, got !
PP: error parsing config file
PP: Error modifying config file, dropping packet
 
   

Solution   Perform the following actions to troubleshoot this problem:


Step 1 Enter the following URL in a web browser to obtain the IP phone configuration file from the Cisco Unified CM Administration console:

http://<cucm_ip>:6970/<config_file_name>
 
   

For example, if the Cisco UCM IP address is 128.106.254.2 and the IP phone configuration file name is SEP000100020003.cnf.xml, enter:

http://128.106.254.2:6970/SEP000100020003.cnf.xml
 
   

Step 2 Save this file, open a case with TAC and send them this file and the output from running the debug phone-proxy tftp command on the adaptive security appliance.


Configuration File Parsing Error: Unable to Get DNS Response

Problem   When the adaptive security appliance receives the configuration file from the Cisco UCM and tries to parse it, the following error appears in the debug output (debug phone-proxy tftp errors):

PP: 192.168.10.5/49357 requesting SEP00010002003.cnf.xml.sgn
PP: opened 0x193166
.......
PP: Callback required for parsing config file
PP: Unable to get dns response for id 7
PP: Callback, error modifying config file
 
   

The error indicates that the Cisco UCM is configured as an FQDN and the phone proxy is trying to do a DNS lookup but failed to get a response.

Solution   


Step 1 Verify that DNS lookup is configured on the adaptive security appliance.

Step 2 If DNS lookup is configured, determine whether you can ping the FQDN for the Cisco UCM from the adaptive security appliance.

Step 3 If adaptive security appliance cannot ping the Cisco UCM FQDN, check to see if there is a problem with the DNS server.

Step 4 Additionally, use the name command to associate a name with an IP address with the FQDN. See the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference for information about using the name command.


Non-configuration File Parsing Error

Problem   The adaptive security appliance receives a file other than an IP phone configuration file from the Cisco UCM and attempts to parse it. The following error appears in the debug output (debug phone-proxy tftp):

PP: 192.168.10.5/49357 requesting SK72f64050-7ad5-4b47-9bfa-5e9ad9cd4aa9.xml.sgn
PP: opened 0x193166
.......
PP: Beginning of element tag is missing, got !
PP: error parsing config file
PP: Error modifying config file, dropping packet
 
   

Solution   The phone proxy should parse only the IP phone configuration file. When the phone proxy TFTP state gets out of state, the phone proxy cannot detect when it is attempting to parse a file other than the IP phone configuration file and the error above appears in the adaptive security appliance output from the debug phone-proxy tftp command.

Perform the following actions to troubleshoot this problem:


Step 1 Reboot the IP phone.

Step 2 On the adaptive security appliance, enter the following command to obtain the error information from the first TFTP request to the point where the first error occurred.

hostname# debug phone-proxy tftp 
 
   

Step 3 Capture the packets from the IP phone to the adaptive security appliance. Make sure to capture the packets on the interface facing the IP phone and the interface facing the Cisco UCM. See Debugging Information from the Security Appliance.

Step 4 Save this troubleshooting data, open a case with TAC and give them this information.


Cisco UCM Does Not Respond to TFTP Request for Configuration File

Problem   When the adaptive security appliance forwards the TFTP request to the Cisco UCM for the IP phone configuration file, the Cisco UCM does not respond and the following errors appear in the debug output (debug phone-proxy tftp):

PP: 192.168.10.5/49355 requesting SEP001562106AF3.cnf.xml.sgn
PP: opened 0x17ccde
PP: 192.168.10.5/49355 requesting SEP001562106AF3.cnf.xml.sgn
PP: Client outside:192.168.10.5/49355 retransmitting request for Config file 
SEP001562106AF3.cnf.xml.sgn
PP: opened 0x17ccde
PP: 192.168.10.5/49355 requesting SEP001562106AF3.cnf.xml.sgn
PP: Client outside:192.168.10.5/49355 retransmitting request for Config file 
SEP001562106AF3.cnf.xml.sgn
PP: opened 0x17ccde
PP: 192.168.10.5/49355 requesting SEP001562106AF3.cnf.xml.sgn
PP: Client outside:192.168.10.5/49355 retransmitting request for Config file 
SEP001562106AF3.cnf.xml.sgn
PP: opened 0x17ccde
 
   

Solution   Perform the following actions to troubleshoot this problem:


Step 1 Determine why the Cisco UCM is not responding to the TFTP request by performing the following troubleshooting actions:

Use the Cisco UCM to ping the adaptive security appliance inside interface when PAT is configured for the outside interface so that the IP phone IP address is uses NAT for the adaptive security appliance inside interface IP address.

Use the Cisco UCM to ping the IP phone IP address when NAT and PAT are not configured.

Step 2 Verify that the adaptive security appliance is forwarding the TFTP request. Capture the packets on the interface between the adaptive security appliance and Cisco UCM. See Debugging Information from the Security Appliance.

 
   

IP Phone Does Not Respond After the Security Appliance Sends TFTP Data

Problem   When the adaptive security appliance receives a TFTP request from the IP phone for the CTL file and forwards the data to the IP phone, the phone might not see the data and the TFTP transaction fails.

The following errors appear in the debug output (debug phone-proxy tftp):

PP: Client outside:68.207.118.9/33606 retransmitting request for CTL file 
CTLSEP001DA2B78E91.tlv
PP: opened 0x214b27a
PP: Data Block 1 forwarded from 168.215.146.220/20168 to 68.207.118.9/33606 ingress ifc 
outside
PP: 68.207.118.9/33606 requesting CTLSEP001DA2B78E91.tlv
PP: Client outside:68.207.118.9/33606 retransmitting request for CTL file 
CTLSEP001DA2B78E91.tlv
PP: 68.207.118.9/33606 requesting CTLSEP001DA2B78E91.tlv
PP: Client outside:68.207.118.9/33606 retransmitting request for CTL file 
CTLSEP001DA2B78E91.tlv
 
   

Solution   Perform the following actions to determine why the IP phone is not responding and to troubleshoot the problem:


Step 1 Verify that the adaptive security appliance is forwarding the TFTP request by entering the following command to capture the packets on the interface between the adaptive security appliance and the IP phone:

hostname# capture out interface outside
 
   

See the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference for more information about using the capture command.

Step 2 If the IP phone is behind a router, the router might be dropping the data. Make sure UDP port forwarding is enabled on the router.

Step 3 If the router is a Linksys router, see Configuring Linksys Routers with UDP Port Forwarding for the Phone Proxy for information on the configuration requirements.


IP Phone Requesting Unsigned File Error

Problem   The IP phone should always request a signed file. Therefore, the TFTP file being requested always has the .SGN extension.

When the IP phone does not request a signed file, the following error appears in the debug output (debug phone-proxy tftp errors):

Error: phone requesting for unsigned config file
 
   

Solution   Most likely, this error occurs because the IP phone has not successfully installed the CTL file from the adaptive security appliance.

Determine whether the IP phone has successfully downloaded and installed the CTL file from the adaptive security appliance by checking the Status messages on the IP phone. See Debugging Information from IP Phones for information.

IP Phone Unable to Download CTL File

Problem   The IP phone Status message indicates it cannot download its CTL file and the IP phone cannot be converted to Secure (encrypted) mode.

Solution   If the IP phone did not have an existing CTL file, check the Status messages by selecting the Settings button > Status > Status Messages. If the list contains a Status message indicating the IP phone encountered a CTL File Auth error, obtain the IP phone console logs, open a TAC case, and send them the logs.

Solution   This error can appear in the IP phone Status messages when the IP phone already has an existing CTL file.


Step 1 Check the IP phone to see if a CTL file already exists on it. This can occur if the IP phone previously registered with a mixed mode cluster Cisco UCM. On the IP phone, select the Settings button > Security Configuration > CTL file.

Step 2 Erase the existing CTL file by selecting the Settings button > Security Configuration > CTL file > Select. Press **# on the keypad and select Erase.


Solution   Problems downloading the CTL file might be caused by issues with media termination. Enter the following command to determine if the media-termination address in the phone proxy configuration is set correctly:

hostname(config)# show running-config all phone-proxy 
!
phone-proxy mypp
media-termination address 10.10.0.25
cipc security-mode authenticated
cluster-mode mixed
disable service-settings
timeout secure-phones 0:05:00
hostname(config)# 
 
   

Make sure that each media-termination instance is created correctly and that the address or addresses are set correctly. The adaptive security appliance must meet specific criteria for media termination. See Media Termination Instance Prerequisites for the complete list of prerequisites that you must follow when creating the media termination instance and configuring the media termination addresses.

IP Phone Registration Failure from Signaling Connections

Problem   The IP phone is unable to complete the TLS handshake with the phone proxy and download its files using TFTP.

Solution   


Step 1 Determine if the TLS handshake is occurring between the phone proxy and the IP phone, perform the following:

a. Enable logging with the following command:

hostname(config)# logging buffered debugging
 
   

b. To check the output from the syslogs captured by the logging buffered command, enter the following command:

hostname# show logging
 
   

The syslogs will contain information showing when the IP phone is attempting the TLS handshake, which happens after the IP phone downloads its configuration file.

Step 2 Determine if the TLS proxy is configured correctly for the phone proxy:

a. Display all currently running TLS proxy configurations by entering the following command:

hostname# show running-config tls-proxy
tls-proxy proxy
server trust-point _internal_PP_<ctl_file_instance_name>
client ldc issuer ldc_signer
client ldc key-pair phone_common
no client cipher-suite
hostname# 
 
   

b. Verify that the output contains the server trust-point command under the tls-proxy command (as shown in substep a.).

If you are missing the server trust-point command, modify the TLS proxy in the phone proxy configuration.

See Step 3 in the "Task Flow for Configuring the Phone Proxy in a Non-secure Cisco UCM Cluster" section, or Step 3 in the "Task Flow for Configuring the Phone Proxy in a Mixed-mode Cisco UCM Cluster" section.

Having this command missing from the TLS proxy configuration for the phone proxy will cause TLS handshake failure.

Step 3 Verify that all required certificates are imported into the adaptive security appliance so that the TLS handshake will succeed.

a. Determine which certificates are installed on the adaptive security appliance by entering the following command:

hostname# show running-config crypto
 
   

Additionally, determine which certificates are installed on the IP phones. See Debugging Information from IP Phones for information about checking the IP phone to determine if it has MIC installed on it.

b. Verify that the list of installed certificates contains all required certificates for the phone proxy.

See Table 44-2, Certificates Required by the Security Appliance for the Phone Proxy, for information.

c. Import any missing certificates onto the adaptive security appliance. See also Importing Certificates from the Cisco UCM.

Step 4 If the steps above fail to resolve the issue, perform the following actions to obtain additional troubleshooting information for Cisco Support.

a. Enter the following commands to capture additional debugging information for the phone proxy:

hostname# debug inspect tls-proxy error
hostname# show running-config ssl
hostname(config) show tls-proxy tls_name session host host_addr detail
 
   

b. Enable the capture command on the inside and outside interfaces (IP phones and Cisco UCM) to enable packet capture capabilities for packet sniffing and network fault isolation. See the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference for information.


Problem   The TLS handshake succeeds, but signaling connections are failing.

Solution   Perform the following actions:

Check to see if SIP and Skinny signaling is successful by using the following commands:

debug sip

debug skinny

If the TLS handshake is failing and you receive the following syslog, the SSL encryption method might not be set correctly:

%ASA-6-725001: Starting SSL handshake with client dmz:171.169.0.2/53097 for TLSv1 
session.
%ASA-7-725010: Device supports the following 1 cipher(s).
%ASA-7-725011: Cipher[1] : RC4-SHA
%ASA-7-725008: SSL client dmz:171.169.0.2/53097 proposes the following 2 cipher(s).
%ASA-7-725011: Cipher[1] : AES256-SHA
%ASA-7-725011: Cipher[2] : AES128-SHA
%ASA-7-725014: SSL lib error. Function: SSL3_GET_CLIENT_HELLO Reason: no shared cipher
%ASA-6-725006: Device failed SSL handshake with dmz client:171.169.0.2/53097
 
   
Set the correct ciphers by completing the following procedure: 

Step 1 To see the ciphers being used by the phone proxy, enter the following command:

hostname# show run all ssl 
 
   

Step 2 To add the required ciphers, enter the following command:

hostname(config)# ssl encryption
 
   

The default is to have all algorithms available in the following order:

[3des-sha1] [des-sha1] [rc4-md5] [possibly others]

See the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference for more information about setting ciphers with the ssl encryption command.


SSL Handshake Failure

Problem   The phone proxy is not functioning. Initial troubleshooting uncovered the following errors in the adaptive security appliance syslogs:

%ASA-7-725014: SSL lib error. Function: SSL3_READ_BYTES Reason: ssl handshake failure
%ASA-7-725014: SSL lib error. Function: SSL3_GET_CLIENT_CERTIFICATE Reason: no certificate 
returned
%ASA-6-725006: Device failed SSL handshake with outside client:72.146.123.158/30519
%ASA-3-717009: Certificate validation failed. No suitable trustpoints found to validate 
certificate serial number: 62D06172000000143FCC, subject name: 
cn=CP-7962G-SEP002155554502,ou=EVVBU,o=Cisco Systems Inc.
%ASA-3-717027: Certificate chain failed validation. No suitable trustpoint was found to 
validate chain.

Solution   

Verify that all required certificates are imported into the adaptive security appliance so that the TLS handshake will succeed.


Step 1 Determine which certificates are installed on the adaptive security appliance by entering the following command:

hostname# show running-config crypto
 
   

Additionally, determine which certificates are installed on the IP phones. See Debugging Information from IP Phones for information about checking the IP phone to determine if it has MIC installed on it.

Step 2 Verify that the list of installed certificates contains all required certificates for the phone proxy.

See Table 44-2, Certificates Required by the Security Appliance for the Phone Proxy, for information.

Step 3 Import any missing certificates onto the adaptive security appliance. See also Importing Certificates from the Cisco UCM.


Problem   The phone proxy is not functioning. Initial troubleshooting uncovered the following errors in the adaptive security appliance syslogs:

%ASA-6-725001: Starting SSL handshake with client dmz:171.169.0.2/53097 for TLSv1 
session.
%ASA-7-725010: Device supports the following 1 cipher(s).
%ASA-7-725011: Cipher[1] : RC4-SHA
%ASA-7-725008: SSL client dmz:171.169.0.2/53097 proposes the following 2 cipher(s).
%ASA-7-725011: Cipher[1] : AES256-SHA
%ASA-7-725011: Cipher[2] : AES128-SHA
%ASA-7-725014: SSL lib error. Function: SSL3_GET_CLIENT_HELLO Reason: no shared cipher
%ASA-6-725006: Device failed SSL handshake with dmz client:171.169.0.2/53097
 
   

Solution   the SSL encryption method might not be set correctly. Set the correct ciphers by completing the following procedure:


Step 1 To see the ciphers being used by the phone proxy, enter the following command:

hostname# show run all ssl 
 
   

Step 2 To add the required ciphers, enter the following command:

hostname(config)# ssl encryption
 
   

The default is to have all algorithms available in the following order:

[3des-sha1] [des-sha1] [rc4-md5] [possibly others]

See the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference for more information about setting ciphers with the ssl encryption command.


Certificate Validation Errors

Problem   Errors in the adaptive security appliance log indicate that certificate validation errors occurred.

Entering the show logging asdm command, displayed the following errors:

3|Jun 19 2008 17:23:54|717009: Certificate validation failed. No suitable trustpoints 
found to validate 
certificate serial number: 348FD2760000000E6E27, subject name: 
cn=CP-7961G-SEP001819A89CC3,ou=EVVBU,o=Cisco Systems Inc.

Solution   

In order for the phone proxy to authenticate the MIC provided by the IP phone, it needs the Cisco Manufacturing CA (MIC) certificate imported into the adaptive security appliance.

Verify that all required certificates are imported into the adaptive security appliance so that the TLS handshake will succeed.


Step 1 Determine which certificates are installed on the adaptive security appliance by entering the following command:

hostname# show running-config crypto
 
   

Additionally, determine which certificates are installed on the IP phones. The certificate information is shown under the Security Configuration menu. See Debugging Information from IP Phones for information about checking the IP phone to determine if it has the MIC installed on it.

Step 2 Verify that the list of installed certificates contains all required certificates for the phone proxy.

See Table 44-2, Certificates Required by the Security Appliance for the Phone Proxy, for information.

Step 3 Import any missing certificates onto the adaptive security appliance. See also Importing Certificates from the Cisco UCM.


Media Termination Address Errors

Problem   Entering the media-termination address command displays the following errors:

hostname(config-phone-proxy)# media-termination address ip_address
ERROR: Failed to apply IP address to interface Virtual254, as the network overlaps with 
interface GigabitEthernet0/0. Two interfaces cannot be in the same subnet.
ERROR: Failed to set IP address for the Virtual interface
ERROR: Could not bring up Phone proxy media termination interface
ERROR: Failed to find the HWIDB for the Virtual interface

Solution   Enter the following command to determine if the media-termination address in the phone proxy configuration is set correctly:

hostname(config)# show running-config all phone-proxy 
asa2(config)# show running-config all phone-proxy
!
phone-proxy mypp
media-termination address 10.10.0.25
cipc security-mode authenticated
cluster-mode mixed
disable service-settings
timeout secure-phones 0:05:00
hostname(config)# 
 
   

Make sure that each media-termination instance is created correctly and that the address or addresses are set correctly. The adaptive security appliance must meet specific criteria for media termination. See Media Termination Instance Prerequisites for the complete list of prerequisites that you must follow when creating the media termination instance and configuring the media termination addresses.

Audio Problems with IP Phones

The following audio errors can occur when the IP phones connecting through the phone proxy.

Media Failure for a Voice Call

Problem   The call signaling completes but there is one way audio or no audio.

Solution   

Problems with one way or no audio might be caused by issues with media termination. Enter the following command to determine if the media-termination address in the phone proxy configuration is set correctly:

hostname(config)# show running-config all phone-proxy 
asa2(config)# show running-config all phone-proxy
!
phone-proxy mypp
media-termination address 10.10.0.25
cipc security-mode authenticated
cluster-mode mixed
disable service-settings
timeout secure-phones 0:05:00
hostname(config)# 
 
   

Make sure that each media-termination instance is created correctly and that the address or addresses are set correctly. The adaptive security appliance must meet specific criteria for media termination. See Media Termination Instance Prerequisites for the complete list of prerequisites that you must follow when creating the media termination instance and configuring the media termination addresses.

If each media-termination address meets the requirements, determine whether the IP addresses are reachable by all IP phones.

If each IP address is set correctly and reachable by all IP phones, check the call statistics on an IP phone (see Debugging Information from IP Phones) and determine if there are Rcvr packets and Sender packets on the IP phone, or if there are any Rcvr Lost or Discarded packets.

Saving SAST Keys

Site Administrator Security Token (SAST) keys on the adaptive security appliance can be saved in the event a recovery is required due to hardware failure and a replacement is required. The following steps shows how to recover the SAST keys and use them on the new hardware.

The SAST keys can be seen via the show crypto key mypubkey rsa command. The SAST keys are associated with a trustpoint that is labeled _internal_ctl-file_name_SAST_X where ctl-file-name is the name of the CTL file instance that was configured, and X is an integer from 0 to N-1 where N is the number of SASTs configured for the CTL file (the default is 2).


Step 1 On the adaptive security appliance, export all the SAST keys in PKCS-12 format by using the crypto ca export command:

hostname(config)# crypto ca export _internal_ctl-file_name_SAST_X pkcs12 passphrase
 
   
hostname(config)# Exported pkcs12 follows:
MIIGZwIBAzCCBiEGCSqGSIb3DQEHAaCCBhIEggYOMIIGCjCCBgYGCSqGSIb3DQEH
 
   
[snip]
 
   
MIIGZwIBAzCCBiEGCSqGSIb3DQEHAaCCBhIEggYOMIIGCjCCBgYGCSqGSIb3DQEH
---End - This line not part of the pkcs12---
 
   
hostname(config)# crypto ca export _internal_ctl-file_name_SAST_X pkcs12 passphrase
 
   
hostname(config)# Exported pkcs12 follows:
MIIGZwIBAzCCBiEGCSqGSIb3DQEHAaCCBhIEggYOMIIGCjCCBgYGCSqGSIb3DQEH
 
   
[snip]
 
   
mGF/hfDDNAICBAA=
 
   
---End - This line not part of the pkcs12---
hostname(config)#

Note Save this output somewhere secure.


Step 2 Import the SAST keys to a new adaptive security appliance.

a. To import the SAST key, enter the following command:

hostname(config)# crypto ca import trustpoint pkcs12 passphrase
 
   

Where trustpoint is _internal_ctl-file_name_SAST_X and ctl-file-name is the name of the CTL file instance that was configured, and X is an integer from 0 to 4 depending on what you exported from the adaptive security appliance.

b. Using the PKCS-12 output you saved in Step 1, enter the following command and paste the output when prompted:

hostname(config)# crypto ca import _internal_ctl-file_name_SAST_X pkcs12 passphrase
 
   
hostname(config)# Enter the base 64 encoded pkcs12.
hostname(config)# End with the word "quit" on a line by itself:
MIIGZwIBAzCCBiEGCSqGSIb3DQEHAaCCBhIEggYOMIIGCjCCBgYGCSqGSIb3DQEH
 
   
[snip]
 
   
muMiZ6eClQICBAA=
hostname(config)# quit
INFO: Import PKCS12 operation completed successfully
hostname(config)# crypto ca import _internal_ctl-file_name_SAST_X pkcs12 passphrase
 
   
hostname(config)# Enter the base 64 encoded pkcs12.
hostname(config)# End with the word "quit" on a line by itself:
MIIGZwIBAzCCBiEGCSqGSIb3DQEHAaCCBhIEggYOMIIGCjCCBgYGCSqGSIb3DQEH
 
   
[snip]
 
   
mGF/hfDDNAICBAA=
hostname(config)# quit
INFO: Import PKCS12 operation completed successfully
hostname(config)#
 
   

Step 3 Create the CTL file instance on the new adaptive security appliance using the same name as the one used in the SAST trustpoints created in Step 2 by entering the following commands. Create trustpoints for each Cisco UMC (primary and secondary).

hostname(config)# ctl-file ctl_name
hostname(config-ctl-file)# record-entry cucm trustpoint trust_point address address
hostname(config-ctl-file)# record-entry capf trustpoint trust_point address address
hostname(config-ctl-file)# no shutdown
 
   

Configuration Examples for the Phone Proxy

This section includes the following topics:

Example 1: Nonsecure Cisco UCM cluster, Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher

Example 2: Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster, Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher

Example 3: Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster, Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Different Servers

Example 4: Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster, Primary Cisco UCM, Secondary and TFTP Server on Different Servers

Example 5: LSC Provisioning in Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster; Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher

Example 6: VLAN Transversal

Example 1: Nonsecure Cisco UCM cluster, Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher

Figure 44-2 shows an example of the configuration for a non-secure Cisco UCM cluster using the following topology.

Figure 44-2 Nonsecure Cisco UCM cluster, Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher

object network obj-192.0.2.101
host 192.0.2.101
nat (inside,outside) static 10.10.0.26
access-list pp extended permit udp any host 10.10.0.26 eq 69
access-group pp in interface outside
crypto key generate rsa label cucmtftp_kp modulus 1024
crypto ca trustpoint cucm_tftp_server
enrollment self
keypair cucmtftp_kp
crypto ca enroll cucm_tftp_server
ctl-file myctl
record-entry cucm-tftp trustpoint cucm_tftp_server address 10.10.0.26
no shutdown
tls-proxy mytls
server trust-point _internal_PP_myctl
media-termination my_mediaterm
address 192.0.2.25 interface inside
address 10.10.0.25 interface outside
phone-proxy mypp
media-termination my_mediaterm
tftp-server address 192.0.2.101 interface inside
tls-proxy mytls
ctl-file myctl
class-map sec_sccp
match port tcp 2443
class-map sec_sip
match port tcp eq 5061
policy-map pp_policy
class sec_sccp
inspect skinny phone-proxy mypp
class sec_sip
inspect sip phone-proxy mypp
service-policy pp_policy interface outside

Example 2: Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster, Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher

Figure 44-3 shows an example of the configuration for a mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster using the following topology.

Figure 44-3 Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster, Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher

object network obj-192.0.2.101
host 192.0.2.101
nat (inside,outside) static 10.10.0.26
access-list pp extended permit udp any host 10.10.0.26 eq 69
access-group pp in interface outside
crypto key generate rsa label cucmtftp_kp modulus 1024
crypto ca trustpoint cucm_tftp_server
enrollment self
keypair cucmtftp_kp
crypto ca enroll cucm_tftp_server
ctl-file myctl
record-entry cucm-tftp trustpoint cucm_tftp_server address 10.10.0.26
no shutdown
crypto key generate rsa label ldc_signer_key modulus 1024
crypto key generate rsa label phone_common modulus 1024
crypto ca trustpoint ldc_server
enrollment self
proxy_ldc_issuer
fqdn my-ldc-ca.exmaple.com
subject-name cn=FW_LDC_SIGNER_172_23_45_200
keypair ldc_signer_key
crypto ca enroll ldc_server
tls-proxy my_proxy
server trust-point _internal_PP_myctl
client ldc issuer ldc_server
client ldc keypair phone_common
client cipher-suite aes128-sha1 aes256-sha1
media-termination my_mediaterm
address 192.0.2.25 interface inside
address 10.10.0.25 interface outside
phone-proxy mypp
media-termination my_mediaterm
tftp-server address 192.0.2.101 interface inside
tls-proxy mytls
ctl-file myctl
cluster-mode mixed
class-map sec_sccp
match port tcp 2443
class-map sec_sip
match port tcp eq 5061
policy-map pp_policy
class sec_sccp
inspect skinny phone-proxy mypp
class sec_sip
inspect sip phone-proxy mypp
service-policy pp_policy interface outside

Example 3: Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster, Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Different Servers

Figure 44-4 shows an example of the configuration for a mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster using the following topology where the TFTP server resides on a different server from the Cisco UCM.

In this sample, the static interface PAT for the TFTP server is configured to appear like the adaptive security appliance's outside interface IP address.

Figure 44-4 Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster, Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Different Servers

object network obj-192.0.2.105
host 192.0.2.105
nat (inside,outside) static 10.10.0.26
object network obj-192.0.2.101
host 192.0.2.101
nat (inside,outside) static interface udp 69 69
access-list pp extended permit udp any host 10.10.0.24 eq 69
access-group pp in interface outside
crypto key generate rsa label cucm_kp modulus 1024
crypto ca trustpoint cucm
enrollment self
keypair cucm_kp
crypto ca enroll cucm
crypto key generate rsa label tftp_kp modulus 1024
crypto ca trustpoint tftp_server
enrollment self
keypair tftp_kp
crypto ca enroll tftp_server
ctl-file myctl
record-entry cucm trustpoint cucm_server address 10.10.0.26
no shutdown
crypto key generate rsa label ldc_signer_key modulus 1024
crypto key generate rsa label phone_common modulus 1024
crypto ca trustpoint ldc_server
enrollment self
proxy_ldc_issuer
fqdn my-ldc-ca.exmaple.com
subject-name cn=FW_LDC_SIGNER_172_23_45_200
keypair ldc_signer_key
crypto ca enroll ldc_server
tls-proxy my_proxy
server trust-point _internal_PP_myctl
client ldc issuer ldc_server
client ldc keypair phone_common
client cipher-suite aes128-sha1 aes256-sha1
media-termination my_mediaterm
address 192.0.2.25 interface inside
address 10.10.0.25 interface outside
phone-proxy mypp
media-termination my_mediaterm
tftp-server address 192.0.2.101 interface inside
tls-proxy mytls
ctl-file myctl
cluster-mode mixed
class-map sec_sccp
match port tcp 2443
class-map sec_sip
match port tcp eq 5061
policy-map pp_policy
class sec_sccp
inspect skinny phone-proxy mypp
class sec_sip
inspect sip phone-proxy mypp
service-policy pp_policy interface outside

Example 4: Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster, Primary Cisco UCM, Secondary and TFTP Server on Different Servers

Figure 44-5 shows an example of the configuration for a mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster using the following topology where the TFTP server resides on a different server from the primary and secondary Cisco UCMs.

In this sample, the static interface PAT for the TFTP server is configured to appear like the adaptive security appliance's outside interface IP address.

Figure 44-5 Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster, Primary Cisco UCM, Secondary Cisco UCM, and TFTP Server on Different Servers

object network obj-192.0.2.105
host 192.0.2.105
nat (inside,outside) static 10.10.0.27
object network obj-192.0.2.101
host 192.0.2.101
nat (inside,outside) static interface udp 69 69
object network obj-192.0.2.106
host 192.0.2.106
nat (inside,outside) static 10.10.0.26
access-list pp extended permit udp any host 10.10.0.24 eq 69
access-group pp in interface outside
crypto key generate rsa label cluster_kp modulus 1024
crypto ca trustpoint pri_cucm
enrollment self
keypair cluster_kp
crypto ca enroll pri_cucm
crypto ca trustpoint sec_cucm
enrollment self
serial-number
keypair cluster_kp
crypto ca enroll sec_cucm
crypto ca trustpoint tftp_server
enrollment self
fqdn my_tftp.example.com
keypair cluster_kp
crypto ca enroll tftp_server
ctl-file myctl
record-entry tftp trustpoint tftp_server address 10.10.0.24
record-entry cucm trustpoint pri_cucm_server address 10.10.0.27
record-entry cucm trustpoint sec_cucm_server address 10.10.0.2
no shutdown
crypto key generate rsa label ldc_signer_key modulus 1024
crypto key generate rsa label phone_common modulus 1024
crypto ca trustpoint ldc_server
enrollment self
proxy_ldc_issuer
fqdn my-ldc-ca.exmaple.com
subject-name cn=FW_LDC_SIGNER_172_23_45_200
keypair ldc_signer_key
crypto ca enroll ldc_server
tls-proxy my_proxy
server trust-point _internal_PP_myctl
client ldc issuer ldc_server
client ldc keypair phone_common
client cipher-suite aes128-sha1 aes256-sha1
media-termination my_mediaterm
address 192.0.2.25 interface inside
address 10.10.0.25 interface outside
phone-proxy mypp
media-termination my_mediaterm
tftp-server address 192.0.2.101 interface inside
tls-proxy mytls
ctl-file myctl
cluster-mode mixed
class-map sec_sccp
match port tcp 2443
class-map sec_sip
match port tcp eq 5061
policy-map pp_policy
class sec_sccp
inspect skinny phone-proxy mypp
class sec_sip
inspect sip phone-proxy mypp
service-policy pp_policy interface outside

Example 5: LSC Provisioning in Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster; Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher

Figure 44-6 shows an example of the configuration for a mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster where LSC provisioning is required using the following topology.


Note Doing LSC provisioning for remote IP phones is not recommended because it requires that the IP phones first register and they have to register in nonsecure mode. Having the IP phones register in nonsecure mode requires the Administrator to open the nonsecure signaling port for SIP and SCCP on the adaptive security appliance. If possible, LSC provisioning should be done inside the corporate network before giving the IP phones to the end-users.


In this sample, you create an access list to allow the IP phones to contact the TFTP server and to allow the IP phones to register in nonsecure mode by opening the nonsecure port for SIP and SCCP as well as the CAPF port for LSC provisioning.

Additionally, you create the CAPF trustpoint by copying and pasting the CAPF certificate from the Cisco UCM Certificate Management software.

Figure 44-6 LSC Provisioning in Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster; Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher

object network obj-192.0.2.105
host 192.0.2.105
nat (inside,outside) static 10.10.0.26
object network obj-192.0.2.101
host 192.0.2.101
nat (inside,outside) static interface udp 69 69
access-list pp extended permit udp any host 10.10.0.24 eq 69
access-list pp extended permit tcp any host 10.10.0.26 eq 2000
access-list pp extended permit tcp any host 10.10.0.26 eq 5060
access-list pp extended permit tcp any host 10.10.0.26 eq 3804
access-group pp in interface outside
crypto key generate rsa label cluster_kp modulus 1024
crypto ca trustpoint cucm
enrollment self
keypair cluster_kp
crypto ca enroll cucm
crypto ca trustpoint tftp_server
enrollment self
serial-number
keypair cluster_kp
crypto ca enroll tftp_server
crypto ca trustpoint capf
enroll terminal
crypto ca authenticate capf
ctl-file myctl
record-entry cucm trustpoint cucm_server address 10.10.0.26
record-entry capf trustpoint capf address 10.10.0.26
no shutdown
crypto key generate rsa label ldc_signer_key modulus 1024
crypto key generate rsa label phone_common modulus 1024
crypto ca trustpoint ldc_server
enrollment self
proxy_ldc_issuer
fqdn my-ldc-ca.exmaple.com
subject-name cn=FW_LDC_SIGNER_172_23_45_200
keypair ldc_signer_key
crypto ca enroll ldc_server
tls-proxy my_proxy
server trust-point _internal_PP_myctl
client ldc issuer ldc_server
client ldc keypair phone_common
client cipher-suite aes128-sha1 aes256-sha1
media-termination my_mediaterm
address 192.0.2.25 interface inside
address 10.10.0.25 interface outside
phone-proxy mypp
media-termination my_mediaterm
tftp-server address 192.0.2.101 interface inside
tls-proxy mytls
ctl-file myctl
cluster-mode mixed
class-map sec_sccp
match port tcp 2443
class-map sec_sip
match port tcp eq 5061
policy-map pp_policy
class sec_sccp
inspect skinny phone-proxy mypp
class sec_sip
inspect sip phone-proxy mypp
service-policy pp_policy interface outside

Example 6: VLAN Transversal

Figure 44-7 shows an example of the configuration to force Cisco IP Communicator (CIPC) softphones to operate in authenticated mode when CIPC softphones are deployed in a voice and data VLAN scenario. VLAN transversal is required between CIPC softphones on the data VLAN and hard phones on the voice VLAN.

In this sample, the Cisco UCM cluster mode is nonsecure.

In this sample, you create an access list to allow the IP phones to contact the TFTP server and to allow the IP phones to register in nonsecure mode by opening the nonsecure port for SIP and SCCP as well as the CAPF port for LSC provisioning.

In this sample, you configure NAT for the CIPC by using PAT so that each CIPC is mapped to an IP address space in the Voice VLAN.

Additionally, you create the CAPF trustpoint by copying and pasting the CAPF certificate from the Cisco UCM Certificate Management software.


Note Cisco IP Communicator supports authenticated mode only and does not support encrypted mode; therefore, there is no encrypted voice traffic (SRTP) flowing from the CIPC softphones.


Figure 44-7 VLAN Transversal Between CIPC Softphones on the Data VLAN and Hard Phones on the Voice VLAN

object network obj-10.130.50.0
subnet 10.130.50.0 255.255.255.0
nat (data,voice) dynamic 192.0.2.10
object network obj-10.130.50.5
host 10.130.50.5
nat (data,voice) static 192.0.2.101
access-list pp extended permit udp any host 10.130.50.5 eq 69
access-list pp extended permit tcp any host 10.130.50.5 eq 2000
access-list pp extended permit tcp any host 10.130.50.5 eq 5060
access-list pp extended permit tcp any host 10.130.50.5 eq 3804
access-group pp in interface data
crypto ca generate rsa label cucmtftp_kp modulus 1024
crypto ca trustpoint cucm_tftp_server
enrollment self
keypair cucmtftp_kp
crypto ca enroll cucm_tftp_server
crypto ca trustpoint capf
enrollment terminal
crypto ca authenticate capf  
ctl-file myctl
record-entry cucm-tftp trustpoint cucm_tftp_server address 10.130.50.5
record-entry capf trustpoint capf address 10.130.50.5
no shutdown
tls-proxy mytls
server trust-point _internal_PP_myctl
media-termination my_mediaterm
address 10.130.50.2
phone-proxy mypp
media-termination my_mediaterm
tftp-server address 10.10.0.20 interface inside
tls-proxy mytls
ctl-file myctl
cipc security-mode authenticated
class-map sec_sccp
match port tcp eq 2443
class-map sec_sip
match port tcp eq 5061
policy-map pp_policy
class sec_sccp
inspect skinny phone-proxy mypp
class sec_sip
inspect sip phone-proxy mypp
service-policy pp_policy interface data
 
   

Feature History for the Phone Proxy

Table 44-7 lists the release history for this feature.

Table 44-7 Feature History for Cisco Phone Proxy 

Feature Name
Releases
Feature Information

Cisco Phone Proxy

8.0(4)

The phone proxy feature was introduced. The following new commands were introduced.

cipc security-mode authenticated, clear configure ctl, clear configure phone-proxy, cluster-ctl-file, cluster-mode nonsecure, ctl-file (global), ctl-file (phone proxy), debug phone proxy, disable service-settings, media-termination address, phone-proxy, proxy-server, record-entry, sast, show phone-proxy, show running-config ctl, show running-config phone-proxy, timeout secure-phones, tftp-server address.

NAT for the media termination address

8.1(2)

The media-termination address command was changed to allow for NAT:

[no] media-termination address ip_address interface intf_name

Where the interface inft_name keyword was added.

The rtp-min-port and rtp-max-ports keywords were removed from the command syntax and included as a separate command:

rtp-min-port port1 rtp-max-port port2