Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide for the Cisco XR 12000 Series Router, Release 4.3.x
Troubleshooting the Cisco IOS XR Software
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Troubleshooting the Cisco IOS XR Software

Table Of Contents

Troubleshooting the Cisco IOS XR Software

Contents

Additional Sources of Information

Basic Troubleshooting Commands

Using show Commands to Display System Status and Configuration

Using the ping Command

Examples

Using the traceroute Command

Examples

Using debug Commands

Displaying a List of Debug Features

Enabling Debugging for a Feature

Displaying Debugging Status

Disabling Debugging for a Service

Disabling Debugging for All Services Started at the Active Terminal Session

Disabling Debugging for All Services Started at All Terminal Sessions

Configuration Error Messages

Configuration Failures During a Commit Operation

Configuration Errors at Startup

Memory Warnings in Configuration Sessions

Understanding Low-Memory Warnings in Configuration Sessions

"WARNING! MEMORY IS IN MINOR STATE"

"ERROR! MEMORY IS IN SEVERE (or CRITICAL) STATE"

Displaying System Memory Information

Removing Configurations to Resolve Low-Memory Warnings

Clearing a Target Configuration

Removing Committed Configurations to Free System Memory

Rolling Back to a Previously Committed Configuration

Clearing Configuration Sessions

Contacting TAC for Additional Assistance

Interfaces Not Coming Up

Verifying the System Interfaces


Troubleshooting the Cisco IOS XR Software


This chapter describes the tools and procedures used to identify the source of hardware and software problems. This chapter also provides instructions on gathering data for further analysis by Cisco customer support representatives.

Contents

Additional Sources of Information

Basic Troubleshooting Commands

Configuration Error Messages

Memory Warnings in Configuration Sessions

Interfaces Not Coming Up

Additional Sources of Information

For additional information on troubleshooting, see the following sources:

If the Cisco IOS XR software does not start and display the EXEC mode prompt, see
Cisco IOS XR ROM Monitor Guidefor the Cisco XR 12000 Series Router.

Technical Assistance Center (TAC) home page, containing 30,000 pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content.

http://www.cisco.com/public/support/tac/home.shtml

"Related Documents" section.

Basic Troubleshooting Commands

The following sections describe some basic techniques used to determine connectivity to another device and display information on the configuration and operation of a router.

Using show Commands to Display System Status and Configuration

Using the ping Command

Using the traceroute Command

Using debug Commands

Using show Commands to Display System Status and Configuration

Use the show commands to check the status of various Cisco IOS XR software subsystems and services. Table 22 lists some of the common show commands.

To display a complete list of the available show commands, enter the show ? command to access the on-screen help system.


Note Different show commands are available in different command modes, and the same show command can show different results in different command modes.

Table 22 Common show Commands in Cisco IOS XR Software 

Command
Description

show variables boot

(EXEC and administration EXEC modes)

Displays the boot variables.

show configuration

(Global configuration and administration configuration modes)

Displays the uncommitted configuration changes made during a configuration session. This command can be entered in any configuration mode.

show context (and show exception)

(EXEC and administration EXEC modes)

Displays context information about all recent reloads.

show controller

(Administration EXEC mode)

Displays hardware controller information.

show controllers

(EXEC mode)

Displays hardware controller information.

show debug

(EXEC and administration EXEC modes)

Displays debug flags enabled from the current terminal.

show environment [options]

(EXEC and administration EXEC modes)

Displays hardware information for the physical components and systems, including fans, LEDs, power supply voltage and current information, and temperatures. To view the command options, enter the show environment ? command.

show exception

(EXEC and administration EXEC modes)

Displays all exception dump configurations.

show install

(EXEC and administration EXEC modes)

Displays installed and active software packages.

show interfaces

(EXEC mode)

Displays interface status and configuration.

show logging

(EXEC and administration EXEC modes)

Displays the contents of logging buffers.

show memory

(EXEC and administration EXEC modes)

Displays memory statistics.

show platform

(EXEC and administration EXEC modes)

Displays information about node status on the router. To display the nodes assigned to an SDR, enter this command in EXEC mode. To display all the nodes in a router, enter this command in administration EXEC mode.

show processes blocked

(EXEC and administration EXEC modes)

Displays blocked processes.

show redundancy

(EXEC and administration EXEC modes)

Display the status of the primary (active) RP1 and the standby (redundant) RP.

show running-config [command]

(EXEC and administration EXEC modes)

Displays the current running configuration.

show tech-support

(EXEC and administration EXEC modes)

Collects a large amount of system information for troubleshooting. The output should be provided to technical support representatives when a problem is reported. Because of the impact the command can have on a running system, it is reserved for users assigned to the cisco-support task ID.

show user [group | tasks | all]

(EXEC mode)

Displays the username for the current logged-in user. Use this command to also display the groups and associated task IDs assigned to the account.

show version

(EXEC and administration EXEC modes)

Displays basic system information.

1 RP stands for Route Processor



Using the ping Command

Use the ping command to diagnose network connectivity. In EXEC mode, enter a hostname or an IP address as an argument to this command. In administration EXEC mode, you can use the fabric or the control Ethernet network (in a multishelf system) to ping other nodes.

The ping command sends an echo request packet to a destination, then awaits a reply. Ping output can help you evaluate path-to-destination reliability, delays over the path, and whether the destination can be reached or is functioning.

Each exclamation point (!) indicates receipt of a reply. A period (.) indicates the network server timed out while waiting for a reply. Other characters may appear in the ping output display, depending on the protocol type.

Examples

The following example shows a successful ping attempt:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# ping 10.233.233.233
 
   
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 10.233.233.233, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/2/7 ms
 
   

In the next example, an unsuccessful ping attempt is shown:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# ping 10.1.1.1
 
   
Mon May 31 23:53:30.820 DST
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 10.1.1.1, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/1/2 ms
 
   

Using the traceroute Command

Use the traceroute command in EXEC mode to discover the routes that packets take when traveling to their destination. Enter a hostname or an IP address as an argument to this command.

This command works by taking advantage of the error messages generated by routers when a datagram exceeds its time-to-live (TTL) value.

The traceroute command starts by sending probe datagrams with a TTL value of 1, causing the first router to discard the probe datagram and send back an error message. The traceroute command sends several probes at each TTL level and displays the round-trip time for each.

The traceroute command sends one probe at a time. Each outgoing packet may result in one or two error messages. A time exceeded error message indicates that an intermediate router has seen and discarded the probe. A destination unreachable error message indicates that the destination node has received the probe and discarded it because it could not deliver the packet. If the timer times out before a response comes in, the traceroute command prints an asterisk (*).

The traceroute command terminates when the destination responds, the maximum TTL is exceeded, or the user interrupts the trace with the escape sequence.

Examples

The following example shows how the route for an IP address appears:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# traceroute 10.233.233.233
 
   
Mon May 31 23:55:23.034 DST
 
   
Type escape sequence to abort.
Tracing the route to 10.233.233.233
 
   
 1  ce28 (172.29.52.1) 2 msec  1 msec  0 msec 
 2  172.24.114.17 0 msec  0 msec  0 msec 
 3  172.24.114.17 !A  *  !A 
 
   

Using debug Commands

Debug commands are used to diagnose and resolve network problems. Use debug commands to troubleshoot specific problems or during troubleshooting sessions.

Use debug commands to turn on or off debugging for a specific service or subsystem. When debugging is turned on for a service, a debug message is generated each time the debugging code section is entered.

The following sections provide information on debugging:

Displaying a List of Debug Features

Enabling Debugging for a Feature

Disabling Debugging for a Service

Displaying Debugging Status

Disabling Debugging for All Services Started at the Active Terminal Session

Disabling Debugging for All Services Started at All Terminal Sessions


Caution Debug commands can generate a large amount of output and can render the system unusable. Use the debug commands to troubleshoot specific problems or during specific troubleshooting sessions on systems that are not in production.

Displaying a List of Debug Features

To display a list of the available debug features, enter the debug mode and enter a ? for on-screen help. The set of debug mode features is different in EXEC and administration EXEC modes. In the following example, EXEC mode is the entry point to debug mode:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# debug
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(debug)# ?
	
  MgmtMultilink      MgmtMultilink controller debugging
  aaa                AAA Authentication, Authorization and Accounting
  access-list        Debug ethernet-services access-lists
  accounting         Turn on Accounting debug
  adjacency          platform AIB information
  afmon-ea           debug afmon-ea services
  afmon-lib          debug afmon client library specific function calls
  afmon-ma           Debug afmon-ma services
  aib                AIB information
  aipc-em            Debug aipc ethernet support
  alarm-location     Alarm Location library debugging
  alarm-logger       Turn on alarm debugging
  ancp               ANCP Debug Information
  ap                 Address Pool Debugs
  app                Address Pool Proxy Debugs
  app-obj            Debug app-obj services
  aps                Address Pool Proxy Debugs
  arm                IP Address Repository Manager
  arp                IP ARP transactions
  arp-gmp            ARP Global Management Process debugging
  async              async messaging information
  atm                ATM debugging
 --More-- 
 
   

In the next example, administration EXEC mode is the entry point to debug mode:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# admin
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(admin)# debug
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(admin-debug)# ?
 
   
caibist      CAI BIST debugging
  cctl         Chassis control driver process debug
  cetftp       Control ethernet TFTP (CE-TFTP) server process debug
  cih          Debug CAI CIH
  cpuctrl      Configure Cpuctrl debug settings
  describe     Describe a command without taking real actions
  diagnostic   Diagnostic debugging
  dsc          dsc debug: all, fsm, table, cfg, and api
  dumper       Admin Debug Dumper
  ethernet     Ethernet debug commands
  exit         Exit from this submode
  fabric       Fabric debugging
  fabricq      Debug Fabric Queue Manager
  fia          Debug the Fabric Interface ASIC (FIA) driver
  gsp          Admin Debug gsp
  i2c-ctrl     Debug the functionality of I2C Control
  ingressq     Debug Ingress Queue Manager
  install      Install debug information
  inv          Inventory manager process debug
  invd         Inventory debug: all, trap, dll mem
  invmgr       Inventory Manager client API interface debug
  no           Disable debugging functions
  obfl         OBFL related admin debugs
 --More-- 

Enabling Debugging for a Feature

To enable debugging for a feature, type enter the debug command in EXEC or administration EXEC mode and then enable the feature for debugging. For example:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# debug
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(debug)# aaa all
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(debug)# exit
 
   

You can also enter the complete command from EXEC mode, as shown in the following example:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# debug aaa all

Displaying Debugging Status

Enter the show debug command to display the debugging features enabled for your terminal session. The terminal session is labeled tty and represents your connection to the router through a specific port, which might be the console port, auxiliary port, or Management Ethernet interface. In the following example, the command display indicates that debugging is enabled for two features (AAA and ipv4 io icmp) from a terminal session on the console port of RP1:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show debug
 
   
####  debug flags set from tty 'con0_RP1_CPU0'  ####
aaa all flag is ON
ipv4 io icmp flag is ON
 
   
RP/0/0/CPU0:router# no debug aaa all
RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show debug
 
   
####  debug flags set from tty 'con0_RP1_CPU0'  ####
ipv4 io icmp flag is ON
 
   

On a Cisco XR 12000 Series Router, the slot number of the tty ID is 0 or 1 instead of RP0 or RP1.

Enter the show debug conditions command to display the conditional debugging status. For example:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show debug conditions
 
   
####  debug conditions set from tty 'con0_RP1_CPU0'  ####
interface  condition is ON for interface 'POS0/2/0/1'

Disabling Debugging for a Service

Use the no form of the debug command or the undebug command to turn off debugging for a service or subsystem.

In the following example, the no debug command disables debugging for the AAA feature:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# no debug aaa all
RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show debug
 
   
####  debug flags set from tty 'con0_RP1_CPU0'  ####
ipv4 io icmp flag is ON
 
   

You can also turn off debugging from the undebug mode, as shown in the following example:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# undebug
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(undebug)# aaa all
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(undebug)# exit

Disabling Debugging for All Services Started at the Active Terminal Session

Use the undebug all or no debug all command to turn off all debugging started by the active terminal session. For example, if you enter either of these commands while connected to the router through the console port on the active RP, all debug sessions started from that console port are disabled. In the following example, debugging for all services is disabled and then verified:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# undebug all
RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show debug
 
   
No matching debug flags set

Disabling Debugging for All Services Started at All Terminal Sessions

Use the undebug all all-tty command to turn off debugging for all services that have been started from all terminal sessions. For example if you enter this command while connected to the router through the console port on the active RP, all debug sessions started from all ports are disabled. In the following example, debugging for all services and ports is disabled and then verified:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# undebug all all-tty
RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show debug
 
   
No matching debug flags set

Configuration Error Messages

The following sections contain information on configuration error messages:

Configuration Failures During a Commit Operation

Configuration Errors at Startup

Configuration Failures During a Commit Operation

A target configuration is added to the running configuration of a router when the commit command is entered. During this operation, the changes are automatically verified by the other components in the system. If successful, the configuration becomes part of the running configuration. If some configuration items fail, an error message is returned.

To display the configuration items that failed and see the cause of each failure, enter the show configuration failed command.


Note The show configuration failed command can be entered in either the EXEC mode or any configuration mode. In any mode, the configuration failures from the most recent commit operation are displayed.


In the following example, a configuration error occurs when an invalid commit operation is attempted:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config)# taskgroup bgp
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-tg)# description this is an example of an invalid taskgroup
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-tg)# commit

% Failed to commit one or more configuration items. Please use 'show configuration failed' 
to view the errors
 
   

To display the configuration items that failed, including a description of the error, enter the show configuration failed command:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-tg)# show configuration failed
 
   
!! CONFIGURATION FAILED DUE TO SEMANTIC ERRORS
taskgroup bgp
!!% Usergroup/Taskgroup names cannot be taskid names
 
   

You can also display the failed configuration items without the error description by entering the show configuration failed noerror command:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-tg)# show configuration failed noerror
 
   
!! CONFIGURATION FAILED DUE TO SEMANTIC ERRORS
taskgroup bgp
 
   

Configuration Errors at Startup

Configuration errors that occurred during system startup can be displayed with the show configuration failed startup command. For example:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show configuration failed startup
 
   
!! CONFIGURATION FAILED DUE TO SYNTAX ERRORS
ntp
xml agent corba
http server

Memory Warnings in Configuration Sessions

The Cisco IOS XR software automatically monitors and manages the system resources in a router. Under normal operating conditions, memory problems should not occur.

When a low-memory issue does occur, it is often in the form of a low-memory warning during a configuration session. Low-memory conditions can be caused by multiple, large configurations being added to the router at a single time. Users can remove the source of a problem by removing configurations.

The following sections describe the commands used to display memory usage in a router and what to do if a low-memory warning appears:

Understanding Low-Memory Warnings in Configuration Sessions

Displaying System Memory Information

Removing Configurations to Resolve Low-Memory Warnings

Contacting TAC for Additional Assistance

Understanding Low-Memory Warnings in Configuration Sessions

The Cisco IOS XR software monitors memory usage in the router. If system memory becomes low, an error message appears when you attempt to enter configuration mode.

An "out-of-memory" error message appears during one of the following situations:

When a user attempts to enter configuration mode.

During a configuration session when the memory shortage occurs.

When a user attempts to load a target configuration from a large file that results in a memory shortage.

During a commit operation that results in the low-memory warning message. The commit operation is denied and only lr-root users can perform commit operations to remove configurations.


Caution Never ignore a low-memory warning. These warnings indicate a memory state that could affect system operations if not addressed.

"WARNING! MEMORY IS IN MINOR STATE"

If the system memory begins to run low, the following minor memory warning appears when you enter a new configuration mode:

WARNING! MEMORY IS IN MINOR STATE
 
   

Although users are allowed to enter configuration mode, they should immediately reduce memory usage using the tools described in the "Removing Configurations to Resolve Low-Memory Warnings" section.

Failure to take action can result in a worsening situation and eventual impact to router operations.

"ERROR! MEMORY IS IN SEVERE (or CRITICAL) STATE"

When the memory is in a severe or critical state, router operation and performance is likely to be affected. Regular users are not allowed to enter configuration mode. Only lr-root owners can enter configuration mode to free memory by removing configurations.

In some situations, the commit command is not allowed. Users with lr-root access can still use the commit force command to apply configurations that reduce memory usage. Reducing memory usage normally means removing configurations, but a user can also add configurations that reduce memory usage. For example, configuring the shutdown command on an interface could cause numerous routes to be purged from Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), the Routing Information Base (RIB), and Forwarding Information Base (FIB) configurations.


Caution The commit force command should be used only to apply configurations that reduce memory usage. Adding configurations that increase memory usage could result in serious loss of router operation.

Displaying System Memory Information

To display a high level summary of system memory, enter the show memory summary command. Table 23 describes the meaning of each heading.

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show memory summary
 
   
Tue Jun  1 00:02:03.826 DST
Physical Memory: 4096M total (2020M available)
 Application Memory : 3818M (2020M available)
 Image: 50M (bootram: 50M)
 Reserved: 226M, IOMem: 2028M, flashfsys: 0
 Total shared window: 32M
RP/0/0/CPU0:router#
 
   

To display general memory usage for the device as a whole and by process, enter the show memory command. Table 23 describes the meaning of each heading.

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show memory
 
   
Tue Jun  1 00:05:44.927 DST
Physical Memory: 4096M total (2020M available)
 Application Memory : 3818M (2020M available)
 Image: 50M (bootram: 50M)
 Reserved: 226M, IOMem: 2028M, flashfsys: 0
 Shared window tunl_gre: 39K
 Shared window statsd_db: 67K
 Shared window l2fib: 323K
 Shared window li: 3K
 Shared window ipv4_fib: 1M
 Shared window ifc-protomax: 1M
 Shared window ifc-mpls: 7M
 Shared window ifc-ipv6: 6M
 Shared window ifc-ipv4: 10M
 Shared window mfwdv6: 449K
 Shared window mfwd_info: 733K
 Shared window infra_statsd: 3K
 Shared window im_rd: 1M
 Shared window im_db: 1M
 Shared window infra_ital: 67K
 Shared window rspp_ma: 3K
 Shared window aib: 623K
 Shared window im_rules: 293K
 Shared window ees_fsdb_svr: 720K
 --More-- 
 
   

Table 23 Heading Descriptions for show memory Command Output

Heading
Description

Physical Memory

Amount of physical memory installed on the device.

Application Memory

Memory available for the system to use (total memory minus image size, reserved, IOMem, and flashfsys).

Image

Size of the bootable image.

Reserved

Reserved for packet memory.

IOMem

IO memory—Currently used as a backup for packet memory.

flashfsys

Flash file system memory.

Process and JID

Process and job ID.

Address

Starting address in memory.

Bytes

Size of memory block.

What

Block description.


Removing Configurations to Resolve Low-Memory Warnings

To resolve most low-memory problems, you should remove the configurations from the router that are consuming the most memory. Often, memory problems occur when a large new configuration is added to the system. The following sections provide information to resolve low-memory issues:

Clearing a Target Configuration

Removing Committed Configurations to Free System Memory

Rolling Back to a Previously Committed Configuration

Clearing Configuration Sessions

Clearing a Target Configuration

A low-memory warning can occur when a large configuration file is loaded into a target configuration session. To remove the target configuration, enter the clear command to discard the changes. For example:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config)# clear
 
   

Caution Committing a target configuration that has caused a low-memory warning can make the system unstable. Clearing a target configuration is a preventive measure to not let the system go into a worse memory state due to additional configuration. In addition, all other active configuration sessions can be closed to minimize the churn.

Removing Committed Configurations to Free System Memory

You can reduce memory usage by removing configurations from the router, as shown in the following procedure:


Step 1 Enter the show memory summary command in EXEC mode to display the overall system memory:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show memory summary
 
   
Tue Jun  1 00:06:34.583 DST
Physical Memory: 4096M total (2020M available)
 Application Memory : 3818M (2020M available)
 Image: 50M (bootram: 50M)
 Reserved: 226M, IOMem: 2028M, flashfsys: 0
 Total shared window: 32M
 
   

Step 2 Enter the show configuration commit list command in EXEC or administration EXEC mode to list the configurations you can remove.


Note To display the details of a configuration, enter the show configuration commit changes command followed by a commitID number. To display additional configuration history information, enter the show configuration history ? command, and use the command options to display additional information.


Step 3 Enter the show running-config command to display the current configuration.

Step 4 Remove configurations as needed to free memory.


For more information, see Managing Configuration History and Rollback.

Rolling Back to a Previously Committed Configuration

You can roll back the system to a previous committed configuration, as described in Managing Configuration History and Rollback.

Clearing Configuration Sessions

Active configuration sessions and their associated target configurations can consume system memory. Users with the appropriate access privileges can display the open configuration sessions of other users and terminate those sessions, if necessary (see Table 24).

Table 24 Session Commands

Command
Description

show configuration sessions

Displays the active configuration sessions.

clear configuration sessions session-id

Clears a configuration session.


In the following example, the open configuration sessions are displayed with the show configuration sessions command. The clear configuration sessions command is then used to clear a configuration session.

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show configuration sessions
 
   
Session                     Line        User      Date                      Lock
00000211-002c409b-00000000  con0_RP1_CPU0  UNKNOWN   Mon Feb  2 01:02:09 2004
 
   
RP/0/0/CPU0:router# clear configuration sessions 00000211-002c409b-00000000
 
   
session ID '00000211-002cb09b-00000000' terminated

Contacting TAC for Additional Assistance

If you remove configurations and the low-memory condition remains, you may need to contact TAC for additional assistance. See the "Additional Sources of Information" section.

Interfaces Not Coming Up

The router interfaces are directly used in processing network traffic, so their status information is crucial to understanding how the device is functioning. This section contains information on the EXEC mode commands used to verify that the router interfaces are operational. The basic commands used in this process are summarized in Table 25.

Table 25 show interface Commands 

Command
Description

show interfaces

Displays detailed information about all interfaces installed or configured on the device, whether or not they are operational.

show interfaces type instance

Specifies a particular interface, rather than displaying information for all interfaces, as in the following example:

show interface POS0/1/0/0

show ipv4 interface

show ipv6 interface

Displays basic, IP-related information for all available interfaces.

show ipv4 interface brief

show ipv6 interface brief

Quickly displays the most critical information about the interfaces, including the interface status (up or down) and the protocol status.


Verifying the System Interfaces

Perform the following steps to verify the system interfaces.


Step 1 Enter the show platform command in administration EXEC to verify that all nodes are in the "IOS XR RUN" state:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router(admin)# show platform
 
   
 
   
 
   
Mon May 31 23:51:18.181 DST
Node            Type            PLIM            State           Config State
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
0/0/CPU0        PRP(Active)     N/A             IOS XR RUN      PWR,NSHUT,MON
0/1/CPU0        L3 Service Eng  N/A             Admin Down      PWR,SHUT,MON
0/2/CPU0        L3LC Eng 3      OC3-ATM-4       IOS XR RUN      PWR,NSHUT,MON
0/3/CPU0        L3LC Eng 5+     Jacket Card     IOS XR RUN      PWR,NSHUT,MON
0/3/1           SPA             SPA-IPSEC-2G-2  READY           PWR,NSHUT
0/3/2           SPA             SPA-1XCHSTM1/OC READY           PWR,NSHUT
0/4/CPU0        L3LC Eng 5      Jacket Card     IOS XR RUN      PWR,NSHUT,MON
0/4/0           SPA             SPA-5X1GE       READY           PWR,NSHUT
0/17/CPU0       CSC6(P)         N/A             PWD             PWR,NSHUT,MON
0/18/CPU0       SFC6            N/A             PWD             PWR,NSHUT,MON
0/19/CPU0       SFC6            N/A             PWD             PWR,NSHUT,MON
0/20/CPU0       SFC6            N/A             PWD             PWR,NSHUT,MON
0/24/CPU0       ALARM6          N/A             PWD             PWR,NSHUT,MON
0/25/CPU0       ALARM6          N/A             PWD             PWR,NSHUT,MON
0/28/CPU0       GSR6-BLOWER     N/A             PWD             PWR,NSHUT,MON

Note When the show platform command is entered in EXEC mode, the display shows only those nodes assigned to the SDR.


Step 2 Enter the show ipv4 interface brief command to verify the IP address configuration and protocol status:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show ipv4 interface brief
 
   
Interface                      IP-Address      Status                Protocol
POS0/1/0/0                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/1                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/2                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/3                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/4                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/5                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/6                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/7                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/8                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/9                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/10                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/11                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/12                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/13                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/14                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/15                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/2/0/0                     10.10.1.101     Down                  Down
POS0/2/0/1                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/2/0/2                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/2/0/3                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
TenGigE0/3/0/0                 unassigned      Shutdown              Down
TenGigE0/3/0/2                 unassigned      Shutdown              Down
MgmtEth0/RP0/CPU0/0            unassigned      Shutdown              Down
 
   

Step 3 Configure the interfaces, as shown in the following examples.


Note You must enter the commit command to make the new configuration part of the active running configuration. If you end the configuration session, you are automatically prompted to commit the changes, as shown in the second example:


RP/0/0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config)# interface pos0/2/0/1
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 10.1.1.1 255.0.0.0
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no shutdown
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end
RP/0/0/CPU0:router#
 
   
RP/0/0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config)# interface pos0/2/0/2
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 10.1.1.2 255.255.0.0
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no shutdown
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end
Uncommitted changes found, commit them? [yes]: yes
RP/0/0/CPU0:router#
 
   

Step 4 Enter the show ipv4 interface brief command to verify that the interfaces are "Up" in the Status column:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show ipv4 interface brief
 
   
Interface                      IP-Address      Status                Protocol
POS0/1/0/0                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/1                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/2                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/3                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/4                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/5                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/6                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/7                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/8                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/9                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/10                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/11                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/12                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/13                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/14                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/15                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/2/0/0                     10.10.1.101     Up                    Up
POS0/2/0/1                     10.1.1.1        Up                    Up
POS0/2/0/3                     10.1.1.2        Shutdown              Down
POS0/2/0/3                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
TenGigE0/3/0/0                 unassigned      Shutdown              Down
TenGigE0/3/0/2                 unassigned      Shutdown              Down
MgmtEth0/RP0/CPU0/0            unassigned      Shutdown              Down
 
   

Step 5 If the interface is in the "Shutdown/Down" state, as shown in the previous example, perform the following tasks:

a. Verify that the status of the interface is "Shutdown":

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show running-config interface POS0/2/0/3
 
   
interface pos0/2/0/3
 shutdown
 keepalive disable
!
 
   

b. Bring the interface up with the following commands:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config)# controller SONET 0/2/0/3
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-sonet)# no shutdown
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-sonet)# commit
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-sonet)# exit
 
   
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config)# interface pos 0/2/0/3
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no shutdown
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit
RP/0/0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end
RP/0/0/CPU0:router#
 
   

Step 6 If the interface state is still displayed as "Down", verify that the physical cable connections are correctly installed. The following message indicates that the interface has either a bad connection or no connection:

LC/0/0/1:Sep 29 15:31:12.921 : plim_4p_oc192[183]: %SONET-4-
ALARM : SONET0_1_1_0: SLOS  
 
   

Step 7 Verify again that the interface is up by entering the show ipv4 interface brief command:

RP/0/0/CPU0:router# show ipv4 interface brief
 
   
Interface                      IP-Address      Status                Protocol
POS0/1/0/0                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/1                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/2                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/3                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/4                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/5                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/6                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/7                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/8                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/9                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/10                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/11                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/12                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/13                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/14                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/1/0/15                    unassigned      Shutdown              Down
POS0/2/0/0                     10.10.1.101     Up                    Up
POS0/2/0/1                     10.1.1.1        Up                    Up
POS0/2/0/2                     10.1.1.2        Up                    Up
POS0/2/0/3                     unassigned      Shutdown              Down
TenGigE0/3/0/0                 unassigned      Shutdown              Down
TenGigE0/3/0/2                 unassigned      Shutdown              Down
MgmtEth0/RP0/CPU0/0            unassigned      Shutdown              Down
 
   

Step 8 Repeat these steps for every interface, until every interface shows both Status and Protocol as "Up."