Setting Up and Installing Cisco Unity Voice Messaging 3.1(3) on the Cisco ICS 7750
Overview
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Overview of Cisco Unity Voice Messaging

Table Of Contents

Overview of Cisco Unity Voice Messaging

Features of Cisco Unity Voice Messaging

System Requirements for Cisco Unity Voice Messaging

Cisco ICS 7750 Requirements

SPE Configurations

Minimum Software Level

Qualified Combinations of Product Releases

Software Requirements for Cisco Unity Voice Messaging

Administrator Workstation

Components of Cisco Unity Voice Messaging

Network Environment

Telephony Integration

Storage for Voice Messages

Global Directory

System Configuration Options

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging Standalone Configuration

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging Networked with Other Cisco Unity Systems

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging Networked to an AMIS-Compliant Voice-Messaging System

Digital Networking for Cisco Unity Voice Messaging


Overview of Cisco Unity Voice Messaging


This chapter provides an overview of the Cisco Unity Voice Messaging integration with the Cisco Integrated Communications System 7750 (ICS 7750). It describes the features and system components for Cisco Unity Voice Messaging.

This chapter contains these sections:

Features of Cisco Unity Voice Messaging

System Requirements for Cisco Unity Voice Messaging

Components of Cisco Unity Voice Messaging

System Configuration Options

Features of Cisco Unity Voice Messaging

With Release 2.0.0, Cisco ICS 7750 provides all the IP telephony features available with Cisco CallManager. With an additional system processing engine (SPE) card, the Cisco ICS 7750 can also provide Cisco Unity Voice Messaging and automated attendant features. This section describes the features that are supported by the Cisco ICS 7750 with an additional SPE for running Cisco Unity Voice Messaging:

Voice Messaging—The Cisco Unity Voice Messaging capabilities allow subscribers to listen to their messages, send voice messages to other subscribers, and customize settings such as personal greetings.

Automated Attendant—With Cisco Unity Voice Messaging, users can set up an automated attendant. This feature serves as an electronic receptionist that answers incoming calls. It provides prompts to allow the incoming caller to dial a subscriber's name or to access the voice messaging system.

Active Assistant—This Web interface makes it possible for subscribers to use their computers to customize personal settings, including recorded greetings or message delivery options.

Cisco Unity Administrator—The Web administrator provides access to the Cisco Unity server from a LAN connection or a remote connection. Administrators use the Cisco Unity Administrator to create or modify subscriber accounts, configure messaging options, assign classes of service, record greetings, and run reports.

Digital Networking—This feature enables subscribers to send and receive voice messages between Cisco Unity servers at different locations. Cisco Unity servers can use the Internet to exchange messages.

Audio Messaging Interchange Specification (AMIS)—With the AMIS feature, a Cisco Unity Voice Messaging system can exchange voice messages with other AMIS-compliant voice-messaging systems, such as Octel 250, Octel 350, Siemens PhoneMail System, and Repartee systems. Messages are exchanged by means of either a private network or the public switched telephone network (PSTN).

Visual Messaging Interface (VMI)—The VMI provides a web-based interface for accessing voice messages on the Cisco Unity server. Cisco Unity Voice Messaging supports up to 300 licensed VMI users, with a single session dedicated to each user. VMI licenses are available in increments of one, from 1 to 300.

Cisco Unity Bridge —The Cisco Unity Bridge is a licensed feature that provides connectivity between Cisco Unity and analog OctelNet servers. This feature integrates Cisco Unity Voice Messaging database and legacy Octel databases. The Cisco Unity Bridge requires a separate Dell 1400 server with Brooktrout TR114 voice cards placed within the server. Up to 24 ports are supported, available in increments of 4. A keycode loaded within the Cisco Unity server (and not the Cisco Unity Bridge server) is required to activate this feature.

Support for multilanguage voice prompts—Cisco Unity Voice Messaging now supports voice prompts in multiple languages, including Spanish (Colombian and European), Dutch, Norwegian, Swedish, Italian, Chinese Mandarin, French, German, Japanese, and English for North America, United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand.

System Requirements for Cisco Unity Voice Messaging

This section describes the hardware components and the software applications that are required to support Cisco Unity Voice Messaging on the Cisco ICS 7750 system.

Cisco ICS 7750 Requirements

The following are the Cisco ICS 7750 hardware and software requirements for supporting Cisco Unity Voice Messaging:

Cisco ICS 7750—The system must have the Cisco ICS 7750 System Software Release 2.0.0 or later and all the system processing engine (SPE 310) cards listed below.

SPE running System Manager—This card has the Cisco ICS 7750 system software which includes Cisco ICS System Manager, Fault Management Module, and Microsoft SQL Server 7.0.


Note Cisco CallManager can be installed either on the SPE running System Manager or on a separate SPE. For information about supported combinations of Cisco CallManager and Cisco Unity Voice Messaging, see the "Qualified Combinations of Product Releases" section.


SPE running Cisco CallManager—This card has Cisco CallManager 3.1 or later, which provides the call-processing features for the Cisco IP Phones and manages the Voice over IP (VoIP) gateways. It can be designated as either the publisher server or the subscriber server. This card is shipped with ICS Core Software and Windows 2000 Server software.

SPE running Cisco Unity Voice Messaging—All the applications that support the voice-messaging system are installed on this card. These applications provide the communications routing and message management for voice messaging and the automated attendant. This card is shipped with ICS Core Software and Windows 2000 Server software.

SPE Configurations

A Cisco ICS 7750 that supports Cisco Unity Voice Messaging can have either of the following two SPE configurations:

Two SPEs—One SPE running both Cisco ICS 7750 System Software and Cisco CallManager, and the other SPE running Cisco Unity Voice Messaging and all the supporting applications.

Three SPEs—One SPE running Cisco ICS 7750 System Software and Cisco CallManager; a second SPE running Cisco CallManager; and a third SPE running Cisco Unity Voice Messaging and all the supporting applications.


Note Only one SPE can run Cisco Unity Voice Messaging in each Cisco ICS 7750.


Minimum Software Level

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging requires the following minimum software release levels:

Cisco ICS 7750 System Software must be at Release 2.0.0 or later.

Cisco CallManager must be at Release 3.1 or later.

Qualified Combinations of Product Releases

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging, Cisco Unity-Cisco CallManager (CM) Telephony Service Provider (TSP), and Cisco CallManager have been qualified for only the combinations of product releases listed in Table 1-1. For more information about the Cisco Unity-CM TSP, see the "Telephony Integration" section.


Note In releases earlier than 3.1(1), the Cisco Unity-CM TSP was known as the AV-Cisco TSP.


Table 1-1 Qualified Combinations of Product Releases

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging Release
Cisco Unity-CM TSP Release
Cisco ICS Version of Cisco CallManager Release
ICS System Manager Core Software Release

3.0(1)

3.0(2)

3.1(2c)

2.1.0, 2.2.0

3.1(2)

6.0(1), 3.1(2)

3.2(1), 3.1(2c)

2.1.0, 2.2.0

3.1(3)

6.0(1)

3.2(1), 3.1(2c)

2.1.0, 2.2.0



Note Cisco Unity Voice Messaging, including Digital Networking and AMIS features, has been qualified on the Cisco ICS 7750. Other features of Cisco Unity, such as e-mail and unified messaging, have not been qualified on the Cisco ICS 7750.


Software Requirements for Cisco Unity Voice Messaging

The following software is required to support Cisco Unity Voice Messaging and is included in the installation CD package. This software must be installed on the SPE used to run Cisco Unity Voice Messaging:

Domain controller--The SPE is promoted to a domain controller, and Microsoft Windows 2000 Active Directory is installed.

Domain Name System (DNS)--A DNS server is configured on the SPE for translating network names into addresses.

Microsoft Data Engine (MSDE)--The MSDE database is used to manage the global directory for all subscribers in an organization.

Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server (Standard Edition)--Microsoft Exchange provides storage for the voice messages.

Administrator Workstation

This computer must have network connectivity with the Cisco ICS 7750. It must have Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.5 installed. The administrator must use Internet Explorer to access Cisco CallManager Administration, Cisco Unity Administrator, and other Cisco Unity system-monitoring tools.

Components of Cisco Unity Voice Messaging

This section describes the following components, which are requirements for installing and using Cisco Unity Voice Messaging:

Network Environment

Telephony Integration

Storage for Voice Messages

Global Directory

Network Environment

The software components that are used in the Cisco Unity Voice Messaging system must reside on SPEs using Windows 2000. The network environment must include a domain controller and a DNS server.

In a Windows 2000 network, you must promote the SPE to the domain controller and install Active Directory on the SPE used for Cisco Unity Voice Messaging. All Cisco Unity Voice Messaging components must be members of the same domain. Domain membership must be set up before Cisco Unity Voice Messaging is installed as a Cisco Unity component system.

The domain controller is used to authenticate end-users when they log in to Cisco Unity Voice Messaging.

A DNS server is configured on the SPE used to run Cisco Unity Voice Messaging. The DNS server is used to translate network names to IP addresses when sending messages across the network. You can use an existing DNS server instead of configuring one on the SPE running Cisco Unity Voice Messaging.

Telephony Integration

A telephone system communicates with a voice messaging system through the integration of three essential features:

Call routing to a personal greeting

Message access

Message waiting indicators

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging and Cisco CallManager provide all three integration requirements using the Telephony Applications Protocol Interface (TAPI) in an IP environment. All call information--including session, signaling, and audio information--is transferred as packets across the network.

Cisco has developed the Cisco Unity-CM TSP program (formerly called the AV-Cisco TSP) for integrating Cisco Unity with Cisco CallManager. The TSP provides the TAPI session and call control service. The Cisco IP Phones are connected to Cisco CallManager by using Skinny Station Protocol (SSP). The SSP layer is similar to the computer telephony integration (CTI) layer and provides an alternate communication channel to Cisco CallManager. All integration functionality is retained using this alternate protocol (SSP), and all TAPI session and call control is serviced through the Cisco Unity-CM TSP.

Storage for Voice Messages

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging works with Microsoft Exchange 2000 to store and access voice messages on the Microsoft Exchange 2000 server. All voice messaging subscribers must have a mailbox set up on the Microsoft Exchange server.

Because Cisco Unity Voice Messaging stores only voice messages, and it is not used for e-mail storage, you are licensed to use Microsoft Exchange 2000 as "Voicemail Runtime-Restricted Use" software. Voice messages are stored as audio (*.wav) files in individual subscribers' Microsoft Exchange 2000 mailboxes.

Microsoft Exchange 2000 server and the message store are installed on the SPE for Cisco Unity Voice Messaging. Microsoft Exchange 2000 is required for voice-messaging management and must be installed and configured before Cisco Unity Voice Messaging is installed.

Global Directory

A global directory is a database resource for information about voice messaging subscribers. You use the directory to find subscribers by name, to address messages to them, and to transfer to their phones. MSDE provides the database engine for the global directory.

Subscribers each have database records that include the subscriber's extension number, voice name, spelled name, and location. For multiple Cisco Unity Voice Messaging systems in the same organization, the subscribers on the separate systems are added into the global directory. This makes it easy to locate and address messages to everyone in an organization.

System Configuration Options

Three general system configurations are supported in the initial integration of Cisco Unity Voice Messaging on the ICS 7750. This section describes these system configurations:

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging Standalone Configuration

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging Networked with Other Cisco Unity Systems

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging Networked to an AMIS-Compliant Voice-Messaging System



Cisco Unity Voice Messaging Standalone Configuration

The standard Cisco ICS 7750 configuration for Cisco Unity Voice Messaging is a standalone system. The procedures provided in this document are intended for use only in installing a standalone configuration.

Figure 1-1 shows the locations of the hardware and software components used in this system configuration.

Figure 1-1 Locations of Hardware and Software Components in the Cisco ICS 7750

1

Multiservice route processor (MRP)

5

SPE running System Manager and Cisco CallManager

2

(Optional slot for MRP or SPE)

6

System switch processor (SSP)

3

System processing engine (SPE) running Cisco Unity Voice Messaging*

7

System alarm processor (SAP)

4

SPE running Cisco CallManager (optional)

   

*The SPE running Cisco Unity Voice Messaging (callout 3) has the following software components:

Domain controller with Active Directory

DNS server

Microsoft Exchange 2000

Microsoft Data Engine (MSDE)

Microsoft SQL Enterprise Manager

Table 1-2 describes the components for the standalone Cisco Unity Voice Messaging configuration.

Table 1-2 Standalone Cisco Unity Voice Messaging Configuration 

Component
Description

Domain controller

The platform for the domain controller must be Microsoft Windows 2000 and Active Directory. The Windows 2000 server on the SPE for Cisco Unity Voice Messaging is promoted to a domain controller.

DNS server

A DNS server is installed on the SPE for Cisco Unity Voice Messaging.

Global directory database

MSDE is installed on the SPE for Cisco Unity Voice Messaging, with up to 16 ports, to manage the global directory.

Message store

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging uses Microsoft Exchange 2000 for message storage. It stores only voice messages. Microsoft Exchange 2000 is installed on the SPE on which Cisco Unity Voice Messaging is installed.


Cisco Unity Voice Messaging Networked with Other Cisco Unity Systems

Two or more Cisco ICS 7750 systems running Cisco Unity Voice Messaging can share a LAN or WAN connection and provide voice messaging between the different sites. The Cisco Unity Networking feature is required for communication between Cisco Unity servers. For more information about the networking feature, refer to Networking in Cisco Unity.

Table 1-3 describes the components for a Cisco Unity Voice Messaging installation in a network with two or more Cisco Unity systems.

Table 1-3 Cisco Unity Voice Messaging Systems Installed in a Digital Network 

Component
Description

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging networking feature

The Cisco Unity digital networking feature is required for communicating with other Cisco Unity servers.

Domain controller

The platform for the domain controller must be Window 2000. When two or more Cisco ICS 7750 systems are using Cisco Unity Voice Messaging, one of the SPEs running Cisco Unity Voice Messaging must be the domain controller. The other SPEs can be either member servers or domain controllers, as long as the SPEs are members of the same domain.

DNS server

A DNS server is required. Use an existing DNS server, or configure the DNS server on the SPE running Cisco Unity Voice Messaging.

Global directory database

Install Microsoft Data Engine (MSDE) to manage the global directory.

Message store

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging 3.0 must use Microsoft Exchange 2000 for message storage. Microsoft Exchange 2000 is installed on the SPE on which Cisco Unity Voice Messaging is installed.

Connection to other Cisco Unity Voice Messaging systems

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging, with digital networking, uses the existing LAN/WAN infrastructure for routing messages between Active Directory sites and Microsoft Exchange 2000 Routing Groups.


Cisco Unity Voice Messaging Networked to an AMIS-Compliant Voice-Messaging System

A Cisco ICS 7750 system with Cisco Unity Voice Messaging installed can connect to an Audio Messaging Interchange Specification (AMIS)-compliant voice messaging system, such as an Octel voice messaging system or a Siemens PhoneMail system. The Cisco Unity Networking feature includes AMIS capability. AMIS provides the protocol for communication between the two voice-messaging servers.

Table 1-4 describes the components required for installing Cisco Unity Voice Messaging in a Cisco ICS 7750 system and connecting to another vendor's AMIS-compliant voice-messaging system.

Table 1-4 Cisco Unity Voice Messaging Connected to an AMIS-Compliant System 

Component
Description

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging networking feature

The Cisco Unity digital networking feature, which includes AMIS communications protocol features, is required for communication with AMIS-compliant voice-messaging servers.

Domain controller

The platform for the domain controller must be Window 2000. When two or more Cisco ICS 7750 systems are using Cisco Unity Voice Messaging, one of the SPEs running Cisco Unity Voice Messaging must be the domain controller, and the other SPEs can be either member servers or domain controllers in the same domain.

DNS server

A DNS server is required. Use an existing DNS server, or configure the DNS server on the SPE running Cisco Unity Voice Messaging.

Global directory database

Install Microsoft Data Engine (MSDE) to manage the global directory.

Message store

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging must use Microsoft Exchange 2000 for message storage. Microsoft Exchange 2000 is installed on the SPE on which Cisco Unity Voice Messaging is installed.

Connection to another AMIS-compliant voice messaging system

An AMIS-compliant voice messaging system requires connections through the public switched telephone network (PSTN) to the Cisco ICS 7750 on multiservice route processors (MRPs) that support the following ports:

T-1

Foreign exchange office (FXO)


Digital Networking for Cisco Unity Voice Messaging

Cisco Unity Voice Messaging uses the plain old voice mail with local area network (POV/LAN) version of Cisco Unity. POV/LAN supports digital networking features.

There are two basic choices involved in installing Cisco Unity Voice Messaging in a digital network:

Install Cisco Unity Voice Messaging into an existing domain and Exchange organization infrastructure. This type of digital networking is normally used if you plan to migrate to Cisco Unity Unified Messaging in the future, and if you have an existing domain and Exchange organization. The advantages of this implementation are the automatic database replication that is inherent with Active Directory and Exchange, and the need for fewer database management tasks, which results from using a shared database.

Install Cisco Unity Voice Messaging in its own domain and Exchange organization. This implementation is typically used if you have no plans for migrating to Cisco Unity Unified Messaging in the future, or if there is no existing domain or Exchange organization. Because Cisco Unity Voice Messaging uses POV, you must configure the Simple Mail Transport Protocol (SMTP) connectors and the Internet Voice Connector (IVC) to interface with the existing Exchange infrastructure. Cisco Unity Voice Messaging also uses blind addressing to send voice messages to other Cisco Unity servers. This form of digital networking requires more system database management support for integrating with other databases.

For more information about setting up digital networking, refer to Networking in Cisco Unity and the Cisco Unity Administration Guide.