Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Modular Quality of Service Configuration Guide, Release 5.1.x
Configuring Modular QoS Service Packet Classification
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Configuring Modular QoS Service Packet Classification

Contents

Configuring Modular QoS Service Packet Classification

Packet classification identifies and marks traffic flows that require congestion management or congestion avoidance on a data path. The Modular Quality of Service (QoS) command-line interface (MQC) is used to define the traffic flows that should be classified, where each traffic flow is called a class of service, or class. Subsequently, a traffic policy is created and applied to a class. All traffic not identified by defined classes falls into the category of a default class.

This module provides the conceptual and configuration information for QoS packet classification.

Line Card, SIP, and SPA Support

Feature

ASR 9000 Ethernet Line Cards

SIP 700 for the ASR 9000

Classification Based on DEI

yes

no

Class-Based Unconditional Packet Marking

yes

yes

In-Place Policy Modification

yes

yes

IPv6 QoS

yes

yes

Packet Classification and Marking

yes

yes

Policy Inheritance

yes

yes

Port Shape Policies

yes

no

Shared Policy Instance

yes

no

Feature History for Configuring Modular QoS Packet Classification and Marking on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers

Release

Modification

Release 3.7.2

The Class-Based Unconditional Packet Marking feature was introduced on ASR 9000 Ethernet Line Cards.

The IPv6 QoS feature was introduced on ASR 9000 Ethernet Line Cards. (QoS matching on IPv6 ACLs is not supported.)

The Packet Classification and Marking feature was introduced on ASR 9000 Ethernet Line Cards.

Release 3.9.0

The Class-Based Unconditional Packet Marking feature was supported on the SIP 700 for the ASR 9000.

The Packet Classification and Marking feature was supported on the SIP 700 for the ASR 9000.

The Policy Inheritance feature was introduced on ASR 9000 Ethernet Line Cards and on the SIP 700 for the ASR 9000.

The Shared Policy Instance feature was introduced on ASR 9000 Ethernet Line Cards.

Release 4.0.0

The Classification Based on DEI feature was introduced on ASR 9000 Ethernet Line Cards.

The In-Place Policy Modification feature was introduced on ASR 9000 Ethernet Line Cards and on the SIP 700 for the ASR 9000.

The IPv6 QoS feature was supported on the SIP 700 for the ASR 9000.

Support for three stand-alone marking actions and three marking actions as part of a policer action in the same class was added on the SIP 700 for the ASR 9000. (ASR 9000 Ethernet Line Cards support two stand-alone marking actions and two marking actions as part of a policer action in the same class.)

Release 4.0.1

Support for the port shape policies feature was introduced on ASR 9000 Ethernet Line Cards.

Release 4.2.1 QoS on satellite feature was added.
Release 5.1.1

The QoS Offload on satellite feature was added.

Release 5.1.1

The Inter Class Policer Bucket Sharing feature was added. This feature is applicable to the ASR 9000 Enhanced Ethernet line cards, ingress side.

Prerequisites for Configuring Modular QoS Packet Classification

These prerequisites are required for configuring modular QoS packet classification and marking on your network:

  • You must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes the proper task IDs. The command reference guides include the task IDs required for each command. If you suspect user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance.
  • You must be familiar with Cisco IOS XR QoS configuration tasks and concepts.

Information About Configuring Modular QoS Packet Classification

Packet Classification Overview

Packet classification involves categorizing a packet within a specific group (or class) and assigning it a traffic descriptor to make it accessible for QoS handling on the network. The traffic descriptor contains information about the forwarding treatment (quality of service) that the packet should receive. Using packet classification, you can partition network traffic into multiple priority levels or classes of service. The source agrees to adhere to the contracted terms and the network promises a quality of service. Traffic policers and traffic shapers use the traffic descriptor of a packet to ensure adherence to the contract.

Traffic policers and traffic shapers rely on packet classification features, such as IP precedence, to select packets (or traffic flows) traversing a router or interface for different types of QoS service. For example, by using the three precedence bits in the type of service (ToS) field of the IP packet header, you can categorize packets into a limited set of up to eight traffic classes. After you classify packets, you can use other QoS features to assign the appropriate traffic handling policies including congestion management, bandwidth allocation, and delay bounds for each traffic class.


Note


IPv6-based classification is supported only on Layer 3 interfaces.


Traffic Class Elements

The purpose of a traffic class is to classify traffic on your router. Use the class-map command to define a traffic class.

A traffic class contains three major elements: a name, a series of match commands, and, if more than one match command exists in the traffic class, an instruction on how to evaluate these match commands. The traffic class is named in the class-map command. For example, if you use the word cisco with the class-map command, the traffic class would be named cisco.

The match commands are used to specify various criteria for classifying packets. Packets are checked to determine whether they match the criteria specified in the match commands. If a packet matches the specified criteria, that packet is considered a member of the class and is forwarded according to the QoS specifications set in the traffic policy. Packets that fail to meet any of the matching criteria are classified as members of the default traffic class. See the “Default Traffic Class” section on page 18.

The instruction on how to evaluate these match commands needs to be specified if more than one match criterion exists in the traffic class. The evaluation instruction is specified with the class-map match-any command. If the match-any option is specified as the evaluation instruction, the traffic being evaluated by the traffic class must match at least one of the specified criteria. If the match-all option is specified, the traffic must match all of the match criteria.

The function of these commands is described more thoroughly in the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers Modular Quality of Service Command Reference. The traffic class configuration task is described in the “Creating a Traffic Class” section on page 32.

Traffic Policy Elements

The purpose of a traffic policy is to configure the QoS features that should be associated with the traffic that has been classified in a user-specified traffic class or classes. The policy-map command is used to create a traffic policy. A traffic policy contains three elements: a name, a traffic class (specified with the class command), and the QoS policies. The name of a traffic policy is specified in the policy map Modular Quality of Service (MQC) (for example, the policy-map policy1 command creates a traffic policy named policy1). The traffic class that is used to classify traffic to the specified traffic policy is defined in class map configuration mode. After choosing the traffic class that is used to classify traffic to the traffic policy, the user can enter the QoS features to apply to the classified traffic.

The MQC does not necessarily require that users associate only one traffic class to one traffic policy. When packets match to more than one match criterion, as many as 1024 traffic classes can be associated to a single traffic policy. The 1024 class maps include the default class and the classes of the child policies, if any.

The order in which classes are configured in a policy map is important. The match rules of the classes are programmed into the TCAM in the order in which the classes are specified in a policy map. Therefore, if a packet can possibly match multiple classes, only the first matching class is returned and the corresponding policy is applied.

The function of these commands is described more thoroughly in the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Modular Quality of Service Command Reference.

The traffic policy configuration task is described in “Creating a Traffic Policy” section on page 38.

Default Traffic Class

Unclassified traffic (traffic that does not meet the match criteria specified in the traffic classes) is treated as belonging to the default traffic class.

If the user does not configure a default class, packets are still treated as members of the default class. However, by default, the default class has no enabled features. Therefore, packets belonging to a default class with no configured features have no QoS functionality. These packets are then placed into a first in, first out (FIFO) queue and forwarded at a rate determined by the available underlying link bandwidth. This FIFO queue is managed by a congestion avoidance technique called tail drop.

For further information about congestion avoidance techniques, such as tail drop, see the “Configuring Modular QoS Congestion Avoidance on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers” module in this guide

Bundle Traffic Policies

When a policy is bound to a bundle, the same policy is programmed on every bundle member (port). For example, if there is a policer or shaper rate, the same rate is configured on every port. Traffic is scheduled to bundle members based on the load balancing algorithm.

A policy can be bound to:

  • Bundles
  • Bundle Layer 3 subinterfaces
  • Bundle Layer 2 subinterfaces (Layer 2 transport)

Both ingress and egress traffic is supported. Percentage-based policies and absolute rate-based policies are supported. However, for ease of use, it is recommended to use percentage-based policies.

Shared Policy Instance

After the traffic class and traffic policy have been created, Shared Policy Instance (SPI) can optionally be used to allow allocation of a single set of QoS resources and share them across a group of subinterfaces, multiple Ethernet flow points (EFPs), or bundle interfaces.

Using SPI, a single instance of qos policy can be shared across multiple subinterfaces, allowing for aggregate shaping of the subinterfaces to one rate. All of the subinterfaces that share the instance of a QoS policy must belong to the same physical interface. The number of subinterfaces sharing the QoS policy instance can range from 2 to the maximum number of subinterfaces on the port.

For bundle interfaces, hardware resources are replicated per bundle member. All subinterfaces that use a common shared policy instance and are configured on a Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LAG) bundle must be load-balanced to the same member link.

When a policy is configured on a bundle EFP, one instance of the policy is configured on each of the bundle member links. When using SPI across multiple bundle EFPs of the same bundle, one shared instance of the policy is configured on each of the bundle member links. By default, the bundle load balancing algorithm uses hashing to distribute the traffic (that needs to be sent out of the bundle EFPs) among its bundle members. The traffic for single or multiple EFPs can get distributed among multiple bundle members. If multiple EFPs have traffic that needs to be shaped or policed together usingSPI, the bundle load balancing has to be configured to select the same bundle member (hash-select) for traffic to all the EFPs that belong the same shared instance of the policy. This ensures that traffic going out on all the EFPs with same shared instance of the policy use the same policer/shaper Instance.

This is normally used when the same subscriber has many EFPs, for example, one EFP for each service type, and the provider requires shaping and queuing to be implemented together for all the subscriber EFPs.

Policy Inheritance

When a policy map is applied on a physical port, the policy is enforced for all Layer 2 and Layer 3 subinterfaces under that physical port.

Port Shape Policies

When a port shaping policy is applied to a main interface, individual regular service policies can also be applied on its subinterfaces. Port shaping policy maps have these restrictions:

  • class-default is the only allowed class map.
  • The shape class action is the only allowed class action.
  • They can only be configured in the egress direction.
  • They can only be applied to main interfaces, not to subinterfaces.
  • Two- and three- level policies are not supported. Only one level or flat policies are supported.

If any of the above restrictions are violated, the configured policy map is applied as a regular policy, not a port shaping policy.

Support for 16 Queues

The ASR 9000 traffic manager (TM) for the enhanced Ethernet line cards now supports up to 16 Queues. The extension is from 8 queues to 16 queues at leaf level called L4 in a QoS policy.

The capabilities of each mode are:

  • 8 Q-mode—8 L4 flows per L3 class. Up to 32000 L3 classes in TM.
  • 16 Q-mode—16 L4 flows per L3 class. Up to 16000 L3 classes in TM.

This table provides the different service profiles supported in different modes:

Mode Service Profile
8Q 1 priority-1 queue, 1 priority-2 queue, 6 normal priority queue
16Q 1 priority-1 queue, 1 priority-2 queue, 14 normal priority queue
8Q 1 priority-1 queue, 2 priority-2 queues, 5 normal priority queue (BNG Only)
16Q 1 priority-1 queue, 2 priority-2 queues, 13 normal priority queue (BNG Only)
8Q 1 priority-1 queue, 1 priority-2 queue, 1 priority- 3 queue, 5 normal priority queue
16Q 1 priority-1 queue, 1 priority-2 queue, 1 priority- 3 queue, 13 normal priority queue

The L3, L4 service profiles in 16 Q-mode are similar to that of the 8 Q-mode, with just an increase in the number of normal priority queues.

Restrictions

The support for 16 queues has these restrictions:

  • Supports only the enhanced Ethernet line cards.
  • When 16Q-mode policy is applied on all interfaces, the number of interface scale will be 4K interface.

Class-based Unconditional Packet Marking Feature and Benefits

The Class-based, Unconditional Packet Marking feature provides users with a means for efficient packet marking by which the users can differentiate packets based on the designated markings.

The Class-based, Unconditional Packet Marking feature allows users to perform these tasks:

  • Mark packets by setting the IP precedence bits or the IP differentiated services code point (DSCP) in the IP ToS byte.
  • Mark Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) packets by setting the EXP bits within the imposed or topmost label.
  • Mark packets by setting the Layer 2 class-of-service (CoS) value.
  • Mark packets by setting inner and outer CoS tags for an IEEE 802.1Q tunneling (QinQ) configuration.
  • Mark packets by setting the value of the qos-group argument.
  • Mark packets by setting the value of the discard-class argument.

    Note


    qos-group and discard-class are variables internal to the router, and are not transmitted.


Unconditional packet marking allows you to partition your network into multiple priority levels or classes of service, as follows:

  • Use QoS unconditional packet marking to set the IP precedence or IP DSCP values for packets entering the network. Routers within your network can then use the newly marked IP precedence values to determine how the traffic should be treated. For example, weighted random early detection (WRED), a congestion avoidance technique, can be used to determine the probability that a packet is dropped. In addition, low-latency queuing (LLQ) can then be configured to put all packets of that mark into the priority queue.
  • Use QoS unconditional packet marking to assign packets to a QoS group. To set the QoS group identifier on MPLS packets, use the set qos-group command in policy map class configuration mode.

    Note


    Setting the QoS group identifier does not automatically prioritize the packets for transmission. You must first configure an egress policy that uses the QoS group.


  • Use CoS unconditional packet marking to assign packets to set the priority value of IEEE 802.1p/Inter-Switch Link (ISL) packets. The router uses the CoS value to determine how to prioritize packets for transmission and can use this marking to perform Layer 2-to-Layer 3 mapping. To set the Layer 2 CoS value of an outgoing packet, use the set cos command in policy map configuration mode.

The configuration task is described in the Configuring Class-based Unconditional Packet Marking, page 46.


Note


Unless otherwise indicated, the class-based unconditional packet marking for Layer 3 physical interfaces applies to bundle interfaces.


Specification of the CoS for a Packet with IP Precedence

Use of IP precedence allows you to specify the CoS for a packet. You use the three precedence bits in the ToS field of the IP version 4 (IPv4) header for this purpose. This figure shows the ToS field.

Figure 1. IPv4 Packet Type of Service Field

Using the ToS bits, you can define up to eight classes of service. Other features configured throughout the network can then use these bits to determine how to treat the packet in regard to the ToS to grant it. These other QoS features can assign appropriate traffic-handling policies, including congestion management strategy and bandwidth allocation. For example, queuing features such as LLQ can use the IP precedence setting of the packet to prioritize traffic.

By setting precedence levels on incoming traffic and using them in combination with the Cisco IOS XR QoS queuing features, you can create differentiated service.

So that each subsequent network element can provide service based on the determined policy, IP precedence is usually deployed as close to the edge of the network or administrative domain as possible. This allows the rest of the core or backbone to implement QoS based on precedence.

The configuration task is described in the “Configuring Class-based Unconditional Packet Marking” section on page 46.

IP Precedence Bits Used to Classify Packets

Use the three IP precedence bits in the ToS field of the IP header to specify the CoS assignment for each packet. As mentioned earlier, you can partition traffic into a maximum of eight classes and then use policy maps to define network policies in terms of congestion handling and bandwidth allocation for each class.

For historical reasons, each precedence corresponds to a name. These names are defined in RFC 791. This table lists the numbers and their corresponding names, from least to most important.

Table 1 IP Precedence Values

Number

Name

0

routine

1

priority

2

immediate

3

flash

4

flash-override

5

critical

6

internet

7

network


Note


IP precedence bit settings 6 and 7 are reserved for network control information, such as routing updates.


IP Precedence Value Settings

By default, Cisco IOS XR software leaves the IP precedence value untouched. This preserves the precedence value set in the header and allows all internal network devices to provide service based on the IP precedence setting. This policy follows the standard approach stipulating that network traffic should be sorted into various types of service at the edge of the network and that those types of service should be implemented in the core of the network. Routers in the core of the network can then use the precedence bits to determine the order of transmission, the likelihood of packet drop, and so on.

Because traffic coming into your network can have the precedence set by outside devices, we recommend that you reset the precedence for all traffic entering your network. By controlling IP precedence settings, you prohibit users that have already set the IP precedence from acquiring better service for their traffic simply by setting a high precedence for all of their packets.

The class-based unconditional packet marking, LLQ, and WRED features can use the IP precedence bits.

Classification Based on DEI

You can classify traffic based on the Drop Eligible Indicator (DEI ) bit that is present in 802.1ad frames and in 802.1ah frames. Default DEI marking is supported. The set DEI action in policy maps is supported on 802.1ad packets for:

  • Ingress and egress
  • Layer 2 subinterfaces
  • Layer 2 main interfaces
  • Layer 3 main interfaces

    Note


    The set DEI action is ignored for traffic on interfaces that are not configured for 802.1ad encapsulation.


Default DEI Marking

Incoming Packet

 

Default DEI on Imposed 802.1ad Headers

802.1q packet

None

0

802.1ad packet

None

DEI of top-most tag of the incoming packet

802.1q packet translated to 802.1ad packet

or

802.1ad packet

set dei {0 | 1}

0 or 1


Based on DEI value in the set action

IP Precedence Compared to IP DSCP Marking

If you need to mark packets in your network and all your devices support IP DSCP marking, use the IP DSCP marking to mark your packets because the IP DSCP markings provide more unconditional packet marking options. If marking by IP DSCP is undesirable, however, or if you are unsure if the devices in your network support IP DSCP values, use the IP precedence value to mark your packets. The IP precedence value is likely to be supported by all devices in the network.

You can set up to 8 different IP precedence markings and 64 different IP DSCP markings.

QoS Policy Propagation Using Border Gateway Protocol

Packet classification identifies and marks traffic flows that require congestion management or congestion avoidance on a data path. Quality-of-service Policy Propagation Using Border Gateway Protocol (QPPB) allows you to classify packets by Qos Group ID, based on access lists (ACLs), Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) community lists, BGP autonomous system (AS) paths, Source Prefix address, or Destination Prefix address. After a packet has been classified, you can use other QoS features such as policing and weighted random early detection (WRED) to specify and enforce policies to fit your business model.

QoS Policy Propagation Using BGP (QPPB) allows you to map BGP prefixes and attributes to Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF) parameters that can be used to enforce traffic policing. QPPB allows BGP policy set in one location of the network to be propagated using BGP to other parts of the network, where appropriate QoS policies can be created.

QPPB supports both the IPv4 and IPv6 address-families.

QPPB allows you to classify packets based on:

  • Access lists.
  • BGP community lists. You can use community lists to create groups of communities to use in a match clause of a route policy. As with access lists, you can create a series of community lists.
  • BGP autonomous system paths. You can filter routing updates by specifying an access list on both incoming and outbound updates, based on the BGP autonomous system path.
  • Source Prefix address. You can classify a set of prefixes coming from the address of a BGP neighbor(s).
  • Destination Prefix address. You can classify a set of BGP prefixes.

Classification can be based on the source or destination address of the traffic. BGP and CEF must be enabled for the QPPB feature to be supported.

QoS on the Satellite System

AutoQoS which automates consistent deployment of QoS features is enabled on the satellite system. All the user-configured Layer2 and Layer3 QoS features are applied on the ASR9000 and no separate Qos configuration required for the satellite system. Auto-Qos handles the over-subscription of the ICL links. All other QoS features, including broadband QoS, on regular ports are supported on satellite ports as well. System congestion handling between the ASR9000 Series Router and satellite ports is setup to maintain priority and protection. AutoQoS Provide sufficient differentiation between different classes of traffic that flow on the satellite ICLs between the ASR9000 Series Router and the Satellite .

The system can support up to 14 unique shape rates for 1G port shapers. 1G ports are represented using a L0 entity in the Traffic Manager (TM) hierarchy. Port shapers are applied at this level. When speed changes on satellite ports, QOS EA would automatically reconfigure any policy-maps based on underlying satellite ports speed. However if there are no policies, then the Policy Manager (PM) needs to setup the speed of the port by calling the port-shaper API (Application Programming Interface). The system shall modify any policies which are percentage-based when the underlying ports speed changes due to AN. There would be a timelag for the Autonegotiated speed to be propagated to the policies on the ASR9000 series router and during that time, packet drops are expected in the satellite device.

For more information about QoS for the satellite system, refer the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Modular Quality of Service Configuration Guide.

Limitations

  • Queueing on an ingress service-policy is not supported on satellite interfaces.
  • Only flat and 2-level HQoS policies are supported on satellite interfaces in L2 Fabric and simple ring topologies.

Auto QoS

Traffic from the satellite system to the Cisco IOS XR ASR9000 series router and traffic from the ASR9000 series router to the satellite system have been discussed.

Satellite to ASR9000 series router

  • Traffic is handled using the trusted port model.
  • Automatic packet classification rules determine whether a packet is control packet (LACP, STP, CDP, CFM, ARP, OSPF etc), high priority data (VLAN COS 5,6,7, IP prec 5, 6, 7) or normal priority data and queued accordingly.
  • Protocol types auto-prioritized by the satellite - all IEEE control protocols (01 80 C2 xx xx xx), LACP, 802.3ah, CFM, STP, CDP, LLDP, ARP, OSPF, RIP, BGP, IGMP, RSVP, HSRP, VRRP p2 q.
  • User data packets auto-prioritized by the satellite - VLAN COS 5, 6, 7, IP precedence 5, 6, 7 MPLS EXP 5, 6, 7.
Figure 2. AutoQoS, satellite to host



ASR9000 series router to satellite

  • Traffic targeted to a satellite egress port is shaped on ASR9K to match downstream access port speed.
  • Traffic is streamed based on the full 3-level egress queuing hierarchy.
  • Each remotely managed satellite access GigE port is auto-shaped to match access line speed.
Figure 3. AutoQoS, host to satellite



QoS Offload on Satellite

The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Satellite System enables you to configure a topology in which one or more satellite switches complement one or more Cisco ASR 9000 Series routers, to collectively deploy a single virtual switching system. In this system, the satellite switches act under the management control of the routers. The connections between the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router and the satellite switches are called the Inter-chassis link (ICL), which is established using standard Ethernet interfaces.

The ICL link between the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router and the satellite gets oversubscribed by the access interfaces on the satellite box. This is because the QoS policies applied on the satellite interfaces are programmed on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Line card locally. Therefore, the flow of traffic on the ICL from the satellite switch is not controlled. This leads a loss of high-priority traffic due to congestion on the ICL.

This figure shows the ports where the QoS policies may be applied.

Figure 4. Satellite and Host connection



Benefits of QoS Offload

The QoS offload feature protects the control packets when Satellite fabric links (SFL) is congested. The offloading of QoS policies helps to drop excess traffic at the ingress direction (or access ports) and prioritize the protocol control traffic at the egress direction (or SFL).

QoS Offload on Different Topologies

The QoS Offload feature is supported on these satellite topologies:

Hub and Spoke Architecture

In the Hub and Spoke (H&S) architecture, a host is connected to a satellite through the Satellite Discovery And Control (SDAC) Protocol. The SDAC Protocol provides the behavioral, semantic, and syntactic definition of the relationship between a satellite device and its host. This figure shows H&S Satellite Network Architecture, where Host1 is synchronized using the Interchassis Communication Protocol (ICCP).

Figure 5. Hub and Spoke Architecture



Here is the sample configuration that displays the QoS policy being offloaded in the H&S architecture.

interfaceTenGigE 0/1/0/0
nv satellite-fabric-link satellite 100
remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/0-9
service-policy output <policy-map name>
!
!

In this configuration, the service-policy is configured in the ingress direction under the nv mode. The QoS policy is offloaded to Satellite 100.

Dual Home Architecture

In the dual home architecture, two hosts are connected to a satellite through the Satellite Discovery And Control (SDAC) Protocol. The SDAC Protocol provides the behavioral, semantic, and syntactic definition of the relationship between a satellite device and its host. This figure shows Dual home Satellite Network Architecture, where Host1 and Host2 are synchronized using the Interchassis Communication Protocol (ICCP).

Figure 6. Dual Home Architecture



Here is the sample configuration that displays the QoS policy being offloaded in the Dual home architecture.

interface TenGigE 0/1/0/0
 redundancy iccp group <group-id>
nv satellite-fabric-link satellite 100
 host-redundancy iccp-group <group-id>
remote-ports Satellite-Ether 0/0/0-9
service-policy output <policy-map name>
!
!

In this configuration, the service-policy is configured in the ingress direction under the nv mode. The QoS policy is offloaded to Satellite 100.

Restriction

Both Host1 and Host2 must be configured similarly on the access ports. This configuration must be different on the ICLs.

L2 Fabric Architecture

In the L2 Fabric architecture, a satellite is connected to one or more hosts through one or more ethernet virtual circuit (EVC) in the Layer 2 Fabric network. An EVC is identified by two transport VLAN IDs, TPVID- S and TP-VID-H. TP-VID-S is the satellite side transport VLAN ID and TP-VID-H is the host side transport VLAN ID.

Figure 7. L2 Fabric Architecture



Here is the sample configuration that displays the QoS policy being offloaded in the L2 Fabric architecture.

interface TenGigabitEthernet 0/1/0/0.1
nv satellite-fabric-link satellite 100
 remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/0-5
service-policy output <policy-map name>
encapsulation dot1q 20
!
!

In this configuration, the ICL link is created on the VLAN and EVC is provisioned as a sub-interface in the host-side. The nV satellite fabric interface is created under this sub-interface. The service-policy is configured in the nv mode and the QoS policy is offloaded on the ICL link where the VLAN is connected to the Host.

Restrictions
  • Bundle interfaces are not supported for bundle ICL.
  • Only sub-interfaces under physical interfaces are supported for L2 Fabric.
  • Only flat and 2-level HQoS policies are supported on satellite interfaces in L2 Fabric topology.
Simple Ring Architecture

In the simple ring architecture, a set of satellites are connected to dual hosts through a single physical link to form a simple ring. The dual hosts—Host1 and Host2—are connected to the satellites through the SDAC protocol. Host1 and Host2 are synchronized using Interchassis Communication Protocol (ICCP). This figure shows the simple ring architecture.

Figure 8. Simple Ring Architecture



Here is the sample configuration that displays QoS policy being applied to the interface-1 facing the host on the satellite in the simple ring architecture.

interface TenGigabitEthernet 0/1/0/0
	ipv4 point-to-point
	ipv4 unnumbered Loopback10
	nv satellite-fabric-link network
	satellite 100
		remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/0-4
			service-policy output <Policy-map-A>
	satellite 200
		remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/5-9
		service-policy output <Policy-map-B>

In this configuration, the service-policy is configured in the egress direction under the nv mode. Both Span-1 and Span-2 have the same QoS policy configured. Also, the Policy-map-B is applied on both Span-1 and Span-2 of Satellite 200. The QoS policy is offloaded on the ICL link where the satellite interface is connected to the Host.

Restrictions
  • Bundle interfaces are not supported for bundle ICL.
  • Only flat and 2-level HQoS policies are supported on satellite interfaces in simple ring topology.

Note


For more information on the different satellite topologies, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide.


QoS Offload Scenarios

This section describes the various QoS offload scenarios on different interfaces on different satellite topologies.

Service-policy on Access Port over Physical Interface

In this scenario, the QoS policy is configured on the access port or in the ingress direction over the physical interface of the satellite.

In this example, the policy_A service-policy is directly applied on the Ethernet interface on the satellite. Thus, policy_A stays on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router and there is no offloading in this example.

interface gigabitEthernet 100/0/0/0
	service-policy input/output policy_A
	!
	!

In this example, the policy_B service-policy is configured under the nv mode, and the QoS policy is completely offloaded to the Satellite.

interface gigabitEthernet100/0/0/0
	nv
		service-policy input/output policy_B
Figure 9. Service-policy on Access Port over Physical Interface (Single Host)



Service-policy on Access Port over Bundle Interface

In this scenario, the QoS policy is configured on the bundle access port or in the ingress direction over the bundle interface of the satellite.

In this example, similar to one for the physical interface, the QoS service-policy is configured under the nv mode and the policy-map is offloaded on the satellite bundle-ether interface.

interface GigabitEthernet 100/0/0/1
	bundle-id 1
!
interface GigabitEthernet 100/0/0/1
	bundle-id 1
!
interface bundle-ether 1
	nv
	service-policy input/output<Policy-map name>
!
!
Figure 10. Service-policy on Access Port over Bundle Interface



Service-policy on SFLs over Physical Interface (Hub and Spoke)

In this scenario, the QoS policy is configured on the host-facing satellite fabric link (SFL) or in the egress direction over the physical interface of the satellite.

In this example, the service-policy is configured on SFL over physical ICL under the nv mode and the QoS policy is offloaded to the satellite.

interfaceTenGigE 0/1/0/0
 nv satellite-fabric-link satellite 100
 remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/0-9
 service-policy output <policy-map name>
!
!
Figure 11. Service-policy on SFLs over Physical Interface (Hub and Spoke)



Service-policy on SFLs over Bundle Interface (Hub and Spoke)

In this scenario, the QoS policy is configured on the host-facing bundle satellite fabric link (SFL) or in the egress direction over the bundle interface of the satellite.

In this example, the service-policy is configured on SFL over bundle ICL under the nv mode and the QoS policy is offloaded to the satellite.

interface Bundle-ether 2
	nv satellite-fabric-link satellite 100
	remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/0-5
	service-policy output <policy-map name>
!
!




Service-policy on SFLs over Physical Interface (L2 Fabric)

In this scenario, the QoS policy is configured on the VLAN sub-interface or in the egress direction over the physical interface of the satellite.

In this example, the QoS policy-map is applied to the host-facing bundle SFL under the nv mode and the QoS policy is offloaded to the satellite 100 through one of the EVC of the L2 Fabric network.

interface TenGigabitEthernet 0/1/0/0.1
	nv satellite-fabric-link satellite 100
	remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/0-5
		service-policy output <Policy-map-name>
!
Figure 12. Service-policy on SFLs over Physical Interface (L2 Fabric)




Note


Only the sub-interfaces under physical interfaces are supported for L2 Fabric.


Service-policy on SFLs over Physical Interface (Ring)

In this scenario, the QoS policy is configured on the host-facing satellite fabric link. The same policy-map is applied on the ring-facing Inter Satellite fabric link (ISFL).

Figure 13. Service-policy on SFLs over Physical Interface (Ring)



In this example, the sample QoS policy-map configuration is applied on both SFLs on the satellite 100 and 200, and the QoS policy is offloaded to the satellite.

interface TenGigabitEthernet 0/1/0/0
 nv satellite-fabric-link network    
  satellite 100
   remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/0-4
   service-policy output <Policy-map-1>
  satellite 200
   remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/5-9
   service-policy output <Policy-map-2>
!
!

Supported Platform-Specific Information for QoS Offload

This section describes the supported capability matrix, various supported classification combinations, and the supported scalability matrix for 9000v.

Supported Capability Matrix

Feature

Support on 9000v Platform

Range

Restrictions

Classification

Ingress

COS

Yes

0-7

The cos classification is done on the outer vlan tag based on the policies and the cos value applied on the outer vlan tag.

Note    The cos classification based on match-rule is not applicable for untagged packets on the ingress direction.

IP DSCP

Yes

0-63

IP DSCP is supported for untagged, single-tagged, double-tagged, and mac-in-mac packets on the ingress direction, from the access-side, where the host is connected.

IP DSCP is supported only for IPv4.

IP PREC

Yes

0-7

IP PREC is supported for untagged, single-tagged, double-tagged, and mac-in-mac packets on the ingress direction, from the access-side, where the host is connected.

IP PR is supported only for IPv4.

MPLS EXPERIMENTAL TOPMOST

Yes

0-7

The mpls experimental topmost feature is supported only for the untagged packets on the ingress direction, from the access-side, where the host is connected.

VLAN

Yes

The vlan classification is done on the outer vlan tag based on the policies and the cos value applied on the outer vlan tag.

Note    The vlan classification based on outer vlan tag is not applicable for untagged packets on the ingress direction.

Egress

QOS-GROUP

Yes

1-5

A class-map with multiple "match qos-group" statements is not supported.

Note   
  • qos-group 0 corresponds to class-default, hence, it cannot be configured.
  • qos-group 6 and qos-group 7 are reserved, and hence, it cannot be configured.

IP DSCP

No

IP PREC

No

Marking

Ingress

COS

Yes

0-7

The cos marking is done on the vlan tag that is added by the satellite on the direction towards host.

DISCARD-CLASS

NA

The discard-class feature is used along with WRED. But, WRED is not supported in 9000v.

IP DSCP

Yes

0-63

IP DSCP is supported for untagged, single-tagged, double-tagged, and mac-in-mac packets on the ingress direction, from the access-side, where the host is connected.

MPLS EXPERIMENTAL IMPOSITION

No

IP PREC

Yes

0-7

IP PREC is supported for untagged, single-tagged, double-tagged, and mac-in-mac packets on the ingress direction, from the access-side, where the host is connected.

QOS-GROUP

Yes

0-5

The qos-group marking feature is only used to redirect packets to a particular queue.

The set qos-group 0 on ingress policy is necessary to send the packets to queue 0 on ICL.

Note    If the QoS marking action for ICL interface in the egress and ingress directions are not the same, then traffic matching the QOS-group does not get accounted in the default class.

Police Actions

QOS-GROUP TRANSMIT

Yes

0-5

The set qos-group 6 and 7 is not configurable.

PREC-TRANSMIT

Yes

0-7

DISCARD-CLASS

No

DSCP-TRANSMIT

Yes

0-63

COS-TRANSMIT

Yes

0-7

The cos-transmit is done on the vlan tag that is added by the satellite on the host direction.

Egress

IP DSCP

No

IP PREC

No

MPLS EXPERIMENTAL TOPMOST

No

Queuing

Egress

Bandwidth Value

Yes

8-10000000

Bandwidth value cannot be configured under qos-group 3. A combination of bandwidth types cannot be configured. For example, the bandwidth command can be configured either with kbps, or remaining percent, or remaining ratio, but not with a combination of all.

Bandwidth Percent

Yes

Bandwidth Remaining

Yes

1-127

Bandwidth Remaining Percent

Yes

Ratio

Yes

Priority lev 1, 2, 3

Yes

When a priority level is configured at the host, it by default gets configured to priority percent 85 on the satellite.

The priority action cannot be combined with other queuing actions.

On 9000v satellites, the priority action is only supported under qos-group 3.

Priority Percent

Yes

Random Detect Discard-class-based

No

Shape Average

Yes

8000- 10000000000

On 9000v satellites, the shape average command cannot be configured under qos-group 3.

Shape Average Percent

Yes

On 9000v satellites, the shape average percent command cannot be configured under qos-group 3.

HQOS

No

Rate Limiting

1R2C

Yes

CIR/PIR: 8000-10000000000

Burst bytes: 1000- 256000000

Burst ms:1-2000

The bytes can be configured in milliseconds (ms) only if CIR is in percent.

Note   
  • CIR stands for Committed Information Rate and PIR stands for Peak Information Rate.
  • Transmit and marking actions are not supported together.

2R3C

Yes

If the exceed-action command is configured, then violate-action is copied from exceed-action, by default. If the exceed-action is not configured, then violate-action and exceed-action are dropped.

Note   
  • 2R3C statistics are supported only for conform & violate actions.
  • Transmit and marking actions are not supported together.
Supported Classification Combination

These are the allowed classification combination in Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router:

  • COS + IP DSCP
  • IP DSCP +VLAN
  • COS + VLAN
  • IP DSCP + IP PREC

Note


The IP DSCP + IP PREC combination is not supported for 9000v.

The table lists the allowed classification combinations in 9000v:

Match-all class map

DSCP + PREC + COS

PREC + DSCP + VLAN

Match-any class map

VLAN + COS + PREC + DSCP

DSCP + VLAN + COS

DSCP + PREC + COS

VLAN + COS + PREC

Supported Scalability Matrix for 9000v

Class-map with options

Number of Field Programmable (FP) entries needed per policy-map(max 8 classes)

Max policy-maps supported

cos (0-7)

7 + 1 ( class default)

2304/8 = 288

ip dscp (0-63)

7 + 1

2304/8 = 288

ip precedence (0-7)

7 + 1

2304/8 = 288

vlan (1-4094)

7 + 1

2304/8 = 288

match-any or match-all with single argument

cos + dscp

cos+ prec

cos + vlan

dscp + vlan

prec + vlan

2 *7 + 1 (class-default) = 15

2304/15 = 153.6

match-any with maximum arguments to the match parameters

cos (max 4)+ ip precedence (max 4)

8 * 7 + 1 (class-default) = 57

2304/57 = 40.4

cos (4) + ip dscp (8)

12 * 7 + 1 (class-default)= 85

2304/85 = 27.1

cos (4) + vlan (30)

34 * 7 + 1 = 239

2304/239 = 9.6

vlan (30) + ip prec (4)

34 *7 + 1 = 239

2304/239 = 9.6

vlan (30)+ip dscp (8)

38*7 + 1 =267

2304/267 = 8.6

match-all with maximum arguments

cos (4) + ip dscp (8)

32 *7 + 1=225

2304/225 = 10.2

cos (4) + vlan (30)

120 *7+ 1=841

2304/841 = 2.7

vlan (30) + ip prec (4)

120*7+1=841

2304/841 = 2.7

cos (4) + ip prec (4)

16 *7 +1= 113

2304/113 = 20.3

vlan (30) + ip dscp (8)

240 *7 + 1 = 1681

2304/1681 =1.3

QoS on PWHE

QoS on Pseudo-wire Head End (PWHE) enables enhanced L3VPN service on a service-provider-edge router.

For more information on PWHE-QoS, refer the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Modular Quality of Service Configuration Guide .

Supported Features

Features of QoS on PW-HE:

  • IPv4 and IPv6 address-families are supported.
  • Policy maps on both ingress and egress PW-HE. Both ingress and egress support policing, marking, and queuing within hardware limitations.
  • Policies at the port for the transit traffic can be applied simultaneously with policies for PWHE interfaces.
  • Policy is replicated on all PWHE members. This means the rate specified in the PWHE policy-map is limited to the lowest rate of all the pin down members. For example, if the PW-HE interface has both 1G and 10G pin down members, the rate is limited to 1G. if the 10G member has a shaper of 900 mbps, the rate of the PWHE interface policy is limited to 900 mbps.
  • Port shaping policy on the member interface will impact the PWHE traffic passing through that port.

Limitations

  • QoS accounting doesnot include pseudowire header.

Bandwidth Distribution

PWHE and non-PWHE traffic on the same pin down member share scheduling resources. It is recommended to configure bandwidth remaining in the parent class-default of PWHE policies to control the distribution of excess bandwidth between PWHE and non-PWHE traffic.

Bandwidth remaining command can be used in the parent default class of PW-HE policies allowing user to control the distribution of excess bandwidth between various PW-HE interfaces and physical interface.

QoS Accounting

  • The packet length when performing QoS functions (policing, shaping, statistics, etc.) will be based on the customer IP packet, customer L2 header and the configured additional overhead.
  • QoS statistics will include the customer IP packet, customer L2 header and configured additional overhead.
  • Outer MPLS headers (VC label, transport labels, etc.) and outer L2 header (Layer 2 encap of the underlying physical interface) will not be included in the packet length when performing QoS on the PW HE virtual interface.

Marking Support

Marking for PW-Ether in ingress and egress direction

  • Marking of customer IP header, qos-group and discard-class will be supported.
  • Marking of EXP bits for all imposed MPLS labels will be supported for PWHE main interface .
  • EXP for imposed labels can be set in an ingress or an egress policy attached to a PW-HE interface.

    Note


    For non-PWHE interfaces, EXP for imposed labels can only be set in an ingress policy. This is an exception made for PW-HE interfaces because more labels are imposed on the customer IP packet after processing the egress QoS policy.
  • Marking of CoS bits in transport L2 header will not be supported.
  • For unconditional markings in ingress direction, the following fields can be marked - DSCP/precedence, EXP for imposed labels, qos-group and discard-class.
  • For unconditional markings in egress direction, the following fields can be marked - DSCP/precedenceand EXP for imposed labels.
  • For conditional policer markings in ingress direction, at most two of the following fields can be marked - DSCP/precedence, EXP for imposed labels, qos-group and discard-class.
  • For conditional policer markings in egress direction, the following fields can be marked - DSCP/precedence and EXP for imposed labels.

Policing and Queuing support

All the policing features supported on normal L3 interfaces will be supported on PW-HE main interface too.

Queuing

  Ingress and Egress Queues Ingress and Egress Policers
PW-HE interface with no policy map

Each PW-HE member has per port default queues. Both the ingress and egress traffic will use the members port default queue.

Not applicable
PW-HE interface with a policy map

Any ingress and egress queues in the policymaps would be replicated on each PW-HE member.

Any ingress and egress policer in the policymaps would be replicated per each PW-HE member.


Note


If PW-HE member is a bundle, policy maps will be replicated on bundle members.

Statistics

Show commands of a PW-HE virtual interface QoS policy will provide ingress / egress statistics;

  • per pin down member.
  • per bundle member if the bundle is a pin down member.
  • aggregated stats on the whole PW-HE interface.

Policy Instantiation

The various scenarios of QoS on PW-HE are discussed here:

  • If any member interface has policies applied to them, only non PW-HE traffic will be subjected to those policies. An exception to this is a configured port shaper.
  • QoS policy applied on the PW-HE main interface is instantiated on pin-down member. If the pin-down member is a bundle, then the policy is instantiated on each bundle member .

Note


When PWHE interface is created, and no PWHE QoS policy is applied on it, PWHE traffic will pass through the member interface default queues.

 


PW-HE without QoS policy

The following two cases represent the default behavior of the pseudowire headend interfaces:

  • PW-HE ingress to core facing egress (access to core) - DSCP/ precedence value from customer IP packet is copied to EXP of all imposed labels (VPN and transport)in the core-facing direction.
  • PW-HE egress (core to access) - DSCP/precedence value from customer IP packet is copied to EXP of all imposed labels (VC and transport) in the access-facing direction.

Configuring QoS on PWHE: Example.

The example shows how to configure QoS on PW-HE main interface .

policy-map pw_child_in
class voip
 priority level 1
  police rate percent 1
  !
!
class video
  police rate percent 10
  !
  priority level 2
!
class data
  police rate percent 70 peak-rate percent 100
   exceed-action transmit
   violate-action drop
  !
!
class class-default
  police rate percent 19 peak-rate percent 100
   exceed-action transmit
   violate-action drop
  !
!
end-policy-map
!
policy-map pw_parent_in
class class-default
  service-policy pw_child_in
  police rate 100 mbps
   child-conform-aware
  !
!
end-policy-map
!

policy-map pw_child_out
class voip
  priority level 1
  police rate 1 mbps
  !
!
class data
  bandwidth remaining percent 70
  random-detect discard-class 3 40 ms 50 ms
!
class video
  priority level 2
  police rate 10 mbps
  !
!
class class-default
  random-detect discard-class 1 20 ms 30 ms
!
end-policy-map
!
policy-map pw_parent_out
class class-default
  service-policy pw_child_out
  shape average 100 mbps
!
end-policy-map
!

interface pw-ether 1
service-policy input pw_parent_in
service-policy output pw_parent_out
!
 

For other PW-HE related information, please refer the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router L2VPN and Ethernet Services Configuration Guide

Ingress Queuing Support

Ingress queuing is disabled for some line cards.

The tables below list out the ingress queuing support for fixed port and modular line cards.


Note


Ingress queuing is not supported on ASR9K-SIP-700 line cards.


Fixed port Line Card

LC type Ingress Queuing Support

A9K-24x10GE-SE

Yes

A9K-24x10GE-TR

Yes

A9K-36x10GE-SE

No

A9K-36x10GE-TR

No

A9K-2x100GE-SE

No

A9K-2x100GE-TR

No

A9K-1x100GE-SE

No

A9K-1x100GE-TR

No

Modular Line Card

LC type EP type Ingress Queuing Support

A9K-MOD80-SE

A9K-MPA-20X1GE

Yes

A9K-MOD80-SE

A9K-MPA-4X10GE

No

A9K-MOD80-SE

A9K-MPA-2X10GE

Yes

A9K-MOD80-SE

A9K-MPA-1X40GE

No

A9K-MOD80-TR

A9K-MPA-20X1G

Yes

A9K-MOD80-TR

A9K-MPA-4X10GE

No

A9K-MOD80-TR

A9K-MPA-2X10GE

Yes

A9K-MOD80-TR

A9K-MPA-1X40GE

No

A9K-MOD160-SE

A9K-MPA-20X1G

Yes

A9K-MOD160-SE

A9K-MPA-4X10GE

Yes

A9K-MOD160-SE

A9K-MPA-2X10GE

Yes

A9K-MOD160-SE

A9K-MPA-1X40GE

No

A9K-MOD160-SE

A9K-MPA-2X40GE

No

A9K-MOD160-SE

A9K-MPA-8X10GE

No

A9K-MOD160-TR

A9K-MPA-20X1G

Yes

A9K-MOD160-TR

A9K-MPA-4X10GE

Yes

A9K-MOD160-TR

A9K-MPA-2X10GE

Yes

A9K-MOD160-TR

A9K-MPA-1X40GE

No

A9K-MOD160-TR

A9K-MPA-2X40GE

No

A9K-MOD160-TR

A9K-MPA-8X10GE

No

ASR9001-LC

Chassis fixed 4X10GE

No

ASR9001-LC

A9K-MPA-4X10GE

No

ASR9001-LC

A9K-MPA-2X10GE

No

ASR9001-LC

A9K-MPA-1X40GE

No

ASR9001-LC

A9K-MPA-20X1GE

No

Ingress Queuing Support for Modular Linecards

LC type EP type Ingress Queuing Support

A9K-MOD80-SE

A9K-MPA-20X1GE

Yes

A9K-MOD80-SE

A9K-MPA-4X10GE

No

A9K-MOD80-SE

A9K-MPA-2X10GE

Yes

A9K-MOD80-SE

A9K-MPA-1X40GE

No

A9K-MOD80-TR

A9K-MPA-20X1G

Yes

A9K-MOD80-TR

A9K-MPA-4X10GE

No

A9K-MOD80-TR

A9K-MPA-2X10GE

Yes

A9K-MOD80-TR

A9K-MPA-1X40GE

No

A9K-MOD160-SE

A9K-MPA-20X1G

Yes

A9K-MOD160-SE

A9K-MPA-4X10GE

Yes

A9K-MOD160-SE

A9K-MPA-2X10GE

Yes

A9K-MOD160-SE

A9K-MPA-1X40GE

No

A9K-MOD160-SE

A9K-MPA-2X40GE

No

A9K-MOD160-SE

A9K-MPA-8X10GE

No

A9K-MOD160-TR

A9K-MPA-20X1G

Yes

A9K-MOD160-TR

A9K-MPA-4X10GE

Yes

A9K-MOD160-TR

A9K-MPA-2X10GE

Yes

A9K-MOD160-TR

A9K-MPA-1X40GE

No

A9K-MOD160-TR

A9K-MPA-2X40GE

No

A9K-MOD160-TR

A9K-MPA-8X10GE

No

ASR9001-LC

Chassis fixed 4X10GE

No

ASR9001-LC

A9K-MPA-4X10GE

No

ASR9001-LC

A9K-MPA-2X10GE

No

ASR9001-LC

A9K-MPA-1X40GE

No

ASR9001-LC

A9K-MPA-20X1GE

No

In-Place Policy Modification

The In-Place Policy Modification feature allows you to modify a QoS policy even when the QoS policy is attached to one or more interfaces. When you modify the QoS policy attached to one or more interfaces, the QoS policy is automatically modified on all the interfaces to which the QoS policy is attached. A modified policy is subject to the same checks that a new policy is subject to when it is bound to an interface.

If the policy-modification is successful, the modified policy takes effect on all the interfaces to which the policy is attached. The configuration session is blocked until the policy modification is complete.

However, if the policy modification fails on any one of the interfaces, an automatic rollback is initiated to ensure that the pre-modification policy is in effect on all the interfaces. The configuration session is blocked until the rollback is complete on all affected interfaces.

If unrecoverable errors occur during in-place policy modification, the policy is put into an inconsistent state on target interfaces. Use the show qos inconsistency command to view inconsistency in each location. (This command is supported only on ASR 9000 Ethernet Line Cards). The configuration session is blocked until the modified policy is effective on all interfaces that are using the policy. No new configuration is possible until the configuration session is unblocked.

When a QoS policy attached to an interface is modified, there might not be any policy in effect on the interfaces in which the modified policy is used for a short period of time.


Note


The QoS statistics for the policy that is attached to an interface are lost (reset to 0) when the policy is modified.


Recommendations for Using In-Place Policy Modification

For a short period of time while a QoS policy is being modified, there might not be any policy in effect on the interfaces in which the modified policy is used. For this reason, modify QoS policies that affect the fewest number of interfaces at a time. Use the show policy-map targets command to identify the number of interfaces that will be affected during policy map modification.

Dynamic Modification of Interface Bandwidth

This section describes the dynamic modification of interface bandwidth feature.

Policy States

  • Verification—This state indicates an incompatibility of the configured QoS policy with respect to the new interface bandwidth value. The system handles traffic on a best-efforts basis and some traffic drops can occur.

Inter Class Policer Bucket Sharing

Inter class policer bucket sharing feature allows policer bucket sharing among different classes in a hierarchical QoS model within the modular quality of service command line (MQC) construct to achieve multi rate policing of the same packet based on different classification criteria. In this feature, the classification of the incoming packet happens only once. However, the policer bucket is shared among classes so that the same token bucket is used even though match happens against different classes.

This feature includes following components:

Policer Bucket Shared

Policer bucket shared feature defines and shares a policer node entity. The defined policer bucket is shared between multiple classes.

Here is a sample configuration that defines and shares policer bucket instance sp1:
policy-map parent 
        class long-distance
          police bucket shared sp1 rate 1 mbps

In this configuration, a policy-map for class long-distance traffic type is created to police at 1Mbps and policer bucket is shared.

Policer Bucket Referred

Policer bucket referred feature refers a defined policer bucket instance. The reference to the policer bucket could be across policy level, a parent can refer a child policer or vice versa, and one policer node can be referred by multiple classes across a policy map.

Here is a sample configuration that refers shared policer bucket instance sp1:
policy-map voip-child
        class long-distance-voip
         police bucket referred sp1

In this configuration, a policy-map for class long-distance-voip traffic type is created and shared policer bucket sp1 is referred.

Interface Support

Inter class policer bucket sharing feature is supported only in the ingress direction. This section describes the supported and non-supported interfaces for inter class policer bucket sharing feature.

Table 2 Supported and non-supported interfaces

Supported Interfaces

1G/10G/100GE Physical interfaces

L2 and L3 sub-interfaces

Bundle ports

Bundle sub-interfaces

Non-supported Interfaces

Bridge Virtual Interface (BVI)

Satellite interfaces

Pseudowire Headend (PWHE) interfaces


Note


Inter class policer bucket sharing feature is supported only on the ASR 9000 Enhanced Ethernet Line Card.

How to Configure Modular QoS Packet Classification

Creating a Traffic Class

To create a traffic class containing match criteria, use the class-map command to specify the traffic class name, and then use the following match commands in class-map configuration mode, as needed.

For conceptual information, see the Traffic Class Elements, page 16.

Restrictions

All match commands specified in this configuration task are considered optional, but you must configure at least one match criterion for a class.

SUMMARY STEPS

    1.    configure

    2.    class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name

    3.    match access-group [ipv4 | ipv6] access-group-name

    4.    match [not] cos [cos-value] [cos-value0 ... cos-value7]

    5.    match [not] cos inner [inner-cos-value] [inner-cos-value0...inner-cos-value7]

    6.    match destination-address mac destination-mac-address

    7.    match source-address mac source-mac-address

    8.    match [not] discard-class discard-class-value [discard-class-value1 ... discard-class-value6]

    9.    match [not] dscp [ipv4 | ipv6] dscp-value [dscp-value ... dscp-value]

    10.    match [not] mpls experimental topmost exp-value [exp-value1 ... exp-value7]

    11.    match [not] precedence [ipv4 | ipv6] precedence-value [precedence-value1 ... precedence-value6]

    12.    match [not] protocol protocol-value
[protocol-value1 ... protocol-value7]

    13.    match [not] qos-group [qos-group-value1 ... qos-group-value8]

    14.    match vlan [inner] vlanid [vlanid1 ... vlanid7]

    15.    Use the commit or end command.


DETAILED STEPS
     Command or ActionPurpose
    Step 1 configure


    Example:
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
     

    Enters global configuration mode.

     
    Step 2class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name


    Example:
    
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# class-map class201
    
     

    Creates a class map to be used for matching packets to the class whose name you specify and enters the class map configuration mode.

    If you specify match-any, one of the match criteria must be met for traffic entering the traffic class to be classified as part of the traffic class. This is the default. If you specify match-all, the traffic must match all the match criteria.

     
    Step 3match access-group [ipv4 | ipv6] access-group-name


    Example:
    
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match access-group ipv4 map1
    
     

    (Optional) Configures the match criteria for a class map based on the specified access control list (ACL) name.

     
    Step 4match [not] cos [cos-value] [cos-value0 ... cos-value7]


    Example:
    
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match cos 5
    
     

    (Optional) Specifies a cos-value in a class map to match packets. The cos-value arguments are specified as an integer from 0 to 7.

     
    Step 5match [not] cos inner [inner-cos-value] [inner-cos-value0...inner-cos-value7]

    Example:
    
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router match cos inner 7
    
     

    (Optional) Specifies an inner-cos-value in a class map to match packets. The inner-cos-value arguments are specified as an integer from 0 to 7.

     
    Step 6match destination-address mac destination-mac-address


    Example:
    
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match destination-address mac 00.00.00
    
     

    (Optional) Configures the match criteria for a class map based on the specified destination MAC address.

     
    Step 7match source-address mac source-mac-address


    Example:
    
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match source-address mac 00.00.00
    
     

    (Optional) Configures the match criteria for a class map based on the specified source MAC address.

     
    Step 8match [not] discard-class discard-class-value [discard-class-value1 ... discard-class-value6]

    Example:
    
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match discard-class 5
    
     

    (Optional) Specifies a discard-class-value in a class map to match packets. The discard-class-value argument is specified as an integer from 0 to 7.

    The match discard-class command is supported only for an egress policy.

     
    Step 9match [not] dscp [ipv4 | ipv6] dscp-value [dscp-value ... dscp-value]

    Example:
    
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match dscp ipv4 15
    
     

    (Optional) Identifies a specific DSCP value as a match criterion.

    • Value range is from 0 to 63.
    • Reserved keywords can be specified instead of numeric values.
    • Up to eight values or ranges con be used per match statement.
     
    Step 10match [not] mpls experimental topmost exp-value [exp-value1 ... exp-value7]


    Example:
    
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match mpls experimental topmost 3
    
     

    (Optional) Configures a class map so that the three-bit experimental field in the topmost Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) labels are examined for experimental (EXP) field values. The value range is from 0 to 7.

     
    Step 11match [not] precedence [ipv4 | ipv6] precedence-value [precedence-value1 ... precedence-value6]


    Example:
    
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match precedence ipv4 5
    
     

    (Optional) Identifies IP precedence values as match criteria.

    • Value range is from 0 to 7.
    • Reserved keywords can be specified instead of numeric values.
     
    Step 12match [not] protocol protocol-value
[protocol-value1 ... protocol-value7]

    Example:
    
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match protocol igmp
    
     

    (Optional) Configures the match criteria for a class map on the basis of the specified protocol.

     
    Step 13match [not] qos-group [qos-group-value1 ... qos-group-value8]

    Example:
    
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match qos-group 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
    
     

    (Optional) Specifies service (QoS) group values in a class map to match packets.

    • qos-group-value identifier argument is specified as the exact value or range of values from 0 to 63.
    • Up to eight values (separated by spaces) can be entered in one match statement.
    • match qos-group command is supported only for an egress policy.
     
    Step 14match vlan [inner] vlanid [vlanid1 ... vlanid7]

    Example:
    
    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match vlan vlanid vlanid1
    
     

    (Optional) Specifies a VLAN ID or range of VLAN IDs in a class map to match packets.

    • vlanid is specified as an exact value or range of values from 1 to 4094.
    • Total number of supported VLAN values or ranges is 8.
     
    Step 15 Use the commit or end command.  

    commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

    end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
    • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
    • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
    • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
     

    Creating a Traffic Policy

    To create a traffic policy, use the policy-map command to specify the traffic policy name.

    The traffic class is associated with the traffic policy when the class command is used. The class command must be issued after you enter the policy map configuration mode. After entering the class command, the router is automatically in policy map class configuration mode, which is where the QoS policies for the traffic policy are defined.

    These class-actions are supported:

    • bandwidth—Configures the bandwidth for the class. See the “Configuring Modular Quality of Service Congestion Management on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers” module in this guide.
    • police—Police traffic. See the “Configuring Modular Quality of Service Congestion Management on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers” module in this guide.
    • priority—Assigns priority to the class. See the “Configuring Modular Quality of Service Congestion Management on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers” module in this guide.
    • queue-limit—Configures queue-limit (tail drop threshold) for the class. See the “Configuring Modular QoS Congestion Avoidance on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers” module in this guide.
    • random-detect—Enables Random Early Detection. See the “Configuring Modular QoS Congestion Avoidance on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers” module in this guide.
    • service-policy—Configures a child service policy.
    • set—Configures marking for this class. See the “Class-based Unconditional Packet Marking Feature and Benefits” section on page 20.
    • shape—Configures shaping for the class. See the “Configuring Modular Quality of Service Congestion Management on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers” module in this guide.

    For additional commands that can be entered as match criteria, see the Cisco ASR 9000 Series  Aggregation Services Router Modular Quality of Service Command Reference.

    For conceptual information, see “Traffic Policy Elements” section on page 17.

    SUMMARY STEPS

      1.    configure

      2.    policy-map [ type qos ] policy-name

      3.    class class-name

      4.    set precedence [ tunnel ] precedence-value

      5.    Use the commit or end command.


    DETAILED STEPS
       Command or ActionPurpose
      Step 1 configure


      Example:
      RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
       

      Enters global configuration mode.

       
      Step 2policy-map [ type qos ] policy-name


      Example:
      RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# policy-map policy1
      
       

      Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy and enters the policy map configuration mode.

       
      Step 3class class-name

      Example:
      
      RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# class class1
      
       

      Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change.

       
      Step 4set precedence [ tunnel ] precedence-value


      Example:
      
      RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# set precedence 3
      
       

      Sets the precedence value in the IP header.

       
      Step 5 Use the commit or end command.  

      commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

      end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
      • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
      • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
      • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
       

      Attaching a Traffic Policy to an Interface

      After the traffic class and traffic policy are created, you must use the service-policy interface configuration command to attach a traffic policy to an interface, and to specify the direction in which the policy should be applied (either on packets coming into the interface or packets leaving the interface).

      For additional commands that can be entered in policy map class configuration mode, see the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services RoutersModular Quality of Service Command Reference..

      Prerequisites

      A traffic class and traffic policy must be created before attaching a traffic policy to an interface.

      SUMMARY STEPS

        1.    configure

        2.    interface type interface-path-id

        3.    service-policy {input | output} policy-map

        4.    Use the commit or end command.

        5.    show policy-map interface type interface-path-id [input | output]


      DETAILED STEPS
         Command or ActionPurpose
        Step 1 configure


        Example:
        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
         

        Enters global configuration mode.

         
        Step 2interface type interface-path-id


        Example:
        
        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/1/0/9
        
         

        Configures an interface and enters the interface configuration mode.

         
        Step 3service-policy {input | output} policy-map


        Example:
        
        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# service-policy output policy1
        
         

        Attaches a policy map to an input or output interface to be used as the service policy for that interface. In this example, the traffic policy evaluates all traffic leaving that interface.

         
        Step 4 Use the commit or end command.  

        commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

        end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
        • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
        • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
        • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
         
        Step 5show policy-map interface type interface-path-id [input | output]


        Example:
        
        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show policy-map interface gigabitethernet 0/1/0/9
        
         

        (Optional) Displays statistics for the policy on the specified interface.

         

        Attaching a Shared Policy Instance to Multiple Subinterfaces

        After the traffic class and traffic policy are created, you can optionally use the service-policy (interface) configuration command to attach a shared policy instance to multiple subinterfaces, and to specify the direction in which the policy should be applied (either on packets coming into or leaving the subinterface).


        Note


        A shared policy can include a combination of Layer 2 and Layer 3 subinterfaces.


        For additional commands that can be entered in policy map class configuration mode, see the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers Modular Quality of Service Command Reference.

        Prerequisites

        A traffic class and traffic policy must be created before attaching a shared policy instance to a subinterface.

        Restrictions

        Shared policy instance across multiple physical interfaces is not supported.

        SUMMARY STEPS

          1.    configure

          2.    interface type interface-path-id

          3.    service-policy {input | output} policy-map [shared-policy-instance instance-name]

          4.    Use the commit or end command.

          5.    show policy-map shared-policy-instance instance-name [input | output] location rack/slot/module


        DETAILED STEPS
           Command or ActionPurpose
          Step 1 configure


          Example:
          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
           

          Enters global configuration mode.

           
          Step 2interface type interface-path-id


          Example:
          
          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/1/0/0.1
          
           

          Enters interface configuration mode and configures a subinterface.

           
          Step 3service-policy {input | output} policy-map [shared-policy-instance instance-name]

          Example:
          
          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# service-policy output policy1 shared-policy-instance Customer1
          
           

          Attaches a policy map to an input or output subinterface to be used as the service policy for that subinterface.

          • In this example, the traffic policy evaluates all traffic leaving that interface.
           
          Step 4 Use the commit or end command.  

          commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

          end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
          • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
          • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
          • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
           
          Step 5show policy-map shared-policy-instance instance-name [input | output] location rack/slot/module


          Example:
          
          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show policy-map shared-policy-instance Customer1 location 0/1/0/7.1
          
           

          (Optional) Displays statistics for the policy on the specified shared policy instance subinterface.

           

          Attaching a Shared Policy Instance to Bundle Interfaces or EFP Bundles

          After the traffic class and traffic policy are created, you can optionally use the service-policy (interface) configuration command to attach a shared policy instance to bundle interfaces and to bundle EFPs, and to specify the direction in which the policy should be applied (either on packets coming into or leaving the subinterface).

          For additional commands that can be entered in policy map class configuration mode, see the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Modular Quality of Service Command Reference.

          Prerequisites

          A traffic class and traffic policy must be created before attaching a shared policy instance to bundle interfaces or EFP bundles.

          Restrictions

          Shared policy instance across multiple physical interfaces is not supported.

          SUMMARY STEPS

            1.    configure

            2.    interface Bundle-Ether bundle-id

            3.    service-policy {input | output} policy-map [shared-policy-instance instance-name]

            4.    Use the commit or end command.

            5.    show policy-map shared-policy-instance instance-name [input | output] location location-id


          DETAILED STEPS
             Command or ActionPurpose
            Step 1 configure


            Example:
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
             

            Enters global configuration mode.

             
            Step 2interface Bundle-Ether bundle-id


            Example:
            
            RP/0/RP1/CPU0:router(config)# interface Bundle-Ether 100.1 l2transport
            
             

            Enters interface configuration mode and configures a bundle interface.

             
            Step 3service-policy {input | output} policy-map [shared-policy-instance instance-name]

            Example:
            
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# service-policy output policy1 shared-policy-instance Customer1
            
             

            Attaches a policy map to an input or output bundle interface to be used as the service policy for that subinterface.

            • In this example, the traffic policy evaluates all traffic leaving that interface.
             
            Step 4 Use the commit or end command.  

            commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

            end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
            • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
            • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
            • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
             
            Step 5show policy-map shared-policy-instance instance-name [input | output] location location-id


            Example:
            
            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show policy-map shared-policy-instance Customer1 location 0/rsp0/cpu0
            
             

            (Optional) Displays statistics for the policy at the specified shared policy instance location.

             

            Configuring Class-based Unconditional Packet Marking

            This configuration task explains how to configure the following class-based, unconditional packet marking features on your router:

            • IP precedence value
            • IP DSCP value
            • QoS group value (ingress only)
            • CoS value ( egress only on Layer 3 subinterfaces)
            • MPLS experimental value
            • Discard class

            Note


            IPv4 and IPv6 QoS actions applied to MPLS tagged packets are not supported. The configuration is accepted, but no action is taken.



            Note


            Choose only two set commands per class.


            SUMMARY STEPS

              1.    configure

              2.    policy-map policy-name

              3.    class class-name

              4.    set precedence

              5.    set dscp

              6.    set qos-group qos-group-value

              7.    set cos cos-value

              8.    set cos [inner] cos-value

              9.    set mpls experimental {imposition | topmost} exp-value

              10.    set srp-priority priority-value

              11.    set discard-class discard-class-value

              12.    set atm-clp

              13.    exit

              14.    exit

              15.    interface type interface-path-id

              16.    service-policy {input | output]} policy-map

              17.    Use the commit or end command.

              18.    show policy-map interface type interface-path-id [input | output]


            DETAILED STEPS
               Command or ActionPurpose
              Step 1 configure


              Example:
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
               

              Enters global configuration mode.

               
              Step 2policy-map policy-name


              Example:
              
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# policy-map policy1
              
               

              Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy and enters the policy map configuration mode.

               
              Step 3class class-name


              Example:
              
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# class class1
              
               

              Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change and enters the policy class map configuration mode.

               
              Step 4set precedence


              Example:
              
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# set precedence 1
              
               

              Sets the precedence value in the IP header.

               
              Step 5set dscp


              Example:
              
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# set dscp 5
              
               

              Marks a packet by setting the DSCP in the ToS byte.

               
              Step 6set qos-group qos-group-value


              Example:
              
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# set qos-group 31
              
               

              Sets the QoS group identifiers on IPv4 or MPLS packets.

              The set qos-group command is supported only on an ingress policy.

               
              Step 7set cos cos-value


              Example:
              
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 7
              
               

              Sets the specific IEEE 802.1Q Layer 2 CoS value of an outgoing packet. Values are from 0 to7.

              Sets the Layer 2 CoS value of an outgoing packet.

              • This command should be used by a router if a user wants to mark a packet that is being sent to a switch. Switches can leverage Layer 2 header information, including a CoS value marking.
              • Packets entering an interface cannot be set with a CoS value.
               
              Step 8set cos [inner] cos-value

              Example:
              
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# set cos 7
              
               

              Sets the specific IEEE 802.1Q Layer 2 CoS value of an outgoing packet. Values are from 0 to7.

              Sets the Layer 2 CoS value of an outgoing packet.

              • This command should be used by a router if a user wants to mark a packet that is being sent to a switch. Switches can leverage Layer 2 header information, including a CoS value marking.
              • For Layer 2 interfaces, the set cos command: Is rejected on ingress or egress policies on a main interface. Is accepted but ignored on ingress policies on a subinterface. Is supported on egress policies on a subinterface.
              • For Layer 3 interfaces, the set cos command: Is ignored on ingress policies on a main interface. Is rejected on ingress policies on a subinterface. Is supported on egress policies on main interfaces and subinterfaces.
               
              Step 9set mpls experimental {imposition | topmost} exp-value


              Example:
              
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# set mpls experimental imposition 3
              
               

              Sets the experimental value of the MPLS packet top-most or imposition labels.

              Note    The imposition keyword can be used only in service policies that are attached in the ingress policy.
               
              Step 10set srp-priority priority-value


              Example:
              
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# set srp-priority 3
              
               

              Sets the spatial reuse protocol (SRP) priority value of an outgoing packet.

              Note    This command can be used only in service policies that are attached in the output direction of an interface.
               
              Step 11set discard-class discard-class-value


              Example:
              
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# set discard-class 3
              
               

              Sets the discard class on IP Version 4 (IPv4) or Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) packets.

              Note    This command can be used only in service policies that are attached in the ingress policy.
               
              Step 12set atm-clp


              Example:
              
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# set atm-clp
              
               

              Sets the cell loss priority (CLP) bit.

               
              Step 13exit


              Example:
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# exit
              
               

              Returns the router to policy map configuration mode.

               
              Step 14exit


              Example:
              
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# exit
              
               

              Returns the router to global configuration mode.

               
              Step 15interface type interface-path-id

              Example:
              
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface pos 0/2/0/0
              
               

              Configures an interface and enters the interface configuration mode.

               
              Step 16service-policy {input | output]} policy-map


              Example:
              
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# service-policy output policy1
              
               

              Attaches a policy map to an input or output interface to be used as the service policy for that interface. In this example, the traffic policy evaluates all traffic leaving that interface.

               
              Step 17 Use the commit or end command.  

              commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

              end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
              • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
              • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
              • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
               
              Step 18show policy-map interface type interface-path-id [input | output]

              Example:
              
              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show policy-map interface pos 0/2/0/0
              
               

              (Optional) Displays policy configuration information for all classes configured for all service policies on the specified interface.

               

              Configuring QoS Policy Propagation Using Border Gateway Protocol

              This section explains how to configure Policy Propagation Using Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) on a router based on BGP community lists, BGP autonomous system paths, access lists, source prefix address, or destination prefix address.

              Policy Propagation Using BGP Configuration Task List

              Policy propagation using BGP allows you to classify packets by IP precedence and/or QoS group ID, based on BGP community lists, BGP autonomous system paths, access lists, source prefix address and destination prefix address. After a packet has been classified, you can use other quality-of-service features such as weighted random early detection (WRED) to specify and enforce policies to fit your business model.

              Overview of Tasks

              To configure Policy Propagation Using BGP, perform these basic tasks:

              • Configure BGP and Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF). To configure BGP, see Cisco IOS XR Routing Configuration Guide . To configure CEF, see Cisco IOS XR IP Address and Services Configuration Guide .
              • Configure a BGP community list or access list.
              • Define the route policy. Set the IP precedence and/or QoS group ID, based on the BGP community list, BGP autonomous system path, access list, source prefix address or destination prefix address.
              • Apply the route policy to BGP.
              • Configure QPPB on the desired interfaces.
              • Configure and enable a QoS Policy to use the above classification (IP precedence or QoS group ID). To configure committed access rate (CAR), WRED and tail drop, see the Configuring Modular QoS Congestion Avoidance on Cisco IOS XR Software module.

              Defining the Route Policy

              This task defines the route policy used to classify BGP prefixes with IP precedence or QoS group ID.

              Prerequisites

              Configure the BGP community list, or access list, for use in the route policy.

              Restrictions
              • IPv4 and IPv6 QPPB with egress QoS policy is supported on all Ethernet and SIP-700 line cards.
              • IPv4 and IPv6 QPPB with ingress QoS policy is supported on the first generation ASR9000 Ethernet line cards.
              SUMMARY STEPS

                1.    configure

                2.    route-policy name

                3.    set qos-groupqos-group-value

                4.    Use the commit or end command.


              DETAILED STEPS
                 Command or ActionPurpose
                Step 1 configure


                Example:
                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
                 

                Enters global configuration mode.

                 
                Step 2route-policy name


                Example:
                
                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# route-policy r1
                
                 

                Enters route policy configuration mode and specifies the name of the route policy to be configured.

                 
                Step 3 set qos-groupqos-group-value


                Example:
                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# set qos-group 30
                 

                Sets the QoS group identifiers. The set qos-group command is supported only on an ingress policy.

                 
                Step 4 Use the commit or end command.  

                commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

                end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
                • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
                • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
                • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
                 

                Applying the Route Policy to BGP

                This task applies the route policy to BGP.

                Prerequisites

                Configure BGP and CEF.

                SUMMARY STEPS

                  1.    configure

                  2.    router bgp as-number

                  3.    address-family { ipv4 |ipv6} address-family-modifier

                  4.    table-policy policy-name

                  5.    Use the commit or end command.


                DETAILED STEPS
                   Command or ActionPurpose
                  Step 1 configure


                  Example:
                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
                   

                  Enters global configuration mode.

                   
                  Step 2 router bgp as-number


                  Example:
                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# router bgp 120
                   

                  Enters BGP configuration mode.

                   
                  Step 3 address-family { ipv4 |ipv6} address-family-modifier


                  Example:
                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-bgp)# address-family ipv4 unicast
                   

                  Enters address-family configuration mode, allowing you to configure an address family.

                   
                  Step 4 table-policy policy-name


                  Example:
                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-bgp-af) # table-policy qppb a1
                   

                  Configures the routing policy for installation of routes to RIB.

                   
                  Step 5 Use the commit or end command.  

                  commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

                  end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
                  • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
                  • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
                  • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
                   

                  Configuring QPPB on the Desired Interfaces

                  This task applies QPPB to a specified interface. The traffic begins to be classified, based on matching prefixes in the route policy. The source or destination IP address of the traffic can be used to match the route policy.

                  SUMMARY STEPS

                    1.    configure

                    2.    interface type interface-path-id

                    3.    ipv4 | ipv6 bgp policy propagation input{ip-precedence|qos-group} {destination[ip-precedence {destination|source}] {source[ip-precedence {destination|source}]

                    4.    Use the commit or end command.


                  DETAILED STEPS
                     Command or ActionPurpose
                    Step 1 configure


                    Example:
                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
                     

                    Enters global configuration mode.

                     
                    Step 2interface type interface-path-id


                    Example:
                    
                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface pos 0/2/0/0
                    
                     

                    Enters interface configuration mode and associates one or more interfaces to the VRF.

                     
                    Step 3ipv4 | ipv6 bgp policy propagation input{ip-precedence|qos-group} {destination[ip-precedence {destination|source}] {source[ip-precedence {destination|source}]


                    Example:
                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 bgp policy propagation input qos-group destination
                    
                     

                    Enables QPPB on an interface

                     
                    Step 4 Use the commit or end command.  

                    commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

                    end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
                    • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
                    • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
                    • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
                     

                    QPPB Scenario

                    Consider a scenario where in traffic is moving from Network1 to Network2 through (a single) router port1 and port2. If QPPB is enabled on port1, then

                    • for qos on ingress: attach an ingress policy on the interface port1.
                    • for qos on egress: attach an egress policy on interface port2.

                    Configuring Hierarchical Ingress Policing

                    SUMMARY STEPS

                      1.    configure

                      2.    policy-map policy-name

                      3.    class class-name

                      4.    service-policy policy-name

                      5.    police rate percent percentage

                      6.    conform-action action

                      7.    exceed-action action

                      8.    Use the commit or end command.


                    DETAILED STEPS
                       Command or ActionPurpose
                      Step 1 configure


                      Example:
                      RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
                       

                      Enters global configuration mode.

                       
                      Step 2policy-map policy-name


                      Example:
                      
                      RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# policy-map parent
                      
                       

                      Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy and enters the policy map configuration mode.

                       
                      Step 3class class-name


                      Example:
                      
                      RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# class class-default
                      
                       

                      Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change and enters the policy map class configuration mode.

                       
                      Step 4 service-policy policy-name


                      Example:
                      
                      RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# service-policy child
                      
                       

                      Specifies the service-policy as a QoS policy within a policy map.

                       
                      Step 5police rate percent percentage


                      Example:
                      
                      RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# police rate percent 50 	
                      
                       

                      Configures traffic policing and enters policy map police configuration mode.

                       
                      Step 6conform-action action


                      Example:
                      
                      RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c-police)# conform-action transmit
                      
                       

                      Configures the action to take on packets that conform to the rate limit. The allowed action is transmit that transmits the packets.

                       
                      Step 7exceed-action action


                      Example:
                      
                      RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c-police)# exceed-action drop
                      
                       

                      Configures the action to take on packets that exceed the rate limit. The allowed action is drop that drops the packet.

                       
                      Step 8 Use the commit or end command.  

                      commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

                      end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
                      • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
                      • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
                      • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
                       

                      QoS Offload Configuration Overview

                      Three steps to configure QoS Offload are:

                      1. Create a class-map of the type ‘qos’.
                      2. Create a policy-map of the type ‘qos’ using the above configured class map.
                      3. Bind QoS policy to Satellite interfaces such as physical access, bundle access, physical ICL, and bundle ICL.

                      To modify a QoS Offload configuration:

                      1. Modify the class-map or policy-map without unbinding the policy-map from the applied interface.

                      Note


                      QoS Offload configuration with police rate in pps unit is not supported.

                      Sample QoS Offload Configuration

                      class-map match-any my_class
                      	match dscp 10
                      	end-class-map
                      !
                      policy-map my_policy
                      	class my_class
                      	police rate percent 30
                      !
                      end-policy-map
                      !
                      interface GigabitEthernet100/0/0/9
                      	ipv4 address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0
                      		nv
                      			service-policy input my_policy
                      !
                      !
                      

                      Prerequisites for QoS Offload Configuration

                      You must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes the proper task IDs. The command reference guides include the task IDs required for each command. If you suspect user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance. Before configuring the QoS offload feature, you must have these hardware and software installed in your chassis.

                      • Hardware—Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers with Cisco ASR 9000 Enhanced Ethernet line cards as the location of Inter Chassis Links and Cisco ASR9000v as Satellite box.
                      • Software—Cisco IOS XR Software Release 5.1.1.

                      Offloading Service-policy on Physical Access Port

                      Perform these tasks to offload the service-policy on the physical access port. This procedure offloads the service-policy in the ingress direction of the Satellite Ethernet interface.

                      SUMMARY STEPS

                        1.    configure

                        2.    class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name

                        3.    match precedenceprecedence-value [precedence-value1 ... precedence-value6]

                        4.    end-class-map

                        5.    policy-map [ type qos ] policy-name

                        6.    class class-name

                        7.    set qos-group qos-group-value

                        8.    exit

                        9.    end-policy-map

                        10.    interface type interface-path-id

                        11.    nv

                        12.    service-policy input policy-map

                        13.    Use the commit or end command.


                      DETAILED STEPS
                         Command or ActionPurpose
                        Step 1 configure


                        Example:
                        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
                         

                        Enters global configuration mode.

                         
                        Step 2class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name


                        Example:
                        
                        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# class-map match-any class1
                        
                         

                        Creates a class map to be used for matching packets to the class specified and enters the class map configuration mode.

                        If you specify match-any, one of the match criteria must be met for traffic entering the traffic class to be classified as part of the traffic class. This is the default. If you specify match-all, the traffic must match all the match criteria.

                         
                        Step 3match precedenceprecedence-value [precedence-value1 ... precedence-value6]


                        Example:
                        
                        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match precedence 5
                        
                         

                        Identifies IP precedence values as match criteria.

                        • Value range is from 0 to 7.
                        • Reserved keywords can be specified instead of numeric values.
                         
                        Step 4end-class-map


                        Example:
                        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# end-class-map
                        
                         

                        Ends the class map configuration.

                         
                        Step 5policy-map [ type qos ] policy-name


                        Example:
                        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# policy-map policy1
                        
                         

                        Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy and enters the policy map configuration mode.

                         
                        Step 6class class-name


                        Example:
                        
                        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# class class1
                        
                         

                        Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change.

                         
                        Step 7set qos-group qos-group-value


                        Example:
                        
                        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# set qos-group 5
                        
                         

                        Sets the QoS group identifiers on IPv4 or MPLS packets.

                         
                        Step 8exit


                        Example:
                        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# exit
                        
                         

                        Returns the router to policy map configuration mode.

                         
                        Step 9end-policy-map


                        Example:
                        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# end-policy-map
                        
                         

                        Ends the policy map configuration.

                         
                        Step 10interface type interface-path-id


                        Example:
                        
                        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface gigabitethernet 100/0/0/0
                        
                         

                        Configures an interface and enters the interface configuration mode.

                         
                        Step 11nv


                        Example:
                        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# nv
                        
                         

                        Enters the satellite network virtualization (nV) configuration submode.

                         
                        Step 12service-policy input policy-map


                        Example:
                        
                        RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-nV)# service-policy input policy1
                        
                         

                        Attaches a policy map to an input interface to be used as the service policy for that interface.

                         
                        Step 13 Use the commit or end command.  

                        commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

                        end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
                        • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
                        • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
                        • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
                         

                        Offloading Service-policy on Bundle Access Port

                        Perform these tasks to offload the service-policy on the bundle access port. This procedure offloads the service-policy in the ingress direction of the Satellite Ethernet interface.

                        SUMMARY STEPS

                          1.    configure

                          2.    class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name

                          3.    match precedenceprecedence-value

                          4.    end-class-map

                          5.    policy-map [ type qos ] policy-name

                          6.    class class-name

                          7.    set qos-group qos-group-value

                          8.    exit

                          9.    end-policy-map

                          10.    interface type interface-path-id

                          11.    bundle id bundle-id

                          12.    nv

                          13.    service-policy input policy-map

                          14.    Use the commit or end command.

                          15.    exit

                          16.    Use the commit or end command.


                        DETAILED STEPS
                           Command or ActionPurpose
                          Step 1 configure


                          Example:
                          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
                           

                          Enters global configuration mode.

                           
                          Step 2class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name


                          Example:
                          
                          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# class-map match-any class2
                          
                           

                          Creates a class map to be used for matching packets to the class specified and enters the class map configuration mode.

                          If you specify match-any, one of the match criteria must be met for traffic entering the traffic class to be classified as part of the traffic class. This is the default. If you specify match-all, the traffic must match all the match criteria.

                           
                          Step 3match precedenceprecedence-value


                          Example:
                          
                          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match precedence 6
                          
                           

                          Identifies IP precedence values as match criteria.

                          • Value range is from 0 to 7.
                          • Reserved keywords can be specified instead of numeric values.
                           
                          Step 4end-class-map


                          Example:
                          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# end-class-map
                          
                           

                          Ends the class map configuration.

                           
                          Step 5policy-map [ type qos ] policy-name


                          Example:
                          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# policy-map policy2
                          
                           

                          Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy and enters the policy map configuration mode.

                           
                          Step 6class class-name


                          Example:
                          
                          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# class class2
                          
                           

                          Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change.

                           
                          Step 7set qos-group qos-group-value


                          Example:
                          
                          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# set qos-group 5
                          
                           

                          Sets the QoS group identifiers on IPv4 or MPLS packets.

                           
                          Step 8exit


                          Example:
                          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# exit
                          
                           

                          Returns the router to policy map configuration mode.

                           
                          Step 9end-policy-map


                          Example:
                          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# end-policy-map
                          
                           

                          Ends the policy map configuration.

                           
                          Step 10interface type interface-path-id


                          Example:
                          
                          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface bundle-ether 1
                          
                           

                          Configures an interface and enters the interface configuration mode.

                           
                          Step 11bundle id bundle-id


                          Example:
                          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# bundle id 1
                          
                           

                          Creates a multilink interface bundle with the specified bundle ID.

                           
                          Step 12nv


                          Example:
                          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# nv
                          
                           

                          Enters the satellite network virtualization (nV) configuration submode.

                           
                          Step 13service-policy input policy-map


                          Example:
                          
                          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-nV)# service-policy input policy2
                          
                           

                          Attaches a policy map to an input interface to be used as the service policy for that interface.

                           
                          Step 14 Use the commit or end command.  

                          commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

                          end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
                          • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
                          • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
                          • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
                           
                          Step 15exit


                          Example:
                          RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# exit
                          
                           

                          Returns the router to global configuration mode.

                           
                          Step 16 Use the commit or end command.  

                          commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

                          end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
                          • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
                          • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
                          • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
                           

                          Offloading Service-policy on Physical Satellite Fabric Link

                          Perform these tasks to offload the service-policy on the physical Satellite Fabric Link (SFL). This procedure offloads the service-policy in the egress direction of SFL.

                          SUMMARY STEPS

                            1.    configure

                            2.    class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name

                            3.    match qos-group [qos-group-value]

                            4.    end-class-map

                            5.    policy-map [ type qos ] policy-name

                            6.    class class-name

                            7.    bandwidth {bandwidth [units] | percent value}

                            8.    exit

                            9.    end-policy-map

                            10.    interface type interface-path-id

                            11.    nv

                            12.    satellite-fabric-link satellite satellite_id

                            13.    remote-ports interface_type remote_subslot

                            14.    service-policy output policy-map

                            15.    Use the commit or end command.


                          DETAILED STEPS
                             Command or ActionPurpose
                            Step 1 configure


                            Example:
                            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
                             

                            Enters global configuration mode.

                             
                            Step 2class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name


                            Example:
                            
                            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# class-map match-any class3
                            
                             

                            Creates a class map to be used for matching packets to the class specified and enters the class map configuration mode.

                            If you specify match-any, one of the match criteria must be met for traffic entering the traffic class to be classified as part of the traffic class. This is the default. If you specify match-all, the traffic must match all the match criteria.

                             
                            Step 3match qos-group [qos-group-value]


                            Example:
                            
                            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match qos-group 5
                            
                             

                            Specifies service (QoS) group values in a class map to match packets.

                            • qos-group-value identifier argument is specified as the exact value or range of values from 0 to 63.
                            • Up to eight values (separated by spaces) can be entered in one match statement.
                            • match qos-groupcommand is supported only for an egress policy.
                             
                            Step 4end-class-map


                            Example:
                            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# end-class-map
                            
                             

                            Ends the class map configuration.

                             
                            Step 5policy-map [ type qos ] policy-name


                            Example:
                            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# policy-map policy3
                            
                             

                            Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy and enters the policy map configuration mode.

                             
                            Step 6class class-name


                            Example:
                            
                            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# class class3
                            
                             

                            Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change.

                             
                            Step 7bandwidth {bandwidth [units] | percent value}


                            Example:
                            
                            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 13
                            
                             

                            Specifies the bandwidth allocated for a class belonging to a policy map.

                             
                            Step 8exit


                            Example:
                            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# exit
                            
                             

                            Returns the router to policy map configuration mode.

                             
                            Step 9end-policy-map


                            Example:
                            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# end-policy-map
                            
                             

                            Ends the policy map configuration.

                             
                            Step 10interface type interface-path-id


                            Example:
                            
                            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface TenGigE 0/1/0/0
                            
                             

                            Configures an interface and enters the interface configuration mode.

                             
                            Step 11nv


                            Example:
                            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# nv
                            
                             

                            Enters the satellite network virtualization (nV) configuration submode.

                             
                            Step 12satellite-fabric-link satellite satellite_id


                            Example:
                            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-nV)# satellite-fabric-link satellite 100
                            
                             

                            Specifies an interface as an Interface Control Plane Extender(ICPE) inter-chassis link (ICL).

                            Note    The Interface Control Plane Extender(ICPE) infrastructure has a mechanism to provide the Control Plane of an interface physically located on the Satellite device in the local Cisco IOS XR software.
                             
                            Step 13remote-ports interface_type remote_subslot


                            Example:
                            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-satellite-fabric-link)# remote-ports Satellite-Ether 0/0/0-9
                            
                             

                            Configures the remote satellite ports 0 to 9.

                             
                            Step 14service-policy output policy-map


                            Example:
                            
                            RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-satellite-fabric-link)# service-policy output policy3
                            
                             

                            Attaches a policy map to an output interface to be used as the service policy for that interface.

                             
                            Step 15 Use the commit or end command.  

                            commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

                            end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
                            • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
                            • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
                            • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
                             

                            Offloading Service-policy on Bundle SFL

                            Perform these tasks to offload the service-policy on the bundle Satellite Fabric Link (SFL). This procedure offloads the service-policy in the egress direction of SFL.

                            SUMMARY STEPS

                              1.    configure

                              2.    class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name

                              3.    match qos-group [qos-group-value]

                              4.    end-class-map

                              5.    policy-map [ type qos ] policy-name

                              6.    class class-name

                              7.    bandwidth {bandwidth [units] | percent value}

                              8.    exit

                              9.    end-policy-map

                              10.    interface type interface-path-id

                              11.    bundle id bundle-id

                              12.    nv

                              13.    satellite-fabric-link satellite satellite_id

                              14.    remote-portsinterface_type remote_subslot

                              15.    service-policy output policy-map

                              16.    Use the commit or end command.

                              17.    exit

                              18.    Use the commit or end command.


                            DETAILED STEPS
                               Command or ActionPurpose
                              Step 1 configure


                              Example:
                              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
                               

                              Enters global configuration mode.

                               
                              Step 2class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name


                              Example:
                              
                              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# class-map match-any class4
                              
                               

                              Creates a class map to be used for matching packets to the class specified and enters the class map configuration mode.

                              If you specify match-any, one of the match criteria must be met for traffic entering the traffic class to be classified as part of the traffic class. This is the default. If you specify match-all, the traffic must match all the match criteria.

                               
                              Step 3match qos-group [qos-group-value]


                              Example:
                              
                              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match qos-group 5
                              
                               

                              Specifies service (QoS) group values in a class map to match packets.

                              • qos-group-value identifier argument is specified as the exact value or range of values from 0 to 63.
                              • Up to eight values (separated by spaces) can be entered in one match statement.
                              • match qos-groupcommand is supported only for an egress policy.
                               
                              Step 4end-class-map


                              Example:
                              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# end-class-map
                              
                               

                              Ends the class map configuration.

                               
                              Step 5policy-map [ type qos ] policy-name


                              Example:
                              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# policy-map policy4
                              
                               

                              Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy and enters the policy map configuration mode.

                               
                              Step 6class class-name


                              Example:
                              
                              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# class class4
                              
                               

                              Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change.

                               
                              Step 7bandwidth {bandwidth [units] | percent value}


                              Example:
                              
                              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 13
                              
                               

                              Specifies the bandwidth allocated for a class belonging to a policy map.

                               
                              Step 8exit


                              Example:
                              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# exit
                              
                               

                              Returns the router to policy map configuration mode.

                               
                              Step 9end-policy-map


                              Example:
                              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# end-policy-map
                              
                               

                              Ends the policy map configuration.

                               
                              Step 10interface type interface-path-id


                              Example:
                              
                              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface Bundle-Ether 2
                              
                               

                              Configures an interface and enters the interface configuration mode.

                               
                              Step 11bundle id bundle-id


                              Example:
                              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# bundle id 2
                              
                               

                              Creates a multilink interface bundle with the specified bundle ID.

                               
                              Step 12nv


                              Example:
                              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# nv
                              
                               

                              Enters the satellite network virtualization (nV) configuration submode.

                               
                              Step 13satellite-fabric-link satellite satellite_id


                              Example:
                              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# satellite-fabric-link satellite 100
                              
                               

                              Specifies an interface as an Interface Control Plane Extender(ICPE) inter-chassis link (ICL).

                              Note    The Interface Control Plane Extender(ICPE) infrastructure has a mechanism to provide the Control Plane of an interface physically located on the Satellite device in the local Cisco IOS XR software.
                               
                              Step 14remote-portsinterface_type remote_subslot


                              Example:
                              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-satellite-fabric-link)# remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/0-5
                              
                               

                              Configures the remote satellite ports 0 to 5.

                               
                              Step 15service-policy output policy-map


                              Example:
                              
                              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-satellite-fabric-link)# service-policy output policy4
                              
                               

                              Attaches a policy map to an output interface to be used as the service policy for that interface.

                               
                              Step 16 Use the commit or end command.  

                              commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

                              end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
                              • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
                              • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
                              • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
                               
                              Step 17exit


                              Example:
                              RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# exit
                              
                               

                              Returns the router to global configuration mode.

                               
                              Step 18 Use the commit or end command.  

                              commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

                              end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
                              • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
                              • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
                              • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
                               

                              Offloading Service-policy on L2 Fabric Physical SFL

                              Perform these tasks to offload the service-policy on L2 Fabric physical Satellite Fabric Link (SFL). This procedure offloads the service-policy in the egress direction of SFL.

                              SUMMARY STEPS

                                1.    configure

                                2.    class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name

                                3.    match qos-group [qos-group-value1]

                                4.    end-class-map

                                5.    policy-map [ type qos ] policy-name

                                6.    class class-name

                                7.    bandwidth {bandwidth [units] | percent value}

                                8.    exit

                                9.    end-policy-map

                                10.    interface type interface-path-id

                                11.    encapsulation dot1qvlan-identifier

                                12.    nv

                                13.    satellite-fabric-link satellite satellite_id

                                14.    remote-portsinterface_type remote_subslot

                                15.    service-policy output policy-map

                                16.    Use the commit or end command.


                              DETAILED STEPS
                                 Command or ActionPurpose
                                Step 1 configure


                                Example:
                                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
                                 

                                Enters global configuration mode.

                                 
                                Step 2class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name


                                Example:
                                
                                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# class-map match-any class5
                                
                                 

                                Creates a class map to be used for matching packets to the class specified and enters the class map configuration mode.

                                If you specify match-any, one of the match criteria must be met for traffic entering the traffic class to be classified as part of the traffic class. This is the default. If you specify match-all, the traffic must match all the match criteria.

                                 
                                Step 3match qos-group [qos-group-value1]


                                Example:
                                
                                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match qos-group 5
                                
                                 

                                Specifies service (QoS) group values in a class map to match packets.

                                • qos-group-value identifier argument is specified as the exact value or range of values from 0 to 63.
                                • Up to eight values (separated by spaces) can be entered in one match statement.
                                • match qos-groupcommand is supported only for an egress policy.
                                 
                                Step 4end-class-map


                                Example:
                                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# end-class-map
                                
                                 

                                Ends the class map configuration.

                                 
                                Step 5policy-map [ type qos ] policy-name


                                Example:
                                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# policy-map policy5
                                
                                 

                                Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy and enters the policy map configuration mode.

                                 
                                Step 6class class-name


                                Example:
                                
                                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# class class5
                                
                                 

                                Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change.

                                 
                                Step 7bandwidth {bandwidth [units] | percent value}


                                Example:
                                
                                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 13
                                
                                 

                                Specifies the bandwidth allocated for a class belonging to a policy map.

                                 
                                Step 8exit


                                Example:
                                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# exit
                                
                                 

                                Returns the router to policy map configuration mode.

                                 
                                Step 9end-policy-map


                                Example:
                                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# end-policy-map
                                
                                 

                                Ends the policy map configuration.

                                 
                                Step 10interface type interface-path-id


                                Example:
                                
                                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface TenGigabitEthernet 0/1/0/0.1
                                
                                 

                                Configures an interface and enters the interface configuration mode.

                                 
                                Step 11encapsulation dot1qvlan-identifier


                                Example:
                                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# encapsulation dot1q 20
                                 

                                Defines the encapsulation format as IEEE 802.1Q (dot1q), and specifies the VLAN identifier.

                                 
                                Step 12nv


                                Example:
                                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# nv
                                
                                 

                                Enters the satellite network virtualization (nV) configuration submode.

                                 
                                Step 13satellite-fabric-link satellite satellite_id


                                Example:
                                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-nV)# satellite-fabric-link satellite 100
                                
                                 

                                Specifies an interface as an Interface Control Plane Extender(ICPE) inter-chassis link (ICL).

                                Note    The Interface Control Plane Extender(ICPE) infrastructure has a mechanism to provide the Control Plane of an interface physically located on the Satellite device in the local Cisco IOS XR software.
                                 
                                Step 14remote-portsinterface_type remote_subslot


                                Example:
                                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-satellite-fabric-link)# remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/0-5
                                
                                 

                                Configures the remote satellite ports 0 to 5.

                                 
                                Step 15service-policy output policy-map


                                Example:
                                
                                RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-satellite-fabric-link)# service-policy output policy5
                                
                                 

                                Attaches a policy map to an output interface to be used as the service policy for that interface.

                                 
                                Step 16 Use the commit or end command.  

                                commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

                                end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
                                • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
                                • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
                                • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
                                 

                                Offloading Service-policy on Ring Physical SFL

                                Perform these tasks to offload the service-policy on ring physical Satellite Fabric Link (SFL). This procedure offloads the service-policy in the egress direction of SFL.

                                SUMMARY STEPS

                                  1.    configure

                                  2.    class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name

                                  3.    match qos-group [qos-group-value1]

                                  4.    end-class-map

                                  5.    policy-map [ type qos ] policy-name

                                  6.    class class-name

                                  7.    bandwidth {bandwidth [units] | percent value}

                                  8.    exit

                                  9.    end-policy-map

                                  10.    encapsulation dot1qvlan-identifier

                                  11.    interface type interface-path-id

                                  12.    nv

                                  13.    satellite-fabric-link network satellite satellite_id

                                  14.    remote-ports interface_type remote_subslot

                                  15.    service-policy output policy-map

                                  16.    exit

                                  17.    satellite-fabric-link network satellite satellite_id

                                  18.    remote-portsinterface_type remote_subslot

                                  19.    service-policy output policy-map

                                  20.    Use the commit or end command.


                                DETAILED STEPS
                                   Command or ActionPurpose
                                  Step 1 configure


                                  Example:
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
                                   

                                  Enters global configuration mode.

                                   
                                  Step 2class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name


                                  Example:
                                  
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# class-map match-any class6
                                  
                                   

                                  Creates a class map to be used for matching packets to the class specified and enters the class map configuration mode.

                                  If you specify match-any, one of the match criteria must be met for traffic entering the traffic class to be classified as part of the traffic class. This is the default. If you specify match-all, the traffic must match all the match criteria.

                                   
                                  Step 3match qos-group [qos-group-value1]


                                  Example:
                                  
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match qos-group 5
                                  
                                   

                                  Specifies service (QoS) group values in a class map to match packets.

                                  • qos-group-value identifier argument is specified as the exact value or range of values from 0 to 63.
                                  • Up to eight values (separated by spaces) can be entered in one match statement.
                                  • match qos-groupcommand is supported only for an egress policy.
                                   
                                  Step 4end-class-map


                                  Example:
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# end-class-map
                                  
                                   

                                  Ends the class map configuration.

                                   
                                  Step 5policy-map [ type qos ] policy-name


                                  Example:
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# policy-map policy6
                                  
                                   

                                  Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy and enters the policy map configuration mode.

                                   
                                  Step 6class class-name


                                  Example:
                                  
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# class class6
                                  
                                   

                                  Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change.

                                   
                                  Step 7bandwidth {bandwidth [units] | percent value}


                                  Example:
                                  
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# bandwidth percent 13
                                  
                                   

                                  Specifies the bandwidth allocated for a class belonging to a policy map.

                                   
                                  Step 8exit


                                  Example:
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# exit
                                  
                                   

                                  Returns the router to policy map configuration mode.

                                   
                                  Step 9end-policy-map


                                  Example:
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# end-policy-map
                                  
                                   

                                  Ends the policy map configuration.

                                   
                                  Step 10encapsulation dot1qvlan-identifier


                                  Example:
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# encapsulation dot1q vlan-identifier
                                   

                                  Defines the encapsulation format as IEEE 802.1Q (dot1q), and specifies the VLAN identifier.

                                   
                                  Step 11interface type interface-path-id


                                  Example:
                                  
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface TenGigabitEthernet 0/1/0/0
                                  
                                   

                                  Configures an interface and enters the interface configuration mode.

                                   
                                  Step 12nv


                                  Example:
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# nv
                                  
                                   

                                  Enters the satellite network virtualization (nV) configuration submode.

                                   
                                  Step 13satellite-fabric-link network satellite satellite_id


                                  Example:
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-nV)# satellite-fabric-link network satellite 100
                                  
                                   

                                  Specifies an interface as an Interface Control Plane Extender(ICPE) inter-chassis link (ICL).

                                  Note    The Interface Control Plane Extender(ICPE) infrastructure has a mechanism to provide the Control Plane of an interface physically located on the Satellite device in the local Cisco IOS XR software.
                                   
                                  Step 14remote-ports interface_type remote_subslot


                                  Example:
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-sfl-network-sat)# remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/0-4
                                  
                                   

                                  Configures the remote satellite ports 0 to 5. Enters the SFL network satellite configuration mode.

                                   
                                  Step 15service-policy output policy-map


                                  Example:
                                  
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-sfl-network-sat)# service-policy output policy6
                                  
                                   

                                  Attaches a policy map to an output interface to be used as the service policy for that interface.

                                   
                                  Step 16exit


                                  Example:
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-sfl-network)# exit
                                  
                                   

                                  Returns the router to nV configuration mode.

                                   
                                  Step 17satellite-fabric-link network satellite satellite_id


                                  Example:
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-nV)# satellite-fabric-link network satellite 200
                                  
                                   

                                  Specifies an interface as an Interface Control Plane Extender(ICPE) inter-chassis link (ICL).

                                  Note    The Interface Control Plane Extender(ICPE) infrastructure has a mechanism to provide the Control Plane of an interface physically located on the Satellite device in the local Cisco IOS XR software.
                                   
                                  Step 18remote-portsinterface_type remote_subslot


                                  Example:
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-sfl-network-sat)# remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/5-9
                                  
                                   

                                  Configures the remote satellite ports 5 to 9. Enters the SFL network satellite configuration mode.

                                   
                                  Step 19service-policy output policy-map


                                  Example:
                                  RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-sfl-network-sat)# service-policy output policy6
                                  
                                   

                                  Attaches a policy map to an output interface to be used as the service policy for that interface.

                                   
                                  Step 20 Use the commit or end command.  

                                  commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

                                  end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
                                  • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
                                  • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
                                  • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
                                   

                                  Configuring Policer Bucket Sharing

                                  Perform these tasks to enable policer bucket sharing in the ingress direction.

                                  SUMMARY STEPS

                                    1.    configure

                                    2.    class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name

                                    3.    match precedence[ number | name ]

                                    4.    end-class-map

                                    5.    class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name

                                    6.    match precedence[ number | name ]

                                    7.    end-class-map

                                    8.    policy-map [ type qos ] policy-name

                                    9.    class class-name

                                    10.    police bucket shared policer instance nameratevalue

                                    11.    exit

                                    12.    class class-name

                                    13.    police bucket referred policer instance name

                                    14.    exit

                                    15.    end-policy-map

                                    16.    interface type interface-path-id

                                    17.    service-policy input policy-map

                                    18.    Use the commit or end command.


                                  DETAILED STEPS
                                     Command or ActionPurpose
                                    Step 1 configure


                                    Example:
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure
                                     

                                    Enters global configuration mode.

                                     
                                    Step 2class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name


                                    Example:
                                    
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# class-map class1
                                    
                                     

                                    Creates a class map to be used for matching packets to the class specified and enters the class map configuration mode.

                                    If you specify match-any, one of the match criteria must be met for traffic entering the traffic class to be classified as part of the traffic class. This is the default. If you specify match-all, the traffic must match all the match criteria.

                                     
                                    Step 3match precedence[ number | name ]


                                    Example:
                                    
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match precedence 5
                                    
                                     

                                    Identifies IP precedence values as match criteria.

                                    • Value range is from 0 to 7.
                                    • Reserved keywords can be specified instead of numeric values.
                                     
                                    Step 4end-class-map


                                    Example:
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# end-class-map
                                    
                                     

                                    Ends the class map configuration.

                                     
                                    Step 5class-map [type qos] [match-any] [match-all] class-map-name


                                    Example:
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# class-map class2
                                    
                                     

                                    Creates a class map to be used for matching packets to the class specified and enters the class map configuration mode.

                                    If you specify match-any, one of the match criteria must be met for traffic entering the traffic class to be classified as part of the traffic class. This is the default. If you specify match-all, the traffic must match all the match criteria.

                                     
                                    Step 6match precedence[ number | name ]


                                    Example:
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# match precedence 1
                                     

                                    Identifies IP precedence values as match criteria.

                                    • Value range is from 0 to 7.
                                    • Reserved keywords can be specified instead of numeric values.
                                     
                                    Step 7end-class-map


                                    Example:
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cmap)# end-class-map
                                    
                                     

                                    Ends the class map configuration.

                                     
                                    Step 8policy-map [ type qos ] policy-name


                                    Example:
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# policy-map policy1
                                    
                                     

                                    Creates or modifies a policy map that can be attached to one or more interfaces to specify a service policy and enters the policy map configuration mode.

                                     
                                    Step 9class class-name


                                    Example:
                                    
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# class class1
                                    
                                     

                                    Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change.

                                     
                                    Step 10police bucket shared policer instance nameratevalue


                                    Example:
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# policer bucket shared policy1 rate 2Mbps
                                    
                                     

                                    Defines and shares a policer bucket.

                                    In this example, shared policer bucket policy1 is created to rate limit traffic at 2Mbps.

                                     
                                    Step 11exit


                                    Example:
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# exit
                                    
                                     

                                    Returns the router to policy map configuration mode.

                                     
                                    Step 12class class-name


                                    Example:
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# class class2
                                     

                                    Specifies the name of the class whose policy you want to create or change.

                                     
                                    Step 13police bucket referred policer instance name


                                    Example:
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# policer bucket referred policy1
                                    
                                     

                                    Refers a shared policer bucket.

                                    In this example, policer bucket policy1 is referred.

                                     
                                    Step 14exit


                                    Example:
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap-c)# exit
                                    
                                     

                                    Returns the router to policy map configuration mode.

                                     
                                    Step 15end-policy-map


                                    Example:
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-pmap)# end-policy-map
                                    
                                     

                                    Ends the policy map configuration.

                                     
                                    Step 16interface type interface-path-id


                                    Example:
                                    
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface gigabitethernet 100/0/0/0
                                    
                                     

                                    Configures an interface and enters the interface configuration mode.

                                     
                                    Step 17service-policy input policy-map


                                    Example:
                                    
                                    RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# service-policy input policy1
                                    
                                     

                                    Attaches a policy map to an input interface to be used as the service policy for that interface.

                                     
                                    Step 18 Use the commit or end command.  

                                    commit—Saves the configuration changes, and remains within the configuration session.

                                    end—Prompts user to take one of these actions:
                                    • Yes— Saves configuration changes and exits the configuration session.
                                    • No—Exits the configuration session without committing the configuration changes.
                                    • Cancel—Remains in the configuration mode, without committing the configuration changes.
                                     

                                    Configuration Examples for Configuring Modular QoS Packet Classification

                                    Traffic Classes Defined: Example

                                    In this example, two traffic classes are created and their match criteria are defined. For the first traffic class called class1, ACL 101 is used as the match criterion. For the second traffic class called class2, ACL 102 is used as the match criterion. Packets are checked against the contents of these ACLs to determine if they belong to the class.

                                    
                                    class-map class1
                                      match access-group ipv4 101
                                      exit
                                    !
                                    class-map class2
                                      match access-group ipv4 102
                                      exit
                                    

                                    Use the not keyword with the match command to perform a match based on the values of a field that are not specified. The following example includes all packets in the class qos_example with a DSCP value other than 4, 8, or 10.

                                    
                                    class-map match-any qos_example
                                      match not dscp 4 8 10
                                    !
                                    end
                                    

                                    Traffic Policy Created: Example

                                    In this example, a traffic policy called policy1 is defined to contain policy specifications for the two classes—class1 and class2. The match criteria for these classes were defined in the traffic classes created in the “Traffic Classes Defined: Example” section on page 68.

                                    For class1, the policy includes a bandwidth allocation request and a maximum byte limit for the queue reserved for the class. For class2, the policy specifies only a bandwidth allocation request.

                                    
                                    policy-map policy1
                                      class class1
                                        bandwidth 3000 kbps
                                        queue-limit 1000 packets
                                    !
                                      class class2
                                        bandwidth 2000 kbps
                                    !
                                      class class-default
                                    !
                                    end-policy-map
                                    !
                                    end
                                    

                                    Traffic Policy Attached to an Interface: Example

                                    This example shows how to attach an existing traffic policy to an interface (see the “Traffic Classes Defined: Example” section on page 68). After you define a traffic policy with the policy-map command, you can attach it to one or more interfaces to specify the traffic policy for those interfaces by using the service-policy command in interface configuration mode. Although you can assign the same traffic policy to multiple interfaces, each interface can have only one traffic policy attached at the input and only one traffic policy attached at the output.

                                    
                                    interface gigabitethernet 0/1/0/9
                                      service-policy output policy1
                                      exit
                                    !
                                    

                                    Traffic Policy Attached to Multiple Subinterfaces: Example

                                    The following example shows how to attach an existing traffic policy to multiple subinterfaces. After you define a traffic policy with the policy-map command, you can attach it to one or more subinterfaces using the service policy command in subinterface configuration mode.

                                    
                                    interface gigabitethernet 0/1/0/0.1
                                      service-policy input policy1 shared-policy-instance ethernet101
                                      exit
                                    !
                                    interface gigabitethernet 0/1/0/0.2
                                      service-policy input policy1 shared-policy-instance ethernet101
                                      exit
                                    

                                    Traffic Policy Attached to a Bundle Interface: Example

                                    The following example shows how to attach an existing traffic policy to a bundle interface. After you define a traffic policy with the policy-map command, you can attach it to one or more bundle subinterfaces using the service policy command in subinterface configuration mode.

                                    
                                    interface Bundle-Ether 100.1
                                      service-policy tripleplaypolicy shared-policy-instance subscriber1
                                      exit
                                    !
                                    interface Bundle-Ether 100.2
                                      service-policy output tripleplaypolicy shared-policy instance subscriber1
                                      exit
                                    

                                    EFP Load Balancing with Shared Policy Instance: Example

                                    The following examples show how to configure load balancing of an EFP when SPI is implemented. For additional information on EFP load balancing on link bundles, see the Cisco IOS XR Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide.

                                    Configuring a Bundle Interface: Example

                                    
                                    interface Bundle-Ether 50
                                    interface gigabitethernet 0/1/0/5
                                      bundle id 50 mode active
                                    interface gigabitethernet 0/1/0/8
                                      bundle id 50 mode active
                                    

                                    Configuring Two Bundle EFPs with the Load Balance Options: Example

                                    This example configures the traffic for two bundle EFPs go over the same physical member link.

                                    
                                    interface Bundle-Ether 50.25 l2transport
                                      encapsulation dot1q 25
                                      bundle load-balance hash-select 2
                                    !
                                    interface Bundle-Ether 50.36 l2transport
                                      encapsulation dot1q 36
                                      bundle load-balance hash-select 2
                                    

                                    Default Traffic Class Configuration: Example

                                    This example shows how to configure a traffic policy for the default class of the traffic policy called policy1. The default class is named class-default, consists of all other traffic, and is being shaped at 60 percent of the interface bandwidth.

                                    
                                    policy-map policy1
                                      class class-default
                                        shape average percent 60
                                    

                                    class-map match-any Command Configuration: Example

                                    This example illustrates how packets are evaluated when multiple match criteria exist. Only one match criterion must be met for the packet in the class-map match-any command to be classified as a member of the traffic class (a logical OR operator). In the example, protocol IP OR QoS group 4 OR access group 101 have to be successful match criteria:

                                    
                                    class-map match-any class1
                                      match protocol ipv4
                                      match qos-group 4
                                      match access-group ipv4 101
                                    

                                    In the traffic class called class1, the match criteria are evaluated consecutively until a successful match criterion is located. Each matching criterion is evaluated to see if the packet matches that criterion. If the packet matches at least one of the specified criteria, the packet is classified as a member of the traffic class.


                                    Note


                                    The match qos-group command is supported only on egress policies.


                                    Class-based Unconditional Packet Marking: Examples

                                    These are typical class-based unconditional packet marking examples:

                                    IP Precedence Marking Configuration: Example

                                    In this example, a service policy called policy1 is created. This service policy is associated to a previously defined class map called class1 through the use of the class command, and then the service policy is attached to the output POS interface 0/1/0/0. The IP precedence bit in the ToS byte is set to 1:

                                    
                                    policy-map policy1
                                      class class1
                                        set precedence 1
                                    !
                                    interface pos 0/1/0/0
                                      service-policy output policy1
                                    

                                    IP DSCP Marking Configuration: Example

                                    In this example, a service policy called policy1 is created. This service policy is associated to a previously defined class map through the use of the class command. In this example, it is assumed that a class map called class1 was previously configured and new class map called class2 is created.

                                    In this example, the IP DSCP value in the ToS byte is set to 5:

                                    
                                    policy-map policy1
                                      class class1
                                        set dscp 5
                                    
                                      class class2
                                        set dscp ef
                                    

                                    After you configure the settings shown for voice packets at the edge, all intermediate routers are configured to provide low-latency treatment to the voice packets, as follows:

                                    
                                    class-map voice
                                      match dscp ef
                                    policy-map qos-policy
                                      class voice
                                        priority level 1
                                        police rate percent 10
                                    

                                    QoS Group Marking Configuration: Example

                                    In this example, a service policy called policy1 is created. This service policy is associated to a class map called class1 through the use of the class command, and then the service policy is attached in the input direction on a GigabitEthernet interface 0/1/0/9. The qos-group value is set to 1.

                                    
                                    class-map match-any class1
                                      match protocol ipv4
                                      match access-group ipv4 101
                                    
                                    policy-map policy1
                                      class class1
                                        set qos-group 1
                                      !
                                    interface GigabitEthernet 0/1/0/9
                                      service-policy input policy1
                                    

                                    Note


                                    The set qos-group command is supported only on an ingress policy.


                                    CoS Marking Configuration: Example

                                    In this example, a service policy called policy1 is created. This service policy is associated to a class map called class1 through the use of the class command, and then the service policy is attached in the output direction on a 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface, TenGigE0/1/0/0. The IEEE 802.1p (CoS) bits in the Layer 2 header are set to 1.

                                    
                                    class-map match-any class1
                                      match protocol ipv4
                                      match access-group ipv4 101
                                    
                                    policy-map policy1
                                      class class1
                                        set cos 1
                                      !
                                    interface TenGigE0/1/0/0 
                                    interface TenGigE0/1/0/0.100 
                                      service-policy output policy1
                                    

                                    MPLS Experimental Bit Imposition Marking Configuration: Example

                                    In this example, a service policy called policy1 is created. This service policy is associated to a class map called class1 through the use of the class command, and then the service policy is attached in the input direction on a 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface, TenGigE0/1/0/0. The MPLS EXP bits of all imposed labels are set to 1.

                                    
                                    class-map match-any class1
                                      match protocol ipv4
                                      match access-group ipv4 101
                                    
                                    policy-map policy1
                                      class class1
                                        set mpls exp imposition 1
                                     !
                                    interface TenGigE0/1/0/0
                                      service-policy input policy1
                                    

                                    Note


                                    The set mpls exp imposition command is supported only on an ingress policy.


                                    MPLS Experimental Topmost Marking Configuration: Example

                                    In this example, a service policy called policy1 is created. This service policy is associated to a class map called class1 through the use of the class command, and then the service policy is attached in the output direction on a 10-Gigabit Ethernet interface, TenGigE0/1/0/0. The MPLS EXP bits on the TOPMOST label are set to 1:

                                    
                                    class-map match-any class1
                                      match mpls exp topmost 2
                                    
                                    policy-map policy1
                                      class class1
                                        set mpls exp topmost 1
                                      !
                                    interface TenGigE0/1/0/0
                                      service-policy output policy1
                                    

                                    QoS Policy Propagation using BGP: Examples

                                    These are the IPv4 and IPv6 QPPB examples:

                                    Applying Route Policy: Example

                                    In this example, BGP is being configured for the IPv4 address family:

                                    router bgp 100
                                     bgp router-id 19.19.19.19
                                     address-family ipv4 unicast
                                      table-policy qppbv4_dest
                                     !  
                                     neighbor 10.10.10.10
                                      remote-as 8000
                                      address-family ipv4 unicast
                                       route-policy pass-all in
                                       route-policy pass-all out
                                    

                                    In this example, BGP is being configured for the IPv6 address family:

                                    router bgp 100
                                     bgp router-id 19.19.19.19
                                     address-family ipv6 unicast
                                      table-policy qppbv6_dest
                                     !  
                                     neighbor 1906:255::2
                                      remote-as 8000
                                      address-family ipv6 unicast
                                       route-policy pass-all in
                                       route-policy pass-all out
                                    

                                    Applying QPPB on a Specific Interface: Example

                                    This example shows applying QPPBv4 (address-family IPv4) for a desired interface:

                                    config
                                    interface POS0/0/0/0
                                    ipv4 address 10.1.1.1 
                                    ipv4 bgp policy propagation input qos-group destination
                                    end
                                    commit
                                    !
                                    

                                    This example shows applying QPPBv6 (address-family IPv6) for a desired interface:

                                    config
                                    interface POS0/0/0/0
                                    ipv6 address 1906:255::1/64
                                    ipv6 bgp policy propagation input qos-group destination
                                    end
                                    commit
                                    !
                                    

                                    In-Place Policy Modification: Example

                                    In this example, the precedence is changed from 3 to 5 after the policy is defined and attached to an interface:

                                    Define a class:

                                    
                                    class-map match-any class1
                                     match cos 7
                                     end-class-map
                                    

                                    Define a policy map that uses the class:

                                    
                                    policy-map policy1
                                     class class1
                                     set precedence 3
                                    

                                    Attach the policy map to an interface:

                                    
                                    interface gigabitethernet 0/6/0/1
                                     service-policy output policy1
                                     commit
                                    

                                    Modify the precedence value of the policy map:

                                    
                                    policy-map policy1
                                     class class1
                                     set precedence 5
                                     commit
                                    

                                    Note


                                    The modified policy policy1 takes effect on all the interfaces to which the policy is attached. Also, you can modify any class map used in the policy map. The changes made to the class map take effect on all the interfaces to which the policy is attached.


                                    Output from the show policy-map targets command indicates that the Gigabit Ethernet interface 0/1/0/0 has one policy map attached as a main policy (as opposed to being attached to a child policy in a hierarchical QoS configuration). Outgoing traffic on this interface is affected if the policy is modified:

                                    
                                    show policy-map targets
                                    
                                    Fri Jul 16 16:38:24.789 DST
                                    1) Policymap: policy1    Type: qos
                                         Targets (applied as main policy):
                                           GigabitEthernet0/1/0/0 output
                                         Total targets: 1
                                    
                                         Targets (applied as child policy):
                                         Total targets: 0
                                    

                                    Configuration Examples for QoS Offload

                                    Offloading Service-policy on Physical Access Port: Example

                                    In this example, a service-policy called policy1 is created. This service policy is associated to a class map called class1 through the use of the class command, and then the service policy is attached in the input direction on a GigabitEthernet interface 100/0/0/0. This service-policy is configured under the nv mode and thus the QoS policy is offloaded to the satellite.

                                    config
                                    class-map match-any class1
                                     match precedence 6
                                     end-class-map
                                    ! 
                                    policy-map policy1
                                     class class1
                                      set qos-group 5
                                     ! 
                                    interface gigabitEthernet 100/0/0/0
                                    nv
                                    service-policy input policy1
                                    end or commit
                                    

                                    Offloading Service-policy on Bundle Access Port: Example

                                    In this example, a service-policy called policy2 is created. This service policy is associated to a class map called class2 through the use of the class command. The service policy is then attached in the input direction on a bundle-ether interface with bundle id as 1 that has two bundle member links—GigabitEthernet interface 100/0/0/1 and GigabitEthernet interface 100/0/0/2. This service-policy is configured under the nv mode and thus the QoS policy is offloaded to the satellite bundle-ether interface.

                                    config
                                    class-map match-any class2
                                     match precedence 6
                                     end-class-map
                                    ! 
                                    policy-map policy2
                                     class class2
                                      set qos-group 5
                                      end-policy-map
                                     ! 
                                    interface bundle-ether 1
                                    bundle-id 1
                                    nv
                                    service-policy input policy2
                                    end or commit
                                    !
                                    end or commit
                                    

                                    Offloading Service-policy on Physical SFL: Example

                                    In this example, a service-policy called policy3 is created, which is associated to a class map called class3 through the use of the class command. The service policy is applied to the host-facing satellite fabric link (SFL) on the satellite 100 and attached in the output direction on a TenGigE interface 0/1/0/0. This is configured under the nv mode and thus the QoS policy is offloaded to the satellite.

                                    config
                                    class-map match-any class3
                                     match qos-group 5
                                     end-class-map
                                    !
                                    policy-map policy3
                                     class class3
                                      bandwidth percent 13
                                     ! 
                                    interface TenGigE 0/1/0/0
                                    nv satellite-fabric-link satellite 100
                                    remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/0-9
                                    service-policy output policy3
                                    end or commit
                                    

                                    Offloading Service-policy on Bundle SFL: Example

                                    In this example, a service-policy called policy4 is created, which is associated to a class map called class4 through the use of the class command. The service policy is applied to the host-facing bundle satellite fabric link (SFL) on the satellite 100 and attached in the output direction on the bundle-ether interface with bundle id 2 that has two bundle member links—TengGig interface 0/1/0/0 and TengGig interface 0/1/0/1. This is configured under the nv mode and thus the QoS policy is offloaded to the satellite.

                                    config
                                    class-map match-any class4
                                     match qos-group 5
                                     end-class-map
                                    !
                                    policy-map policy4
                                     class class4
                                      bandwidth percent 13
                                     ! 
                                    interface Bundle-ether 2
                                    nv satellite-fabric-link satellite 100
                                    remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/0-5
                                    service-policy output policy4
                                    exit/commit
                                    interface TengGig 0/1/0/0 
                                    bundle-id 2
                                    !
                                    interface TengGig 0/1/0/1
                                    bundle-id 2
                                    !
                                    end or commit
                                    

                                    Offloading Service-policy on L2 Fabric physical SFL: Example

                                    In this example, a service-policy called policy5 is created, which is associated to a class map called class5 through the use of the class command. The service policy is applied to the host-facing bundle SFL under the nv mode and attached in the output direction on the TenGigabitEthernet 0/1/0/0.1 sub-interface. The QoS policy is offloaded to the satellite 100 in the L2 Fabric network.

                                    config
                                    class-map match-any class5
                                     match qos-group 5
                                     end-class-map
                                    !
                                    policy-map policy5
                                     class class5
                                      bandwidth percent 13
                                     ! 
                                    interface TenGigabitEthernet 0/1/0/0.1
                                    encapsulation dot1q 20
                                    nv satellite-fabric-link satellite 100
                                    remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/0-5
                                    service-policy output policy5
                                    end or commit
                                    

                                    Offloading Service-policy on Ring Physical SFL: Example

                                    In this example, a service-policy called policy6 is created, which is associated to a class map called class6 through the use of the class command. The service policy is applied on the ring-facing Inter Satellite fabric link (ISFL) on both satellites—100 and 200— and the policy is attached in the output direction on the TenGigabitEthernet 0/1/0/0. Thus the QoS policy is offloaded to the satellites.

                                    config
                                    class-map match-any class6
                                     match qos-group 5
                                     end-class-map
                                    !
                                    policy-map policy6
                                     class class6
                                      bandwidth percent 13
                                     ! 
                                    interface TenGigabitEthernet 0/1/0/0
                                     nv satellite-fabric-link network
                                      satellite 100
                                        remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/0-4
                                        service-policy output policy6
                                      satellite 200
                                        remote-ports GigabitEthernet 0/0/5-9
                                    service-policy output policy6
                                    end or commit
                                    

                                    Configuring Inter Class Policer Bucket Sharing: Example

                                    In this example, policer bucket policy1 is defined and shared by class class1. The shared policer bucket policy1 is referred by class class2.

                                    configure
                                    class-map class1
                                     match precedence 5  
                                     !
                                    class-map class2
                                     match precedence 1 
                                     !
                                    policy-map parent
                                      class class1
                                        police bucket shared policy1 rate 2 mbps
                                      class class2
                                        police bucket referred policy1 
                                    end-policy-map
                                    !
                                    

                                    Additional References

                                    These sections provide references related to implementing packet classification.

                                    Related Documents

                                    Related Topic

                                    Document Title

                                    Initial system bootup and configuration

                                    Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Getting Started Guide

                                    Master command reference

                                    Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Master Command Listing

                                    QoS commands

                                    Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Modular Quality of Service Command Reference

                                    User groups and task IDs

                                    “Configuring AAA Services on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router” module of Cisco Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router System Security Configuration Guide

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