Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide for the Cisco CRS Router, Release 4.1
Configuring Additional Router Features
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Configuring Additional Router Features

Table Of Contents

Configuring Additional Router Features

Contents

Configuring the Domain Name and Domain Name Server

Examples

Related Documents

Configuring Telnet, HTTP, and XML Host Services

Prerequisites

Examples

Managing Configuration History and Rollback

Displaying the CommitIDs

Displaying the Configuration Changes Recorded in a CommitID

Previewing Rollback Configuration Changes

Rolling Back the Configuration to a Specific Rollback Point

Rolling Back the Configuration over a Specified Number of Commits

Loading CommitID Configuration Changes to the Target Configuration

Loading Rollback Configuration Changes to the Target Configuration

Deleting CommitIDs

Configuring Logging and Logging Correlation

Logging Locations and Severity Levels

Alarm Logging Correlation

Configuring Basic Message Logging

Examples

Disabling Console Logging

Related Documents

Creating and Modifying User Accounts and User Groups

Displaying Details About User Accounts, User Groups, and Task IDs


Configuring Additional Router Features


This chapter contains instructions and information for entering basic configurations using the command-line interface (CLI).

Contents

Configuring the Domain Name and Domain Name Server

Configuring Telnet, HTTP, and XML Host Services

Managing Configuration History and Rollback

Configuring Logging and Logging Correlation

Creating and Modifying User Accounts and User Groups

Configuring the Domain Name and Domain Name Server

Configure a domain name and Domain Name Server (DNS) for your router to contact other devices on your network efficiently. Use the following guidelines:

To define a default domain name that the Cisco IOS XR software uses to complete unqualified hostnames (names without a dotted-decimal domain name), use the domain-name command in global configuration mode.

To specify the address of one or more name servers to use for name and address resolution, use the domain name-server command in global configuration mode. If no name server address is specified, the default name server is 255.255.255.255 so the DNS lookup can be broadcast to the local network segment. If a DNS server is in the local network, it replies. If not, there might be a server that knows how to forward the DNS request to the correct DNS server.

Use the show hosts command in EXEC mode to display the default domain name, the style of name lookup service, a list of name server hosts, and the cached list of hostnames and addresses.

To configure the DNS and DNS server, follow these steps:

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. domain name domain-name-of-organization

3. domain name-server ipv4-address

4. end or commit

5. show hosts

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

domain name domain-name-of-organization

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# domain name cisco.com

Defines a default domain name used to complete unqualified hostnames.

Step 3 

domain name-server ipv4-address

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# domain name-server 192.168.1.111

Specifies the address of a name server to use for name and address resolution (hosts that supply name information).

Note You can enter up to six addresses, but only one for each command.

Step 4 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Step 5 

show hosts

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# show hosts

Displays all configured name servers.

Examples

The following example shows how the domain name and DNS are configured.

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# domain name cisco.com
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# domain name-server 10.1.1.1
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# commit 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# end 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show hosts

Default domain is cisco.com
Name/address lookup uses domain service
Name servers: 10.1.1.1

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Complete descriptions of the domain services commands

Implementing Host Services and Applications on Cisco IOS XR Software module in Cisco IOS XR IP Addresses and Services Configuration Guide for the Cisco CRS Router


Configuring Telnet, HTTP, and XML Host Services

For security reasons, some host services are disabled by default. You can enable Host services, such as Telnet, XML, and HTTP by using the commands described in this section. Host services provide the following features:

Enabling the Telnet server allows users to log in to the router using IPv4 or IPv6 Telnet clients.

Enabling the XML agent enables XML Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) agent services so that you can manage and configure the router using an XML interface.

Prerequisites

Ensure the following prerequisites are met before configuring Telnet, HTTP, and XML host services:

For the XML and HTTP host services, the Manageability package must be installed and activated on the router.

To enable the Secure Socket Layer (SSL) of the HTTP and XML services, the security package must be installed and activated on the router.

See Cisco IOS XR System Management Configuration Guide for the Cisco CRS Router for information on installing and activating packages.


Note This process enables the Telnet, HTTP, and XML host services on the Management Ethernet interfaces. For more information on how to enable these services on other inband interfaces, see Implementing Management Plane Protection in Cisco IOS XR Software module in Cisco IOS XR System Security Configuration Guide for the Cisco CRS Router .


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. interface MgmtEth interface-path-id
ipv4 address ipv4-address subnetmask

3. ipv4 virtual address ipv4-address subnetmask

4. end or commit

5. exit

6. configure

7. telnet {ipv4 | ipv6} server max-servers limit

8. http server

9. xml agent

10. end or commit

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

interface MgmtEth interface-path-id

ipv4 address ipv4-address subnetmask

Example:

Active RP

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/RP0/CPU0/0
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 172.29.52.75 255.255.255.0
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no shut

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# exit


Standby RP

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/RP1/CPU0/0

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 172.29.52.76 255.255.255.0

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no shut

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# exit

Configures the Management Ethernet ports on the active and standby RPs.

Step 3 

ipv4 virtual address ipv4-address subnetmask


RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipv4 virtual address 172.29.52.77 255.255.255.0

Defines an IPv4 virtual address for the Management Ethernet interface.

Step 4 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Step 5 

exit

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# exit

Exits global configuration mode.

Step 6 

configure

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 7 

telnet ipv4 server max-servers limit

or

telnet ipv6 server max-servers limit

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# telnet ipv4 server max-servers 5

Enables Telnet services on the router and specifies the maximum number of allowable Telnet servers.

Step 8 

http server

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# http server

Enables HTTP server on the router.

Step 9 

xml agent

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# xml agent

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# xml agent tty

Enables XML requests on the router.

Step 10 

end

or

commit

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:

Uncommitted changes found, commit them before 
exiting(yes/no/cancel)? 
[cancel]:

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Examples

The following example shows how the host services are enabled.

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface MgmtEth0/RP0/CPU0/0

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipv4 address 172.29.52.75 255.255.255.0

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipv4 virtual address 172.29.52.77 255.255.255.0

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# commit

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# exit

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# telnet ipv4 server max-servers 5

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# http server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# xml agent

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# commit

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Installation and activation of the Manageability and Security Packages

Upgrading and Managing Cisco IOS XR Software module of Cisco IOS XR System Management Configuration Guide for the Cisco CRS Router

Descriptions of the HTTP and XML server commands

Manageability Commands on Cisco IOS XR Software module of Cisco IOS XR System Management Command Reference for the Cisco CRS Router

Descriptions of the Telnet commands

Host Services and Applications Commands on Cisco IOS XR Software module of Cisco IOS XR IP Addresses and Services Command Reference for the Cisco CRS Router


Managing Configuration History and Rollback

After each commit operation, the system saves a record of the committed configuration changes. This record contains only the changes made during the configuration session; it does not contain the complete configuration. Each record is assigned a unique ID, known as a commitID.

When multiple commitIDs are present, you can use a commitID to identify a previous configuration to which to return, or you can use the commitID to load the configuration changes made during that configuration session. You can also load configuration changes from multiple commitIDs, and you can clear commitIDs. If you are thinking about rolling back the configuration to a specific commitID, consider the following guidelines:

You cannot roll back to a configuration that was removed because of package incompatibility. Configuration rollbacks can succeed only when the configuration passes all compatibility checks with the currently active Cisco IOS XR Software release.

If the system finds an incompatible configuration during rollback, the operation fails and an error appears.

The Cisco IOS XR software automatically saves up to 100 of the most recent commitIDs. The following sections describe how to manage configuration changes and roll back to a previously committed configuration:

Displaying the CommitIDs

Displaying the Configuration Changes Recorded in a CommitID

Previewing Rollback Configuration Changes

Rolling Back the Configuration to a Specific Rollback Point

Rolling Back the Configuration over a Specified Number of Commits

Loading CommitID Configuration Changes to the Target Configuration

Loading Rollback Configuration Changes to the Target Configuration

Deleting CommitIDs

Displaying the CommitIDs

To display a history of up to 100 of the most recent commitIDs, enter the show configuration commit list command in EXEC or administration EXEC mode. Up to 100 of the most recent commitIDs are saved by the system. Each commitID entry shows the user who committed configuration changes, the connection used to execute the commit, and commitID time stamp.

The commitIDs are shown in the "Label/ID" column. The following example shows the show configuration commit list command display in EXEC and administration EXEC modes:

RP/0/RP1/CPU0:router# show configuration commit list

SNo. Label/ID    User      Line        Client      Time Stamp
~~~~ ~~~~~~~~    ~~~~      ~~~~        ~~~~~~      ~~~~~~~~~~
1    1000000219  cisco     vty0        CLI         12:27:50 UTC Wed Mar 22 2006
2    1000000218  cisco     vty1        CLI         11:43:31 UTC Mon Mar 20 2006
3    1000000217  cisco     con0_RP0_C  CLI         17:44:29 UTC Wed Mar 15 2006

RP/0/RP1/CPU0:router# admin
RP/0/RP1/CPU0:router(admin)# show configuration commit list

SNo. Label/ID    User      Line        Client      Time Stamp
~~~~ ~~~~~~~~    ~~~~      ~~~~        ~~~~~~      ~~~~~~~~~~
1    2000000022  cisco     vty1        CLI         15:03:59 UTC Fri Mar 17 2006
2    2000000021  cisco     con0_RP0_C  CLI         17:42:55 UTC Wed Mar 15 2006
3    2000000020  SYSTEM    con0_RP0_C  Setup Dial  17:07:39 UTC Wed Mar 15 2006

Displaying the Configuration Changes Recorded in a CommitID

To display the configuration changes made during a specific commit session (commitID), go to EXEC or administration EXEC mode and enter the show configuration commit changes command followed by a commitID number. The easiest way to determine the commitID is to enter the show configuration commit changes ? command first. In the following example, the command help is used to display the available commitIDs, and then the changes for a specific commitID are displayed:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(admin)# show configuration commit changes ?         

  last        Changes made in the most recent <n> commits
  since       Changes made since (and including) a specific commit
  2000000020  Commit ID
  2000000021  Commit ID
  2000000022  Commit ID

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(admin)# show configuration commit changes 2000000020

Building configuration...
username cisco
 secret 5 $1$MgUH$xzUEW6jLfyAYLKJE.3p440
 group root-system
!
end

Previewing Rollback Configuration Changes

The show configuration rollback changes command allows you to preview the configuration changes that take place if you roll back the configuration to a specific commitID. For example, if you want to roll back the configuration to a specific point, all configuration changes made after that point must be undone. This rollback process is often accomplished by executing the no version of commands that must be undone.

To display the prospective rollback configuration changes from the current configuration to a specific commitID, go to EXEC or administration EXEC mode and enter the show configuration rollback changes to commitID command. In the following example, the command help displays the available commitIDs, and then the rollback changes are displayed.

RP/0/RP1/CPU0:router# show configuration rollback changes to ?

  1000000217  Commit ID
  1000000218  Commit ID
  1000000219  Commit ID

RP/0/RP1/CPU0:router# show configuration rollback changes to 1000000218

Building configuration...
no interface Loopback100
interface POS0/1/0/0
 no ipv6 nd dad attempts
!
!
no route-policy xx
end

To display the prospective rollback configuration changes from the current configuration to a specified number of previous sessions, go to EXEC or administration EXEC mode and enter the show configuration rollback changes last commit-range command:

RP/0/RP1/CPU0:router# show configuration rollback changes last 2

Building configuration...
interface Loopback3
no description
no ipv4 address 10.0.1.1 255.0.0.0
exit
interface Loopback4
no description
no ipv4 address 10.0.0.1 255.0.0.0
end

In the preceding example, the command display shows the proposed rollback configuration changes for the last two commitIDs.

Rolling Back the Configuration to a Specific Rollback Point

When you roll back the configuration to a specific rollback point, you undo all configuration changes made during the session identified by the commitID for that rollback point, and you undo all configuration changes made after that point. The rollback process rolls back the configuration and commits the rolled-back configuration. The rollback process also creates a new rollback point so that you can roll back the configuration to the previous configuration.


Tip To preview the commands that undo the configuration during a rollback, use the show configuration rollback changes command.


To roll back the router configuration to a previously committed configuration, go to EXEC or administration EXEC mode and enter the rollback configuration to commitID command:

RP/0/RP1/CPU0:router# rollback configuration to 1000000220   
Loading Rollback Changes.
Loaded Rollback Changes in 1 sec 
Committing.
2 items committed in 1 sec (1)items/sec
Updating.
Updated Commit database in 1 sec 
Configuration successfully rolled back to '1000000220'.

Rolling Back the Configuration over a Specified Number of Commits

When you roll back the configuration over a specific number of commits, you do not have to enter a specific commit ID. Instead, you specify a number x, and the software undoes all configuration changes made in the last x committed configuration sessions. The rollback process rolls back the configuration, commits the rolled-back configuration, and creates a new commitID for the previous configuration.


Tip To preview the commands that undo the configuration during a rollback, use the show configuration rollback changes command.


To roll back to the last x commits made, go to EXEC or administration EXEC mode and enter the rollback configuration last x command; x is a number ranging from 1 to the number of saved commits in the commit database.

In the following example, a request is made to roll back the configuration changes made during the previous two commits:

RP/0/RP1/CPU0:router# rollback configuration last 2

Loading Rollback Changes.
Loaded Rollback Changes in 1 sec
Committing.
1 items committed in 1 sec (0)items/sec
Updating.
Updated Commit database in 1 sec
Configuration successfully rolled back 2 commits.

Loading CommitID Configuration Changes to the Target Configuration

If the changes saved for a specific commitID are close to what you want, but a rollback is not appropriate, you can load the configuration changes for a commitID into the target configuration, modify the target configuration, and then commit the new configuration. Unlike the rollback process, the loaded changes are not applied until you commit them.


Note Unlike the rollback process, loading the commitID configuration changes loads only the changes made during that commit operation. The load process does not load all changes made between the commitID and the current committed configuration.


To load commitID changes in the target configuration, go to global configuration or administration configuration mode and enter the load commit changes command with the commitID number. In the following example, show commands are used to display the changes for a commitID, the commitID configuration is loaded into the target configuration, and the target configuration is displayed:

RP/0/RP1/CPU0:router# show configuration commit changes ?

  last        Changes made in the most recent <n> commits
  since       Changes made since (and including) a specific commit
  1000000217  Commit ID
  1000000218  Commit ID
  1000000219  Commit ID
  1000000220  Commit ID
  1000000221  Commit ID

RP/0/RP1/CPU0:router# show configuration commit changes 1000000219
Building configuration...
interface Loopback100
!
interface POS0/1/0/0
ipv6 nd dad attempts 50
!
end

RP/0/RP1/CPU0:router# config

RP/0/RP1/CPU0:router(config)# load commit changes 1000000219
Building configuration...
Loading.
77 bytes parsed in 1 sec (76)bytes/sec

RP/0/RP1/CPU0:router(config)# show configuration 

Building configuration...
interface Loopback100
!
interface POS0/1/0/0
ipv6 nd dad attempts 50
!
end

Loading Rollback Configuration Changes to the Target Configuration

If the changes for a specific rollback point are close to what you want, but a rollback is not appropriate, you can load the rollback configuration changes into the target configuration, modify the target configuration, and then commit the new configuration. Unlike the rollback process, the loaded changes are not applied until you commit them.


Tip To display the rollback changes, enter the show configuration rollback changes command.


To load rollback configuration changes from the current configuration to a specific session, go to global configuration or administration configuration mode and enter the load rollback changes to commitID command:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# load rollback changes to 1000000068

Building configuration...
Loading.
233 bytes parsed in 1 sec (231)bytes/sec

To load rollback configuration changes from the current configuration to a specified number of previous sessions, go to global configuration or administration configuration mode and enter the load rollback changes last commit-range command:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# load rollback changes last 6

Building configuration...
Loading.
221 bytes parsed in 1 sec (220)bytes/sec

In the preceding example, the command loads the rollback configuration changes for the last six commitIDs.

To load the rollback configuration for a specific commitID, go to global configuration or administration configuration mode and enter the load rollback changes commitID command:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# load rollback changes 1000000060

Building configuration...
Loading.
199 bytes parsed in 1 sec (198)bytes/sec

Deleting CommitIDs

You can delete the oldest configuration commitIDs by entering the clear configuration commits command in EXEC or administration EXEC mode. The clear configuration commits command must be followed by either the amount of disk space to reclaim or number of commitIDs to delete. To reclaim disk space from the oldest commitIDs, enter the clear configuration commits command followed by the diskspace keyword and number of kilobytes to reclaim:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# clear configuration commits diskspace 50

Deleting 4 rollback points '1000000001' to '1000000004'
64 KB of disk space will be freed. Continue with deletion?[confirm]

To delete a specific number of the oldest commitIDs, enter the clear configuration commits command followed by the oldest keyword and number of commitIDs to delete:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# clear configuration commits oldest 5

Deleting 5 rollback points '1000000005' to '1000000009'
80 KB of disk space will be freed. Continue with deletion?[confirm]

Configuring Logging and Logging Correlation

System messages generated by the Cisco IOS XR software can be logged to a variety of locations based on the severity level of the messages. For example, you could direct information messages to the system console and also log debugging messages to a network server.

In addition, you can define correlation rules that group and summarize related events, generate complex queries for the list of logged events, and retrieve logging events through an XML interface.

The following sections describe logging and the basic commands used to log messages in Cisco IOS XR software:

Logging Locations and Severity Levels

Alarm Logging Correlation

Configuring Basic Message Logging

Disabling Console Logging

Logging Locations and Severity Levels

Table 5-1 shows error messages that can be logged to a variety of locations.

Table 5-1 Logging Locations for System Error Messages 

Logging Destination
Command (Global Configuration Mode)

console

logging console

vty terminal

logging monitor

external syslog server

logging trap

internal buffer

logging buffered


Table 5-2 shows how you can log messages based on the severity level of the messages.

Table 5-2 Logging Severity Levels for System Error Messages 

Level
Description

Level 0—Emergencies

System has become unusable.

Level 1—Alerts

Immediate action needed to restore system stability.

Level 2—Critical

Critical conditions that may require attention.

Level 3—Errors

Error conditions that may help track problems.

Level 4—Warnings

Warning conditions that are not severe.

Level 5—Notifications

Normal but significant conditions that bear notification.

Level 6—Informational

Informational messages that do not require action.

Level 7—Debugging

Debugging messages are for system troubleshooting only.


Alarm Logging Correlation

Alarm logging correlation is used to group and filter similar messages to reduce the amount of redundant logs and isolate the root causes of the messages.

For example, the original message describing the online insertion and removal (OIR) and system state being up or down can be reported, and all subsequent messages reiterating the same event can be correlated. When you create correlation rules, a common root event that is generating larger volumes of follow-on error messages can be isolated and sent to the correlation buffer. An operator can extract all correlated messages for display later, should the need arise. For more information, see Cisco IOS XR System Management Configuration Guide for the Cisco CRS Router .

Configuring Basic Message Logging

Numerous options for logging system messages in Cisco IOS XR software are available. This section provides a basic example.

To configure basic message logging, follow these steps:

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. logging {ip-address | hostname}

3. logging trap severity

4. logging console [severity]

5. logging buffered [severity | buffer-size]

6. commit

7. end

8. show logging

DETAILED STEPS

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

configure

Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2 

logging {ip-address | hostname}

Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# logging 10.1.1.1

Specifies a syslog server host to use for system logging.

Step 3 

logging trap severity

Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# logging trap 
debugging

Limits the logging of messages sent to syslog servers to only those messages at the specified level.

Table 5-2 shows a summary of the logging severity levels.

Step 4 

logging console [severity]

Example:
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# logging console 
emergencies

Logs messages on the console.

When a severity level is specified, only messages at that severity level are logged on the console.

Table 5-2 shows a summary of the logging severity levels.

Step 5 

logging buffered [severity | buffer-size]

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# logging buffered 1000000

Copies logging messages to an internal buffer.

Newer messages overwrite older messages after the buffer is filled.

Specifying a severity level causes messages at that level and numerically lower levels to be logged in an internal buffer. See Table 5-2 for a summary of the logging severity levels.

The buffer size is from 4096 to 4,294,967,295 bytes. Messages above the set limit are logged to the console.

Step 6 

commit

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# commit

Commits the target configuration to the router running configuration.

Step 7 

end

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# end

Ends the configuration session and returns to EXEC mode.

Step 8 

show logging

Example:

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show logging

Displays the messages that are logged in the buffer.

Examples

The following example shows how the basic message logging is configured.

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# logging 10.1.1.1
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# logging trap debugging
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# logging console emergencies
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# logging buffered 1000000
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# commit
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# end
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# show logging 

Syslog logging: enabled (162 messages dropped, 0 flushes, 0 overruns)
    Console logging: level emergencies, 593 messages logged
    Monitor logging: level debugging, 0 messages logged
    Trap logging: level debugging, 2 messages logged
    Logging to 10.1.1.1, 2 message lines logged
    Buffer logging: level debugging, 722 messages logged

Log Buffer (1000000 bytes):

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:Apr  8 19:18:58.679 : instdir[203]: %INSTALL-INSTMGR-6-INSTALL_OP 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:Apr  8 19:19:01.287 : instdir[203]: %INSTALL-INSTMGR-6-INSTALL_OP 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:Apr  8 19:22:15.658 : instdir[203]: %INSTALL-INSTMGR-6-INSTALL_OP 
LC/0/1/CPU0:Apr  8 19:22:30.122 : sysmgr[74]: %OS-SYSMGR-7-INSTALL_NOTIFICATION 
LC/0/6/CPU0:Apr  8 19:22:30.160 : sysmgr[74]: %OS-SYSMGR-7-INSTALL_NOTIFICATION 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:Apr  8 19:22:30.745 : sysmgr[79]: %OS-SYSMGR-7-INSTALL_NOTIFICATI 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:Apr  8 19:22:32.596 : sysmgr[79]: %OS-SYSMGR-7-INSTALL_NOTIFICATI 
LC/0/1/CPU0:Apr  8 19:22:35.181 : sysmgr[74]: %OS-SYSMGR-7-INSTALL_FINISHED : s 
LC/0/6/CPU0:Apr  8 19:22:35.223 : sysmgr[74]: %OS-SYSMGR-7-INSTALL_FINISHED : s 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:Apr  8 19:22:36.122 : sysmgr[79]: %OS-SYSMGR-7-INSTALL_FINISHED : 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:Apr  8 19:22:37.790 : sysmgr[79]: %OS-SYSMGR-7-INSTALL_FINISHED : 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:Apr  8 19:22:41.015 : schema_server[332]: %MGBL-SCHEMA-6-VERSIONC 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:Apr  8 19:22:59.844 : instdir[203]: %INSTALL-INSTMGR-4-ACTIVE_SOF 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:Apr  8 19:22:59.851 : instdir[203]: %INSTALL-INSTMGR-6-INSTALL_OP 
 --More-- 

Disabling Console Logging

To disable console logging, enter the logging console disable command in global configuration mode.

Related Documents

Related Topic
Document Title

Configuration of system logging

Implementing Logging Services on Cisco IOS XR Software module of Cisco IOS XR System Monitoring Configuration Guide for the Cisco CRS Router

Commands used to configure logging

Logging Services Commands on Cisco IOS XR Software module of Cisco IOS XR System Monitoring Command Reference for the Cisco CRS Router

Configuration of alarm correlation and generating complex queries

Implementing and Monitoring Alarms and Alarm Log Correlation on Cisco IOS XR Software module of Cisco IOS XR System Management Configuration Guide for the Cisco CRS Router

Commands used to configure alarm correlation

Alarm Management and Logging Correlation Commands on Cisco IOS XR Software module of Cisco IOS XR System Management Command Reference for the Cisco CRS Router

Retrieve logging events through an XML interface

Cisco IOS XR XML API Guide for the Cisco CRS Router


Creating and Modifying User Accounts and User Groups

In the Cisco IOS XR software, users are assigned individual usernames and passwords. Each username is assigned to one or more user group, each of which defines display and configuration commands the user is authorized to execute. This authorization is enabled by default in the Cisco IOS XR software, and each user must log in to the system using a unique username and password.

The following section describe the basic commands used to configure users and user groups. For a summary of user accounts, user groups, and task IDs, see the "User Groups, Task Groups, and Task IDs" section on page 4-84.

Displaying Details About User Accounts, User Groups, and Task IDs


Note The management of user accounts, user groups, and task IDs is part of the authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) feature. AAA is a suite of security features included in the Cisco IOS XR software. For more information on the AAA concepts and configuration tasks, see Cisco IOS XR System Security Configuration Guide for the Cisco CRS Router and Cisco IOS XR System Security Command Reference for the Cisco CRS Router . For instructions to activate software packages, see Cisco IOS XR System Management Configuration Guide for the Cisco CRS Router .


Displaying Details About User Accounts, User Groups, and Task IDs

Table 5-3 summarizes the EXEC mode commands used to display details about user accounts, user groups, and task IDs.

Table 5-3 Commands to Display Details About Users and User Groups

Command
Description

show aaa userdb username

Displays the task IDs and privileges assigned to a specific username. To display all users on the system, type the command without a username.

show aaa usergroup usergroup-name

Displays the task IDs and privileges that belong to a user group. To display all groups on the system, type the command without a group name.

show task supported

Displays all task IDs for the system. Only the root-system users, root-lr users, or users associated with the WRITE:AAA task ID can configure task groups.


Table 5-4 Video Monitoring Limits

Category
Maximum Value
Comments

Class Maps

1024 per policy map

1024 per system

The maximum value is valid when the keyword is traffic.

Policy Maps

256 per system

The maximum value is valid when the keyword is performance-traffic.

Video Monitoring service policies

One policy per interface

The maximum values is valid when the keyword is performance-traffic.

Monitored Flows

1024 per Network Processor (NP)
1024 per class map
1024 per policy map

Includes both static and dynamic flows.

Flow Rate at Layer 3

280 kpps per flow

Equivalent to uncompressed high definition (HD) video streams. The absolute configuration maximum value is 1 Mpps per flow.

Flow Rate at Media Layer

3 Gbps per flow

Equivalent to uncompressed high definition (HD) video streams. The absolute configuration maximum value is 10 Gbps per flow.

Delay Factor (DF) Precision

100 microsecond

Media Rate Variation (MRV) range

999.999%

Minimum range is -100%

Flow History

60 intervals per flow

Default value is 10 intervals per flow.

Interval Duration

300 seconds per interval

Default value is 30 seconds per interval. Minimum value is 10 seconds that can be incremented by 5 seconds.

Reacts

14 reacts per class map


Note This value is specific to Cisco IOS XR Software Release 4.0.