Cisco IOS XR System Management Configuration Guide for the Cisco CRS Router, Release 5.1.x
Configuring Flexible Command Line Interface Configuration Groups
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Configuring Flexible Command Line Interface Configuration Groups

Contents

Configuring Flexible Command Line Interface Configuration Groups

This module describes how to configure and use flexible command line interface (CLI) configuration groups.

Table 1 Feature History for Configuring Flexible CLI Configuration Groups

Release

Modification

Release 4.3.1

Flexible CLI configuration groups were introduced.

This module contains these topics:

Information About Flexible CLI Configuration Groups

Flexible command line interface (CLI) configuration groups provide the ability to minimize repetitive configurations by defining a series of configuration statements in a configuration group, and then applying this group to multiple hierarchical levels in the router configuration tree.

Flexible CLI configuration groups utilize regular expressions that are checked for a match at multiple submodes of the configuration tree based on where the group is applied within the hierarchy. If a match is found at a configuration submode, the corresponding configuration defined in the group is inherited within the matched submode.

Flexible CLI configuration groups also provide an auto-inheritance feature. Auto-inheritance means that any change done to a CLI configuration group is automatically applied to the configuration in any matched submodes that have an apply-group at that hierarchical level. This allows you to make a configuration change or addition once, and have it applied automatically in multiple locations, depending on where you have applied the flexible CLI configuration group.

Flexible Configuration Restrictions

Note these restrictions while using flexible configuration groups:

  • Flexible CLI configuration groups are not supported in administration configurations and corresponding apply-groups are not supported in administration configurations.
  • Use of preconfigured interfaces in configuration groups is not supported.
  • Downgrading from an image that supports configuration groups to an image that does not support them is not supported.
  • Access lists, quality of service and route policy configurations do not support the use of configuration groups. Configurations such as these are not valid:
    group g-not-supported
     ipv4 access-list ...
     !
     ipv6 access-list ...
     !
     ethernet-service access-list ...
     !
     class-map ...
     !
     policy-map ...
     !
     route-policy ...
     !
    end-group
    
    You can, however, reference such configurations, as shown in this example:
    group g-reference-ok
     router bgp 6500
      neighbor 7::7
       remote-as 65000
       bfd fast-detect
       update-source Loopback300
       graceful-restart disable
       address-family ipv6 unicast
        route-policy test1 in
        route-policy test2 out
        soft-reconfiguration inbound always
       !
      !
     !
     interface Bundle-Ether1005
       bandwidth 10000000
       mtu 9188
       service-policy output input_1                                                  
       load-interval 30
     !
    end-group
      
  • Some regular expressions are not supported within groups. For example, ‘?’, ‘|’ and ‘$,’ are not supported within groups. Also some characters such as /d and /w are not supported.
    • The choice operator “|” to express multiple match expressions within a regular expression is not supported. For example, these expressions are not supported: Gig.*|Gig.*\..*—To match on either Gigabit Ethernet main interfaces or Gigabit Ethernet sub-interfaces. Gig.*0/0/0/[1-5]|Gig.*0/0/0/[10-20]—To match on either Gig.*0/0/0/[1-5] or Gig.*0/0/0/[10-20]. 'TenGigE.*|POS.*—To match on either TenGigE.* or POS.* .
  • Commands that require a node identifier for the location keyword are not supported. For example, this configuration is not supported:
    lpts pifib hardware police location 0/0/CPU0
  • Overlapping regular expressions within a configuration group for the same configuration are not supported. For example:
    group G-INTERFACE
    interface 'gig.*a.*'
      mtu 1500
    !
    interface 'gig.*e.* '
      mtu 2000
    !
    end-group
    
    interface gigabitethernet0/4/1/0
      apply-group G-INTERFACE
      
    This configuration is not permitted because it cannot be determined whether the interface gigabitethernet0/4/1/0 configuration inherits mtu 1500 or mtu 2000. Both expressions in the configuration group match gigabitethernet0/4/1/0.
  • Up to eight configuration groups are permitted on one apply-group command.

Configuring a Configuration Group

A configuration group includes a series of configuration statements that can be used in multiple hierarchical levels in the router configuration tree. By using regular expressions in a configuration group, you can create generic commands that can be applied in multiple instances.

Use this task to create and use a configuration group.


Note


Flexible CLI configurations are not available through the XML interface.


SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    configure

    2.    group group-name

    3.    Enter configuration commands, starting from global configuration mode. Use regular expressions for interface names and other variable instances.

    4.    end-group

    5.    apply-group


DETAILED STEPS
     Command or ActionPurpose
    Step 1 configure


    Example:
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure
     

    Enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 2group group-name


    Example:
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# group g-interf
     

    Specifies a name for a configuration group and enters group configuration mode to define the group.The group-name argument can have up to 32 characters and cannot contain any special characters. For information regarding special characters, refer to the Understanding Regular Expressions, Special Characters, and Patterns module in the Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide for the Cisco CRS Router.

     
    Step 3Enter configuration commands, starting from global configuration mode. Use regular expressions for interface names and other variable instances.

    Example:
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# group g-interf
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# interface 'GigabitEthernet.*'
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-if)# mtu 1500
      
     

    Specifies the configuration statements that you want included in this configuration group.

    For more information regarding the use of regular expressions, see Regular Expressions in Configuration Groups. This example is applicable to all Gigabit Ethernet interfaces.

     
    Step 4end-group


    Example:
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-if)# end-group
     

    Completes the configuration of a configuration group and exits to global configuration mode.

     
    Step 5apply-group


    Example:
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0/0
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# apply-group g-interf
      
     

    Adds the configuration of the configuration group into the router configuration applicable at the location that the group is applied. Groups can be applied in multiple locations, and their effect depends on the location and context.

    The MTU value from the group g-interf is applied to the interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0/0. If this group is applied in global configuration mode, the MTU value is inherited by all Gigabit Ethernet interfaces that do not have an MTU value configured.

     

    Simple Configuration Group: Example

    This example shows how to use configuration groups to add a global configuration to the system:

    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# group g-logging
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# logging trap notifications
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# logging console debugging
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# logging monitor debugging
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# logging buffered 10000000
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# end-group
    
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# apply-group g-logging
      

    When this configuration is committed, all commands contained in the g-logging configuration group are committed.

    Configuration Group Applied to Different Places: Example

    Configuration groups can be applied to different places, and their effect depends on the context within which they are applied. Consider this configuration group:

    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# group g-interfaces
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# interface 'FastEthernet.*'
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-if)# mtu 1500
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-if)# exit
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# interface 'GigabitEthernet.*'
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-if)# mtu 1000
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-if)# exit
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# interface 'POS.*'
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-if)# mtu 2000
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-if)# end-group
      
    This group can be applied to Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet or POS interfaces, and in each instance the applicable MTU is applied. For instance, in this example, the Gigabit Ethernet interface is configured to have an MTU of 1000:
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/2/0/0
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# apply-group g-interfaces
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 2.2.2.2 255.255.255.0
      

    In this example, the Fast Ethernet interface is configured to have an MTU of 1500:

    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface FastEthernet0/2/0/0
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# apply-group g-interfaces
    RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 3.3.3.3 255.255.255.0
      

    The same configuration group is used in both cases, but only the applicable configuration statements are used.

    Verifying the Configuration of Configuration Groups

    Use this task to verify the router configuration using configuration groups:

    SUMMARY STEPS

      1.    show running-config group group-name

      2.    show running-config

      3.    show running-config inheritance

      4.    show running-config inheritance config-command


    DETAILED STEPS
       Command or ActionPurpose
      Step 1show running-config group group-name


      Example:
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running-config group
       
      group g-int-ge
       interface 'GigabitEthernet.*'
        mtu 1000
        negotiation auto
       !
      end-group
       
       

      Displays the contents of a specific or all configured configuration groups.

       
      Step 2show running-config


      Example:
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running-config
      
      group G-INTERFACE-MTU
       interface ‘POS.*’
        mtu 1500
       !
      end-group
      
      interface POS0/4/1/0 
       apply-group G-INTERFACE-MTU
      !
      interface POS0/4/1/1 
       apply-group G-INTERFACE-MTU
       mtu 2000
      !
        
       

      Displays the running configuration. Any applied groups are displayed. There is no indication as to whether these configuration groups affect the actual configuration or not. In this example, although the group G-INTERFACE-MTU is applied to POS0/4/1/1, the configured MTU value is 2000 and not 1500. This happens if the command mtu 2000 is configured directly on the interface. An actual configuration overrides a configuration group configuration if they are the same.

       
      Step 3show running-config inheritance


      Example:
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running-config inheritance
      .
      .
      group G-INTERFACE-MTU
       interface ‘POS.*’
        mtu 1500
       !
      end-group
      .
      .
      interface POS0/4/1/0 
       ## Inherited from group G-INTERFACE-MTU
       mtu 1500
      !
      interface POS0/4/1/1
       mtu 2000
      !
      .
      .
      
       

      Displays the inherited configuration where ever a configuration group has been applied.

       
      Step 4show running-config inheritance config-command


      Example:
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running-config inheritance interface pos0/4/1/0
      
      interface POS0/4/1/0 
       ## Inherited from group G-INTERFACE-MTU
       mtu 1500
        
       

      Displays the inherited configuration for a specific configuration command.

       

      Regular Expressions in Configuration Groups

      Regular expressions are used in configuration groups to make them widely applicable. Portable Operating System Interface for UNIX (POSIX) 1003.2 regular expressions are supported in the names of configuration statements. Single quotes must be used to delimit a regular expression.

      For general information regarding regular expressions, refer to the Understanding Regular Expressions, Special Characters, and Patterns module in the Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide for the Cisco CRS Router.


      Note


      Not all POSIX regular expressions are supported. Refer to Flexible Configuration Restrictions for more information.


      Regular Expressions for Interface Identifiers

      Configuration groups do not accept exact interface identifiers. You must use a regular expression to identify a group of interfaces that are applicable to the configuration group. The regular expression ‘.*’ is not allowed. You must begin the regular expression for an interface identifier with an unambiguous word, followed by the regular expression. For example, to configure Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, use the regular expression 'GigabitEthernet.*'.

      To display a list of available interface types for your router configuration, enter interface ? at the configuration group prompt:

      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# interface ?
      
        ATM              'RegExp': ATM Network Interface(s)
        BVI              'RegExp': Bridge-Group Virtual Interface
        Bundle-Ether     'RegExp': Aggregated Ethernet interface(s)
        Bundle-POS       'RegExp': Aggregated POS interface(s)
        GigabitEthernet  'RegExp': GigabitEthernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s)
        IMA              'RegExp': ATM Network Interface(s)
        Loopback         'RegExp': Loopback interface(s)
        MgmtEth          'RegExp': Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s)
        Multilink        'RegExp': Multilink network interface(s)
        Null             'RegExp': Null interface
        POS              'RegExp': Packet over SONET/SDH network interface(s)
        PW-Ether         'RegExp': PWHE Ethernet Interface
        PW-IW            'RegExp': PWHE VC11 IP Interworking Interface
        Serial           'RegExp': Serial network interface(s)
        tunnel-ip        'RegExp': GRE/IPinIP Tunnel Interface(s)
        tunnel-mte       'RegExp': MPLS Traffic Engineering P2MP Tunnel interface(s)
        tunnel-te        'RegExp': MPLS Traffic Engineering Tunnel interface(s)
        tunnel-tp        'RegExp': MPLS Transport Protocol Tunnel interface
        

      Note


      Although you are required to enter only enough characters for the interface type to be unique, it is recommended that you enter the entire phrase. All interface types used in regular expressions are case-sensitive.


      To specify a subinterface, prefix the expression with the characters \. (backslash period). For example, use interface 'GigabitEthernet.*\..*' to configure all Gigabit Ethernet subinterfaces.

      You can specify Layer 2 transport interfaces or point-to-point interfaces as shown in these examples:
      group g-l2t
        interface 'Gi.*\..*' l2transport 
      .
      .
      end-group
      group g-ptp
        interface 'Gi.*\..*' point-to-point 
      .
      .
      end-group
        

      Regular Expressions for an OSPF Configuration

      Exact router process names and OSPF areas cannot be used. You must use a regular expression to specify a process name or group of OSPF areas. To specify that the OSFP area can be either a scalar value or an IP address, use the regular expression ‘.*’, as in this example:
      group g-ospf
      router ospf '.*' 
      area '.*'
      mtu-ignore enable
      !
      !
      end-group
        
      To specify that the OSPF area must be an IP address, use the expression '\.' as in this example:
      group g-ospf-ipaddress
      router ospf '.*\..*\..*\..*'
      area '.*'
      passive enable 
      !
      !
       end-group
        
      To specify that the OSPF area must be a scalar value, use the expression '1.*', as in this example:
      group g-ospf-match-number
      router ospf '.*'
      area '1.*'
      passive enable
      !
      !
      end-group
        

      Regular Expressions for a BGP AS

      Exact BGP AS values cannot be used in configuration groups. Use a regular expression to specify either AS plain format, or AS dot format as in the format X.Y. To match AS plain format instances, use a simple regular expression. To match AS dot format instances, use two regular expressions separated by a dot, as shown in this example:

      group g-bgp
      router bgp '*'.'*' 
      address-family ipv4 unicast
      !
      !
      end-group 
        

      Regular Expressions for ANCP

      Exact Access Node Control Protocol (ANCP) sender-name identifiers cannot be used in configuration groups. Because the sender name argument can be either an IP address or a MAC address, you must specify in the regular expression which one is being used. Specify an IP address as '.*\..*\..*\..*'; specify a MAC address as '.*\..*\..*'.

      Resolving to a Uniform Type

      Regular expressions must resolve to a uniform type. This is an example of an illegal regular expression:

      group g-invalid
       interface ‘.*’
        bundle port-priority 10
       !
      interface ‘.*Ethernet.*’
        bundle port-priority 10
       !
      end-group
        

      In this example, the bundle command is supported for interface type 'GigabitEthernet' but not for interface type ‘FastEthernet’. The regular expressions ‘.*’ and ‘.*Ethernet.*’ match both GigabitEthernet and FastEthernet types. Because the bundle command is not applicable to both these interface types, they do not resolve to a uniform type and therefore the system does not allow this configuration.


      Note


      If the system cannot determine from the regular expression what the configuration should be, the expression is not considered valid.



      Note


      The regular expression ‘.*’ is not allowed when referring to an interface identifier. You must begin the regular expression for an interface identifier with an unambiguous word, followed by the regular expression. Refer to Regular Expressions for Interface Identifiers in this section for more information.


      Configuration Examples Using Regular Expressions

      Configuration Group with Regular Expression: Example

      This example shows the definition of a configuration group for configuring Gigabit Ethernet interfaces with ISIS routing parameters, using regular expressions for the exact interface:

      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# group g-isis-gige
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# router isis '.*'
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-isis)# interface 'GigabitEthernet.*'
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-isis-if)# lsp-interval 20
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-isis-if)# hello-interval 40
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-isis-if)# address-family ipv4 unicast
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-isis-if-af)# metric 10
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-isis-if-af)# end-group
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)#
        

      To illustrate the use of this configuration group, assume that you want to configure these Gigabit Ethernet interfaces with the ISIS routing parameters:

      router isis green
       interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/0
        lsp-interval 20
        hello-interval 40
        address-family ipv4 unicast
         metric 10
        !
       !
       interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/1
        lsp-interval 20
        hello-interval 40
        address-family ipv4 unicast
         metric 10
        !
       !
       interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/2
        lsp-interval 20
        hello-interval 40
        address-family ipv4 unicast
         metric 10
        !
       !
       interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/3
        lsp-interval 20
        hello-interval 40
        address-family ipv4 unicast
         metric 10
        !
       !
      !
        
      There are three possible ways to use the configuration group to configure these interfaces. The first is by applying the group within the interface configuration, as shown here:
      router isis green
       interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/0
        apply-group g-isis-gige
        !
       !
       interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/1
        apply-group g-isis-gige
        ! 
       ! 
       interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/2
        apply-group g-isis-gige
        !
       !
       interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/3 
        apply-group g-isis-gige
        !
       !
        
      In this situation, only the interfaces to which you apply the configuration group inherit the configuration.
      The second way to configure these interfaces using the configuration group is to apply the configuration group within the router isis configuration, as shown here:
      router isis green
       apply-group g-isis-gige
       interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/0
       !
       interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/1
       !
       interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/2
       !
       interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/3
       !
      !
        
      In this way, any other Gigabit Ethernet interfaces that you configure in the ISIS green configuration also inherit these configurations.
      The third way to configure these interfaces using the configuration group is to apply the group at the global level as shown here:
      apply-group g-isis-gige
      router isis green
       interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/0
       !
       interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/1
       !
       interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/2
       !
       interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/3
       !
      !
        
      In this example, the configuration of the group is applied to all Gigabit Ethernet interfaces configured for ISIS.

      Configuration Group Inheritance with Regular Expressions: Example

      Local Configuration Has Precedence Over Configuration Group

      An explicit configuration takes precedence over a configuration applied from a configuration group. For example, assume that this configuration is running on the router:

      router ospf 100
       packet-size 1000
      !
         

      You configure this configuration group, apply it, and commit it to the configuration.

      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# group g-ospf
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# router ospf '.*'
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-ospf)# nsf cisco
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-ospf)# packet-size 3000
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-ospf)# end-group
      
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# apply-group g-ospf
        

      The result is effectively this configuration:

      router ospf 100
       packet-size 1000
       nsf cisco
        

      Note that packet-size 3000 is not inherited from the configuration group because the explicit local configuration has precedence.

      The configuration in the configuration group must match the configuration on the router to be inherited. If the configuration does not match, it is not inherited. For example, assume that this configuration is running on the router:

      router ospf 100
       auto-cost disable
      !
        

      You configure this configuration and commit it to the configuration.

      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# group g-ospf
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# router ospf '.*'
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-ospf)# area '.*'
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-ospf-ar)# packet-size 2000
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-ospf)# end-group
        
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# apply-group g-ospf
        
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# router ospf 200
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-ospf)# area 1
        

      The result is effectively this configuration:

      router ospf 100
        auto-cost disable
      
      router ospf 200
        area 1
        packet-size 2000 
        

      The packet size is inherited by the ospf 200 configuration, but not by the ospf 100 configuration because the area is not configured.

      Layer 2 Transport Configuration Group: Example

      This example shows how to configure and apply a configuration group with Layer 2 transport subinterfaces:

      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# group g-l2trans-if
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# interface 'TenGigE.*\..*' l2transport
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# mtu 1514
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# end-group 
      
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface TenGigE0/0/0/0.1 l2transport
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# apply-group g-l2trans-if
         

      When this configuration is committed, the Ten Gigabit Ethernet interface 0/0/0/0.1 inherits the 1514 MTU value. This is the output displayed from the show running-config inheritence command for the Ten Gigabit Ethernet interface:

      
      interface TenGigE0/0/0/0.1 l2transport
       ## Inherited from group g-l2trans-if
       mtu 1514
      !

      Configuration Group Precedence: Example

      When similar configuration statements are contained in multiple configuration groups, groups applied in inner configuration modes take precedence over groups applied in outer modes. This example shows two configuration groups that configure different cost values for OSPF.

      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# group g-ospf2
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# router ospf '.*'
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-ospf)# area '.*'
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-ospf-ar)# cost 2
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-ospf-ar)# end-group
      
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# group g-ospf100
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# router ospf '.*'
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-ospf)# area '.*'
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-ospf-ar)# cost 100
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-ospf-ar)# end-group
        

      If these configuration groups are applied as follows, the cost 2 specified in g-ospf2 is inherited by OSPF area 0 because the group is applied in a more inner configuration mode. In this case, the configuration in group g-ospf100 is ignored.

      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# router ospf 0
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-ospf)# apply-group g-ospf100
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-ospf)# area 0
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-ospf-ar)# apply-group g-ospf2
        

      Changes to Configuration Group are Automatically Inherited: Example

      When you make changes to a configuration group that is committed and applied to your router configuration, the changes are automatically inherited by the router configuration. For example, assume that this configuration is committed:

      group g-interface-mtu
       interface ‘POS.*’
        mtu 1500
       !
      end-group
      
      interface POS0/4/1/0 
       apply-group g-interface-mtu
      !
        

      Now you change the configuration group as in this example:

      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# group g-interface-mtu
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP)# interface 'POS.*'
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-if)# mtu 2000
      RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-GRP-if)# end-group
        

      When this configuration group is committed, the MTU configuration for interface POS0/4/1/0 is automatically updated to 2000.

      Configuration Examples for Flexible CLI Configuration

      Basic Flexible CLI Configuration: Example

      This example shows that the Media Access Control (MAC) accounting configuration from the gd21 configuration group is applied to all Gigabit Ethernet interfaces in slot 2, ports 1 to 9.

      1. Configure the configuration group that configures MAC accounting:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running group gd21
         
        group gd21
        interface 'GigabitEthernet0/0/0/2[1-9]'
        description general interface inheritance check
        load-interval 30
        mac-accounting ingress
        mac-accounting egress
        !
        end-group
          
      2. Check that the corresponding apply-group is configured in global configuration or somewhere in the hierarchy:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running | in apply-group gd21
        
        Building configuration...
        apply-group gd21
          
      3. Check the concise local view of the configuration of some of the interfaces:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running interface
        
        interface GigabiEthernet0/0/0/21
        !
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/22
        !
        
      4. Verify that the match and inheritance occur on these interfaces:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running inheritance interface
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/21
        ## Inherited from group gd21
        description general interface inheritance check
        ## Inherited from group gd21
        load-interval 30
        ## Inherited from group gd21
        mac-accounting ingress
        ## Inherited from group gd21
        mac-accounting egress
        !
        Interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/22
        ## Inherited from group gd21
        description general interface inheritance check
        ## Inherited from group gd21
        load-interval 30
        ## Inherited from group gd21
        mac-accounting ingress
        ## Inherited from group gd21
        mac-accounting egress
        !  
        !
        
      5. Verify that the inherited configuration actually takes effect:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show mac gigabitEthernet0/0/0/21
        
        GigabitEthernet0/0/0/21
          Input (96 free)
            6c9c.ed35.90fd:  1271 packets, 98426 bytes
                Total: 1271 packets, 98426 bytes
          Output (96 free)
            6c9c.ed35.90fd:   774 packets, 63265 bytes
                Total: 774 packets, 63264 bytes
          

      Interface MTU Settings for Different Interface Types: Example

      This example shows that an MTU value is configured on different interface types.

      1. Configure an interface MTU configuration group and apply this group:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running group l2tr
        
        group l2tr
        interface 'GigabitEthernet0/0/0/3.*'
        mtu 1500
        !
        interface 'GigabitEthernet0/0/0/9\..*'
        mtu 1400
        !
        interface 'GigabitEthernet0/0/0/9\..*' l2transport
        mtu 1400
        !
        end-group
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running | inc apply-group
        
        Building configuration...
        
        apply-group l2tr 
          
      2. Check the concise view and the inheritance view of the various interfaces:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running interface gigabitEthernet0/0/0/30         
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/30
        !
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running inheritance interface gigabitEthernet0/0/0/30
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/30
        ## Inherited from group l2tr
        mtu 1500
        !
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running interface gigabitEthernet0/0/0/9.800         
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/9.800
          encapsulation dot1q 800
        !
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running inheritance interface gigabitEthernet0/0/0/9.800
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/9.800
        ## Inherited from group l2tr
        mtu 1400
        encapsulation dot1q800
        !
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running interface gigabitEthernet0/0/0/9.250         
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/9.250 l2transport
          encapsulation dot1q 250
        !
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running inheritance interface gigabitEthernet0/0/0/9.800
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/9.250 l2transport
        encapsulation dot1q250
        ## Inherited from group l2tr
        mtu 1400
        !
          
      3. Verify that the correct values from the group do take effect:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show interface gigabitEthernet 0/0/0/30
        
        GigabitEthernet0/0/0/30 is down, line protocol is down 
          Interface state transitions: 0
          Hardware is GigabitEthernet, address is 0026.9824.ee56 (bia 0026.9824.ee56)
          Internet address is Unknown
          MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1000000 Kbit (Max: 1000000 Kbit)
             reliability 255/255, txload 0/255, rxload 0/255
          Encapsulation ARPA,
          Full-duplex, 1000Mb/s, link type is force-up
          output flow control is off, input flow control is off
          loopback not set,
          Last input never, output never
          Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
          5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
          5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
             0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 total input drops
             0 drops for unrecognized upper-level protocol
             Received 0 broadcast packets, 0 multicast packets
                      0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles, 0 parity
             0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
             0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 total output drops
             Output 0 broadcast packets, 0 multicast packets
             0 output errors, 0 underruns, 0 applique, 0 resets
             0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show interface gigabitEthernet 0/0/0/9.801
        
        GigabitEthernet0/0/0/9.801 is up, line protocol is up 
          Interface state transitions: 1
          Hardware is VLAN sub-interface(s), address is 0026.9824.ee41
          Internet address is Unknown
          MTU 1400 bytes, BW 1000000 Kbit (Max: 1000000 Kbit)
             reliability 255/255, txload 0/255, rxload 0/255
          Encapsulation 802.1Q Virtual LAN, VLAN Id 801,  loopback not set,
          Last input never, output never
          Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
          5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
          5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
             0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 total input drops
             0 drops for unrecognized upper-level protocol
             Received 0 broadcast packets, 0 multicast packets
             0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 total output drops
             Output 0 broadcast packets, 0 multicast packets
        
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show interface gigabitEthernet 0/0/0/9.250
        
        GigabitEthernet0/0/0/9.250 is up, line protocol is up 
          Interface state transitions: 1
          Hardware is VLAN sub-interface(s), address is 0026.9824.ee41
          Layer 2 Transport Mode
          MTU 1400 bytes, BW 1000000 Kbit (Max: 1000000 Kbit)
             reliability Unknown, txload Unknown, rxload Unknown
          Encapsulation 802.1Q Virtual LAN,
            Outer Match: Dot1Q VLAN 250
            Ethertype Any, MAC Match src any, dest any
          loopback not set,
          Last input never, output never
          Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
             0 packets input, 0 bytes
             0 input drops, 0 queue drops, 0 input errors
             0 packets output, 0 bytes
        
             0 output drops, 0 queue drops, 0 output errors
          

      ACL Referencing: Example

      This example shows how to reference access-lists on a number of interfaces using configuration groups.

      1. Configure the configuration group and apply-group:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running group acref 
        
        group acref
         interface 'GigabitEthernet0/0/0/3.*'
          ipv4 access-group adem ingress
          ipv4 access-group adem egress
         !
        end-group
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running | inc apply-group 
        
        Building configuration...
        
        apply-group isis l2tr isis2 mpp bundle1 acref
          
      2. Check the concise and inheritance view of the matching configurations:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running interface gigabitEthernet 0/0/0/30
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/30
        !
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running inheritance interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/0/30
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/30
         ## Inherited from group l2tr
         mtu 1500
         ## Inherited from group acref
         ipv4 access-group adem ingress
         ## Inherited from group acref
         ipv4 access-group adem egress
        !
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running interface gigabitEthernet 0/0/0/31
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/31
        !
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running inheritance interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/0/31
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/31
         ## Inherited from group l2tr
         mtu 1500
         ## Inherited from group acref
         ipv4 access-group adem ingress
         ## Inherited from group acref
         ipv4 access-group adem egress
          
      3. Check that the ACL group configuration actually got configured by using a traffic generator and watching that denied traffic is dropped.

      Local Configuration Takes Precedence: Example

      This example illustrates that local configurations take precedence when there is a discrepancy between a local configuration and the configuration inherited from a configuration group.

      1. Configure a local configuration in a configuration submode with an access list:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running interface gigabitEthernet 0/0/0/39
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/39
         ipv4 access-group smany ingress
         ipv4 access-group smany egress
        !
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running interface gigabitEthernet 0/0/0/38
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/38
        !
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running ipv4 access-list smany 
        
        ipv4 access-list smany
         10 permit ipv4 any any
        !
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running ipv4 access-list adem
        
        ipv4 access-list adem
         10 permit ipv4 21.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 host 55.55.55.55
         20 deny ipv4 any any
        !
        
      2. Configure and apply the access list group configuration:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running group acref 
        
        group acref
         interface 'GigabitEthernet0/0/0/3.*'
          ipv4 access-group adem ingress
          ipv4 access-group adem egress
         !
        end-group
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running | inc apply-group 
        
        Building configuration...
        apply-group isis l2tr isis2 mpp bundle1 acref
          
      3. Check the concise and inheritance views for the matching interface where the access list reference is configured locally:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running interface gigabitEthernet 0/0/0/39
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/39
         ipv4 access-group smany ingress
         ipv4 access-group smany egress
        !
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running inheritance interface gigabitEthernet 0/0/0/39
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/39
         ## Inherited from group l2tr
         mtu 1500
         ipv4 access-group smany ingress
         ipv4 access-group smany egress     << no config inherited, local config prioritized
        !
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running interface gigabitEthernet 0/0/0/38
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/38
        !
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running inheritance interface gigabitEthernet 0/0/0/38
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/38
         ## Inherited from group l2tr
         mtu 1500
         ## Inherited from group acref
         ipv4 access-group adem ingress
         ## Inherited from group acref
         ipv4 access-group adem egress
        !
         
      4. Use a traffic generator to verify that the traffic pattern for interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/39 gets acted on by the access list in the local configuration (smany) and not according to the inherited referenced access list (adem).

      ISIS Hierarchical Configuration: Example

      This example illustrates inheritance and priority handling with two ISIS groups using an ISIS configuration.

      1. Configure the local ISIS configuration:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running router isis
        
        router isis vink
         net 49.0011.2222.2222.2222.00
         address-family ipv4 unicast
          mpls traffic-eng level-1-2
          mpls traffic-eng router-id Loopback0
          redistribute connected
         !
         interface Bundle-Ether1
          address-family ipv4 unicast
          !
         !
         interface Bundle-Ether2
         !
         interface Loopback0
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3521
          address-family ipv4 unicast
          !
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3522
          address-family ipv4 unicast
          !
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3523
          address-family ipv4 unicast
          !
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3524
          address-family ipv4 unicast
          !
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3525
          address-family ipv4 unicast
          !
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3526
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3527
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3528
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/1
          address-family ipv4 unicast
          !
         !
        !
          
      2. Configure two ISIS groups and apply these to the configuration:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running group isis
        
        group isis
         router isis '.*'
          address-family ipv4 unicast
           mpls traffic-eng level-1-2
           mpls traffic-eng router-id Loopback0
           redistribute connected
           redistribute ospf 1 level-1-2
          !
          interface 'TenGig.*'
           lsp-interval 40
           hello-interval 15
           address-family ipv4 unicast
            metric 50
           !
          !
          interface 'Bundle-Ether.*'
           address-family ipv4 unicast
            metric 55
           !
          !
         !
        end-group
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running group isis2
        
        group isis2
         router isis '.*'
         !
         router isis '^(vink)'
          address-family ipv4 unicast
          !
          interface '(^Ten)Gig.*'
          !
          interface '^(Ten)Gig.*'
           address-family ipv4 unicast
            metric 66
           !
          !
         !
        end-group
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running | inc apply-group
         
        Building configuration...
        
        apply-group isis  l2tr  isis2  mpp  bundle1  acref
          
      3. Check the inheritance view of the ISIS configuration:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running inheritance router isis
        
        router isis vink
         net 49.0011.2222.2222.2222.00
         address-family ipv4 unicast
          mpls traffic-eng level-1-2
          mpls traffic-eng router-id Loopback0
          redistribute connected
          ## Inherited from group isis
          redistribute ospf 1 level-1-2
         !
         interface Bundle-Ether1
          address-family ipv4 unicast
           ## Inherited from group isis
           metric 55
          !
         !
         interface Bundle-Ether2
          ## Inherited from group isis
          address-family ipv4 unicast
           ## Inherited from group isis
           metric 55
          !
         !
         interface Loopback0
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3521
          ## Inherited from group isis
          lsp-interval 40
          ## Inherited from group isis
          hello-interval 15
          address-family ipv4 unicast
           ## Inherited from group isis
           metric 50
          !
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3522
          ## Inherited from group isis
          lsp-interval 40
          ## Inherited from group isis
          hello-interval 15
          address-family ipv4 unicast
           ## Inherited from group isis
           metric 50
          !
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3523
          ## Inherited from group isis
          lsp-interval 40
          ## Inherited from group isis
          hello-interval 15
          address-family ipv4 unicast
           ## Inherited from group isis
           metric 50
          !
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3524
          ## Inherited from group isis
          lsp-interval 40
          ## Inherited from group isis
          hello-interval 15
          address-family ipv4 unicast
           ## Inherited from group isis
           metric 50
          !
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3525
          ## Inherited from group isis
          lsp-interval 40
          ## Inherited from group isis
          hello-interval 15
          address-family ipv4 unicast
           ## Inherited from group isis
           metric 50
          !
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3526
          ## Inherited from group isis
          lsp-interval 40
          ## Inherited from group isis
          hello-interval 15
          ## Inherited from group isis
          address-family ipv4 unicast
           ## Inherited from group isis
           metric 50
          !
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3527
          ## Inherited from group isis
          lsp-interval 40
          ## Inherited from group isis
          hello-interval 15
          ## Inherited from group isis
          address-family ipv4 unicast
           ## Inherited from group isis
           metric 50
          !
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3528
          ## Inherited from group isis
          lsp-interval 40
          ## Inherited from group isis
          hello-interval 15
          ## Inherited from group isis
          address-family ipv4 unicast
           ## Inherited from group isis
           metric 50
          !
         !
         interface TenGigE0/2/0/1
          ## Inherited from group isis
          lsp-interval 40
          ## Inherited from group isis
          hello-interval 15
          address-family ipv4 unicast
           ## Inherited from group isis
           metric 50
          !
         !
        !
        
      4. Verify the actual functionality:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show isis interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3528 | inc Metric
        
        Metric (L1/L2):         50/50
          

      OSPF Hierarchy: Example

      This example illustrates hierarchical inheritance and priority. The configuration that is lower in hierarchy gets the highest priority.

      1. Configure a local OSPF configuration:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running router ospf 
        
        router ospf 1
         apply-group go-c
         nsr
         router-id 121.121.121.121
         nsf cisco
         redistribute connected
         address-family ipv4 unicast
         area 0
          apply-group go-b
          interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/0
           apply-group go-a
          !
          interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/1
          !
          interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/3
          !
          interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/4
          !
          interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/21
           bfd minimum-interval 100
           bfd fast-detect
           bfd multiplier 3
          !
          interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3891
          !
          interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3892
          !
          interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3893
          !
          interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3894
          !
         !
        !
        router ospf 100
        !
        router ospf 1000
        !
        router ospf 1001
        !
        
      2. Configure a configuration group and apply it in a configuration submode:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running group go-a
        
        group go-a
         router ospf '.*'
          area '.*'
           interface 'Gig.*'
            cost 200
           !
          !
         !
        end-group
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running group go-b
        
        group go-b
         router ospf '.*'
          area '.*'
           interface 'Gig.*'
            cost 250
           !
          !
         !
        end-group
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running group go-c
        
        group go-c
         router ospf '.*'
          area '.*'
           interface 'Gig.*'
            cost 300
           !
          !
         !
        
        end-group
      3. Check the inheritance view and verify that the apply-group in the lowest configuration submode gets the highest priority:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running inheritance router ospf 1
         
        router ospf 1
         nsr
         router-id 121.121.121.121
         nsf cisco
         redistribute connected
         address-family ipv4 unicast
         area 0
          interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/0
           ## Inherited from group go-a
           cost 200                     << apply-group in lowest submode  gets highest priority
          !
          interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/1
           ## Inherited from group go-b
           cost 250     
          !
          interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/3
           ## Inherited from group go-b
           cost 250
          !
          interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/4
           ## Inherited from group go-b
           cost 250
          !
          interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0/21
           bfd minimum-interval 100
           bfd fast-detect
           bfd multiplier 3
           ## Inherited from group go-b
           cost 250
          !
          interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3891
          !
          interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3892
          !
          interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3893
          !
          interface TenGigE0/2/0/0.3894
          !
         !
        !
        
      4. Check the functionality of the cost inheritance through the groups:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show ospf 1 interface GigabitEthernet 0/0/0/0  
        
        GigabitEthernet0/0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up 
          Internet Address 1.0.1.1/30, Area 0 
          Process ID 1, Router ID 121.121.121.121, Network Type BROADCAST, Cost: 200
          Transmit Delay is 1 sec, State DR, Priority 1, MTU 1500, MaxPktSz 1500
          Designated Router (ID) 121.121.121.121, Interface address 1.0.1.1
          No backup designated router on this network
          Timer intervals configured, Hello 10, Dead 40, Wait 40, Retransmit 5
          Non-Stop Forwarding (NSF) enabled
            Hello due in 00:00:02
          Index 5/5, flood queue length 0
          Next 0(0)/0(0)
          Last flood scan length is 1, maximum is 40
          Last flood scan time is 0 msec, maximum is 7 msec
          LS Ack List: current length 0, high water mark 0
          Neighbor Count is 1, Adjacent neighbor count is 0
          Suppress hello for 0 neighbor(s)
          Multi-area interface Count is 0
          

      Link Bundling Usage: Example

      This example shows how to configure interface membership in a bundle link:

      1. Configure the configuration groups:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running group bundle1
        
        group bundle1
         interface 'GigabitEthernet0/1/0/1[1-6]'
          bundle id 1 mode active
         !
        end-group
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running | inc apply-group 
        
        Building configuration...
        
        apply-group isis l2tr  isis2  mpp  bundle1
          
      2. Check the local configuration:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running interface gigabitEthernet 0/1/0/11
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0/11
        !
        
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running interface Bundle-Ether1
        
        interface Bundle-Ether1
         ipv4 address 108.108.1.1 255.255.255.0
         bundle maximum-active links 10
         bundle minimum-active links 5
        !
          
      3. Check the inheritance configuration view:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show running inheritance interface GigabitEthernet 0/1/0/11
        
        interface GigabitEthernet0/1/0/11
         ## Inherited from group bundle1
         bundle id 1 mode active
        !
        
      4. Check that the inheritance configuration took effect:
        RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show interface Bundle-Ether1 
        
        Bundle-Ether1 is up, line protocol is up 
          Interface state transitions: 1
          Hardware is Aggregated Ethernet interface(s), address is 0024.f71f.4bc3
          Internet address is 108.108.1.1/24
          MTU 1514 bytes, BW 6000000 Kbit (Max: 6000000 Kbit)
             reliability 255/255, txload 0/255, rxload 0/255
          Encapsulation ARPA,
          Full-duplex, 6000Mb/s
          loopback not set,
          ARP type ARPA, ARP timeout 04:00:00
            No. of members in this bundle: 6
              GigabitEthernet0/1/0/11      Full-duplex  1000Mb/s     Active          
              GigabitEthernet0/1/0/12      Full-duplex  1000Mb/s     Active          
              GigabitEthernet0/1/0/13      Full-duplex  1000Mb/s     Active          
              GigabitEthernet0/1/0/14      Full-duplex  1000Mb/s     Active          
              GigabitEthernet0/1/0/15      Full-duplex  1000Mb/s     Active          
              GigabitEthernet0/1/0/16      Full-duplex  1000Mb/s     Active          
          Last input 00:00:00, output 00:00:00
          Last clearing of "show interface" counters never
          5 minute input rate 8000 bits/sec, 1 packets/sec
          5 minute output rate 3000 bits/sec, 1 packets/sec
             2058 packets input, 1999803 bytes, 426 total input drops
             0 drops for unrecognized upper-level protocol
             Received 1 broadcast packets, 2057 multicast packets
                      0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles, 0 parity
             0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
             1204 packets output, 717972 bytes, 0 total output drops
             Output 2 broadcast packets, 1202 multicast packets
             0 output errors, 0 underruns, 0 applique, 0 resets
             0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
             0 carrier transitions