Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router CGv6 Configuration Guide, Release 5.1.x
Carrier Grade IPv6 over ISM
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Table of Contents

Carrier Grade IPv6 over Integrated Services Module (ISM)

Contents

Cisco Integrated Service Module

Solution Components

Support for Multiple ISM Line Cards

CGN as Default Application on ISM

Configuring CGN as Default Application on ISM

Implementing NAT over ISM

Implementing NAT 44 over ISM

Implementing NAT 64 over ISM

CGv6 Applications

Network Address Translation (NAT44)

Dual-Stack Lite

Stateful NAT64

Mapping of Address and Port-Translation Mode

IPv6 Rapid Deployment

Mapping of Address and Port-Encapsulation Mode

Policy Functions

Application Level Gateway

TCP Maximum Segment Size Adjustment

Static Port Forwarding

High Availability

External Logging

Netflow v9 Support

Syslog Support

Bulk Port Allocation

Destination-Based Logging

Configuring CGv6 on Cisco IOS XR Software

Installing Carrier Grade IPv6 on ISM

Hardware

Software

FPGA UPGRADE

Accessing CPU consoles on ISM Card

Installing CGv6 Application on an ISM Running CDS-TV/CDS-IS for Cisco IOS XR Software Release 4.2.0

Installing CGv6 Application on an ISM Running CDS-TV/CDS-IS for Cisco IOS XR Software Release 4.2.1

Configuring the Service Role for the Carrier Grade IPv6

Configuring the Service Instance and Location for the Carrier Grade IPv6

Configuring the Infrastructure Service Virtual Interface for the Carrier Grade IPv6

Configuring Different CGv6 Applications on ISM

Configuring NAT44 on ISM

Configuring the Application Service Virtual Interface

Configuring a NAT44 Instance

Configuring an Inside and Outside Address Pool Map

Configuring the Policy Functions

Configuring External Logging for the NAT Table Entries

Netflow Logging

Syslog Logging

Bulk Port Allocation

Destination-Based Logging for NAT44

Configuring DS-Lite on ISM

Configuring the Application Service Virtual Interface

Configuring a DS Lite Instance

Configuring the Policy Functions

Configuring External Logging

Netflow Logging

Syslog Logging

Bulk Port Allocation

Destination-Based Logging for DS-Lite

Configuring Stateful NAT64 on ISM

Configuring the Application Service Virtual Interface

Configuring a Stateful NAT64 Instance

Configuring the Policy Functions

Configuring External Logging

Configuring MAP-T on ISM

Configuring the Application Service Virtual Interface

Configuring a MAP-T Instance

Configuring the Policy Functions

Configuring 6RD on ISM

Configuring the Application Service Virtual Interface

Configuring a 6RD Instance

Configuring the Policy Functions

Configuring MAP-E on ISM

Configuring the Application Service Virtual Interface

Configuring a MAP-E Instance

Configuring the Policy Functions

Configuring High Availability on ISM

Configuring Active or Standby ISM

Enabling Failure Detection

Configuration Examples for Implementing CGv6

Configuring a Different Inside VRF Map to a Different Outside VRF for NAT44: Example

NAT44 Configuration: Example

Bulk Port Allocation and Syslog Configuration: Example

DS Lite Configuration: Example

IPv6 ServiceApp and Static Route Configuration

IPv4 ServiceApp and Static Route Configuration

DS Lite Configuration

Stateful NAT64 Configuration: Example

MAP-T Configuration: Example

DBL Configuration: Example

NAT44 Instance

DS-Lite Instance

Services Redundancy Configuation (Active/Standby ISM): Example

6RD Configuration: Example

MAP-E Configuration: Example

PPTP ALG Configuration: Example

NAT44 Instance

Carrier Grade IPv6 over Integrated Services Module (ISM)

This module describes how to implement the Carrier Grade IPv6 (CGv6) over Integrated Services Module (ISM).

Cisco Integrated Service Module

Cisco Integrated Service Module (ISM) is a physical line interface module (PLIM) that provides a highly scalable modular services delivery platform for delivering multiple types of services. ISM is designed to deliver flexible and highly scalable service integration that allows operational efficiency, service flexibility, and faster time to market. The module offers the architectural advantages of integration with the routing system.

Solution Components

These are the solution components of the Cisco Integrated Service Module (ISM).

  • ASR 9000 with IOS XR

High-capacity, carrier-class SP platform with Cisco IOS XR Software

Leverages XR infrastructure to divert packets to ISM

Uniform, integrated configuration and management

  • Integrated Service Module

Flexible Linux-based development & test environment

Supports required CGv6

First IPv6 Transition Strategy

  • Integrated Service Module

Hardware-

  • CGv6 function residing on ISM
  • Intel x86 with 12 CPU cores

Software-

  • IOS-XR on LC, Linux on Intel CPUs
  • Integrated configuration and management through Cisco IOS XR Software
  • Service Virtual Interface (SVI)

Two types of Service Virtual Interfaces are used in ISM

  • ServiceInfra SVI
  • ServiceApp SVI

There can be only one ServiceInfra SVI per ISM Slot. This is used for the management plane and is required to bring up ISM. This is of local significance within the chassis.

ServiceApp SVI is used to forward the data traffic to the Application. Scale of ISM 244 ServiceApp per chassis is validated. These interfaces can be advertised in IGP/EGP.

Support for Multiple ISM Line Cards

Cisco IOS XR Software Release 4.2.3 and onwards supports a maximum of six ISM line cards in each Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router chassis. For applications such as NAT44 and DS-Lite, the configuration can be independently applied to each ISM line card.

For NAT-44, a maximum of twenty million sessions are supported by each ISM line card.

For NAT-64, a maximum of fifteen million sessions are supported by each ISM line card

For DS-Lite, a maximum of twenty million sessions are supported by each ISM line card.


Note No additional configuration is required to support multiple ISM line cards.


CGN as Default Application on ISM

ISM supports CGN as the default application.

Configuring CGN as Default Application on ISM

To configure CGN as the default application, perform these steps.


Step 1 Install CGN services.pie.

Step 2 Configure the CGN role using hw-module service cgn location < node_id > command.

Step 3 Load the CGN Linux image as the default image instead of CDS-IS.

Step 4 Reload ISM.


 

Implementing NAT over ISM

These sections provide the information about implementation of NAT.

Implementing NAT 44 over ISM

The following figure illustrates the implementation of NAT 44 over ISM.

 

The components of this illustration are as follows:

  • Private IP4 subscribers: It denotes a private network.
  • Interface/VLAN: It denotes a designated interface or VLAN which is associated with the VRF.
  • Inside VRF: It denotes the VRF that handles packets coming from the subscriber network. It is known as inside VRF as it forwards packets from the private network.
  • App SVI: It denotes an application interface that forwards the data packet to and from the ISM. The data packet may be sent from another line card through a backplane. Because the ISM card does not have a physical interface, the APP SVI acts as a logical entry into it.

The inside VRF is bound to an App SVI. There are 2 App SVIs required; one for the inside VRF and the other one for the outside VRF. Each App SVI pair will be associated with a unique "inside VRF" and a unique public IP address pool. The VRF consists of a static route for forwarding packets to App SVI1.

  • Outside VRF: It denotes the VRF that handles packets going out to the public network. It is known as outside VRF as it forwards packets from the public network.
  • Public IPV4: It denotes a public network.

The following figure illustrates the path of the data packet from a private network to a public network in a NAT implementation.

 

The packet goes through the following steps when it travels from the private network to the public network:


Step 1 In the network shown in this figure, the packet travels from the host A (having the IP address 10.222.5.55) in the private network to host B (having the IP address 5.5.5.2) in the public network. The private address has to be mapped to the public address by NAT44 that is implemented in ISM.

Step 2 The packet enters through the ingress port on the Gigabit Ethernet (GigE) interface at Slot 0. While using NAT44, it is mandatory that the packet enters through VRF.

Step 3 Once the packet reaches the designated interface or VLAN on ASR9K, it is forwarded to the inside VRF either through static routing or ACL-based forwarding (ABL). After the inside VRF determines that the packet needs address translation, it is forwarded to the App SVI that is bound to the VRF.

Step 4 The packet is forwarded by AppSVI1 through a default static route (ivrf1). The destination address and the port get translated because of the CGN configuration applied on ISM.

Step 5 The ISM applies NAT44 to the packet and a translation entry is created. The CGN determines the destination address from the FIB Look Up. It pushes the packet to the egress port.

Step 6 The packet is then forwarded to the egress port on the interface through App SVI2. An inside VRF is mapped to an outside VRF. The outside VRF is associated with this interface. The packet is forwarded by App SVI2 through the default static route (ovrf1). Then the packet is sent to the public network.

Step 7 The packets that do not need the address translation can bypass the App SVI and can be forwarded to the destination through a different static route and a different egress port.

The following figure illustrates the path of the packet coming from the public network to the private network.

 

The packet goes through the following steps when it travels from the public network to the private network:


Step 1 In the network shown in this figure, the packet travels from the host A (having the IP address 10.222.5.55) in the public network to host B (having the IP address 5.5.5.2) in the private network. The public address has to be mapped to the private address by NAT44 that is implemented in ISM.

Step 2 The packet enters through the ingress port on the Gigabit Ethernet (GigE) interface at Slot 0.

Step 3 Once the packet reaches the designated interface or VLAN on ASR9K, it is forwarded to the outside VRF either through static routing or ACL-based forwarding (ABL).

Step 4 The packet is forwarded by App SVI2 through a default static route. The destination address and the port are mapped to the translated address.

Step 5 The ISM applies NAT44 to the packet. The CGN determines the destination address from the FIB Look Up. It pushes the packet to the egress port.

Step 6 The packet is then forwarded to the egress port on the interface through App SVI2. Then the packet is sent to the private network through the inside VRF.

Step 7 The packets that do not need the address translation can bypass the App SVI and can be forwarded to the destination through a different static route and a different egress port.

Implementing NAT 64 over ISM

This section explains how NAT64 is implemented over ISM. The figure illustrates the implementation of NAT64 over ISM.

 

The components of this implementation are as follows:

  • Private IP6 subscribers – It denotes a private network.
  • Interface/VLAN- It denotes a designated interface or VLAN which is associated with the VRF.
  • Inside VRF – It denotes the VRF that handles packets coming from the subscriber network. It is known as inside VRF as it forwards packets from the private network.
  • App SVI- It denotes an application interface that forwards the data packet to and from the ISM. The data packet may be sent from another line card through a backplane. Because the ISM card does not have a physical interface, the APP SVI acts as a logical entry into it.

The inside VRF is bound to an App SVI. There are 2 App SVIs required; one for the inside VRF and the other one for the outside VRF. Each App SVI pair will be associated with a unique "inside VRF" and a unique public IP address pool. The VRF consists of a static route for forwarding packets to App SVI1.

  • Outside VRF- It denotes the VRF that handles packets going out to the public network. It is known as outside VRF as it forwards packets from the public network.
  • Public IPV4- It denotes a public network.

The following figure illustrates the path of the data packet from a private network to a public network in a NAT64 implementation.

 

The packet goes through the following steps when it travels from the private network to the public network:


Step 1 In the network shown in this figure, the packet travels from the host A (having the IP address 3001:DB8:E0E:E03::/40) in the private network to host B (having the IP address 11.11.11.2) in the public network. The private address has to be mapped to the public address by NAT64 that is implemented in ISM.

Step 2 The packet enters through the ingress port on the Gigabit Ethernet (GigE) interface at Slot 3.

Step 3 Once the packet reaches the designated interface or VLAN on ASR9K, it is forwarded to the inside VRF either through static routing or ACL-based forwarding (ABL). Based on this routing decision, the packet that needs address translation is determined and is forwarded to the App SVI that is bound to the VRF.

Step 4 The packet is forwarded by AppSVI1 through a default static route. The destination address and the port get translated because of the CGN configuration applied on ISM.

Step 5 The ISM applies NAT64 to the packet and a translation entry is created. The CGN determines the destination address from the FIB Look Up. It pushes the packet to the egress port.

Step 6 The packet is then forwarded to the egress port on the interface through App SVI2. The packet is forwarded by App SVI2 through the default static route. Then the packet is sent to the public network.

Step 7 The packets that do not need the address translation can bypass the App SVI and can be forwarded to the destination through a different static route and a different egress port.

The following figure illustrates the path of the packet coming from the public network to the private network.

 

The packet goes through the following steps when it travels from the public network to the private network:


Step 1 In the network shown in this figure, the packet travels from the host A (having the IP address 11.11.11.2) in the public network to host B (having the IP address 3001:DB8:E0E:E03::) in the private network. The public address has to be mapped to the private address by NAT64 that is implemented in ISM.

Step 2 The packet enters through the ingress port on the Gigabit Ethernet (GigE) interface at Slot 3.

Step 3 Once the packet reaches the designated interface or VLAN on ASR9K, it is forwarded to the outside VRF either through static routing or ACL-based forwarding (ABL). Based on this routing decision, the packet is forwarded to the App SVI that is bound to the VRF.

Step 4 The packet is forwarded by App SVI2 through a default static route. The destination address and the port are mapped to the translated address.

Step 5 The ISM applies NAT64 to the packet. The CGN determines the destination address from the FIB Look Up. It pushes the packet to the egress port.

Step 6 The packet is then forwarded to the egress port on the interface through App SVI2. Then the packet is sent to the private network through the inside VRF.

Step 7 The packets that do not need the address translation can bypass the App SVI and can be forwarded to the destination through a different static route and a different egress port.

Network Address Translation (NAT44)

Network Address Translation (NAT44) or Carrier Grade Network Address Translation (CGN) is a large scale NAT that is capable of providing private IPv4 to public IPv4 address translation in the order of millions of translations to support a large number of subscribers, and at least 10 Gbps full-duplex bandwidth throughput.

CGN is a workable solution to the IPv4 address completion problem, and offers a way for service provider subscribers and content providers to implement a seamless transition to IPv6. CGN employs network address and port translation (NAPT) methods to aggregate many private IP addresses into fewer public IPv4 addresses. For example, a single public IPv4 address with a pool of 32 K port numbers supports 320 individual private IP subscribers assuming each subscriber requires 100 ports. For example, each TCP connection needs one port number.

A Network Address Translation (NAT) box is positioned between private and public IP networks that are addressed with non-global private addresses and a public IP addresses respectively. A NAT performs the task of mapping one or many private (or internal) IP addresses into one public IP address by employing both network address and port translation (NAPT) techniques. The mappings, otherwise referred to as bindings, are typically created when a private IPv4 host located behind the NAT initiates a connection (for example, TCP SYN) with a public IPv4 host. The NAT intercepts the packet to perform these functions:

  • Rewrites the private IP host source address and port values with its own IP source address and port values
  • Stores the private-to-public binding information in a table and sends the packet. When the public IP host returns a packet, it is addressed to the NAT. The stored binding information is used to replace the IP destination address and port values with the private IP host address and port values.

Traditionally, NAT boxes are deployed in the residential home gateway (HGW) to translate multiple private IP addresses. The NAT boxes are configured on multiple devices inside the home to a single public IP address, which are configured and provisioned on the HGW by the service provider. In enterprise scenarios, you can use the NAT functions combined with the firewall to offer security protection for corporate resources and allow for provider-independent IPv4 addresses. NATs have made it easier for private IP home networks to flourish independently from service provider IP address provisioning. Enterprises can permanently employ private IP addressing for Intranet connectivity while relying on a few NAT boxes, and public IPv4 addresses for external public Internet connectivity. NAT boxes in conjunction with classic methods such as Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR) have slowed public IPv4 address consumption.

Network Address and Port Mapping

Network address and port mapping can be reused to map new sessions to external endpoints after establishing a first mapping between an internal address and port to an external address. These NAT mapping definitions are defined from RFC 4787:

  • Endpoint-independent mapping —Reuses the port mapping for subsequent packets that are sent from the same internal IP address and port to any external IP address and port.
  • Address-dependent mapping —Reuses the port mapping for subsequent packets that are sent from the same internal IP address and port to the same external IP address, regardless of the external port.

Note CGN on ISM implements Endpoint-Independent Mapping.


Translation Filtering

RFC 4787 provides translation filtering behaviors for NATs. These options are used by NAT to filter packets originating from specific external endpoints:

  • Endpoint-independent filtering —Filters out only packets that are not destined to the internal address and port regardless of the external IP address and port source.
  • Address-dependent filtering —Filters out packets that are not destined to the internal address. In addition, NAT filters out packets that are destined for the internal endpoint.
  • Address and port-dependent filtering —Filters out packets that are not destined to the internal address. In addition, NAT filets out packets that are destined for the internal endpoint if the packets were not sent previously.

Note CGN on ISM implements Endpoint-Independent Filtering.


Dual-Stack Lite

The DS-Lite (DS-Lite) feature enables legacy IPv4 hosts and server communication over both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Also, IPv4 hosts may need to access IPv4 internet over an IPv6 access network. The IPv4 hosts will have private addresses which need to have network address translation (NAT) completed before reaching the IPv4 internet.

The DS-Lite application has these two components:

  • Basic Bridging BroadBand Element (B4): This is a Customer Premises Equipment (CPE) router that is attached to the end hosts. The IPv4 packets entering B4 are encapsulated using a IPv6 tunnel and sent to the Address Family Transition Router (AFTR).
  • Address Family Transition Router(AFTR): This is the router that terminates the tunnel from the B4. It decapsulates the tunneled IPv4 packet, translates the network address and routes to the IPv4 network. In the reverse direction, IPv4 packets coming from the internet are reverse network address translated and the resultant IPv4 packets are sent the B4 using a IPv6 tunnel.

The Dual Stack Lite feature helps in these functions:

  • Tunnelling IPv4 packets from CE devices over IPv6 tunnels to the ISM blade.
  • Decapsulating the IPv4 packet and sending the decapsulated content to the IPv4 internet after completing network address translation.
  • In the reverse direction completing reverse-network address translation and then tunnelling them over IPv6 tunnels to the CPE device.

IPv6 traffic from the CPE device is natively forwarded.


Note The number of DS-Lite instances supported on the Integrated Service Module (ISM) line card is 64.


Scalability and Performance of DS Lite

The DS-Lite feature pulls translation entries from the same pool as the NAT44.

  • Supports a total of 20 million sessions.
  • Number of unique users behind B4 router, basically IPv6 and IPv4 Source tuple, can scale to 1 million.

There is no real limit to the number of B4 routers and their associated tunnels connecting to the AFTR, except the session limit, which is 20 million B4 routers (assuming each router has only one session). In reality, a maximum of 1 million B4 routers can connect to an AFTR at any given time.

The performance of DS-Lite traffic, combined IPv4 and IPv6, is 10 Gbps.

Stateful NAT64

Stateful NAT64 provides a translation mechanism that translates IPv6 packets into IPv4 packets, and vice versa.

Stateful NAT64 supports Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP), TCP, and UDP traffic. Packets that are generated in an IPv6 network and destined for an IPv4 network are routed within the IPv6 network towards the Stateful NAT64 translator. Stateful NAT64 translates the packets and forwards them as IPv4 packets through the IPv4 network. The process is reversed for traffic that is generated by hosts connected to the IPv4 network and destined for an IPv6 receiver.

The Stateful NAT64 translation is not symmetric, because the IPv6 address space is larger than the IPv4 address space and a one-to-one address mapping is not possible. Before it can perform an IPv6 to an IPv4 translation, Stateful NAT64 requires a state that binds the IPv6 address and the TCP or UDP port to the IPv4 address. The binding state is either statically configured or dynamically created when the first packet that flows from the IPv6 network to the IPv4 network is translated. After the binding state is created, packets flowing in both directions are translated. In dynamic binding, Stateful NAT64 supports communication initiated by the IPv6-only node toward an IPv4-only node. Static binding supports communication initiated by an IPv4-only node to an IPv6-only node, and vice versa. Stateful NAT64 with port overloading provides a 1:n mapping between IPv4 and IPv6 addresses.

Each NAT64 instance configured is associated with two serviceApps for the following purposes:

  • One serviceApp is used to carry traffic from IPv6 side
  • Another serviceApp is used to carry traffic from IPv4 side of the NAT64.

NAT64 instance parameters are configured using the CGN CLI. The NAT64 application in the octeons updates its NAT64 instance and serviceApp databases, which are used to perform the translation between IPv6 and IPv4 and vice versa.

Active CGN instance configuration is replicated in the standby CGN instance through the XR control plane. Translations that are established on the Active CGN instance are exported to the Standby CGN instance as the failure of the Active CGN affects the service until translations are re-established through normal packet flow. Service interruption is moderate for the given fault detection time and translation learning rate in terms of seconds or tens of seconds for a large translation database.


Note A maximum of 64 NAT64 instances are supported in the NAT64 configuration.


Prefix Format

A set of bits at the start of an IPv6 address is called the format prefix. Prefix length is a decimal value that specifies the number of the left-most contiguous bits of an address.

When packets flow from the IPv6 to the IPv4 direction, the IPv4 host address is derived from the destination IP address of the IPv6 packet that uses the prefix length. When packets flow from the IPv4 to the IPv6 direction, the IPv6 host address is constructed using the stateful prefix.

According to the IETF address format, a u-bit (bit 70) defined in the IPv6 architecture should be set to zero. The reserved octet, also called u-octet, is reserved for compatibility with the host identifier format defined in the IPv6 addressing architecture. When constructing an IPv6 packet, the translator has to make sure that the u-bits are not tampered, and are set to the value suggested by RFC 2373. The suffix will be set to all zeros by the translator. IETF recommends that the 8 bits of the u-octet (bit range 64-71) be set to zero.

Well Known Prefix (WKP)

Well Known Prefix (WKP) 64:FF9B::/96 is supported for Stateful NAT64. During stateful translation, if no stateful prefix is configured (either on the interface or globally), the WKP prefix is used to translate the IPv4 host addresses.

Stateful IPv4-to-IPv6 Packet Flow

The packet flow of IPv4-initiated packets for Stateful NAT64:

  • The destination address is routed to a NAT Virtual Interface (NVI). A virtual interface is created when Stateful NAT64 is configured. For Stateful NAT64 translation to work, all packets must get routed to the NVI. When you configure an address pool, a route is automatically added to all IPv4 addresses in the pool. This route automatically points to the NVI.
  • The IPv4-initiated packet hits static or dynamic binding. Dynamic address bindings are created by the Stateful NAT64 translator when you configure dynamic Stateful NAT64. A binding is dynamically created between an IPv6 and an IPv4 address pool. Dynamic binding is triggered by the IPv6-to-IPv4 traffic and the address is dynamically allocated. Based on your configuration, you can have static or dynamic binding.
  • The IPv4-initiated packet is protocol-translated and the destination IP address of the packet is set to IPv6 based on static or dynamic binding. The Stateful NAT64 translator translates the source IP address to IPv6 by using the Stateful NAT64 prefix (if a stateful prefix is configured) or the Well Known Prefix (WKP) (if a stateful prefix is not configured).
  • A session is created based on the translation information.

All subsequent IPv4-initiated packets are translated based on the previously created session.

Stateful IPv6-to-IPv4 Packet Flow

Stateful IPv6-initiated packet flow:

  • The first IPv6 packet is routed to the NAT Virtual Interface (NVI) based on the automatic routing setup that is configured for the stateful prefix. Stateful NAT64 performs a series of lookups to determine whether the IPv6 packet matches any of the configured mappings based on an access control list (ACL) lookup. Based on the mapping, an IPv4 address (and port) is associated with the IPv6 destination address. The IPv6 packet is translated and the IPv4 packet is formed by using these methods:

Extracting the destination IPv4 address by stripping the prefix from the IPv6 address. The source address is replaced by the allocated IPv4 address (and port).

Translating the rest of the fields from IPv6-to-IPv4 to form a valid IPv4 packet.

  • Creating a new NAT64 translation in the session database and in the bind database. The pool and port databases are updated depending on the configuration. The return traffic and the subsequent traffic of the IPv6 packet flow will use this session database entry for translation.

Note Static port forwarding is not supported over StatefulNAT64 on ISM.


IP Packet Filtering

Stateful NAT64 filters IPv6 and IPv4 packets. All IPv6 packets that are transmitted into the stateful translator are filtered because statefully translated IPv6 packets consume resources in the translator. These packets consume processor resources for packet processing, memory resources (always session memory) for static configuration, IPv4 address resources for dynamic configuration, and IPv4 address and port resources for Port Address Translation (PAT).

Stateful NAT64 utilizes configured access control lists (ACLs) and prefix lists to filter IPv6-initiated traffic flows that are allowed to create the NAT64 state. Filtering of IPv6 packets is done in the IPv6-to-IPv4 direction because dynamic allocation of mapping between an IPv6 host and an IPv4 address can be done only in this direction.

Stateful NAT64 supports endpoint-dependent filtering for the IPv4-to-IPv6 packet flow with PAT configuration. In a Stateful NAT64 PAT configuration, the packet flow originates from the IPv6 realm and creates the state information in NAT64 state tables. Packets from the IPv4 side that do not have a previously created state are dropped. Endpoint-independent filtering is supported with static NAT and non-PAT configurations.

Mapping of Address and Port-Translation Mode

Mapping of Address and Port-Translation Mode (MAP-T) is a CGN solution that enables IPv4-only clients to communicate with IPv6-only resources using address and packet translation. MAP-T is also referred to as Dual IVI (dIVI) or Stateless NAT46. This enables a service provider to offer IPv4 services to IPv6 enabled (customer) sites to which it provides customer premise equipment (CPE). This approach utilizes stateless IPv4 to IPv6 translation (that is NAT64) to transit IPv6-enabled network infrastructure. The provider access network can now be on IPv6, while customers use IPv6 and IPv4 services simultaneously. MAP-T keeps the stateful NAT44 on CPE, as usual, to handle IPv4 address exhaustion, in addition to stateless NAT64 on CPE and Border Router.

MAP-T is attractive to those SPs who have deployed, or are planning to deploy IPv6 end-to-end services, and want to manage IPv4 address exhaustion with utmost predictability.

MAP-T is a preferred alternate to DS-Lite in a sevice provider network when there is no tunneling needed.


Note MAP-T is offered in stateless mode only.


IPv6 Rapid Deployment

IPv6 Rapid Deployment (6RD) is a mechanism that allows service providers to provide a unicast IPv6 service to customers over their IPv4 network. This approach utilizes stateless IPv6 in IPv4 encapsulation to transit IPv4-only network infrastructure. 6RD encapsulates an IPv6 packet with an IPv4 header for transport over an IPv4 network. The mapping between an IPv6 destination address in the inner packet, and the IPv4 destination address of the outer packet is computed at the time of packet forwarding.

The encapsulation must be supported by the Customer Premise Equipment (CPE), while the CGv6 solution (6RD Border Relay) must support tunnel termination to route packets to Internet hosts on IPv6. The provider access network continues to be on IPv4, while customers experience IPv6 and IPv4 service simultaneously.

6RD Concepts

  • 6RD Customer Edge: The 6RD Customer Edge (CE) router sits between an IPv6-enabled site and an IPv4-enabled SP network. In the context of residential broadband deployment, this is the Residential Gateway (RG) or Customer Premises Equipment (CPE) or Internet Gateway Device (IGD). This router has a 6RD tunnel interface acting as an endpoint for the IPv6 in IPv4 encapsulation and forwarding, with at least one 6RD CE LAN side interface and 6RD CE WAN side interface, respectively.
  • 6RD Border Relay: The 6RD Border Relay (BR) router is located at the service provider's premises. It has at least one IPv4 interface, a 6RD tunnel interface for multi-point tunneling, and at least one IPv6 interface that is reachable through the IPv6 Internet or IPv6-enabled part of the SP network.
  • 6RD Delegated Prefix: The 6RD Delegated Prefix (DP) is an IPv6 prefix, determined by the 6RD CE device, for use by hosts within the customer site.
  • 6RD Service Provider Prefix: The 6RD Service Provider Prefix (SP Prefix) is an IPv6 prefix selected by the service provider for use by a 6RD domain. There is only one 6RD prefix for a given 6RD domain.
  • Customer Edge LAN side: The functionality of a 6RD Customer Edge (CE) that serves the LAN or customer-facing side of the CE. The CE LAN side interface is only IPv6-enabled.
  • Customer Edge WAN side: The functionality of a 6RD Customer Edge (CE) that serves the WAN or service provider-facing side of the CE. The CE WAN side is only IPv4-enabled.
  • Border Relay IPv4 address: The IPv4 address of the 6RD Border Relay (BR) for a given 6RD domain. This IPv4 address is used by the CE to send packets to a BR in order to reach IPv6 destinations outside the 6RD domain.
  • Customer Edge IPv4 address: The IPv4 address assigned to the CE as part of normal IPv4 Internet access (configured through DHCP, PPP, or otherwise). This address may be global or private within the 6RD domain. This address is used by a 6RD CE to create the 6RD delegated prefix, and to send and receive IPv4-encapsulated IPv6 packets.

Mapping of Address and Port-Encapsulation Mode

Mapping of Address and Port-Encapsulation Mode (MAP-E) is a CGN solution that allows a service provider to enable IPv4 services at IPv6 (customer) sites to which it provides Customer Premise Equipment (CPE). This approach utilizes stateless IPv4-in-IPv6 encapsulation to transit IPv6-enabled network infrastructure. The encapsulation must be supported by the CPE and MAP-E Gateway/Border Relay, which removes the IPv6 encapsulation from IPv4 packets while forwarding them to the Internet. The provider access network can now be on IPv6, while customers see IPv6 and IPv4 service simultaneously.

MAP-E also helps manage IPv4 address exhaustion by keeping the stateful NAT44 on CPE.

Policy Functions

These are the policy functions used to configure CGv6 applications.

Application Level Gateway

The Application Level Gateway (ALG) deals with the applications that are embedded in the IP address payload. Active File Transfer Protocol (FTP), Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP), and Real Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP) are supported.

FTP-ALG

CGN supports both passive and active FTP. FTP clients are supported with inside (private) address and servers with outside (public) addresses. Passive FTP is provided by the basic NAT function. Active FTP is used with the ALG.

RTSP-ALG

CGN supports the RTSP, an application-level protocol for control over the delivery of data with real-time properties. RTSP provides an extensible framework to enable controlled, on-demand delivery of real-time data, such as audio and video. Sources of data can include both live data feeds and stored clips.

PPTP-ALG

CGN supports the PPTP, a network protocol that enables secure transfer of data from a remote client to a private enterprise server by creating a Virtual Private Network (VPN). It is used to provide IP security at the network layer.

PPTP-ALG allows traffic from all clients to pass through a single PPTP tunnel.

PPTP uses a control channel over TCP, and a GRE tunnel operating to encapsulate Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) packets.

A PPTP tunnel is instantiated on a TCP port. This TCP connection is then used to initiate and manage a second GRE tunnel to the same peer.

Components of PPTP:

PPTP uses an access controller and a network server to establish the connection.

  • PPTP Access Controller (PAC)- A device attached to one or more PSTN or ISDN lines capable of Point-to-Point Protocol operation and handling the PPTP protocol. It terminates the PPTP tunnel and provides VPN connectivity to a remote client.
  • PPTP Network Server (PNS)-A device which provides the interface between the PPP (encapsulated in the PPTP protocol) and a LAN or WAN. The PNS uses the PPTP protocol to support tunneling between a PAC and the PNS. It requests to establish a VPN connectivity using PPTP tunnel.
  • Control Connection-A control connection is established between a PAC and a PNS for TCP.
  • Tunnel-A tunnel carries GRE encapsulated PPP datagrams between a PAC and a PNS.

Note Active FTP, PPTP ALG, and RTSP ALG are supported on NAT44 applications. Active FTP and RTSP ALG are supported on DS-Lite and Stateful NAT64 applications.


TCP Maximum Segment Size Adjustment

When a host initiates a TCP session with a server, the host negotiates the IP segment size by using the maximum segment size (MSS) option. The value of the MSS option is determined by the maximum transmission unit (MTU) that is configured on the host.

Static Port Forwarding

Static port forwarding configures a fixed, private (internal) IP address and port that are associated with a particular subscriber while CGv6 allocates a free public IP address and port. Therefore, the inside IP address and port are associated to a free outside IP address and port.

High Availability

High Availability (HA) or 1:1 redundancy enables network-wide protection by providing fast recovery from faults that may occur in any part of the network. With Cisco High Availability on ISM, the network hardware and software work together and enable rapid recovery from disruption, to ensure fault transparency to users and network applications. It provides continuous access to applications, data, and content anywhere, anytime by addressing potential causes of downtime with functionality, design, and best practices.

ISM HA supports:

  • 1:1 active or standby redundancy infrastructure for the services running on the ISM

Intra-chassis redundancy

Cold standby redundancy

  • Replication of CGN-related configuration into a standby card
  • Failure detection

Punt path - Channel between the ISM line card CPU and CGv6 application processes

Data path - Channel through which CGV6 application data packets traverse

CPU health monitoring

Control path

Crashed processes

The following commands are supported for failure detection:

Punt Path

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service-cgv6-ha location location-name puntpath-test

Data Path

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service-cgv6-ha location location-name datapath-test

Note By default, failure detection for punt path, data path is not triggered unless the above commands are configured.These commands can be configured only when ISM role is CGN and ISM in “App-Ready” state.


  • Failure reporting and recovery

If redundant ISM card is configured, then switch-over the stand by ISM to active and reload the active ISM.

If redundant ISM card is not configured, then reload the ISM. This comes up again as an active ISM.

External Logging

External logging configures the export and logging of the NAT table entries, private bindings that are associated with a particular global IP port address, and to use Netflow to export the NAT table entries.

Netflow v9 Support

The NAT44 and DS Lite features support Netflow for logging of the translation records. Logging of the translation records can be mandated by for Lawful Intercept. The Netflow uses binary format and hence requires software to parse and present the translation records.

Syslog Support

The DS Lite and NAT44 features support Syslog as an alternative to Netflow. Syslog uses ASCII format, which can be read by users. However, the log data volume is higher in Syslog than Netflow.

Attributes of Syslog Collector

  • Syslog is supported in ASCII format only.
  • Logging to multiple syslog collectors (or relay agents) is not supported.

Bulk Port Allocation

The creation and deletion of NAT sessions need to be logged and these create huge amount of data. These are stored on Syslog collector which is supported over UDP. In order to reduce the volume of data generated by the NAT device, bulk port allocation can be enabled. When bulk port allocation is enabled and when a subscriber creates the first session, a number of contiguous outside ports are pre-allocated. A bulk allocation message is logged indicating this allocation. Subsequent session creations will use one of the pre-allocated port and hence does not require logging.

Destination-Based Logging

Destination-Based Logging (DBL) includes the destination IPv4 address and port number in the Netflow create and delete records for NAT44, Stateful NAT64, and DS-Lite applications. It is also known as Session-Logging.


Note Session-Logging and Bulk Port Allocation are mutually exclusive.


Configuring CGv6 on Cisco IOS XR Software

These configuration tasks are required to implement CGv6 on Cisco IOS XR software.

Installing Carrier Grade IPv6 on ISM

This section provides instructions on installing CGv6 on the ISM line card, removing CGv6 on the ISM line card, and reinstalling the CDS TV application support.

Hardware

  • ISM hardware in chassis

Software

  • asr9k-mini-p.vm or asr9k-mini-px.vm
  • asr9k-services-p.pie or asr9k-services-px.pie
  • asr9k-fpd-p.pie or asr9k-fpd-px.pie

FPGA UPGRADE

The installation is similar to an FPGA upgrade on any other ASR 9000 cards.


Step 1 Load the fpd pie.

Step 2 Run the show hw-module fpd location <> command in admin mode.

 
 
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:#admin
RP/0/RSP1/CPU0:LHOTSE#show hw-module fpd location 0/1/CPU0
===================================== ================================================
Existing Field Programmable Devices
================================================
HW Current SW Upg/
Location Card Type Version Type Subtype Inst Version Dng?
============ ======================== ======= ==== ======= ==== =========== ==== =====
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
0/1/CPU0 A9K-ISM-100 1.0 lc fpga1 0 0.29 No
1.0 lc cbc 0 18.04 Yes
1.0 lc cpld1 0 0.01 No
1.0 lc fpga7 0 0.17 No
1.0 lc cpld3 0 0.16 No
1.0 lc fpga2 0 0.01 Yes
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 

If one or more FPD needs an upgrade (can be identified from the Upg/Dng column in the output) then this can be accomplished using the following steps.

Step 3 Upgrade the identified FPGAs using the relevant commands:

upgrade hw-module fpd fpga1 location <>
upgrade hw-module fpd cbc location <>
upgrade hw-module fpd cpld1 location <>
upgrade hw-module fpd fpga7 location <>
upgrade hw-module fpd cpld3 location <>
upgrade hw-module fpd fpga2 location <>
 

To upgrade all FPGA using a single command, type:

upgrade hw-module fpd all location <>
 

Step 4 If one or more FPGAs were upgraded, reload the ISM card after all the upgrade operation completes successfully.

hw-module location <> reload
 

Step 5 After the ISM card comes up, check for the FPGA version. This can be done using the following command from the admin mode.

show hw-module fpd location <>
 


 

Accessing CPU consoles on ISM Card

This output shows ISM card in slot1:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0 #show platform
0/RSP0/CPU0 A9K-RSP-4G(Active) IOS XR RUN PWR,NSHUT,MON
0/1/CPU0 A9K-ISM-100(LCP) IOS XR RUN PWR,NSHUT,MON
0/1/CPU1 A9K-ISM-100(SE) SEOS-READY

To access LC CPU console:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0#run attach 0/1/CPU0
#

To return to RSP console:

#exit

To access X86 CPU console:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:CRANE#run attachCon 0/0/cpu1 115200
attachCon: Starting console session to node 0/0/cpu1
attachCon: To quit console session type 'detach'
Current Baud 115200
Setting Baud to 115200
 
localhost.localdomain login: root
Password: rootroot
[root@localhost ~]#
 

To return to RSP console:

[root@localhost]# detach

Installing CGv6 Application on an ISM Running CDS-TV/CDS-IS for Cisco IOS XR Software Release 4.2.0

If the card is in CDS-IS mode, then it must be converted to CDS-TV before installing CGv6. For installation instructions, see the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router ISM Line Card Installation Guide .


Note With kernel.rpm, the "kernel.rpm" or "kernel-4.2.0.rpm" file is referred and with "ism_infra.tgz", the "ism_infra.tgz" or "ism_infra-4.2.0.tgz" file is referred.



Step 1 Manually remove the non-CGv6 (CDS TV) configuration.

Step 2 Install the Cisco IOS XR Software Release 5.1.x4.2.0 image on the ASR 9000 router.

Step 3 To handle version incompatibility between APIs of Cisco IOS XR and Linux software, run these commands as soon as the ISM LCP is in IOS XR RUN state.

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0#proc mandatory OFF fib_mgr location <ism_node_location>
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0#proc SHUTDOWN fib_mgr location <ism_node_location>
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:#admin
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0(admin)#debug sim reload-disable location<ism_node_location>

Caution Any delay may result in card reload due to API mismatch.

Step 4 Extract the ism_infra.tgz and kernel.rpm image from the tar file (available in the Download Software page in Cisco.com) and copy the content to the disk on the RSP console.

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0#copy tftp://<tftp_addr><image_location>/ism_infra.tgz disk0:/
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0#copy tftp://<tftp_addr><image_location>/kernel.rpm disk0:/
 

Step 5 Copy kernel.rpm and ism_infra.tgz to X86 location.

a. Log into X86 CPU console and start the se_mbox_server process:

[root@localhost]# se_mbox_server -d

b. Log into ISM LC CPU and upload the images to X86:

#avsm_se_upload /disk0:/kernel.rpm
#avsm_se_upload /disk0:/ism_infra.tgz
 

c. After successful upload, the images should be available under /tmp directory in the X86 CPU.

Step 6 Install the images on X86:

[root@localhost /] cd /tmp
[root@localhost tmp]# rpm -i --force kernel.rpm
[root@localhost tmp]# avsm_install ism_infra.tgz
 

Step 7 Run the following Cisco IOS XR Software Release 4.2.0 commands in admin mode, on RSP to install the Services PIE:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0#admin
(admin)#install add tftp://<tftp_addr>/<image_location>/asr9k-services-p.pie synchronous activate
. . . . . . . . . . .
(admin)#exit
 

Step 8 Run the following Cisco IOS XR Software Release 4.2.0 commands on the RSP to set the service role as cgn.

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0#config
(config)#hw-module service cgn location <ism_node_location>
(config)#commit
(config)#exit
 

Step 9 Revert the changes made in Step 3

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0#proc mandatory ON fib_mgr location <ism_node_location>
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0#proc START fib_mgr location <ism_node_location>
RP/0/RP0/CPU0:#admin
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:(admin)#no debug sim reload-disable location <ism_node_location>
 

Step 10 Reload the ISM line card.

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0#hw-module location <ism_node_location> reload
 

Step 11 Wait for the card to return to SEOS-READY and proceed with ServiceInfra interface configuration.


 

Installing CGv6 Application on an ISM Running CDS-TV/CDS-IS for Cisco IOS XR Software Release 4.2.1

From Cisco IOS XR Software Release 5.1.x4.2.1 onwards, the CGv6 application can be installed on an ISM line card directly without changing from CDS-IS to CDS-TV and then CGv6.


Step 1 Manually remove the non-CGv6 configuration, if any.

Step 2 Install the Cisco IOS XR Software Release 4.2.1 image(asr9k-mini-p/px.vm/pie) on the router.

Step 3 To handle version incompatibility between APIs of Cisco IOS XR and Linux software, run the following commands in admin mode. Enter into maintenance mode by using the following command.

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:#admin
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0(admin)#debug sim reload-disable location<ism_node_location>
 

The card must be in the following state:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0# show platform
 
Node Type State Config State
___________________________________________________________________________
0/5/CPU0 A9K-ISM-100(LCP) IOS XR RUN PWR,NSHUT,MON
0/5/CPU1 A9K-ISM-100(SE) RECOVERY MODE
 

Sometimes, the card goes into IN-RESET state due to multiple resets or if you miss to execute the step for a long time.

Reload the card using the following command to get out of the state:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0(admin)# hw-module location <ism_node_location> reload
 

Note The command must be executed in admin mode.


Step 4 To install the Services PIE on RSP, run the commands in admin mode:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0#admin
(admin)#install add tftp://<tftp_addr>/<image_location>/asr9k-services-p.pie synchronous activate
. . . . . . . . . . .
(admin)#exit
 

Step 5 To set the service role as cgn on RSP, run the following commands.

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0#config
(config)#hw-module service cgn location <ism_node_location>
(config)#commit
(config)#exit
 

Step 6 To install Linux Install-Kit from RSP, run the commands in admin mode.

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0#admin
RP/0/RSP0/CPU0(admin)# download install-image <install_kit_name_and_location> from <rsp_where_kit_present> to <ism_node_location>

Note For Cisco IOS XR Release 4.2.1, you can download the Install-Kit from the File Exchage Server https://upload.cisco.com/cgi-bin/swc/fileexg/main.cgi?CONTYPES=IOS-XR


Step 7 Wait for around 12-14 minutes for the card to come at SEOS-READY. Proceed with ServiceInfra interface configuration.

Configuring the Service Role for the Carrier Grade IPv6

Perform this task to configure the service role on the specified location to start the CGv6 service.


Note Removal of service role is strictly not recommended while the card is active. This puts the card into FAILED state, which is service impacting.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. hw-module service cgn location node-id

3. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

hw-module service cgn location node-id

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# hw-module service cgn location 0/1/CPU0

Configures a CGv6 service role (cgn) on location 0/1/CPU0.

Step 3

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Service Instance and Location for the Carrier Grade IPv6

Perform this task to configure the service instance and location for the CGv6 application.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-location preferred-active node-id

4. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-location preferred-active node-id

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-location preferred-active 0/1/CPU0

Configures the active locations for the CGv6 application.

Note preferred-standby option is supported in Cisco IOS XR Release 4.3.0 onwards for redundancy.

Step 4

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Infrastructure Service Virtual Interface for the Carrier Grade IPv6

Perform this task to configure the infrastructure service virtual interface (SVI) to forward the control traffic. The subnet mask length must be at least 30 (denoted as /30).


Note Do not remove or modify service infra interface configuration when the card is in Active state. The configuration is service affecting and the line card must be reloaded for the changes to take effect.


SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. interface ServiceInfra value

3. service-location node-id

4. ipv4 address address/mask

5. end
or
commit

6. reload

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

interface ServiceInfra value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface ServiceInfra 1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)#

Configures the infrastructure service virtual interface (SVI) as 1 and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Note Only one service infrastructure SVI can be configured for a CGv6 instance.

Step 3

service-location node-id

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# service-location 0/1/CPU0

Configures the location of the CGv6 service for the infrastructure SVI.

Step 4

ipv4 address address/mask

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 1.1.1.1/30

Sets the primary IPv4 address for an interface.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Step 6

reload

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:Router#hw-mod location 0/3/cpu0 reload

Once the configuration is complete, the card must be reloaded for changes to take effect.

WARNING: This will take the requested node out of service.
Do you wish to continue?[confirm(y/n)] y

Configuring Different CGv6 Applications on ISM

These CGv6 applications are configured on ISM.

Configuring the Application Service Virtual Interface

The following section lists guidelines for selecting serviceapp interfaces for NAT44.

  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+1> , where <n> is an odd integer. This is to ensure that the ServiceApp pairs works with a maximum throughput. For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp2 or ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp4
  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+5> or ServiceApp<n+9>, and so on, where <n> is an odd integer. However, maintaining a track of these associations can be error prone. For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp6 , ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp10 , ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp8 , or ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp12
  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+4> , where <n> is an integer (odd or even integer). For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp5 , or ServiceApp2 with ServiceApp6 . Although such ServiceApp pairs work, the aggregate throughput for Inside-to-Outside and Outside-to-Inside traffic for the ServiceApp pair is halved.
  • Do not pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+1> , where <n> is an even integer. When used, Outside-to-Inside traffic is dropped becasue traffic flows in the wrong dispatcher and core.
  • Do not pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+1> , where <n> is an integer. When used, Outside-to-Inside traffic is dropped becasue traffic flows in the wrong dispatcher and core.

One ServiceApp pair can be used as inside and the other as outside.

Perform the following tasks to configure the application service virtual interface (SVI) to forward data traffic.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. interface ServiceApp value

3. service cgn instance-name service-type nat44

4. vrf vrf-name

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

interface ServiceApp value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface ServiceApp 1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)#

Configures the application SVI as 1 and enters interface configuration mode.

Step 3

service cgn instance-name service-type nat44

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# service cgn cgn1

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 4

vrf vrf-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# vrf insidevrf1

Configures the VPN routing and forwarding (VRF) for the

Service Application interface

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring a NAT44 Instance

Perform this task to configure a NAT44 instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 instance-name

4. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn nat44 instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 NAT44 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring an Inside and Outside Address Pool Map

Perform this task to configure an inside and outside address pool map with the following scenarios.

  • The designated address pool is used for CNAT.
  • One inside VRF is mapped to only one outside VRF.
  • Multiple non-overlapping address pools can be used in a specified outside VRF mapped to different inside VRF.
  • Max Outside public pool per ISM/CGv6 instance is 64 K or 65536 addresses. That is, if a /16 address pool is mapped, then we cannot map any other pool to that particular ISM.
  • Multiple inside vrf cannot be mapped to same outside address pool.
  • While Mapping Outside Pool Minimum value for prefix is 16 and maximum value is 30.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. inside-vrf vrf-name

5. map [ outside-vrf outside-vrf-name ] address-pool address/prefix

6. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

inside-vrf vrf-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat44)# inside-vrf insidevrf1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)#

Configures an inside VRF named insidevrf1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF configuration mode.

Step 5

map [ outside-vrf outside-vrf-name ] address-pool address/prefix

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)# map outside-vrf outside vrf1 address-pool 10.10.0.0/16

Configures an inside VRF to an outside VRF and address pool mapping.

Step 6

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Port Limit Per Subscriber

Perform this task to configure the port limit per subscriber for the system that includes TCP, UDP, and ICMP.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. portlimit value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

portlimit value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat44)# portlimit 10

Limits the number of entries per address for each subscriber of the system

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Timeout Value for the ICMP Protocol

Perform this task to configure the timeout value for the ICMP type for the CGv6 instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. protocol icmp

5. timeout seconds

6. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

protocol icmp

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat44)# protocol icmp

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-proto)#

Configures the ICMP protocol session. The example shows how to configure the ICMP protocol for the CGv6 instance named cgn1.

Step 5

timeout seconds

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-proto)# timeout 908

Configures the timeout value as 908 for the ICMP session for the CGv6 instance named cgn1.

Step 6

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-proto)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-proto)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Timeout Value for the TCP Session

Perform this task to configure the timeout value for either the active or initial sessions for TCP.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. protocol tcp

5. session { active | initial } timeout seconds

6. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

protocol tcp

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat44)# protocol tcp

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-proto)#

Configures the TCP protocol session. The example shows how to configure the TCP protocol for the CGv6 instance named cgn1.

Step 5

session { active | initial } timeout seconds

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-proto)# session initial timeout 90

Configures the timeout value as 90 for the TCP session. The example shows how to configure the initial session timeout.

Step 6

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-proto)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-proto)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Timeout Value for the UDP Session

Perform this task to configure the timeout value for either the active or initial sessions for UDP.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. protocol udp

5. session { active | initial } timeout seconds

6. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

protocol udp

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat44)# protocol udp

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-proto)#

Configures the UDP protocol sessions. The example shows how to configure the TCP protocol for the CGv6 instance named cgn1.

Step 5

session { active | initial } timeout seconds

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-proto)# session active timeout 90

Configures the timeout value as 90 for the UDP session. The example shows how to configure the active session timeout.

Step 6

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-proto)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-proto)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring FTP ALG

Perform this task to configure FTP as the ALG for the specified NAT44 instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 instance-name

4. alg activeFTP

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGN application and enters CGN configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for NAT44 application.

Step 4

alg activeFTP

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat44)# alg activeFTP

Configures the FTP ALG on the NAT44 instance.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring PPTP ALG

Perform this task to configure PPTP as the ALG for the specified NAT44 instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 instance-name

4. alg pptpAlg

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGN application and enters CGN configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for NAT44 application.

Step 4

alg pptpAlg

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat44)# alg pptpAlg

Configures PPTP as the ALG for the NAT44 instance.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring RTSP ALG

Perform this task to configure RTSP as the ALG for the specified NAT44 instance. RTSP packets are usually destined to port 554. But this is not always true because RTSP port value can be configured.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 instance-name

4. alg rtsp server-port value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGN application and enters CGN configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for NAT44 application.

Step 4

alg rtsp [server-port] value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat44)# alg rtsp server-port 5000

Configures the rtsp ALG on the NAT44 instance for server port 5000. The range is from 1 to 65535. The default port is 554.


Caution The option of specifying a server port) is currently not supported. Even if you configure some port, RTSP works only on the default port (554).

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the TCP Adjustment Value for the Maximum Segment Size

Perform this task to configure the adjustment value for the maximum segment size (MSS) for the VRF. You can configure the TCP MSS adjustment value on each VRF.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. inside-vrf vrf-name

5. protocol tcp

6. mss size

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-location preferred-active 0/1/CPU0

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

inside-vrf vrf-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat44)# inside-vrf insidevrf1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)#

Configures the inside VRF for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF configuration mode.

Step 5

protocol tcp

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)# protocol tcp

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-proto)#

Configures the TCP protocol session and enters CGv6 inside VRF AFI protocol configuration mode.

Step 6

mss size

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-afi-proto)# mss 1100

Configures the adjustment MSS value as 1100 for the inside VRF.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-proto)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-proto)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Refresh Direction for the Network Address Translation

Perform this task to configure the NAT mapping refresh direction as outbound for TCP and UDP traffic.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. refresh-direction Outbound

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

refresh-direction Outbound

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat44)# protocol tcp

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-proto)#refresh-direction Outbound

 

Configures the NAT mapping refresh direction as outbound for the CGv6 instance named cgn1.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Static Port Forwarding for Port Numbers

Perform this task to configure static port forwarding for reserved or nonreserved port numbers.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. inside-vrf vrf-name

5. protocol tcp

6. static-forward inside

7. address address port number

8. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

inside-vrf vrf-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat44)# inside-vrf insidevrf1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)#

Configures the inside VRF for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF configuration mode.

Step 5

protocol tcp

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)# protocol tcp

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-proto)#

Configures the TCP protocol session and enters CGv6 inside VRF AFI protocol configuration mode.

Step 6

static-forward inside

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-proto)# static-forward inside

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ivrf-sport-inside)#

Configures the CGv6 static port forwarding entries on reserved or nonreserved ports and enters CGv6 inside static port inside configuration mode.

Step 7

address address port number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ivrf-sport-inside)# address 1.2.3.4 port 90

Configures the CGv6 static port forwarding entries for the inside VRF.

Step 8

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ivrf-sport-inside)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ivrf-sport-inside)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Dynamic Port Ranges

Perform this task to configure dynamic port ranges for TCP, UDP, and ICMP ports. The default value range of 0 to 1023 is preserved and not used for dynamic translations. Therefore, if the value of dynamic port range start is not configured explicitly, the dynamic port range value starts at 1024.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. dynamic port range start value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

dynamic port range start value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat44)# dynamic port range start 1024

Configures the value of dynamic port range start for a CGv6 NAT 44 instance. The value can range from 1 to 65535.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ivrf-sport-inside)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ivrf-sport-inside)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring External Logging for the NAT Table Entries

Perform the following to configure external logging for NAT table entries.

Configuring the Server Address and Port for Netflow Logging

Perform this task to configure the server address and port to log network address translation (NAT) table entries for Netflow logging.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. inside-vrf vrf-name

5. external-logging netflow version 9

6. server

7. address address port number

8. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

inside-vrf vrf-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# inside-vrf insidevrf1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)#

Configures the inside VRF for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF configuration mode.

Step 5

external-logging netflow version 9

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)# external-logging netflow version 9

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF address family external logging configuration mode.

Step 6

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the netflowv9-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 inside VRF address family external logging server configuration mode.

Step 7

address address port number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# address 2.3.4.5 port 45

Configures the IPv4 address and port number 45 to log Netflow entries for the NAT table.

Step 8

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Path Maximum Transmission Unit for Netflow Logging

Perform this task to configure the path maximum transmission unit (MTU) for the netflowv9-based external-logging facility for the inside VRF.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. inside-vrf vrf-name

5. external-logging netflow version 9

6. server

7. path-mtu value

8. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

inside-vrf vrf-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# inside-vrf insidevrf1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)#

Configures the inside VRF for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF configuration mode.

Step 5

external-logging netflow version 9

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)# external-logging netflow version 9

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF address family external logging configuration mode.

Step 6

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the netflowv9-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 inside VRF address family external logging server configuration mode.

Step 7

path-mtu value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# path-mtu 200

Configures the path MTU with the value of 200 for the netflowv9-based external-logging facility.

Step 8

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Refresh Rate for Netflow Logging

Perform this task to configure the refresh rate at which the Netflow-v9 logging templates are refreshed or resent to the Netflow-v9 logging server.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. inside-vrf vrf-name

5. external-logging netflow version 9

6. server

7. refresh-rate value

8. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

inside-vrf vrf-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# inside-vrf insidevrf1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)#

Configures the inside VRF for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF configuration mode.

Step 5

external-logging netflow version 9

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)# external-logging netflow version 9

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF address family external logging configuration mode.

Step 6

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the netflow-v9 based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 inside VRF address family external logging server configuration mode.

Step 7

refresh-rate value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# refresh-rate 50

Configures the refresh rate value of 50 to log Netflow-based external logging information for an inside VRF.

Step 8

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Timeout for Netflow Logging

Perform this task to configure the frequency in minutes at which the Netflow-V9 logging templates are to be sent to the Netflow-v9 logging server.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. inside-vrf vrf-name

5. external-logging netflow version 9

6. server

7. timeout value

8. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

inside-vrf vrf-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# inside-vrf insidevrf1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)#

Configures the inside VRF for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF configuration mode.

Step 5

external-logging netflowv9

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)# external-logging netflow version 9

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF address family external logging configuration mode.

Step 6

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the netflowv9-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 inside VRF address family external logging server configuration mode.

Step 7

timeout value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# timeout 50

Configures the timeout value of 50 for Netflow logging of NAT table entries for an inside VRF.

Step 8

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Server Address and Port for Syslog Logging

Perform this task to configure the server address and port to log NAT table entries for Syslog logging.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. inside-vrf vrf-name

5. external-logging syslog

6. server

7. address address port number

8. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

inside-vrf vrf-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# inside-vrf insidevrf1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)#

Configures the inside VRF for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF configuration mode.

Step 5

external-logging syslog

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)# external-logging syslog

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF address family external logging configuration mode.

Step 6

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the syslog-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 inside VRF address family external logging server configuration mode.

Step 7

address address port number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# address 2.3.4.5 port 45

Configures the IPv4 address and port number 45 to log Netflow entries for the NAT table.

Step 8

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Host-Name for Syslog Logging

Perform this task to configure the host name to be filled in the Netflow header for the syslog logging.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. inside-vrf vrf-name

5. external-logging syslog

6. server

7. host-name name

8. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

inside-vrf vrf-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# inside-vrf insidevrf1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)#

Configures the inside VRF for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF configuration mode.

Step 5

external-logging syslog

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)# external-logging syslog

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF address family external logging configuration mode.

Step 6

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the syslog-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 inside VRF address family external logging server configuration mode.

Step 7

host-name name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# host-name host1

Configures the host name for the syslog-based external-logging facility.

Step 8

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Path Maximum Transmission Unit for Syslog Logging

Perform this task to configure the path maximum transmission unit (MTU) for the syslog-based external-logging facility for the inside VRF.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. inside-vrf vrf-name

5. external-logging syslog

6. server

7. path-mtu value

8. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

inside-vrf vrf-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# inside-vrf insidevrf1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)#

Configures the inside VRF for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF configuration mode.

Step 5

external-logging syslog

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)# external-logging syslog

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF address family external logging configuration mode.

Step 6

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the syslog-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 inside VRF address family external logging server configuration mode.

Step 7

path-mtu value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# path-mtu 200

Configures the path MTU with the value of 200 for the syslog-based external-logging facility.

Step 8

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Bulk Port Allocation

Perform this task to configure bulk port allocation to reduce Netflow or Syslog data volume.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. inside-vrf vrf-instance

5. bulk-port-alloc size number of ports

6. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 NAT44 application.

Step 4

inside-vrf vrf-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# inside-vrf insidevrf1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)#

Configures the inside VRF for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 inside VRF configuration mode.

Step 5

bulk-port-alloc size number of ports

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat44-invrf-)# bulk-port-alloc size 64

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat44-invrf)

Allocate ports in bulk to reduce Netflow/Syslog data volume.

Step 6

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat44-invrf)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat44-invrf)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Destination-Based Logging for NAT44

Perform these tasks to configure destination-based logging for NAT table entries.

Configuring the Session-Logging for Netflow Logging

Perform this task to configure session-logging if destination IP and Port information needs to logged in the Netflow records.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. inside-vrf vrf-name

5. external-logging netflow version 9

6. server

7. session-logging

8. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGN application and enters CGN configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for NAT44 application.

Step 4

inside-vrf vrf-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# inside-vrf insidevrf1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)#

Configures the inside VRF for the CGN instance named cgn1 and enters CGN inside VRF configuration mode.

Step 5

external-logging netflowv9

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)# external-logging netflow version 9

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the NAT44 instance.

Step 6

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the netflow-v9 based external-logging facility.

Step 7

session-logging

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# session-logging

Configures the session logging for a NAT44 instance.

Step 8

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Session-Logging for Syslog Logging

Perform this task to configure session-logging if destination IP and Port information needs to logged in the Netflow records.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat44 nat1

4. inside-vrf vrf-name

5. external-logging syslog

6. server

7. session-logging

8. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGN application and enters CGN configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat44 nat1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat44 nat1

Configures the service type keyword definition for NAT44 application.

Step 4

inside-vrf vrf-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# inside-vrf insidevrf1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)#

Configures the inside VRF for the CGN instance named cgn1 and enters CGN inside VRF configuration mode.

Step 5

external-logging syslog

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf)# external-logging syslog

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the NAT44 instance.

Step 6

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the syslog-based external-logging facility.

Step 7

session-logging

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# session-logging

Configures the session logging for a NAT44 instance.

Step 8

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-invrf-af-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Application Service Virtual Interface

The following section lists guidelines for selecting serviceapp interfaces for DS-Lite.

  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+1> , where <n> is an odd integer. This is to ensure that the ServiceApp pairs works with a maximum throughput. For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp2 or ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp4
  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+5> or ServiceApp<n+9>, and so on, where <n> is an odd integer. However, maintaining a track of these associations can be error prone. For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp6 , ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp10 , ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp8 , or ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp12
  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+4> , where <n> is an integer (odd or even integer). For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp5 , or ServiceApp2 with ServiceApp6 . Although such ServiceApp pairs work, the aggregate throughput for Inside-to-Outside and Outside-to-Inside traffic for the ServiceApp pair is halved.
  • Do not pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+1> , where <n> is an even integer. When used, Outside-to-Inside traffic is dropped becasue traffic flows in the wrong dispatcher and core.
  • Do not pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+1> , where <n> is an integer. When used, Outside-to-Inside traffic is dropped becasue traffic flows in the wrong dispatcher and core.

One ServiceApp pair can be used as inside and the other as outside.

Perform the following tasks to configure the application service virtual interface (SVI) to forward data traffic.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. interface ServiceApp value

3. service cgn instance-name service-type ds-lite

4. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

interface ServiceApp value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface ServiceApp 1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)#

Configures the application SVI as 1 and enters interface configuration mode.

Step 3

service cgn instance-name service-type ds-lite

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# service cgn cgn1 service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 4

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring a DS Lite Instance

Perform this task to configure an instance of the DS-Lite application.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance name

4. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring IPv6 Tunnel Endpoint Address

Perform this task to configure the IPv6 tunnel endpoint address:

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance name

4. aftr-tunnel-endpoint-address X:X::X IPv6 address

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

aftr-tunnel-endpoint-address X:X::X IPv6 address

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# aftr-tunnel-endpoint-address 10:2::10

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)

Configures an IPv6 tunnel endpoint address.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the FTP ALG

Perform this task to configure the FTP ALG for the specified DS-Lite instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance-name

4. alg ftp

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGN application and enters CGN configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

Configures the service type keyword definition for DS-Lite application.

Step 4

alg ftp

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# alg ftp

Configures the FTP ALG on the DS-Lite instance.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the RTSP ALG

Perform this task to configure the ALG for the rtsp for the specified DS-Lite instance. RTSP packets are usually destined to port 554. But this is not always true because RTSP port value is configurable.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance-name

4. alg rtsp {server-port} value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGN application and enters CGN configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

Configures the service type keyword definition for DS-Lite application.

Step 4

alg rtsp [server-port] value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# alg rtsp server-port 5000

Configures the rtsp ALG on the DS-Lite instance for server port 5000. The range is from 1 to 65535. The default port is 554.


Caution The option of specifying a server port) is currently not supported. Even if you configure some port, RTSP works only on the default port (554).

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring an Address Pool Map

Perform this task to configure an address pool map.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance name

4. map address-pool address/prefix

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

map address-pool address/prefix

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# map address-pool 10.10.0.0/16

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# map address-pool 100.1.0.0/16

Configures an address pool mapping.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Path Maximum Transmission Unit

Perform this task to configure the path maximum transmission unit (MTU):

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance name

4. path-mtu value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

path-mtu value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# path-mtu 2000

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)

Configures the path MTU with the value of 2000 for the ds-lite instance.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Port Limit Per Subscriber

Perform this task to configure the port limit per subscriber for the system that includes TCP, UDP, and ICMP.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance-name

4. port-limit value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

port-limit value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# port-limit 65

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)

Configures the port value that restricts the number of translations for the ds-lite instance.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Timeout Value for the ICMP Protocol

Perform this task to configure the timeout value for the ICMP type.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance-name

4. protocol icmp

5. timeout seconds

6. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

protocol icmp

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# protocol icmp

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-proto)

Configures the ICMP protocol session.

Step 5

timeout seconds

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-proto)

timeout 90

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-proto)

Configures the timeout value for the ICMP session.

Step 6

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-proto)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-proto)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Timeout Value for the TCP Session

Perform this task to configure the timeout value for either the active or initial sessions for TCP.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance-name

4. protocol tcp

5. session { active | init } timeout seconds

6. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

protocol tcp

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# protocol tcp

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-proto)

Configures the TCP protocol session.

Step 5

session { active | initial } timeout seconds

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-proto)# session initial timeout 90

Configures the timeout value for the TCP session. The example shows how to configure the initial session timeout.

Step 6

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-proto)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-proto)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Timeout Value for the UDP Session

Perform this task to configure the timeout value for either the active or initial sessions for UDP.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance-name

4. protocol udp

5. session { active | init } timeout seconds

6. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

protocol udp

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# protocol icmp

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-proto)

Configures the UDP protocol session.

Step 5

session { active | initial } timeout seconds

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-proto)# session initial timeout 90

Configures the timeout value for the UDP session. The example shows how to configure the initial session timeout.

Step 6

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-proto)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-proto)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the TCP Adjustment Value for the Maximum Segment Size

Perform this task to configure the adjustment value for the maximum segment size (MSS).

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance-name

4. protocol tcp

5. mss size

6. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

protocol tcp

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# protocol tcp

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-proto)

Configures the TCP protocol session.

Step 5

mss size

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-proto)# mss 90

Configures maximum segment size value for TCP sessions for a ds-lite instance

Step 6

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-proto)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-proto)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring External Logging

Perform the following to configure external logging for DS-Lite entries.

Configuring the Server Address and Port for Netflow Logging

Perform this task to configure the server address and port for Netflow logging.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance-name

4. external-logging netflow9

5. server

6. address address port number

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

external-logging netflow9

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# external-logging netflow9

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 external logging configuration mode.

Step 5

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the netflowv9-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 external logging server configuration mode.

Step 6

address address port number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# address 10.3.20.130 port 45

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)

Configures the IPv4 address and port number to log Netflow entries for the DS-Lite instance.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Path Maximum Transmission Unit for Netflow Logging

Perform this task to configure the path maximum transmission unit (MTU) for the netflow9-based external-logging facility.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance-name

4. external-logging netflow9

5. server

6. path-mtu value

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

external-logging netflow9

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# external-logging netflow9

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 external logging configuration mode.

Step 5

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the netflow9-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 external logging server configuration mode.

Step 6

path-mtu value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# path mtu 200

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)

Configures the path MTU with the value of 200 for the netflowv9-based external-logging facility.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Refresh Rate for Netflow Logging

Perform this task to configure the refresh rate at which the Netflow-9 logging templates are refreshed or resent to the Netflow-9 logging server:

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance-name

4. external-logging netflow9

5. server

6. refresh-rate value

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

external-logging netflowv9

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# external-logging netflow9

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 external logging configuration mode.

Step 5

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the netflow9-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 external logging server configuration mode.

Step 6

refresh-rate value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# refresh-rate 200

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)

Configures the refresh rate value of 200 to log Netflow-based external logging information.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Timeout for Netflow Logging

Perform this task to configure the frequency in minutes at which the Netflow-9 logging templates are to be sent to the Netflow-9 logging server:

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance-name

4. external-logging netflow9

5. server

6. timeout value

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

external-logging netflow9

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# external-logging netflow9

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 external logging configuration mode.

Step 5

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the netflow9-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 external logging server configuration mode.

Step 6

timeout value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# timeout 200

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)

Configures the timeout value of 200 for Netflow logging of the DS-Lite instance.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Server Address and Port for Syslog Logging

Perform this task to configure the server address and port to log DS-Lite entries for Syslog logging.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance-name

4. external-logging syslog

5. server

6. address address port number

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

external-logging syslog

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# external-logging syslog

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 external logging configuration mode.

Step 5

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the syslog-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 external logging server configuration mode.

Step 6

address address port number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# address 2.3.4.5 port 45

Configures the IPv4 address and port number 45 to log Netflow entries.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Host-Name for Syslog Logging

Perform this task to configure the host name to be filled in the Netflow header for the syslog logging.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance-name

4. external-logging syslog

5. server

6. host-name name

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

external-logging syslog

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# external-logging syslog

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 external logging configuration mode.

Step 5

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the syslog-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 external logging server configuration mode.

Step 6

host-name name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# host-name host1

Configures the host name for the syslog-based external-logging facility.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Path Maximum Transmission Unit for Syslog Logging

Perform this task to configure the path maximum transmission unit (MTU) for the syslog-based external-logging facility.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance-name

4. external-logging syslog

5. server

6. path-mtu value

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

external-logging syslog

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# external-logging syslog

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance named cgn1 and enters CGv6 external logging configuration mode.

Step 5

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the syslog-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 external logging server configuration mode.

Step 6

path-mtu value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# path-mtu 200

Configures the path MTU with the value of 200 for the syslog-based external-logging facility.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Bulk Port Allocation

Perform this task to configure bulk port allocation to reduce Netflow or Syslog data volume.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

4. bulk-port-alloc size number of ports

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 DS-Lite application.

Step 4

bulk-port-alloc size number of ports

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# bulk-port-alloc size 64

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)

Allocate ports in bulk to reduce Netflow/Syslog data volume.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Destination-Based Logging for DS-Lite

Perform these tasks to configure destination-based logging for DS-Lite entries.

Configuring Session-Logging for Netflow Logging

Perform this task to configure session-logging if destination IP and Port information needs to logged in the Netflow records.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

4. external-logging netflow9

5. server

6. session-logging

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGN application and enters CGN configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

Configures the service type keyword definition for DS-Lite application.

Step 4

external-loging netflow9

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# external-logging netflow9

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the DS-Lite instance.

Step 5

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the netflow-9 based external-logging facility.

Step 6

session-logging

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# session-logging

Configures the session logging for a DS-Lite instance.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Session-Logging for Syslog Logging

Perform this task to configure session-logging if destination IP and Port information needs to logged in the Netflow records.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type ds-lite instance-name

4. external-logging syslog

5. server

6. session-logging

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGN application and enters CGN configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type ds-lite ds-lite1

Configures the service type keyword definition for DS-Lite application.

Step 4

external-logging syslog

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite)# external-logging syslog

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the DS-Lite instance.

Step 5

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the syslog-based external-logging facility.

Step 6

session-logging

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# session-logging

Configures the session logging for a DS-Lite instance.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-ds-lite-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Application Service Virtual Interface

The following section lists guidelines for selecting serviceapp interfaces for Stateful NAT64.

  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+1> , where <n> is an odd integer. This is to ensure that the ServiceApp pairs works with a maximum throughput. For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp2 or ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp4
  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+5> or ServiceApp<n+9>, and so on, where <n> is an odd integer. However, maintaining a track of these associations can be error prone. For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp6 , ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp10 , ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp8 , or ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp12
  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+4> , where <n> is an integer (odd or even integer). For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp5 , or ServiceApp2 with ServiceApp6 . Although such ServiceApp pairs work, the aggregate throughput for Inside-to-Outside and Outside-to-Inside traffic for the ServiceApp pair is halved.
  • Do not pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+1> , where <n> is an even integer. When used, Outside-to-Inside traffic is dropped becasue traffic flows in the wrong dispatcher and core.
  • Do not pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+1> , where <n> is an integer. When used, Outside-to-Inside traffic is dropped becasue traffic flows in the wrong dispatcher and core.

One ServiceApp pair can be used as inside and the other as outside.

Perform the following tasks to configure the application service virtual interface (SVI) to forward data traffic.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. interface ServiceApp value

3. service cgn instance-name service-type nat64 stateful

4. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

interface ServiceApp value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface ServiceApp 1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)#

Configures the application SVI as 1 and enters interface configuration mode.

Step 3

service cgn instance-name service-type nat64 stateful

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# service cgn cgn1 service-type nat64 stateful nat1

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 4

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring a Stateful NAT64 Instance

Perform this task to configure a stateful NAT64 instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring an IPv4 Interface

Perform this task to configure an IPv4 interface for a stateful NAT64 instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. address-family ipv4 interface ServiceApp number

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

address-family ipv4 interface ServiceApp number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#address-family ipv4 interface serviceApp 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)

Configures the IPv4 interface to divert Ipv4 nat64 traffic.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring IPv4 TCP Maximum Segment Size (MSS)

Perform this task to configure the MSS for TCP in bytes.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. address-family ipv4 tcp mss value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

address-family ipv4 tcp mss value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#address-family ipv4 tcp mss 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)

Configures the MSS for TCP in bytes.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring IPv4 Type of Service (ToS)

Perform this task to configure the configure ToS value to be used when translating a packet from IPv6 to IPv4.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. address-family ipv4 tos value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

address-family ipv4 tos value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#address-family ipv4 tos 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)

Configures the ToS value.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring IPv6 Do not Fragment (DF) Override

Perform this task to enable DF override configuration.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. address-family ipv6 df-override

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

address-family ipv6 df-override

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#address-family ipv6 df-override

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)

Configures the DF-Override.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring an IPv6 Interface

Perform this task to configure an IPv6 interface for a stateful NAT64 instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. address-family ipv6 interface ServiceApp number

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

address-family ipv6 interface ServiceApp number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#address-family ipv6 interface serviceApp 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)

Configures the IPv6 interface to divert IPv6 nat64 traffic.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring IPv6 Reset Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) for an ICMP Protocol

Perform this task to reset the MTU for an ICMP protocol.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. address-family ipv6 protocol icmp reset-mtu

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

address-family ipv6 protocol icmp reset-mtu

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#address-family ipv6 protocol icmp reset-mtu

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)

Resets the MTU value of the ICMP protocol packet.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring IPv6 TCP Maximum Segment Size (MSS)

Perform this task to configure the MSS for TCP in bytes.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. address-family ipv6 tcp mss value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

address-family ipv6 tcp mss value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#address-family ipv6 tcp mss 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)

Configures the MSS for TCP in bytes.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring IPv6 Traffic-Class

Perform this task to configure a traffic-class.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. address-family ipv6 traffic-class value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

address-family ipv6 traffic-class value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#address-family ipv6 traffic-class 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)

Configures the traffic class to be set.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring RTSP ALG

Perform this task to configure RTSP as the ALG for the specified Stateful NAT64 instance. RTSP packets are usually destined to port 554. But this is not always true because RTSP port value can be configured.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. alg rtsp server-port value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

alg rtsp server-port value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#alg rtsp server-port 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)

Configures the server port for RTSP. The default port is 554. The range is from 1 to 65535.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stful-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Dynamic Port Range

Perform this task to configure a dynamic port range.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. dynamic-port-range start port number

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

dynamic-port-range start port number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#dynamic-port-range start 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)

Configures the port range from 1 to 65535.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Filter-Policy

Perform this task to configure the filter policy.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. filter-policy

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

filter-policy

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#filter-policy

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)

Configures the address-dependent filtering policy.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Fragment-Timeout

Perform this task to configure the time interval to store packet fragments.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. fragment-timeout value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

fragment-timeout value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#fragment-timeout 6

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)

Configures the time interval, in seconds, to store packet fragments.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring an IPv4 Address Pool

Perform this task to configure an IPv4 address pool.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. ipv4 address-pool address/prefix

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

ipv4 address-pool address/prefix

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#ipv4 address-pool 10.2.2.24/32

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)

Configures an IPv4 address pool.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring an IPv6-Prefix

Perform this task to configure an IPv6 prefix.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. ipv6-prefix address/prefix

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

ipv6-prefix address/prefix

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#ipv6-prefix 2001:db8::/32

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)

Configures the IPv6 prefix that is used to convert destination IPv6 address to an external destination IPv4 address.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Portlimit per Subscriber

Perform this task to restrict the number of ports used by an IPv6 address.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. portlimit value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

portlimit value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#portlimit 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)

Configures a value to restict the number of ports used by an IPv6 address.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Timeout Value for ICMP, TCP and UDP Sessions

Perform this task to configure the timeout value for ICMP, TCP or UDP sessions for a stateful NAT64 instance:

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. protocol tcp session {active | initial} timeout value

protocol {icmp | udp} timeout value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

protocol tcp session {active | initial} timeout value

or

protocol {icmp | udp} timeout value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#protocol tcp session active timeout 90

or

protocol icmp timeout 90

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)

Configures the timeout value, in seconds, for ICMP and UDP.

Configures the initial and active session timeout values for TCP.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Timeout Value for ICMP, TCP and UDP Sessions per Address and Port

Perform this task to configure the timeout value for ICMP, TCP or UDP sessions for any given IPv4 address and port.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. protocol {icmp | tcp | udp} address IPv4 address port port number timeout value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

protocol {icmp | tcp | udp} address IPv4 address port port number timeout value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#protocol icmp address 10.2.2.24 port 66 timeout 777

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)

Configures the timeout value, in seconds, for the specified address and port.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Timeout Value for IPv4 Initiated Sessions

Perform this task to configure the timeout value for IPv4 sessions:

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. protocol {icmp | tcp | udp} v4-init-timeout value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

protocol {icmp | tcp | udp} v4-init-timeout value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#protocol icmp v4-init-timeout 777

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)

Configures the timeout value, in seconds, for IPv4 sessions.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring TCP Policy

Perform this task to enable or disable IPv4 initiated sessions.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. tcp-policy

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

tcp-policy

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#tcp-policy

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)

Enables or disables IPv4 initiated sessions.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Ubit-Reserved

Perform this task to enable reserving ubits in IPv6 addresses.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. ubit-reserved

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 Stateful NAT64 application.

Step 4

ubit-reserved

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#ubit-reserved

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)

Enables reserving ubits in IPv6 addresses.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Server Address and Port for Netflow Logging

Perform this task to configure the server address and port.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. external-logging netflowversion 9

5. server

6. address ipv4 address port number

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6.

Step 4

external-logging netflow version 9

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# external-logging netflow version 9

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance and enters CGv6 external logging configuration mode.

Step 5

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the netflow version 9-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 external logging server configuration mode.

Step 6

address ipv4 address port number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)# address 10.3.20.130 port 45

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)

Configures the IPv4 address and port number to log Netflow entries.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Path Maximum Transmission Unit for Netflow Logging

Perform this task to configure the path maximum transmission unit (MTU).

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. external-logging netflow version 9

5. server

6. path-mtu value

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6.

Step 4

external-logging netflow version 9

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# external-logging netflow version 9

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance and enters CGv6 external logging configuration mode.

Step 5

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the netflow version 9-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 external logging server configuration mode.

Step 6

path-mtu value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)# path-mtu 120

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)

Configures the path MTU for the netflow version 9-based external-logging facility.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Refresh Rate for Netflow Logging

Perform this task to configure the refresh rate.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. external-logging netflow version 9

5. server

6. refresh-rate value

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6.

Step 4

external-logging netflow version 9

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# external-logging netflow version 9

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance and enters CGv6 external logging configuration mode.

Step 5

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the netflow version 9-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 external logging server configuration mode.

Step 6

refresh-rate value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)# refresh-rate 120

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)

Configures the refresh rate value netflow-based external logging information.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Session Logging for Netflow Logging

Perform this task to configure session logging.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. external-logging netflow version 9

5. server

6. session-logging

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6.

Step 4

external-logging netflow version 9

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# external-logging netflow version 9

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance and enters CGv6 external logging configuration mode.

Step 5

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the netflow version 9-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 external logging server configuration mode.

Step 6

session-logging

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)# session-logging

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)

Configures session-logging.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Timeout for Netflow Logging

Perform this task to configure the frequency in minutes at which the Netflow-version 9 logging templates are to be sent to the Netflow-v9 logging server.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

4. external-logging netflow

5. server

6. timeout value

7. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type nat64 stateful instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type nat64 stateful nat64-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6.

Step 4

external-logging netflow version 9

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-stateful)# external-logging netflow version 9

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog)#

Configures the external-logging facility for the CGv6 instance and enters CGv6 external logging configuration mode.

Step 5

server

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog)# server

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)#

Configures the logging server information for the IPv4 address and port for the server that is used for the netflow version 9-based external-logging facility and enters CGv6 external logging server configuration mode.

Step 6

timeout value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)# timeout 660

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)

Configures the timeout value in minutes. The range is from 1 to 3600.

Step 7

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-nat64-extlog-server)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring MAP-T on ISM

Perform these tasks to configure MAP-T on ISM.

Configuring the Application Service Virtual Interface

The following section lists guidelines for selecting serviceapp interfaces for MAP-T.

  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+1> , where <n> is an odd integer. This is to ensure that the ServiceApp pairs works with a maximum throughput. For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp2 or ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp4
  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+5> or ServiceApp<n+9>, and so on, where <n> is an odd integer. However, maintaining a track of these associations can be error prone. For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp6 , ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp10 , ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp8 , or ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp12
  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+4> , where <n> is an integer (odd or even integer). For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp5 , or ServiceApp2 with ServiceApp6 . Although such ServiceApp pairs work, the aggregate throughput for Inside-to-Outside and Outside-to-Inside traffic for the ServiceApp pair is halved.
  • Do not pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+1> , where <n> is an even integer. When used, Outside-to-Inside traffic is dropped becasue traffic flows in the wrong dispatcher and core.

Perform this task to configure the application service virtual interface (SVI) to forward data traffic.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. interface ServiceApp value

3. service cgn instance-name service-type map-t

4. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

interface ServiceApp value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface ServiceApp 1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)#

Configures the application SVI as 1 and enters interface configuration mode.

Step 3

service cgn instance-name service-type map-t

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# service cgn cgn1 service-type map-t map1

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 4

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring a MAP-T Instance

Perform this task to configure a MAP-T instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-t instance-name

4. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-t instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-t map-t-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 MAP-T application.

Step 4

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Address Family

Perform these tasks to configure address family.

Configuring IPv4 Address Family

Perform these tasks configure IPv4 address family for a MAP-T instance.

Configuring an IPv4 Interface

Perform this task to configure an IPv4 interface for a MAP-T instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-t instance-name

4. address-family ipv4 interface ServiceApp number

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-t instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-t map-t-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 MAP-T application.

Step 4

address-family ipv4 interface ServiceApp number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#address-family ipv4 interface serviceApp 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)

Configures the IPv4 interface to divert IPv4 map-t traffic.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring IPv4 TCP Maximum Segment Size (MSS)

Perform this task to configure the MSS for TCP in bytes.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-t instance-name

4. address-family ipv4 tcp mss value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-t instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-t map-t-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 MAP-T application.

Step 4

address-family ipv4 tcp mss value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#address-family ipv4 tcp mss 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)

Configures the MSS for TCP in bytes.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring IPv4 Type of Service (ToS)

Perform this task to configure the configure ToS value to be used when translating a packet from IPv6 to IPv4.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-t instance-name

4. address-family ipv4 tos value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-t instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-t map-t-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 MAP-T application.

Step 4

address-family ipv4 tos value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#address-family ipv4 tos 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)

Configures the ToS value.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring IPv6 Do not Fragment (DF) Override

Perform this task to enable DF override configuration.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-t instance-name

4. address-family ipv6 df-override

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-t instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-t map-t-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 MAP-T application.

Step 4

address-family ipv6 df-override

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#address-family ipv6 df-override

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)

Configures the DF-Override.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring an IPv6 Interface

Perform this task to configure an IPv6 interface.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-t instance-name

4. address-family ipv6 interface ServiceApp number

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-t instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-t map-t-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 MAP-T application.

Step 4

address-family ipv6 interface ServiceApp number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#address-family ipv6 interface serviceApp 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)

Configures the IPv6 interface to divert IPv6 nat64 traffic.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring IPv6 TCP Maximum Segment Size (MSS)

Perform this task to configure the MSS for TCP in bytes.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-t instance-name

4. address-family ipv6 tcp mss value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-t instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-t map-t-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 MAP-T application.

Step 4

address-family ipv6 tcp mss value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#address-family ipv6 tcp mss 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)

Configures the MSS for TCP in bytes.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring IPv6 Traffic-Class

Perform this task to configure a traffic-class.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-t instance-name

4. address-family ipv6 traffic-class value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-t instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-t map-t-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 MAP-T application.

Step 4

address-family ipv6 traffic-class value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#address-family ipv6 traffic-class 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)

Configures the traffic class to be set.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Contiguous Ports

Perform this task to configure contiguous ports.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-t instance-name

4. contiguous-ports number

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-t instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-t map-t-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 MAP-T application.

Step 4

contiguous-ports number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#contiguous-ports 14

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)

Configures the number of ports and the value is expressed in powers of 2. The range is from 1 to 65536.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Customer Premise Equipment Domain Parameters

Perform this task to configure Customer Premise Equipment (CPE) domain parameters.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-t instance-name

4. cpe-domain ipv4 prefix ipv4 address/prefix

cpe-domain ipv6 prefix ipv6 address/prefix

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-t instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-t map-t-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 MAP-T application.

Step 4

cpe-domain ipv4 prefix ipv4 address/prefix

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#cpe-domain ipv4 prefix 10.2.2.24/2

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)

or

cpe-domain ipv6 prefix ipv6 address/prefix

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#cpe-domain ipv6 prefix 10:2::2/24

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)

Configures the cpe domain parameters.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring External Domain Parameters

Perform this task to configure external domain parameters.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-t instance-name

4. external-domain ipv6 prefix ipv6 address/prefix

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-t instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-t map-t-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 MAP-T application.

Step 4

external-domain ipv6 prefix ipv6 address/prefix

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#external-domain ipv6 prefix 10:2::2/24

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)

Configures the external domain parameters.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Port Sharing Ratio

Perform this task to configure port sharing ratio.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-t instance-name

4. sharing-ratio number

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-t instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-t map-t-inst

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 MAP-T application.

Step 4

sharing-ratio number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)#sharing-ratio 14

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)

Configures the port sharing ratio and the value is expressed in powers of 2. The range is from 1 to 32768.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-mapt)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring the Application Service Virtual Interface

This section lists the guidelines for selecting service application interfaces for 6RD.

  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+1>, where <n> is an odd integer. This is to ensure that the ServiceApp pairs works with a maximum throughput. For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp2 or ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp4.
  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+5> or ServiceApp<n+9>, and so on, where <n> is an odd integer. For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp6, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp10, ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp8, or ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp12.
  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+4>, where <n> is an integer (odd or even integer). For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp5, or ServiceApp2 with ServiceApp6.

Warning Although ServiceApp pairs work, the aggregate throughput for Inside-to-Outside and Outside-to-Inside traffic for the ServiceApp pair is halved.



Caution Do not pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+1>, where <n> is an even integer. When used, Outside-to-Inside traffic is dropped because traffic flows in the incorrect dispatcher and core.

Perform this task to configure the application service virtual interface (SVI) to forward data traffic.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. interface ServiceApp value

3. service cgn instance-name

4. service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

interface ServiceApp value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface ServiceApp 1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)#

Configures the application SVI to 1, and enters interface configuration mode.

Step 3

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# service cgn cgn1

Configures the instance named cgn1 for the CGv6 application, and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 4

service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

 

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type

tunnel v6rd 6rd1

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Configures the service-type as tunnel v6rd, and the instance name as 6rd1.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-v6rd)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-v6rd)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring a 6RD Instance

Perform this task to configure a 6RD instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

4. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type tunnel v6rd 6rd1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 6RD application.

Step 4

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Address Family

Perform these tasks to configure address family for a 6RD instance.

Configuring IPv4 Address Family

Perform this task to configure IPv4 address family for a 6RD instance.

Configuring IPv4 Interface

Perform this task to configure an IPv4 interface for a 6RD instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

4. address-family ipv4 interface ServiceApp number

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application, and enters the CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type tunnel v6rd 6rd1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for CGv6 6RD application.

Step 4

address-family ipv4 interface ServiceApp number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# address-family ipv4 interface serviceApp 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Configures the IPv4 interface to divert IPv4 6RD traffic. The range is from 1 to 2000.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring IPv6 Address Family

Perform this task to configure an IPv6 address family for a 6RD instance.

Configuring IPv6 Interface

Perform this task to configure an IPv6 interface for a 6RD instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

4. address-family ipv6 interface ServiceApp number

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application, and enters the CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type tunnel v6rd 6rd1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for CGv6 6RD application.

Step 4

address-family ipv6 interface ServiceApp number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# address-family ipv6 interface serviceApp 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Configures the IPv6 interface to divert IPv4 6RD traffic. The range is from 1 to 2000.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Border Relay

Perform these tasks to configure a border relay router for a 6RD instance.

Configuring IPv4 Interface

Perform this task to configure an IPv4 interface for a border relay router.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

4. br ipv4 prefix | suffix length value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application and enters the CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type tunnel v6rd 6rd1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for CGv6 6RD application.

Step 4

br ipv4 prefix | suffix length value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# br ipv4 prefix length 20

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Configures the IPv4 interface for a border relay router. The IPv4 prefix or suffix length is used to derive delegated IPv6 prefix.

The prefix or suffix value range is from 0 to 31.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring IPv6 Prefix

Perform this task to configure IPv6 address and prefix for a border relay router.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

4. br ipv6-prefix address

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application, and enters the CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type tunnel v6rd 6rd1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for CGv6 6RD application.

Step 4

br ipv6-prefix address

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# br ipv6-prefix 2001:db8::/32

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Configures the IPv6 address and prefix for a border relay router.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Source Address

Perform this task to configure IPv4 source address for a tunnel.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

4. br source-address address

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application, and enters the CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type tunnel v6rd 6rd1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for CGv6 6RD application.

Step 4

br source-address address

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# br source-address 22.23.24.26

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Configures the IPv4 source address for a tunnel.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Unicast Address

Perform this task to configure IPv6 unicast address.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

4. br unicast address address

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application, and enters the CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type tunnel v6rd 6rd1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for CGv6 6RD application.

Step 4

br unicast address address

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# br unicast address 3001:db8:1617:181a::1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Configures the IPv6 address that is unicast from the IPv6 network.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Maximum Transmission Unit

Perform this task to configure the Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) of the tunnel for a 6RD instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

4. path-mtu value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application, and enters the CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type tunnel v6rd 6rd1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for CGv6 6RD application.

Step 4

path-mtu value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

path-mtu 1282

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Configures the path mtu of the tunnel. The range is from 1280 to 9216.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#
end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Reassembly-Enable

Perform this task to assemble the fragmented packets for a 6RD instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

4. reassembly-enable

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application, and enters the CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type tunnel v6rd 6rd1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for CGv6 6RD application.

Step 4

reassembly-enable

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

reassembly-enable

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Assembles the fragmented packets after forwarding is complete.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#
end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Reset-df-bit

Perform this task to reset the df bit and enable the anycast feature for a 6RD instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

4. reset-df-bit

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application, and enters the CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type tunnel v6rd 6rd1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for CGv6 6RD application.

Step 4

reset-df-bit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

reset-df-bit

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Resets the df bit and enables the anycast feature.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#
end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Type of Service

Perform this task to configure the Type of Service (ToS) to be used for the IPv4 tunnel for a 6RD instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

4. tos value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application, and enters the CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type tunnel v6rd 6rd1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for CGv6 6RD application.

Step 4

tos value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

tos 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Configures the type of service to be used for the IPv4 tunnel. The range is from 0 to 255.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#
end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Time to Live

Perform this task to configure Time to Live (TTL) value to be used for the IPv4 tunnel for a 6RD instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

4. ttl value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application, and enters the CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type tunnel v6rd instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type tunnel v6rd 6rd1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for CGv6 6RD application.

Step 4

ttl value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

ttl 220

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#

Configures the time-to-live value, in seconds, to be used for the IPv4 tunnel. The range is from 1 to 255.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)#
end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-tunnel-6rd)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring MAP-E on ISM

Perform these tasks to configure MAP-E on ISM.

Configuring the Application Service Virtual Interface

This section lists the guidelines for selecting service application interfaces for MAP-E.

  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+1>, where <n> is an odd integer. This is to ensure that the ServiceApp pairs works with a maximum throughput. For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp2 or ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp4.
  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+5> or ServiceApp<n+9>, and so on, where <n> is an odd integer. For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp6, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp10, ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp8, or ServiceApp3 with ServiceApp12.
  • Pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+4>, where <n> is an integer (odd or even integer). For example, ServiceApp1 with ServiceApp5, or ServiceApp2 with ServiceApp6.

Warning Although ServiceApp pairs work, the aggregate throughput for Inside-to-Outside and Outside-to-Inside traffic for the ServiceApp pair is halved.



Caution Do not pair ServiceApp<n> with ServiceApp<n+1>, where <n> is an even integer. When used, Outside-to-Inside traffic is dropped because traffic flows in the incorrect dispatcher and core.

Perform this task to configure the application service virtual interface (SVI) to forward data traffic.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. interface ServiceApp value

3. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters the global configuration mode.

Step 2

interface ServiceApp value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface ServiceApp 1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)#

Configures the application SVI to 1, and enters interface configuration mode.

Step 3

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring a MAP-E Instance

Perform this task to configure a MAP-E instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-e instance-name

4. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Configures the instance for the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-e instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-e m1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)#

Configures the service type keyword definition for CGv6 MAP-E application.

Step 4

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Address Family

Perform these tasks to configure address family.

Configuring IPv4 Address Family

Perform these tasks configure IPv4 address family for a MAP-E instance.

Configuring IPv4 Interface

Perform this task to configure an IPv4 interface for a MAP-E instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-e instance-name

4. address-family ipv4 interface ServiceApp number

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-e instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-e m1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for the CGv6 MAP-E application.

Step 4

address-family ipv4 interface ServiceApp number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# address

-family ipv4 interface serviceApp 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e-afi)#

Configures the IPv4 interface to divert IPv4 map-e traffic.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring TCP Maximum Segment Size

Perform this task to configure the Maximum Segment Size (MSS) for TCP.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-e instance-name

4. address-family ipv4 tcp mss value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-e instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-e m1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for the CGv6 MAP-E application.

Step 4

address-family ipv4 tcp mss value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# address

-family ipv4 tcp mss 300

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e-afi)#

Configures the MSS to be used, in bytes. The range is from 28 to 1500.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring IPv6 Address Family

Perform these tasks configure an IPv6 address family.

Configuring IPv6 Interface

Perform this task to configure an IPv6 interface.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-e instance-name

4. address-family ipv6 interface ServiceApp number

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-e instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-e m1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for the CGv6 MAP-E application.

Step 4

address-family ipv6 interface ServiceApp number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# address

-family ipv6 interface serviceApp 66

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e-afi)#

Configures the IPv6 interface to divert IPv6 map-e traffic.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring TCP Maximum Segment Size

Perform this task to configure the Maximum Segment Size (MSS) to be used for TCP.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-e instance-name

4. address-family ipv6 tcp mss value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-e instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-e m1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for the CGv6 MAP-E application.

Step 4

address-family ipv6 tcp mss value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# address

-family ipv6 tcp mss 300

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e-afi)#

Configures the MSS to be used, in bytes. The range is from 28 to 1500.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e-afi)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e-afi)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring AFTR Endpoint Address

Perform this task to configure the Address Family Transition Router (AFTR) endpoint address.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-e instance-name

4. aftr-endpoint-address ipv6 address

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-e instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-e m1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for the CGv6 MAP-E application.

Step 4

aftr-endpoint-address IPv6 address

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# aftr-en

dpoint-address 2001:db8::32

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)#

Configures the AFTR endpoint address.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Contiguous Ports

Perform this task to configure the number of contiguous ports for a MAP-E instance.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-e instance-name

4. contiguous-ports number

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-e instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-e m1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for the CGv6 MAP-E application.

Step 4

contiguous-ports number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# contigu

ous-ports 16

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)#

Configures the number of contiguous ports. The range is from 1 to 65536.

Note The value is expressed in powers of 2.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring CPE Domain Parameters

Perform this task to configure Customer Premise Equipment (CPE) domain parameters.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-e instance-name

4. cpe-domain ipv4 prefix ipv4 address/prefix

or

cpe-domain ipv6 prefix ipv6 address/prefix

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-e instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-e m1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for the CGv6 MAP-E application.

Step 4

cpe-domain ipv4 prefix ipv4 address/prefix

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# cpe-dom

ain ipv4 prefix 10.2.2.24/2

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)#

or

cpe-domain ipv6 prefix ipv6 address/prefix

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# cpe-dom

ain ipv6 prefix 2001:da8:a464::/48

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)#

Configures the IPv4 or IPv6 prefixes of the CPE domain.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Path MTU of the Tunnel

Perform this task to configure the path Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) of the tunnel.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-e instance-name

4. path-mtu value

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-e instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-e m1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for the CGv6 MAP-E application.

Step 4

path-mtu value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# path-mtu 1300

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)#

Configures the path MTU of the tunnel. The range is from 1280 to 9216.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring Port Sharing Ratio

Perform this task to configure the sharing ratio of the port.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service cgn instance-name

3. service-type map-e instance-name

4. sharing-ratio number

5. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service cgn instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service cgn cgn1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)#

Creates an instance of the CGv6 application and enters CGv6 configuration mode.

Step 3

service-type map-e instance-name

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn)# service-type map-e m1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)#

Defines the service type keyword definition for the CGv6 MAP-E application.

Step 4

sharing-ratio number

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# sharing-ratio 64

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)#

Configures the port sharing ratio. The range is from 1 to 32768.

Note The value is expressed in powers of 2.

Step 5

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-cgn-map_e)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Configuring High Availability on ISM

ISM supports high availability or 1:1 redundancy on different CGv6 applications.

Perform these tasks to configure HA on ISM.

Configuring Active or Standby ISM

Perform this task to configure active or standby ISM.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. hw-module service cgn location node-id

3. interface ServiceInfra value

4. service-location preferred-active node-id [ preferred-standby node-id ]

5. ipv4 address address/mask

6. end
or
commit

7. reload

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

hw-module service cgn location node-id

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# hw-module service cgn location 0/1/CPU0

Configures role as CGN on both the ISM locations.

Step 3

interface ServiceInfra value

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface ServiceInfra 1

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)#

Configures the infrastructure service virtual interface (SVI) for both the ISM locations.

Step 4

service-location preferred-active node-id [ preferred-standby node-id]

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# service-location preferred-active 0/1/CPU0 preferred-standby 0/4/CPU0

Configures the preferred active and preferred standby nodes.

Step 5

ipv4 address address/mask

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 1.1.1.1/30

Sets the primary IPv4 address and netmask.

Step 6

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Step 7

reload

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:Router#hw-mod location 0/1/CPU0 reload

Once the configuration is complete, reload both the cards for changes to take effect and wait till in ‘APP READY’ state.

Enabling Failure Detection

Perform this task to enable failure detection.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. configure

2. service-cgv6-ha location node-id puntpath-test

3. service-cgv6-ha location node-id datapath-test

4. end
or
commit

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1

configure

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router# configure

Enters global configuration mode.

Step 2

service-cgv6-ha location node-id puntpath-test

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service-cgv6-ha location 0/1/CPU0 puntpath-test

Configures role as CGv6 and failure detection for puntpath tests.

Step 3

service-cgv6-ha location node-id datapath-test

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config)# service-cgv6-ha location 0/1/CPU0 datapath-test

Configures role as CGv6 and failure detection for datapath tests.

Step 4

end

or

commit

 

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end

or

RP/0/RP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit

Saves configuration changes.

  • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes:
Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)?
[cancel]:
 

Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode.

Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes.

Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes.

  • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.

Note By default, failure detection for punt path, data path is not triggered unless the above commands are configured.These commands can be configured only when ISM role is CGN and ISM in “App-Ready” state.


To disable failure detection, use the no form of the commands:

  • no service-cgv6-ha location node-id puntpath-test
  • no service-cgv6-ha location node-id datapath-test

Configuration Examples for Implementing CGv6

This section provides the following configuration examples for CGv6:

Configuring a Different Inside VRF Map to a Different Outside VRF for NAT44: Example

This example shows how to configure a different inside VRF map to a different outside VRF and different outside address pools:

service cgn cgn1
inside-vrf insidevrf1
map outside-vrf outsidevrf1 address-pool 100.1.1.0/24
!
!
inside-vrf insidevrf2
map outside-vrf outsidevrf2 address-pool 100.1.2.0/24
!
service-location preferred-active 0/2/cpu0
!
interface ServiceApp 1
vrf insidevrf1
ipv4 address 210.1.1.1 255.255.255.0
service cgn cgn1
!
router static
vrf insidevrf1
0.0.0.0/0 serviceapp 1
!
!
interface ServiceApp 2
vrf outsidevrf1
ipv4 address 211.1.1.1 255.255.255.0
service cgn cgn1
service-type nat44 nat1
!
router static
vrf outsidevrf1
100.1.1.0/24 serviceapp 2
!
!
interface ServiceApp 3
vrf insidevrf2
ipv4 address 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.0
service cgn cgn1
service-type nat44 nat1
!
router static
vrf insidevrf2
0.0.0.0/0 serviceapp 3
!
!
interface ServiceApp 4
vrf outsidevrf2
ipv4 address 2.2.2.1 255.255.255.0
service cgn cgn1
service-type nat44 nat1
!
router static
vrf outsidevrf2
100.1.2.0/24 serviceapp 4
 

NAT44 Configuration: Example

This example shows a NAT44 sample configuration:

interface Loopback40
description IPv4 Host for NAT44
ipv4 address 40.22.22.22 255.255.0.0
!
interface Loopback41
description IPv4 Host for NAT44
ipv4 address 41.22.22.22 255.255.0.0
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/3/0/0.1
description Connected to P2_ASR9000-8 GE 0/6/5/0.1
ipv4 address 10.222.5.22 255.255.255.0
dot1q vlan 1
!
router static
address-family ipv4 unicast
180.1.0.0/16 10.222.5.2
181.1.0.0/16 10.222.5.2
!
!

Hardware Configuration for ISM

!
vrf InsideCustomer1
address-family ipv4 unicast
!
!
vrf OutsideCustomer1
address-family ipv4 unicast
!
!
hw-module service cgn location 0/3/CPU0
!
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/6/5/0.1
vrf InsideCustomer1
ipv4 address 10.222.5.2 255.255.255.0
dot1q vlan 1
!
interface GigabitEthernet0/6/5/1.1
vrf OutsideCustomer1
ipv4 address 10.12.13.2 255.255.255.0
dot1q vlan 1
!
interface ServiceApp1
vrf InsideCustomer1
ipv4 address 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.252
service cgn cgn1 service-type nat44
!
interface ServiceApp2
vrf OutsideCustomer1
ipv4 address 2.1.1.1 255.255.255.252
service cgn cgn1 service-type nat44
!
interface ServiceInfra1
ipv4 address 75.75.75.75 255.255.255.0
service-location 0/3/CPU0
!
!