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Cisco 12012 Alarm Card Replacement Instructions

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Cisco 12012 Gigabit Switch Router Alarm Card Replacement Instructions

Table Of Contents

Cisco 12012 Gigabit Switch Router Alarm Card Replacement Instructions

Product Overview

Safety Guidelines

Safety with Equipment

Safety with Electricity

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Tools and Parts Required

Removing and Replacing an Alarm Card

Removing an Alarm Card

Installing an Alarm Card

Checking the Installation

FCC Class A Compliance

Cisco Connection Online


Cisco 12012 Gigabit Switch Router Alarm Card Replacement Instructions


Product Number: GSR12-ALRM=
Document Order Number: DOC-784340=

This document contains instructions for installing or replacing an alarm card in the Cisco 12012 Gigabit Switch Router (GSR).

The sections in this document include the following:

Product Overview

Safety Guidelines

Tools and Parts Required

Removing and Replacing an Alarm Card

FCC Class A Compliance

Cisco Connection Online

Product Overview

The Cisco 12012 has two card cages; the upper card cage and the lower card cage. (Refer to .) The upper card cage has 12 user-configurable slots available for line cards and a route processor (RP). One additional slot (rightmost slot) in the upper card cage is non-configurable; it is reserved for an alarm card. The line cards and the RP are not slot dependent; you can install the line cards and the RP in any of the first 12 available slots.

Figure 1 Cisco 12012—Front View

The lower card cage, located behind the air filter, has five horizontal slots for switch fabric cards.

Below the lower card cage is a power supply bay. Up to four AC-input power supplies or two DC-input power supplies can be installed in the bay.

The alarm card is installed in the rightmost slot in the upper card cage. (Refer to .) The slot is slightly narrower than the rest of the slots in the upper card cage. In addition, the backplane connector is different from the rest of the backplane connectors in the upper card cage.

Figure 2 Upper Card Cage Alarm Card Slot

The alarm card has three primary functions:

Provides a visual display of three severity levels of alarms (critical, major, and minor) detected by the system through the maintenance bus. (Refer to .) The three pairs of alarm LEDs (critical and major alarm LEDs are red, minor alarm LEDs are amber) can warn of an overtemperature condition on a component in the card cage assembly, a fan failure in a blower module, an overcurrent condition in a power supply, or an out-of-tolerance voltage on one of the cards in the upper or lower card cage.

The threshold levels for triggering the different stages of alarms are set by software. The RP continuously polls the system for temperature, voltage, current, and fan speed values. If a threshold value is detected, the RP sets the appropriate severity level of alarm on the alarm card lighting one of three pairs of LEDs and energizing the appropriate alarm card relays activating any external audible or visual alarms.

Provides a connection point for the system to connect to two site-wide external alarm systems. Two redundant, 25-pin D-sub connectors (ALARM1 and ALARM2) on the alarm card faceplate are tied directly to the critical, major, and minor alarm relay normally open, normally closed, and common contacts. You can only attach safety extra-low voltage (SELV) external alarm circuits to the two alarm card connectors. The external alarm can be visual or audible. Audible external alarms can be reset by the cutoff switch on the alarm card faceplate. Visual alarms are reset by software.

Provides visual status of the clock and scheduler cards and the switch fabric cards. Five pairs of LEDs (one pair for each slot in the lower card cage) provide a visual status of the switch fabric.

Figure 3 Alarm Card Faceplate Connectors, LEDs, and Switch

Safety Guidelines

Before you begin the replacement procedure, review the safety guidelines in this section to avoid injuring yourself or damaging the equipment.

In addition, review the safety warnings listed in the document Regulatory Compliance and Safety Information for the Cisco 12012 Gigabit Switch Router (Document Number 78-4347-xx) that supports your Cisco 12012 before installing, configuring, or maintaining the router.

Safety with Equipment

The following guidelines will help ensure your safety and protect the equipment. This list is not inclusive of all potentially hazardous situations, so be alert.

Always disconnect all power cords and interface cables before moving the system.

Keep tools and assembly components away from walk areas.

Do not work alone if potentially hazardous conditions exist.

Do not perform any action that creates a potential hazard to people or makes the equipment unsafe.

Carefully examine your work area for possible hazards such as moist floors, ungrounded power extension cables, and missing safety grounds.

Safety with Electricity

The line cards, RP, switch fabric cards, alarm card, blower modules, and redundant power supplies are designed to be removed and replaced while the system is operating without presenting an electrical hazard or damage to the system.

Follow these basic guidelines when working with any electrical equipment:

Before beginning any procedures requiring access to the interior of the Cisco 12012, locate the emergency power-off switch for the room in which you are working.

Look carefully for possible hazards in your work area, such as moist floors, ungrounded power extension cables, and missing safety grounds.

If an electrical accident occurs, proceed as follows:

Use caution; do not become a victim yourself. Disconnect power to the system.

If possible, send another person to get medical aid. Otherwise, assess the condition of the victim and then call for help.

Determine if the person needs rescue breathing or external cardiac compressions; then take appropriate action.

Disconnect all power and external cables before installing or removing a router.

Never assume that power has been disconnected from a circuit; always check.

Do not perform any action that creates a potential hazard to people or makes the equipment unsafe.

Never install equipment that appears damaged.

In addition, use the guidelines that follow when working with any equipment that is disconnected from a power source, but still connected to telephone or network wiring:

Never install telephone wiring during a lightning storm.

Never install telephone jacks in wet locations unless the jack is specifically designed for wet locations.

Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the telephone line has been disconnected at the network interface.

Use caution when installing or modifying telephone lines.

Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage

Electrostatic discharge damage, which can occur when electronic boards or components are handled improperly, can result in complete or intermittent failures.

Following are guidelines for preventing ESD damage:

Always use an ESD-preventive wrist strap or ankle strap and ensure that it makes good skin contact.

When removing or installing a component, connect the equipment end of a ground strap to one of the two ESD ground sockets located on the front sides of the upper card cage or to a bare metal surface on the frame.

If you plan to return a replaced component to the factory, immediately place it in a static shielding bag to avoid ESD damage to the component.

The wrist strap only protects the component from ESD voltages on the body; ESD voltages on clothing can still cause damage.


Caution   
You should periodically check the resistance value of the antistatic strap. The measurement should be between 1 and 10 megohms.

Tools and Parts Required

You need the following tools and parts to install or replace an alarm card:

3/16-inch flat-blade screwdriver

ESD-preventive wrist strap

The replacement alarm card (Product Number GSR12-ALRM=)

Removing and Replacing an Alarm Card

This section provides the procedures for removing and replacing an alarm card. The Cisco 12012 supports online insertion and removal of field-replaceable units (FRUs), which means you can remove and replace an alarm card while the Cisco 12012 remains powered up.


Caution   
Always wear an antistatic wrist strap to prevent ESD when removing and replacing an alarm card.

Removing an Alarm Card

Perform the following steps to remove an alarm card:


Step 1 Attach an antistatic wrist strap to yourself and to one of the two ESD connection sockets located on the front edges of the upper card cage or to bare metal on the frame.

Step 2 Disconnect any interface cables attached to the alarm card connectors. Carefully set them aside.

Step 3 Loosen the two captive screws at the top and bottom of the alarm card. (Refer to a.)


Note   Unlike the line cards and RP, the alarm card does not have card ejector levers. The alarm card backplane connector is smaller, has fewer pins, and is easier to seat and unseat than the line cards and RP.


Step 4 Using the screwdriver blade, gently pry at the top and bottom of the card to unseat the card from the backplane connector.

Step 5 Grasp the card carrier edge with one hand and place your other hand under the carrier to support it (refer to b.) Slide the alarm card out of the card slot and place it immediately on the antistatic mat.

If you plan to return the used alarm card to the factory, repackage it in the shipping container you received with the replacement alarm card.

Figure 4 Removing an Alarm Card

Installing an Alarm Card

Perform the following steps to install the replacement alarm card:


Step 1 Attach an antistatic wrist strap to yourself and to one of the two ESD connection sockets located on the front edges of the upper card cage or to bare metal on the frame.

Step 2 Grasp the alarm card faceplate with one hand and place your other hand under the card carrier to support and guide it into the rightmost slot in the upper card cage (the slot labeled Alarm card).

Step 3 Carefully slide the alarm card carrier into the slot until it makes contact with the backplane connector, then stop.

Step 4 Carefully push on the top and bottom of the alarm card faceplate to seat the alarm card in the backplane connector.

Step 5 Tighten the two captive screws at the top and bottom of the alarm card to secure the card in the slot.

Step 6 Connect any external devices to their respective connectors on the alarm card faceplate.

Checking the Installation

To complete the installation, observe the LEDs on the alarm card faceplate to verify that the alarm card is operating correctly:


Step 1 Check the following components to make sure that they are secure:

The alarm card is inserted all the way in its slot, and the two captive screws at the top and bottom of the card are tightened.

The interface cables to the alarm 1 and alarm 2 connectors on the alarm card are plugged in and secure.

Step 2 Visually check the LEDs on the alarm card faceplate:

Check that the green CSC/SFC LEDs are lit only for slots in the lower card cage occupied by switch fabric cards.

Check that the three pairs of critical, major, and minor alarm LEDs are off.

Step 3 Check that your external site alarm system is not indicating any false critical, major, or minor alarms because of a defective alarm card relay.

If you continue to experience problems, contact a service representative for assistance.

FCC Class A Compliance

This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case users will be required to correct the interference at their own expense.

You can determine whether your equipment is causing interference by turning it off. If the interference stops, it was probably caused by the Cisco equipment or one of its peripheral devices. If the equipment causes interference to radio or television reception, try to correct the interference by using one or more of the following measures:

Turn the television or radio antenna until the interference stops.

Move the equipment to one side or the other of the television or radio.

Move the equipment farther away from the television or radio.

Plug the equipment into an outlet that is on a different circuit from the television or radio. (That is, make certain the equipment and the television or radio are on circuits controlled by different circuit breakers or fuses.)

Modifications to this product not authorized by Cisco Systems, Inc. could void the FCC approval and negate your authority to operate the product.

Cisco Connection Online

Cisco Connection Online (CCO) is Cisco Systems' primary, real-time support channel. Maintenance customers and partners can self-register on CCO to obtain additional information and services.

Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, CCO provides a wealth of standard and value-added services to Cisco's customers and business partners. CCO services include product information, product documentation, software updates, release notes, technical tips, the Bug Navigator, configuration notes, brochures, descriptions of service offerings, and download access to public and authorized files.

CCO serves a wide variety of users through two interfaces that are updated and enhanced simultaneously: a character-based version and a multimedia version that resides on the World Wide Web (WWW). The character-based CCO supports Zmodem, Kermit, Xmodem, FTP, and Internet e-mail, and it is excellent for quick access to information over lower bandwidths. The WWW version of CCO provides richly formatted documents with photographs, figures, graphics, and video, as well as hyperlinks to related information.

You can access CCO in the following ways:

WWW:  http://www.cisco.com

WWW:  http://www-europe.cisco.com

WWW:  http://www-china.cisco.com

Telnet:  cco.cisco.com

Modem:  From North America, 408 526-8070; from Europe, 33 1 64 46 40 82. Use the following terminal settings: VT100 emulation; databits: 8; parity: none; stop bits: 1; and connection rates up to 28.8 kbps.

For a copy of CCO's Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ), contact cco-help@cisco.com. For additional information, contact cco-team@cisco.com.


Note   If you are a network administrator and need personal technical assistance with a Cisco product that is under warranty or covered by a maintenance contract, contact Cisco's Technical Assistance Center (TAC) at 800 553-2447, 408 526-7209, or tac@cisco.com. To obtain general information about Cisco Systems, Cisco products, or upgrades, contact 800 553-6387, 408 526-7208, or cs-rep@cisco.com.


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