Cisco AS5350XM and Cisco AS5400XM Universal Gateways Software Configuration Guide
Understanding Basic Hardware Architecture and Cisco IOS Software
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Understanding Basic Hardware Architecture and Cisco IOS Software

Table Of Contents

Understanding Basic Hardware Architecture and Cisco IOS Software

Basic Hardware Architecture

Exploring the Cisco IOS File System

Exploring Cisco IOS Software

Getting Help

Understanding Command Modes

Finding Command Options

Undoing a Command or Feature

Saving Configuration Changes

Upgrading to a New Cisco IOS Release

Changing Console Line Speed

Changing Gateway Line Speed

Upgrade the ROM Monitor Image

Selecting a ROM Monitor Image for Execution

Verifying the ROM Monitor Image

Where to Go Next


Understanding Basic Hardware Architecture and Cisco IOS Software


The information in this chapter applies to the Cisco AS5350XM and Cisco AS5400XM universal gateways. This chapter provides a brief profile of the Cisco AS5350XM and Cisco AS5400XM universal gateway hardware components and functionality, explains how to use the Cisco IOS command-line interface (CLI), and describes how to upgrade your Cisco IOS software:

Basic Hardware Architecture

Exploring the Cisco IOS File System

Exploring Cisco IOS Software

Upgrading to a New Cisco IOS Release

Upgrade the ROM Monitor Image

Where to Go Next

The Cisco AS5350XM and Cisco AS5400XM universal gateways are versatile data and voice communications platforms that provide the functions of a gateway, router, and digital modems in a single modular chassis.

The gateways are intended for Internet service providers (ISPs), telecommunications carriers, and other service providers that offer managed Internet connections, and also medium to large sites that provide both digital and analog access to users on an enterprise network.

Basic Hardware Architecture


Note The cards that reside in the Cisco AS5350XM and Cisco AS5400XM chassis are of two types: trunk feature cards, which provide an T1, E1, or channelized T3 interface, and universal port, dial-only, and voice feature cards, which host the universal digital signal processors (DSPs) that dynamically handle voice, dial, or fax calls.


Figure 1 shows the logical and physical system architecture for the Cisco AS5350XM and Cisco AS5400XM universal gateways, and illustrates the components used to process a call.

Figure 1 Cisco AS5350XM and Cisco AS5400XM Basic System Architecture

Figure 1 shows the following:

Client modems and Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) routers dial into the gateway through the public switched telephone network (PSTN).

Analog Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) calls connect to modems inside the gateway.

Each modem inside the gateway provides a corresponding TTY line and asynchronous interface for terminating character and packet mode services.

Asynchronous interfaces clone their configurations from a group-async interface.

Synchronous PPP calls connect to serial interface channels (for example, Se2/0:1 and Se2/0:2).

Synchronous interfaces clone their configurations from a dialer interface.

One analog PPP call uses the following resources:

One T1 DS0 channel

One channel in a time-division multiplexing (TDM) bus

One integrated modem

One TTY line

One asynchronous interface

One synchronous PPP call uses the following resources:

One T1 DS0 channel

One serial interface channel

Exploring the Cisco IOS File System

The Cisco IOS File System (IFS) feature provides a single interface to the following:

Flash memory file system

Network file system (TFTP, rcp, and FTP)

Any other endpoint for reading or writing data (such as NVRAM, modem firmware, the running configuration, ROM, raw system memory and flash load helper log)


Note The Cisco AS5350XM and Cisco AS5400XM universal gateways use a Class C Flash File System.


IFS first appeared in Cisco IOS Releases 11.3 AA and 12.0. For more information about IFS, see the chapter "Using the Cisco IOS File System" in the Cisco IOS Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide for your software release.

Table 1 describes the memory locations.

Table 1 Memory Location Descriptions

Component
Description

CPU

750 MHz (Cisco AS5350XM and Cisco AS5400XM)

Processor memory

Stores the Cisco IOS image after it is initially read out of flash memory and decompressed (also known as main memory or DRAM).

Also stores routing tables, call control blocks, and other data structures.

Packet I/O memory

Temporarily stores packets in transit.

System flash and flash memory

Stores Cisco IOS images, modem firmware/portware, and custom web pages.

NVRAM memory

Stores configurations in nonvolatile memory, which retains its contents when a unit is powered off.


To inspect the file system, enter the show file systems command and the dir command as shown in the following procedure.


Step 1 View the different file storage areas and file management functions:

Router# show file systems
File Systems:

     Size(b)     Free(b)      Type  Flags  Prefixes
      520184      520184     nvram     rw   nvram:
           -           -    opaque     rw   null:
           -           -    opaque     rw   system:
           -           -   network     rw   tftp:
           -           -    opaque     wo   vfc:
*   32768000    22992256     flash     rw   flash:
     7602176     4634364     flash     rw   flash:
           -           -    opaque     wo   lex:
           -           -   network     rw   rcp:
           -           -   network     rw   ftp:

In addition, verify that you have everything that you ordered (for example, 32 megabytes of flash memory). The asterisk (*) indicates the current directory.

Step 2 Display the objects in the system memory directory:

Router# dir system:
Directory of system:/
 
    4  dr-x           0              <no date>  memory
    1  -rw-        5026              <no date>  running-config
    2  dr-x           0              <no date>  ucode
   14  dr-x           0              <no date>  vfiles

Note Remember to include the trailing colon (:) in dir commands.


Step 3 Inspect the contents of flash memory:

Router# dir flash:
Directory of flash:/
1 -rw- 18442404 Oct 11 2004 16:52:54 +00:00 c5400-js-mz
2 -rw- 11978    Sep 13 2004 13:27:22 +00:00 tb3-2-nemo-sip-stress.conf
3 -rw- 18373376 Oct 05 2004 14:34:42 +00:00 c5400-js-mz-nm51520ef
4 -rw- 18446620 Oct 06 2004 13:47:46 +00:00 c5400-js-mz.nemo.Sep30

In the example, the flash image is c5350-js-mz. The compressed file size is 1962796 bytes. The total flash memory size is 7602176 bytes. The number of free bytes is 4634364. The crashinfo file is a collection of useful information related to the current crash stored in system flash or flash memory.


Note For more information on crashinfo files, see the Retrieving Information from the Crashinfo File document, available online at
http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/63/crashinfo.html.


Step 4 Display the contents of flash memory:

Router# pwd
flash:
Router# dir
1  -rw-     9950528   Jan 01 2000 00:48:59  c5350-js-mz.121-1.XD1.bin

32768000 bytes total (22817344 bytes free)

The Cisco IOS image named c5350-js-mz.121-1.XD1.bin is present.

Step 5 Inspect the NVRAM directory:

Router# dir nvram:
Directory of nvram:/
 
  1 -rw-        0                 <no date>  startup-config
  2 ----        0                 <no date>  private-config
 
520184 bytes total (520184 bytes free)

In the example, the startup-config and private-config are present. The private-config file is a secure file that is part of the startup configuration. It supports encryption technologies, but it is not user accessible.


Exploring Cisco IOS Software

This section describes what you need to know about the Cisco IOS software (the software that runs the gateway) before you configure the gateway using the CLI.

Understanding these concepts saves you time if you have no or minimal experience using the Cisco IOS software.

Getting Help

Use the question mark (?) and arrow keys to help you enter commands, where Router> is the prompt for the top level of the Cisco IOS software for the Cisco AS5350XM or Cisco AS5400XM universal gateway.


Note The examples in this guide show prompts for either a Cisco AS5350XM or a Cisco AS5400XM universal gateway. However, regardless of the prompt or output shown, all examples apply to either type of gateway.


For a list of available commands, enter a question mark:

Router> ?

To complete a command, enter a few known characters followed by a question mark (with no space):

Router> s?

For a list of command variables, enter the show command followed by a space and a question mark:

Router> show ?

To redisplay a command you previously entered, press the Up Arrow key. You can continue to press the Up Arrow key for more commands.

Understanding Command Modes

You need to use many different command modes to configure the gateway. Each command mode restricts you to a subset of commands.


Tip If you are having trouble entering a command, check the prompt, and then enter the question mark (?) for a list of available commands. You might be in the wrong command mode or using the wrong syntax.


In the following example, notice how the prompt changes after each command to indicate a new command mode:

Router> enable
Router> password
Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/0 
Router(config-if)# ip address 172.16.254.250
Router(config-if)# exit
Router#
%SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by console

The last message is normal and does not indicate an error. Press Return to get the Router> prompt.


Note You can press Ctrl-Z at any time to immediately return to enable mode (Router#), instead of entering exit, which returns you to the previous mode.


Finding Command Options

This section explains how to display options for a command. To display options for a command, enter a ? at the configuration prompt, or after entering part of a command followed by a space. The configuration parser displays options available with the command. For example, if you were in global configuration mode, typed the command arap, and wanted to see all the keywords and arguments for that command, you would type arap ?

 
Command
Purpose

Step 1 

Router> enable
Password: password
Router

Enters enable mode. Enters the password. You are in enable mode when the prompt changes to Router#.

Step 2 

Routerconfig terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End 
with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#

Enters global configuration mode. You are in global configuration mode when the prompt changes to Router(config)#.

Step 3 

Router(config)# controller t1 1/?
<0-1>  Controller port number
Router(config)# controller t1 1/0

Specifies the T1 controller that you want to configure using the controller T1 number global configuration command.

Step 4 

Router(config-controller)# ?
Controller configuration commands:

Displays controller configuration commands.

 
cablelength 

channel-group 
 

default
description

ds0
ds0-group
 
 

exit 

fdl 

framing 

help 

linecode 

loopback 

no 

pri-group 

shutdown
Specify cable length for a 
DS1 link
Specify timeslots to 
channel-group mapping for an 
interface
Set a command to its defaults
Controller specific 
description
ds0 commands
Replacement of cas-group
Configure group of timeslots 
to a particular signaling 
type
Exit from controller 
configuration mode
Specify the FDL standard for 
a DS1 data link
Specify the type of Framing 
on a DS1 link
Description of the 
interactive help system
Specify the line encoding 
method for a DS1 link
Put the entire T1 line into 
loopback
Negate a command or set its 
defaults
Configure the specified 
timeslots for PRI
Shut down a DS1 link (send 
Blue Alarm)
 

Step 5 

Router(config-controller)# ds0-group ?
     <0-23>  Channel number

Displays the options for the ds0-group controller configuration command. This command is used to configure the channel-associated signaling on a T1 controller.

Step 6 

Router(config-controller)# ds0-group 1 ?
     timeslots  List of timeslots in the ds0-group

Displays the only command (timeslots) available in ds0-group 1.

Step 7 

Router(config-controller)# ds0-group 1 timeslots ?
     <1-24>  List of timeslots which comprise the 
ds0-group

Displays the range for the timeslot option. Specify a time slot range of values from 1 to 24. You can specify time slot ranges (for example, 1-24), individual time slots separated by commas (for example 1, 3, 5), or a combination of the two (for example 1-3, 8, 17-24). The 16th time slot is not specified in the command line, because it is reserved for transmitting the channel signaling.

Step 8 

Router(config-controller)# ds0-group 1 timeslots  
1-24 ?

Displays the two commands (service and type) available for the time slots.

 
  service 
  type
Specify the type of service 
Specify the type of signaling
 

Step 9 

Router(config-controller)# ds0-group 1 timeslots 
1-24 type ?

Lists supported signaling types.

 
  e&m-fgb 
  e&m-fgd 
  e&m-immediate-start 
  fxs-ground-start 
  fxs-loop-start 
  sas-ground-start 
  sas-loop-start
E & M Type II FGB 
E & M Type II FGD 
E & M Immediate Start 
FXS Ground Start 
FXS Loop Start 
SAS Ground Start 
SAS Loop Start
 

Step 10 

Router(config-controller)# ds0-group 1 timeslots 
1-24 type e&m-fgb ?
  dtmf     DTMF tone signaling 
  mf       MF tone signaling 
  service  Specify the type of service 
  <cr>

Displays the types of channel-associated signaling available for the e&m-fgb type.

Step 11 

Router(config-controller)# ds0-group 1 timeslots 
1-24 type e&m-fgb dtmf ?
  dnis     DNIS addr info provisioned 
  service   Specify the type of service 
  <cr>

Displays the options supported for the DTMF tone signaling option.

Undoing a Command or Feature

If you want to undo a command you entered or disable a feature, enter the keyword no before most commands; for example, no ip routing.

Saving Configuration Changes

Enter the copy running-config startup-config command to save your configuration changes to nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM) so that they are not lost if there is a system reload or power outage. For example:

Router# copy running-config startup-config
Building configuration...

It might take a minute or two to save the configuration to NVRAM. After the configuration has been saved, the following appears:

[OK]
Router#

Timesaver You can use the question mark (?) and arrow keys to help you enter commands.



Timesaver Each command mode restricts you to a set of commands. If you are having difficulty entering a command, check the prompt and then enter the question mark (?) for a list of available commands. You might be in the wrong command mode or using the wrong syntax.



Timesaver If you want to disable a feature, enter the keyword no before the command; for example, no ip routing.



Timesaver You need to save your configuration changes to NVRAM so that they are not lost if there is a system reload or power outage.


Upgrading to a New Cisco IOS Release

Obtain new Cisco IOS features and more stable code by upgrading to a new Cisco IOS release.


Step 1 Display the contents of flash memory:

Router# cd flash:
Router# dir
Directory of flash:/

1  -rw-     9950528   Jan 01 2000 00:48:59  c5350-js-mz.121-1.XD1.bin

32768000 bytes total (13041600 bytes free)

Step 2 Copy the new image from the remote TFTP server into flash memory. Make sure that you specify your own TFTP server's IP address and Cisco IOS filename. If you encounter issues with upgrading the image, be sure that you can ping the TFTP server and that appropriate directory permissions are configured on the TFTP server. To see the bangs (!) during the download operation, enable line wrap in your terminal emulation software.


Note If you have available space for two images, leave both images in flash memory. If necessary, you can easily revert back to the previous image. Enter the boot system flash newiosname.bin command to point to the new image filename. By default, the first image in flash memory is loaded.

If you do not have available space, during the copy operation the system displays a message telling you to delete the current file and squeeze the flash memory to make room for the new image. Enter the delete flash:version command, followed by the squeeze flash command, to perform this delete-and-squeeze operation. Then proceed with the copy operation.


Router# copy tftp flash
Address or name of remote host [172.22.191.135]? 172.22.191.135
Source filename [c5350-js-mz.121-1.XD1.bin]? c5350-js-mz.121-3.T.bin
Destination filename [c5350-js-mz.121-3.T.bin]? 
Accessing tftp://172.22.191.135/c5350-js-mz.121-3.T.bin...
Loading c5350-js-mz.121-3.T.bin from 172.22.191.135 (via GigabitEthernet0/0): !!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
[OK - 9775616/19551232 bytes]

9775616 bytes copied in 66.424 secs (148115 bytes/sec)

Caution Occasionally TFTP errors occur. Make sure that the verifying checksum reports "OK." Do  not reload the gateway if the checksum reports errors.

Step 3 Verify that the new image was downloaded. In this example, notice that the Cisco IOS Release 12.1(1)XD image is the first in flash memory, so it is loaded during the boot sequence. To boot using the new image, you must either delete the unwanted image or use the boot system command to specify the alternative image to use during the boot sequence.

Router# dir flash:
Directory of flash:/

  1  -rw-     9950528   Jan 01 2000 00:48:59  c5350-js-mz.121-1.XD1.bin
  2  -rw-     9775616   Jan 01 2000 00:59:10  c5350-js-mz.121-3.T.bin
32768000 bytes total (13041600 bytes free)

For more information on deleting the image, see the Cisco IOS File System document, available online at
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios113ed/113aa/113aa_2/allplats/ifs.htm


Note The Cisco AS5350XM and Cisco AS5400XM universal gateways use a Class C Flash File System.


Step 4 To specify the alternative image that is to be used during the boot sequence use the boot system flash newiosname.bin command to specify the location (device) and name of the image to be used:

Router(config)# boot system flash c5350-js-mz.121-3.T.bin
Router(config)# ^Z
Router# copy running-config startup-config
Destination filename [startup-config]?
Building configuration...
[OK]

To verify that this command is in effect, use the show running-configuration command. Save your running configuration before the reload so that the gateway loads the correct image.


Note The configuration register must be set to 0xXXX2, where 2 tells the system to use the "boot system" command. If the configuration register is set to 0xXXX1, the system will ignore the boot system command and will load the first image on flash memory.


Step 5 Reload the Cisco AS5350XM or Cisco AS5400XM universal gateway to run the new image. If you erased the old Cisco IOS image, make sure that the boot system flash oldiosname.bin command is not enabled and pointing to the old image filename; otherwise, the gateway becomes stuck trying to reload the old image over and over again.

Router# reload
Proceed with reload? [confirm]

System Bootstrap, Version 12.0(20000106:234457) [tombnyg-rommon_1_6 106],
SOFTWARE REV 1.6
Copyright (c) 1994-2000 by cisco Systems, Inc.
AS5400XM platform with 524288 Kbytes of main memory


Self decompressing the image : #################################################
##################################################### [OK]
Self decompressing the image : #################################################
################################################################################
################################################################################
################################################################################
################################################################################
################################################################### [OK]
Press RETURN to get started!


Note Most sections of the boot sequence have been omitted from the example.



For more information about TFTP, see the Loading and Maintaining System Images and Microcode document, available online at
http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios120/12cgcr/fun_c/fcprt2/fcimages.htm


Tip On system reload, if the console session freezes or displays unusual characters on the screen, you may have a console session mismatch between the Cisco IOS console line speed and the terminal server speed. This mismatch may occur because of the program settings of your console or your terminal server speed.



Note Before you proceed to correct session mismatch, verify that your problem is not due to a defective cable or improper cable connection. Check your cable connection or replace the cable and reload the system again.


To correct a console session mismatch, do one of the following:

Change your console line speed.

Change your terminal server speed.

If the above two solutions do not correct the console session, install the console jumper on the motherboard to set your default console port speed to 9600 bps.

Changing Console Line Speed


Caution Changing your console line speed on an active Cisco AS5350XM or Cisco AS5400XM universal gateway results in a temporary loss of synchronization between the console line and terminal port speeds. At this point, the gateway may recognize a false send break command that may result in your system crashing.

To avoid this problem, you can do one of the following:

If the configuration register on your Cisco AS5350XM or Cisco AS5400XM already has the Break Abort Effect bit set (mask is 0x0100), then you are protected and the false send break event does not occur. (You can change the configuration register to have this bit set, but the change does not take effect until your gateway is rebooted.)

If the configuration register does not have the Break Abort Effect bit set (mask 0x0100), then disconnect the cable on the console port and either log in to the Cisco AS5350XM or Cisco AS5400XM universal gateway through the AUX port or telnet in through a VTY session. Change the console line speed and the related terminal server speed, and then reconnect the console cable.

Log in to your Cisco AS5350XM or Cisco AS5400XM universal gateway through the AUX port or Telnet VTY session. Enter the show running-config command and determine the speed your line console is set for. Possible console speeds are 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, and 115200. The default setting is 9600.

If your gateway is in ROM monitor mode, then the AUX port is not functioning. You must then change the terminal server port speed through your console port connection until the rommon> prompt is displayed. See Appendix B, "ROM Monitor."

Changing Gateway Line Speed

The following example shows how to configure line speed on a Cisco AS5350XM or Cisco AS5400XM universal gateway, beginning in global configuration mode:

Router(config)# line 3
Router(config-line)# speed speed_value

Upgrade the ROM Monitor Image

Use the upgrade rom-monitor command to upgrade the ROM monitor to a new version. The Cisco AS5350XM and Cisco AS5400XM universal gateways have two ROM monitor images. The original image shipped with your system is a read-only image that cannot be erased or altered in the field; the second image is read-and-write upgradable by the field. This eliminates or reduces the need to physically replace the hardware in order to get a new image.

The upgrade rom-monitor commands allow you to:

Load the upgrade ROM monitor image.

Configure your system to point to the upgrade ROM monitor image at the next reboot of your router.

Select the read-only ROM monitor image for execution on the next reboot.

Display both ROM monitor image versions and which ROM monitor image is currently selected.


Note If the upgrade ROM monitor image fails to boot, the router will mark this ROM monitor image as invalid and revert to the read-only image.


The first time a new ROM monitor image is loaded, you must allow the system to boot ROM monitor before doing any additional resets or power cycling. If the ROM monitor-loading process is interrupted, the system interprets this as a bootup failure of the new ROMmon image and reverts to the read-only image.

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

upgrade rom-monitor file {archive: [file-path] | cns: [file-path] | flash: [file-path] | ftp: [file-path] | http: [file-path] | null: [file-path] | nvram: [file-path] | pram: [file-path] | rcp: [file-path] | system: [file-path] | tftp: [file-path]}

Example:

Router# upgrade rom-monitor file tftp: //00.0.00.0/biff/AS5350_RMFUR.srec


Loads the upgrade ROM monitor image from a specified source directory filename. In the example, you are loading the ROM monitor image from a TFTP server using a TFTP path name.

Selecting a ROM Monitor Image for Execution

This section contains the procedure to select a ROM monitor image for execution on the next reboot. Use this procedure if you want to replace the upgrade ROM monitor image, which has been selected, with the read-only ROM monitor image. The read-only ROM monitor image will then be booted on the next reload of the gateway.

 
Command or Action
Purpose

Step 1 

enable

Example:

Router> enable

Enables Privileged EXEC mode.

Enter your password if prompted.

Step 2 

upgrade rom-monitor preference [readonly | upgrade]

Example:

Router# upgrade rom-monitor preference readonly

When in Cisco IOS, this command in Privileged EXEC mode selects either the read-only or upgrade ROM monitor image as the image to be booted on the next reload.

In this example, you are selecting the read-only ROM monitor image. One reason could be that the upgrade image has features or side effects you do not like.

Verifying the ROM Monitor Image

To verify whether the upgrade ROM monitor or the read-only ROM monitor image has been installed, perform the following steps.


Step 1 enable

Enables privileged EXEC mode. Enter your password if prompted.

Router> enable

Step 2 show rom-monitor

When in Cisco IOS, this command in privileged EXEC mode shows both the read-only and the upgrade ROM monitor image versions, as well as which ROM monitor image is running.

Router# show rom-monitor

ReadOnly ROMMON version is: 
System Bootstrap, Version 12.3(12r)PI6, RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1) 
Technical Support: 	http://www.cisco.com/techsupport 
Copyright (c) 2004 by cisco Systems, Inc. 

Upgrade ROMMON version is: 
System Bootstrap, Version 12.3(12r)PI6, RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1) 
Technical Support: 	http://www.cisco.com/techsupport 
Copyright (c) 2004 by cisco Systems, Inc.

Currently running ROMMON from ReadOnly region 
ROMMON from ReadOnly region is selected for next boot 


Where to Go Next

At this point you should go to these references:

Chapter 2, "Verifying Basic Setup," to analyze your system and execute basic tasks and system configuration before configuring the Cisco AS5350XM or Cisco AS5400XM universal gateway using the CLI to prepare your system for data call processing.


Tip The following publications are available on the Documentation DVD, or on the World Wide Web from the Cisco home page.


Cisco IOS publications Dial Solutions Configuration Guide and Dial Solutions Command Reference provide additional basic configuration information. For more advanced configuration topics, see the Cisco IOS software configuration guide, feature modules, and command reference publications that pertain to your Cisco IOS software release.

For troubleshooting information, see the System Error Messages and Debug Command Reference publications.