Cisco Security Appliance Command Line Configuration Guide, Version 7.2
Permitting or Denying Network Access
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Permitting or Denying Network Access

Table Of Contents

Permitting or Denying Network Access

Inbound and Outbound Access List Overview

Applying an Access List to an Interface


Permitting or Denying Network Access


This chapter describes how to control network access through the security appliance using access lists. To create an extended access lists or an EtherType access list, see Chapter 16, "Identifying Traffic with Access Lists."


Note You use ACLs to control network access in both routed and transparent firewall modes. In transparent mode, you can use both extended ACLs (for Layer 3 traffic) and EtherType ACLs (for Layer 2 traffic).

To access the security appliance interface for management access, you do not also need an access list allowing the host IP address. You only need to configure management access according to Chapter 40, "Managing System Access."


This chapter includes the following sections:

Inbound and Outbound Access List Overview

Applying an Access List to an Interface

Inbound and Outbound Access List Overview

By default, all traffic from a higher-security interface to a lower-security interface is allowed. Access lists let you either allow traffic from lower-security interfaces, or restrict traffic from higher-security interfaces.

The security appliance supports two types of access lists:

Inbound—Inbound access lists apply to traffic as it enters an interface.

Outbound—Outbound access lists apply to traffic as it exits an interface.


Note "Inbound" and "outbound" refer to the application of an access list on an interface, either to traffic entering the security appliance on an interface or traffic exiting the security appliance on an interface. These terms do not refer to the movement of traffic from a lower security interface to a higher security interface, commonly known as inbound, or from a higher to lower interface, commonly known as outbound.


An outbound access list is useful, for example, if you want to allow only certain hosts on the inside networks to access a web server on the outside network. Rather than creating multiple inbound access lists to restrict access, you can create a single outbound access list that allows only the specified hosts (see Figure 18-1). See the "IP Addresses Used for Access Lists When You Use NAT" section on page 16-3 for information about NAT and IP addresses. The outbound access list prevents any other hosts from reaching the outside network.

Figure 18-1 Outbound Access List

See the following commands for this example:

hostname(config)# access-list OUTSIDE extended permit tcp host 209.165.201.4 
host 209.165.200.225 eq www
hostname(config)# access-list OUTSIDE extended permit tcp host 209.165.201.6 
host 209.165.200.225 eq www
hostname(config)# access-list OUTSIDE extended permit tcp host 209.165.201.8 
host 209.165.200.225 eq www
hostname(config)# access-group OUTSIDE out interface outside

Applying an Access List to an Interface

To apply an extended access list to the inbound or outbound direction of an interface, enter the following command:

hostname(config)# access-group access_list_name {in | out} interface interface_name 
[per-user-override]

You can apply one access list of each type (extended and EtherType) to both directions of the interface. See the "Inbound and Outbound Access List Overview" section for more information about access list directions.

The per-user-override keyword allows dynamic access lists that are downloaded for user authorization to override the access list assigned to the interface. For example, if the interface access list denies all traffic from 10.0.0.0, but the dynamic access list permits all traffic from 10.0.0.0, then the dynamic access list overrides the interface access list for that user. See the "Configuring RADIUS Authorization" section for more information about per-user access lists. The per-user-override keyword is only available for inbound access lists.

For connectionless protocols, you need to apply the access list to the source and destination interfaces if you want traffic to pass in both directions.

The following example illustrates the commands required to enable access to an inside web server with the IP address 209.165.201.12 (this IP address is the address visible on the outside interface after NAT):

hostname(config)# access-list ACL_OUT extended permit tcp any host 209.165.201.12 eq www
hostname(config)# access-group ACL_OUT in interface outside

You also need to configure NAT for the web server.

The following access lists allow any hosts to communicate between the inside and hr networks, but only specific hosts (209.168.200.3 and 209.168.200.4) to access the outside network, as shown in the last line below:

hostname(config)# access-list ANY extended permit ip any any
hostname(config)# access-list OUT extended permit ip host 209.168.200.3 any
hostname(config)# access-list OUT extended permit ip host 209.168.200.4 any

hostname(config)# access-group ANY in interface inside
hostname(config)# access-group ANY in interface hr
hostname(config)# access-group OUT out interface outside

For example, the following sample access list allows common EtherTypes originating on the inside interface:

hostname(config)# access-list ETHER ethertype permit ipx
hostname(config)# access-list ETHER ethertype permit bpdu
hostname(config)# access-list ETHER ethertype permit mpls-unicast
hostname(config)# access-group ETHER in interface inside

The following access list allows some EtherTypes through the security appliance, but denies all others:

hostname(config)# access-list ETHER ethertype permit 0x1234
hostname(config)# access-list ETHER ethertype permit bpdu
hostname(config)# access-list ETHER ethertype permit mpls-unicast
hostname(config)# access-group ETHER in interface inside
hostname(config)# access-group ETHER in interface outside

The following access list denies traffic with EtherType 0x1256 but allows all others on both interfaces:

hostname(config)# access-list nonIP ethertype deny 1256
hostname(config)# access-list nonIP ethertype permit any
hostname(config)# access-group ETHER in interface inside
hostname(config)# access-group ETHER in interface outside